AOQ Review 2-9: "What's My Line (Part One)"

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Arbitrar Of Quality

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Feb 12, 2006, 12:04:36 AM2/12/06
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A reminder: Please avoid spoilers for later episodes in these review
threads.


BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER
Season Two, Episode 9: "What's My Line? (Part One)"
(or "What would Brian Boitano do?")
Writers: Howard Gordon and Marti Noxon
Director: David Solomon

The title and the central conceit of the episode refer to Career Week.
Most high schoolers get to meet those forms (with no "none of the
above" options, naturally), but not generally for a full week. And
Buffy wastes no time going into pouty mode over the whole thing. The
issue of leading a normal life isn't exactly new to the series, but
it makes sense that this would reinforce it. I can forgive the
repetition because the dialogue between her and Giles is nuanced enough
to make it seem like an ongoing topic of discussion rather than a
rehash. The omnipresent sarcastic banter is used very well here, as an
indication that what's underneath isn't very funny ("...you
notice that I don't laugh." I was also totally with Giles in a
later scene, where he snaps at Xander when he won't shut up.) Buffy
and her Watcher fully understand the other's perspective, so
there's not so much yelling, and both wish things could be different.
I can't say I've ever pictured Buffy as a cop, but I suppose
it'd kinda make sense.

Angel's trying to do his job as a good boyfriend and change up his
"you're in danger again" routine upon request. The skating rink
would've been a good idea if circumstances didn't get in the way
- the episode does a good job in making the viewer really feel
Buffy's desire for a little peace, and the universe's way of
thwarting it. A few particular highlights of the typically strong B/A
scenes: I don't think we've seen her apologize for lashing out at
someone in frustration before. Also, the kiss while he's in
vamp-face (and the stuff leading up to it, where it's so bizarre for
someone who looks like that to be talking so quietly) is nice because
it gives us a good luck at what she means to him; we're usually more
familiar with Buffy's feelings than with Angel's.

Seriously, what kind of school posts everyone's career results for
anyone to read? (The kind run by a mean Designated Comic Relief
character, maybe?)

The Xander-as-prison-guard joke falls pretty flat for me. I don't
know if we're "supposed" to be laughing at him or the
multiple-choice forms, but it doesn't really work either way. If he
can make it into college, he'll have a blast, whether or not he
actually attends class. Well, he has a good day for getting the last
word in the wordplay duals he's involved in. He hits the right
punchlines be they flippant ("well, I'm glad you feel comfortable
enough to be so honest with
me. And I can only hope that one day I'm in the position to be that
honest with you.") or more serious (at least he cares about whether
Buffy's okay).

Meanwhile, Willow and Oz get dragged away by some computer types for...
something. At first I thought she'd been chosen to be a CIA agent or
something, which would have been appallingly silly. As it is, I'm
just confused by this whole subplot and don't know what it's doing
in this episode. Part Two got isself some serious 'splainin to do,
ah tell you hwhut.

And meanwhile in vamp-land, Spike is taking an active interest in
curing Drusilla. He's also beating up his underlings when he gets
unhappy (which doesn't make him seem like a stock villain at all,
nope). What's mildly interesting about these scenes is that
Buffy's really getting to him, so his unflappable manner goes away
for a few seconds here or there when frustration gets the better of
him. So we can ultimately blame Buffy for making Drusilla cry, if
we're so inclined. Eventually he busts out a hitherto unknown ritual
to summon the Order Of Long Fantasy Name, and while these scenes are a
bit formulaic, they do send the message that everyone involved is
taking this seriously, so we should consider doing the same.

The Slayer is soon taking things seriously too. Although it's not
immediate, Giles is eventually able to do his job and convince her that
this is something a little bit different, not run-of-the-mill vamp
stuff. I'm not sure if he counted on really scaring her to that
degree, though. I want to work in the phrase "fear of death,"
somewhere, since the last time we've seen her like this is that time
she was fated to die. The Buffy-on-edge scenes are great; they're
well filmed and Gellar's non-verbal acting shines. Of course when
actually facing enemies she appears as calm as ever, but we viewers can
tell the difference. Going to Angel's place for help also makes
sense - it's probably what I would've done had I been her - so
it's weird that the others don't think of it.

This leads our show to its series of fights and dangers and such. The
diverse appearance of the Order Of Long Fantasy Name goons is kinda
nice, though Worm Guy (I believe that's even how he's credited)
seems more gimmicky than the rest of the episode would call for. The
first hitman (the guy who looks like a large trucker or member of a
southern rock band) has a great look for such a part, and he's
dispatched in a manner that involves the best misuse of an ice skate
that I've had the privilege of seeing in my short time on Earth.

Now, I don't know if we should credit Bianca Lawson, her stunt
double, or the choreographers, but both fights involving Kendra
(particularly the first one) crackle with energy. I do wonder what
universe Joss lives in where there are conveniently usable chain-link
fences everywhere in sight. This of course leads up to a "Puppet
Show"-esque reveal of who Kendra thinks she is. It was natural to
just assume that she was the next member of the OOLFN. Or she still
could be. In any case, if Buffy can get through to her, that ought to
get Angel out of his cliffhangery position. But even if the Slayers
manage to put their differences a side for a little... as the early
dialogue reminds us without being too obvious about the exposition,
There Can Be Only One...

Lots of stuff happening, many cool, not-cool, and okay ways it could
go. In the end, what matters is that I'm interested in watching on,
though not waiting with baited breath or anything. So, Part One has
done its job pretty well (that's four in a row. How long can the
show keep it up?). Whether or not "What's My Line" as a whole
ends up being worthwhile rests solely in the hands of Part Two now.

Religion really is creepy.


So...

One-sentence summary: It intrigues.

AOQ rating: Good

[Season Two so far:
1) "When She Was Bad" - Good
2) "Some Assembly Required" - Weak
3) "School Hard" - Decent
4) "Inca Mummy Girl" - Good
5) "Reptile Boy" - Decent
6) "Halloween" - Good
7) "Lie To Me" - Good
8) "The Dark Age" - Good
9) "What's My Line (Part One)" - Good]

Eric Hunter

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Feb 12, 2006, 12:32:33 AM2/12/06
to
Arbitrar Of Quality wrote:
> A reminder: Please avoid spoilers for later episodes in these review
> threads.
>
>
> BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER
> Season Two, Episode 9: "What's My Line? (Part One)"
> (or "What would Brian Boitano do?")

ROFL, good one.

I really think you ought to post your review for
part two, so that we can deal with "What's My
Line?" as a whole, rather than trying to discuss
the set-up without the pay-off.

Eric.

kenm47

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Feb 12, 2006, 12:31:07 AM2/12/06
to
I couldn't wait, and when I watched Pt 1, I also watched Pt 2. So,
minimal comment as I do not want to give anything away.

"Meanwhile, Willow and Oz get dragged away by some computer types
for...
something. At first I thought she'd been chosen to be a CIA agent or
something, which would have been appallingly silly. As it is, I'm
just confused by this whole subplot and don't know what it's doing
in this episode. Part Two got isself some serious 'splainin to do,
ah tell you hwhut. "

Well, here it seems I can comment as I'm pretty sure what follows was
clear to me back in 1997. Oz and Willow not only meet, they find out
each other is really special at old Sunnydale High. Oz's cool goes way
up once we the audience see he's on par with our Willow. Right away we
actually know yes, he is good enough for her.

PS: We're suppposed to think it's a Bill Gates type who is interested
in them. Microsoft still ruled the computer world in 1997.

BTW, I never figured out what they did with the body of Cyclops Taraka
killer.

There was also something throwaway sweet that even though Joyce was
away Buffy returned from her patrol via the bedroom window.

Stopping now. I'm sure there's a lot more to be said. I'll wait for
part 2.

Ken (Brooklyn)

MBangel10 (Melissa)

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Feb 12, 2006, 1:02:11 AM2/12/06
to
Arbitrar Of Quality wrote:
> A reminder: Please avoid spoilers for later episodes in these review
> threads.
>
>
> BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER
> Season Two, Episode 9: "What's My Line? (Part One)"
> (or "What would Brian Boitano do?")

Bwahahaha!

> Writers: Howard Gordon and Marti Noxon
> Director: David Solomon
>

<snip>


>
> Angel's trying to do his job as a good boyfriend and change up his
> "you're in danger again" routine upon request. The skating rink
> would've been a good idea if circumstances didn't get in the way
> - the episode does a good job in making the viewer really feel
> Buffy's desire for a little peace, and the universe's way of
> thwarting it.

Yeah, poor Buffy. She really can never get a moment to be 'normal' girl.

A few particular highlights of the typically strong B/A
> scenes: I don't think we've seen her apologize for lashing out at
> someone in frustration before. Also, the kiss while he's in
> vamp-face (and the stuff leading up to it, where it's so bizarre for
> someone who looks like that to be talking so quietly) is nice because
> it gives us a good luck at what she means to him; we're usually more
> familiar with Buffy's feelings than with Angel's.

I always thought this scene had such a great contrast with the one
moment in the episode 'Angel'. Her first reaction to him was of fear
after their first kiss. In this moment, it's of complete acceptance, and
even with the fact he's in vamp face she kisses him anyway. It reflects
how far they've come in accepting each other since season 1.

So basically, WMLP1 really moves their relationship forward.


>
> Seriously, what kind of school posts everyone's career results for
> anyone to read? (The kind run by a mean Designated Comic Relief
> character, maybe?)

I can picture Snyder looking out the window and enjoying every moment of
"WTF" the students express at their results. He's an ass. :)
>
<snip>


>
> Meanwhile, Willow and Oz get dragged away by some computer types for...
> something. At first I thought she'd been chosen to be a CIA agent or
> something, which would have been appallingly silly. As it is, I'm
> just confused by this whole subplot and don't know what it's doing
> in this episode. Part Two got isself some serious 'splainin to do,
> ah tell you hwhut.

I got the impression it was some big software company. As someone
mentioned previously, a Bill Gates type.


>
> And meanwhile in vamp-land, Spike is taking an active interest in
> curing Drusilla. He's also beating up his underlings when he gets
> unhappy (which doesn't make him seem like a stock villain at all,
> nope). What's mildly interesting about these scenes is that
> Buffy's really getting to him, so his unflappable manner goes away
> for a few seconds here or there when frustration gets the better of
> him.

She's driving him bonkers. Yes.

So we can ultimately blame Buffy for making Drusilla cry, if
> we're so inclined. Eventually he busts out a hitherto unknown ritual
> to summon the Order Of Long Fantasy Name, and while these scenes are a
> bit formulaic, they do send the message that everyone involved is
> taking this seriously, so we should consider doing the same.
>

<snip>


>
> This leads our show to its series of fights and dangers and such. The
> diverse appearance of the Order Of Long Fantasy Name goons is kinda
> nice, though Worm Guy (I believe that's even how he's credited)
> seems more gimmicky than the rest of the episode would call for. The
> first hitman (the guy who looks like a large trucker or member of a
> southern rock band) has a great look for such a part, and he's
> dispatched in a manner that involves the best misuse of an ice skate
> that I've had the privilege of seeing in my short time on Earth.

Seriously, the one issue I had with the villains was the worm guy. How
can it kill anyone? Ideas? Suggestions?


>
> Now, I don't know if we should credit Bianca Lawson, her stunt
> double, or the choreographers, but both fights involving Kendra
> (particularly the first one) crackle with energy. I do wonder what
> universe Joss lives in where there are conveniently usable chain-link
> fences everywhere in sight. This of course leads up to a "Puppet
> Show"-esque reveal of who Kendra thinks she is. It was natural to
> just assume that she was the next member of the OOLFN. Or she still
> could be. In any case, if Buffy can get through to her, that ought to
> get Angel out of his cliffhangery position. But even if the Slayers
> manage to put their differences a side for a little... as the early
> dialogue reminds us without being too obvious about the exposition,
> There Can Be Only One...

Kendra - I believe, owns the award for worst fake accent in the
Buffyverse. Other than that, I got a kick out of her character.


>
> Lots of stuff happening, many cool, not-cool, and okay ways it could
> go. In the end, what matters is that I'm interested in watching on,
> though not waiting with baited breath or anything. So, Part One has
> done its job pretty well (that's four in a row. How long can the
> show keep it up?). Whether or not "What's My Line" as a whole
> ends up being worthwhile rests solely in the hands of Part Two now.

Yes... on to part two now. Please?
>
> Religion really is creepy.

Very, very creepy indeed.

MBangel10 (Melissa)

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 1:04:22 AM2/12/06
to
Arbitrar Of Quality wrote:
> A reminder: Please avoid spoilers for later episodes in these review
> threads.
>
>
> BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER
> Season Two, Episode 9: "What's My Line? (Part One)"
> (or "What would Brian Boitano do?")

Bwahahaha!

> Writers: Howard Gordon and Marti Noxon
> Director: David Solomon
>

<snip>


>
> Angel's trying to do his job as a good boyfriend and change up his
> "you're in danger again" routine upon request. The skating rink
> would've been a good idea if circumstances didn't get in the way
> - the episode does a good job in making the viewer really feel
> Buffy's desire for a little peace, and the universe's way of
> thwarting it.

Yeah, poor Buffy. She really can never get a moment to be 'normal' girl.

A few particular highlights of the typically strong B/A


> scenes: I don't think we've seen her apologize for lashing out at
> someone in frustration before. Also, the kiss while he's in
> vamp-face (and the stuff leading up to it, where it's so bizarre for
> someone who looks like that to be talking so quietly) is nice because
> it gives us a good luck at what she means to him; we're usually more
> familiar with Buffy's feelings than with Angel's.

I always thought this scene had such a great contrast with the one

moment in the episode 'Angel'. Her first reaction to him was of fear
after their first kiss. In this moment, it's of complete acceptance, and
even with the fact he's in vamp face she kisses him anyway. It reflects
how far they've come in accepting each other since season 1.

So basically, WMLP1 really moves their relationship forward.
>

> Seriously, what kind of school posts everyone's career results for
> anyone to read? (The kind run by a mean Designated Comic Relief
> character, maybe?)

I can picture Snyder looking out the window and enjoying every moment of

"WTF" the students express at their results. He's an ass. :)
>
<snip>
>

> Meanwhile, Willow and Oz get dragged away by some computer types for...
> something. At first I thought she'd been chosen to be a CIA agent or
> something, which would have been appallingly silly. As it is, I'm
> just confused by this whole subplot and don't know what it's doing
> in this episode. Part Two got isself some serious 'splainin to do,
> ah tell you hwhut.

I got the impression it was some big software company. As someone

mentioned previously, a Bill Gates type.
>

> And meanwhile in vamp-land, Spike is taking an active interest in
> curing Drusilla. He's also beating up his underlings when he gets
> unhappy (which doesn't make him seem like a stock villain at all,
> nope). What's mildly interesting about these scenes is that
> Buffy's really getting to him, so his unflappable manner goes away
> for a few seconds here or there when frustration gets the better of
> him.

She's driving him bonkers. Yes.

So we can ultimately blame Buffy for making Drusilla cry, if


> we're so inclined. Eventually he busts out a hitherto unknown ritual
> to summon the Order Of Long Fantasy Name, and while these scenes are a
> bit formulaic, they do send the message that everyone involved is
> taking this seriously, so we should consider doing the same.
>

<snip>


>
> This leads our show to its series of fights and dangers and such. The
> diverse appearance of the Order Of Long Fantasy Name goons is kinda
> nice, though Worm Guy (I believe that's even how he's credited)
> seems more gimmicky than the rest of the episode would call for. The
> first hitman (the guy who looks like a large trucker or member of a
> southern rock band) has a great look for such a part, and he's
> dispatched in a manner that involves the best misuse of an ice skate
> that I've had the privilege of seeing in my short time on Earth.

Seriously, the one issue I had with the villains was the worm guy. How

can it kill anyone? Ideas? Suggestions?
>

> Now, I don't know if we should credit Bianca Lawson, her stunt
> double, or the choreographers, but both fights involving Kendra
> (particularly the first one) crackle with energy. I do wonder what
> universe Joss lives in where there are conveniently usable chain-link
> fences everywhere in sight. This of course leads up to a "Puppet
> Show"-esque reveal of who Kendra thinks she is. It was natural to
> just assume that she was the next member of the OOLFN. Or she still
> could be. In any case, if Buffy can get through to her, that ought to
> get Angel out of his cliffhangery position. But even if the Slayers
> manage to put their differences a side for a little... as the early
> dialogue reminds us without being too obvious about the exposition,
> There Can Be Only One...

Kendra - I believe, owns the award for worst fake accent in the

Buffyverse. Other than that, I got a kick out of her character.
>

> Lots of stuff happening, many cool, not-cool, and okay ways it could
> go. In the end, what matters is that I'm interested in watching on,
> though not waiting with baited breath or anything. So, Part One has
> done its job pretty well (that's four in a row. How long can the
> show keep it up?). Whether or not "What's My Line" as a whole
> ends up being worthwhile rests solely in the hands of Part Two now.

Yes... on to part two now. Please?
>
> Religion really is creepy.

Very, very creepy indeed.

Also, if you haven't read all the posts in response to The Dark Age. Be
careful when you get to the last 4-5 posts. It gets rather spoilery. I
tried to warn you with a header, but it may be too late.

Message has been deleted

Don Sample

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Feb 12, 2006, 2:40:08 AM2/12/06
to
In article <1139720676.8...@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,

"Arbitrar Of Quality" <tsm...@wildmail.com> wrote:

> Meanwhile, Willow and Oz get dragged away by some computer types for...
> something. At first I thought she'd been chosen to be a CIA agent or
> something, which would have been appallingly silly. As it is, I'm
> just confused by this whole subplot and don't know what it's doing
> in this episode. Part Two got isself some serious 'splainin to do,
> ah tell you hwhut.

It was "the world's leading software concern" and its executives flew
out of Sea-Tac.

It was worse than the CIA.

Can you say "Microsoft"?

--
Quando omni flunkus moritati
Visit the Buffy Body Count at <http://homepage.mac.com/dsample/>

Daniel Damouth

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Feb 12, 2006, 4:31:00 AM2/12/06
to
"Arbitrar Of Quality" <tsm...@wildmail.com> wrote in
news:1139720676.8...@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:

> A reminder: Please avoid spoilers for later episodes in these
> review threads.

I agree with some others that it's hard to properly evaluate part 1
without having seen part 2, and it's especially hard to write a
review exclusively of part 1 in retrospect. Given that you watch
ahead a bit, I might even suggest that you review the 2 two-parters
that are coming up in the remainder of the season as wholes. My
words here are constrained.

That said, I do have a few comments that pertain purely to the first
part of this twofer.

[...]


> And Buffy wastes no time going into pouty mode over the
> whole thing. The issue of leading a normal life isn't exactly new
> to the series, but it makes sense that this would reinforce it. I
> can forgive the repetition because the dialogue between her and
> Giles is nuanced enough to make it seem like an ongoing topic of
> discussion rather than a rehash.

Yes to all of the above. Buffy pouting over (her lack of) a normal
life is a major theme that deserves to be revisited.

[..]


> I can't say I've ever pictured Buffy as a cop, but I suppose
> it'd kinda make sense.

Yes, it does make sense. Buffy has a powerful sense of right and
wrong, and her first choice in resolving problems is usually violent.



> Angel's trying to do his job as a good boyfriend and change up his
> "you're in danger again" routine upon request. The skating rink
> would've been a good idea if circumstances didn't get in the way
> - the episode does a good job in making the viewer really feel
> Buffy's desire for a little peace, and the universe's way of
> thwarting it. A few particular highlights of the typically strong
> B/A scenes: I don't think we've seen her apologize for lashing out
> at someone in frustration before. Also, the kiss while he's in
> vamp-face (and the stuff leading up to it, where it's so bizarre
> for someone who looks like that to be talking so quietly) is nice
> because it gives us a good luck at what she means to him; we're
> usually more familiar with Buffy's feelings than with Angel's.

This is one of my favorite sequences. First, SMG can actually skate,
which is fortunate and nice to see.

When Angel says "you shouldn't have to touch me when I'm like this",
and Buffy replies "Oh. I didn't even notice", takes off her glove,
and gently touches his face, I choke up a little. For a viewer who
considers himself ugly, this is a magical "Beauty and the Beast"
moment.

On another note, I always wished that the final shot of that scene
included an enlarging pool of blood on the ice, considering that
Buffy slit the bad guy's throat with the blade of her skate.

I have a few great lines in mind, but I can't remember if they are
from part 1 or part 2, so I forbear.

The name of the "Order of Long Fantasy Name" is actually rather
short.

You have tons of positive things to say about this episode, but in
the end you merit it a mere "good". I suggest that for future TV
show reviews you employ a new grading nomenclature.

> This leads our show to its series of fights and dangers and such.
> The diverse appearance of the Order Of Long Fantasy Name goons is
> kinda nice, though Worm Guy (I believe that's even how he's
> credited) seems more gimmicky than the rest of the episode would
> call for.

Apropos of nothing, what I remember most about the Worm Guy encounter
is how cute Cordy looks in that outfit.

I like that you constructed the word "cliffhangery". There's hope
for you yet.

> Lots of stuff happening, many cool, not-cool, and okay ways it
> could go. In the end, what matters is that I'm interested in
> watching on, though not waiting with baited breath or anything.

It's "bated breath", as in "abated". Shakespeare, "The Merchant of
Venice," Act I, Scene 3.

> So, Part One has done its job pretty well (that's four in a row.
> How long can the show keep it up?). Whether or not "What's My
> Line" as a whole ends up being worthwhile rests solely in the
> hands of Part Two now.
>
> Religion really is creepy.

Note to self: religion, freaky.

-Dan Damouth

vague disclaimer

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 7:24:08 AM2/12/06
to
In article <PI2dnZhEqbdnUnPe...@comcast.com>,
"MBangel10 (Melissa)" <mban...@comcast.net> wrote:

> Kendra - I believe, owns the award for worst fake accent in the
> Buffyverse.
> >

Oh, please. In a universe containing Dru van Dyke?
--
A vague disclaimer is nobody's friend

Steve Schaffner

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Feb 12, 2006, 8:49:02 AM2/12/06
to
Daniel Damouth <dam...@san.rr.com> writes:

> "Arbitrar Of Quality" <tsm...@wildmail.com> wrote in
> news:1139720676.8...@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:
>
> > A reminder: Please avoid spoilers for later episodes in these
> > review threads.
>

> [..]
> > I can't say I've ever pictured Buffy as a cop, but I suppose
> > it'd kinda make sense.
>
> Yes, it does make sense. Buffy has a powerful sense of right and
> wrong, and her first choice in resolving problems is usually violent.

The latter is not necessarily something one wants in a police officer.

--
Steve Schaffner s...@broad.mit.edu
Immediate assurance is an excellent sign of probable lack of
insight into the topic. Josiah Royce

John Briggs

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 9:00:07 AM2/12/06
to
MBangel10 (Melissa) wrote:
>
> Kendra - I believe, owns the award for worst fake accent in the
> Buffyverse.

No, it has been established that this is a completely accurate accent.
Unfortunately, it is from somewhere (Montserrat) that no one has heard of
:-)
--
John Briggs


Arbitrar Of Quality

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Feb 12, 2006, 9:13:26 AM2/12/06
to
kenm47 wrote:
> I couldn't wait, and when I watched Pt 1, I also watched Pt 2. So,
> minimal comment as I do not want to give anything away.
>
> "Meanwhile, Willow and Oz get dragged away by some computer types
> for...
> something. At first I thought she'd been chosen to be a CIA agent or
> something, which would have been appallingly silly. As it is, I'm
> just confused by this whole subplot and don't know what it's doing
> in this episode. Part Two got isself some serious 'splainin to do,
> ah tell you hwhut. "
>
> Well, here it seems I can comment as I'm pretty sure what follows was
> clear to me back in 1997. Oz and Willow not only meet, they find out
> each other is really special at old Sunnydale High. Oz's cool goes way
> up once we the audience see he's on par with our Willow. Right away we
> actually know yes, he is good enough for her.

It seems like a lot of screen time and this-is-a-major-plot vibe to
waste on this if its sole purpose is to throw the two characters
together.

> PS: We're suppposed to think it's a Bill Gates type who is interested
> in them. Microsoft still ruled the computer world in 1997.

Yeah, I got that, but why does it employ serious be-suited types and
take people away mysteriously? And how (and why) did it keep Willow
from being assigned an official Career Week vocation?

-AOQ

Mike Zeares

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Feb 12, 2006, 9:17:55 AM2/12/06
to

Daniel Damouth wrote:
>
> You have tons of positive things to say about this episode, but in
> the end you merit it a mere "good". I suggest that for future TV
> show reviews you employ a new grading nomenclature.

"Good" isn't positive?

This is like when people ask me how I am, and I say "OK," which means
everything is fine, and they say, "Just OK?" as if there's something
wrong with me if I don't say "Great! Super!" I hate people who do
that.

-- Mike Zeares

Arbitrar Of Quality

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Feb 12, 2006, 9:30:47 AM2/12/06
to
Daniel Damouth wrote:

> I agree with some others that it's hard to properly evaluate part 1
> without having seen part 2, and it's especially hard to write a
> review exclusively of part 1 in retrospect. Given that you watch
> ahead a bit, I might even suggest that you review the 2 two-parters
> that are coming up in the remainder of the season as wholes. My
> words here are constrained.

As far as I'm concerned, if two episodes have separate directors,
separate sets of credits, etc., they count as two shows, not one.
[Finding a way to bring Trek into the conversation for the 4619th time,
the halves of TNG two-parters were often written months apart, and the
"to be continued" and fadeout was a major part of their rhythm, so it
always cheesed me off when videotapes would try to jam the two episodes
together as if they were a single movie.]

I've found that there's really not much that Part II of a twofer can
really do to retroactively change the quality of Part I. These reviews
are about first impressions: how much did I enjoy the act of watching
WML1, not knowing what was to come? Sure, later stuff sheds new light
on earlier stuff, but that's true of any serialized TV show, so by that
logic I should only write one review for the whole of BTVS. I think
its interesting to evaluate how entertaining something is while the
pieces are still falling into place, not just afterward.

The "What's My Line" shows were meant to be viewed a week apart, and my
reviews will reflect that.

> On another note, I always wished that the final shot of that scene
> included an enlarging pool of blood on the ice, considering that
> Buffy slit the bad guy's throat with the blade of her skate.

That might've been nice. Network TV is sometimes a little sterile, but
I'm used to it.

> The name of the "Order of Long Fantasy Name" is actually rather
> short.

That's true, but by the time I remembered "Turaka," I was too in love
with the "OOLFN" turn of phrase.
(Never let someone who loves to listen to himself write do your
reviews.)

> You have tons of positive things to say about this episode, but in
> the end you merit it a mere "good". I suggest that for future TV
> show reviews you employ a new grading nomenclature.

So it's wrong to rate a good episode as "Good?" ;-)

> > Lots of stuff happening, many cool, not-cool, and okay ways it
> > could go. In the end, what matters is that I'm interested in
> > watching on, though not waiting with baited breath or anything.
>
> It's "bated breath", as in "abated". Shakespeare, "The Merchant of
> Venice," Act I, Scene 3.

Ah, thank you. That's worth knowing. Gotta take a stand against the
abuse of the language (i.e. the "should of" and "for all intensive
purposes" people). "Just deserts" (there should only be one 's'; it's
a separate word from either cactus-type 'desert' or chocolate-type
'dessert') is another one we've almost lost already.

-AOQ

drifter

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 9:35:26 AM2/12/06
to
Daniel Damouth wrote:
> "Arbitrar Of Quality" <tsm...@wildmail.com> wrote in

/snip-a-bit/

>> In the end, what matters is that I'm interested in
>> watching on, though not waiting with baited breath or anything.
>
> It's "bated breath", as in "abated". Shakespeare, "The Merchant of
> Venice," Act I, Scene 3.

We have a bad guy made up entirely of worms; I think "baited" breath
actually works here.
--

Kel
"I reject your reality, and substitute my own."


Arbitrar Of Quality

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 9:42:19 AM2/12/06
to

Heh.

I guess I'm a little guilty too, since there are episodes I don't much
care for that I rated "Decent." I guess the difference is that while
decent TV can be enjoyed, I don't want to waste much of my time with
it, unlike good TV.

"You have been trained to accept mediocrity as excellence" - Chirs
Jericho

-AOQ
~I don't have time to bother watching pro wrestling anymore either~
~~with a show like BTVS that rarely falls below "Decent," it's
basically a two-point rating scale: "Good" and "Not Good"~~

Arbitrar Of Quality

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 9:44:03 AM2/12/06
to
drifter wrote:
> Daniel Damouth wrote:

> > It's "bated breath", as in "abated". Shakespeare, "The Merchant of
> > Venice," Act I, Scene 3.
>
> We have a bad guy made up entirely of worms; I think "baited" breath
> actually works here.

AMUSE'D

Of course, my breath was considerably less bated there than it was with
the other plotlines...

-AOQ

kenm47

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 9:51:57 AM2/12/06
to
"Yeah, I got that, but why does it employ serious be-suited types and
take people away mysteriously? And how (and why) did it keep Willow
from being assigned an official Career Week vocation? "

I got that Willow and Oz are getting very special jealousy inducing and
griping secret special treatment - canapes anyone? I guess we have to
assume this is with the knowledge and blessing of Snyder.

Mainly it's a joke and a means to an end. Sometimes stuff on Buffy is
just for the whacky fun. Sometimes not. Sometimes only time will tell.

Ken (Brooklyn)

kenm47

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 9:55:52 AM2/12/06
to

Neither bothered me. Kendra's is one I've heard in Brooklyn. Dru's?
Sounded as fine to me as Spike's, but then again that's from a Brooklyn
perspective.

Ken (Brooklyn)

kenm47

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 9:58:44 AM2/12/06
to
"Seriously, the one issue I had with the villains was the worm guy. How
can it kill anyone? Ideas? Suggestions? "

I figured he inundates the victim, possibly smothering or choking the
victim, and starts eating it from the outside and inside/out.

Not quite sure how he would overpower or outrun a conscious victim
though.

Ken (Brooklyn)

kenm47

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 10:00:15 AM2/12/06
to
"It's "bated breath", as in "abated". Shakespeare, "The Merchant of
Venice," Act I, Scene 3. "

I did not know that.

Thanks.

Ken (Brooklyn)

kenm47

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 10:04:36 AM2/12/06
to
"As far as I'm concerned, if two episodes have separate directors,
separate sets of credits, etc., they count as two shows, not one.
[Finding a way to bring Trek into the conversation for the 4619th time,
the halves of TNG two-parters were often written months apart, and the
"to be continued" and fadeout was a major part of their rhythm, so it
always cheesed me off when videotapes would try to jam the two episodes
together as if they were a single movie.] "

Let me suggest there's a big difference here. The ST two parters were
used, IIRC, as season ending cliffhangers to supposedly draw the
friends back to the new season.

In "Buffy" the second part was the following week (except for WttH and
TH shown together originally), building suspense and the "gotta know"
factor a lot better than a three or four month hiatus. The Buffy
two-parters were more an organic two hour show forced to be split by
the one hour time slot.

Ken (Brooklyn).

MBangel10 (Melissa)

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 10:08:06 AM2/12/06
to

I guess if someone freaks enough to black out after seeing a man fall
into a pile of worms, I guess he could take 'em. LOL

MBangel10 (Melissa)

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 10:11:01 AM2/12/06
to
It's funny, because so many years later, Kendra's accent is still made
fun of in season to season discussions. I've never read too many knocks
on Dru's accent, so she must have done something right.

John Briggs

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 10:59:50 AM2/12/06
to
Arbitrar Of Quality wrote:
>
> As far as I'm concerned, if two episodes have separate directors,
> separate sets of credits, etc., they count as two shows, not one.

You are right, but your criteria are not. Later in this season you will
come across a two-parter with a single director that was always intended to
be broadcast as separate episodes. Separate sets of credits isn't really a
criterion either, as these can be re-done if the episodes are re-edited.
--
John Briggs


vague disclaimer

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 11:10:30 AM2/12/06
to
In article <1139753606.8...@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,

"Arbitrar Of Quality" <tsm...@wildmail.com> wrote:

>
> > PS: We're suppposed to think it's a Bill Gates type who is interested
> > in them. Microsoft still ruled the computer world in 1997.
>
> Yeah, I got that, but why does it employ serious be-suited types and
> take people away mysteriously? And how (and why) did it keep Willow
> from being assigned an official Career Week vocation?

Because it is MS and MS is evil. It. Is. A. Joke. (whether it is a very
good one is another issue, but a tendency towards excessive literalism
won't help your enjoyment of the show).

vague disclaimer

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 11:22:53 AM2/12/06
to
In article <KZOdna8koZq7zXLe...@comcast.com>,
"MBangel10 (Melissa)" <mban...@comcast.net> wrote:

> kenm47 wrote:
> > vague disclaimer wrote:
> >> In article <PI2dnZhEqbdnUnPe...@comcast.com>,
> >> "MBangel10 (Melissa)" <mban...@comcast.net> wrote:
> >>
> >>> Kendra - I believe, owns the award for worst fake accent in the
> >>> Buffyverse.
> >> Oh, please. In a universe containing Dru van Dyke?
> >> --
> >> A vague disclaimer is nobody's friend
> >
> > Neither bothered me. Kendra's is one I've heard in Brooklyn. Dru's?
> > Sounded as fine to me as Spike's, but then again that's from a Brooklyn
> > perspective.
> >
> >

> It's funny, because so many years later, Kendra's accent is still made
> fun of in season to season discussions. I've never read too many knocks
> on Dru's accent, so she must have done something right.

That's what you get for frequenting US dominated groups.

Marsters gives the impression of someone who has put some thought into
his accent. The result, although far from perfect, gets points for that
effort.

Landau gives the impression that, because she spent several years of her
youth in the UK (while Pops filmed Space: 1999 etc), she doesn't have to
try and can safely model her accent on that of a character played by a
native of West Plains, Missouri. The result is approximately akin to
having finger nails scraped down a blackboard.

I don't know enough about Afro-Caribbean accent to comment on Lawson's,
but I do know several people of Afro-Caribbean descent who, when trying
to sound like their parents, sound a bit like Kendra.

Chim Chimerney, chim chimmerney, chim chim cheroo....

Eric Hunter

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 11:43:19 AM2/12/06
to
Arbitrar Of Quality wrote:
> kenm47 wrote:

>>> Willow and Oz get dragged away by some computer types for...
>>> something. At first I thought she'd been chosen to be a CIA
>>> agent or something, which would have been appallingly silly.
>>> As it is, I'm just confused by this whole subplot and don't
>>> know what it's doing in this episode.
>>

>> Oz and Willow not only meet, they find out each other
>> is really special at old Sunnydale High. Oz's cool goes
>> way up once we the audience see he's on par with our
>> Willow. Right away we actually know yes, he is good
>> enough for her.

> It seems like a lot of screen time and this-is-a-major-plot vibe to
> waste on this if its sole purpose is to throw the two characters
> together.

A lot of screen time has been devoted over the last
several episodes to establishing the Oz-Willow
connection, from "Who's that girl?" to "Canapé?"

>> PS: We're supposed to think it's a Bill Gates type who is interested


>> in them. Microsoft still ruled the computer world in 1997.
>
> Yeah, I got that, but why does it employ serious be-suited types and
> take people away mysteriously? And how (and why) did it keep Willow
> from being assigned an official Career Week vocation?

It's already been established that Willow is exceptional.
She's one of a handful of students capable of making
Frankenstein's Monster in "Some Assembly Required".
The implication here is that her Career Week test
scores were so exceptional that she was getting special
treatment. Was it over-done? Yes. Was it done primarily
to give Oz and Willow kindred-spirit alone-time. Well,
that would be a spoiler, but a familiarity with logic and
tv show plotting ought to give you a clue. ;-)

Eric.
--

MBangel10 (Melissa)

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 11:45:51 AM2/12/06
to
vague disclaimer wrote:
> In article <KZOdna8koZq7zXLe...@comcast.com>,
> "MBangel10 (Melissa)" <mban...@comcast.net> wrote:
>
>> kenm47 wrote:
>>> vague disclaimer wrote:
>>>> In article <PI2dnZhEqbdnUnPe...@comcast.com>,
>>>> "MBangel10 (Melissa)" <mban...@comcast.net> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Kendra - I believe, owns the award for worst fake accent in the
>>>>> Buffyverse.
>>>> Oh, please. In a universe containing Dru van Dyke?
>>>> --
>>>> A vague disclaimer is nobody's friend
>>> Neither bothered me. Kendra's is one I've heard in Brooklyn. Dru's?
>>> Sounded as fine to me as Spike's, but then again that's from a Brooklyn
>>> perspective.
>>>
>>>
>> It's funny, because so many years later, Kendra's accent is still made
>> fun of in season to season discussions. I've never read too many knocks
>> on Dru's accent, so she must have done something right.
>
> That's what you get for frequenting US dominated groups.

Actually, that is not true. I've found that a large percentage of the
participants in the groups I've followed (and ones I still do) are from
the UK and Australia. Just because I'm American, doesn't mean all the
posts I read are from Americans.


>
> Marsters gives the impression of someone who has put some thought into
> his accent. The result, although far from perfect, gets points for that
> effort.

In many articles and a few 'top 10 best accents on TV lists', Marsters
is often highly complimented on his british accent. A lot of people
assumed he was British and were surprised when they heard his normal
accent. Although some Brits dissected his accent and remarked that it
wasn't exactly correct, quite a few were rather impressed.


>
> Landau gives the impression that, because she spent several years of her
> youth in the UK (while Pops filmed Space: 1999 etc), she doesn't have to
> try and can safely model her accent on that of a character played by a
> native of West Plains, Missouri. The result is approximately akin to
> having finger nails scraped down a blackboard.

Her accent never bothered me. Now, her shrieks on the other hand.....


>
> I don't know enough about Afro-Caribbean accent to comment on Lawson's,
> but I do know several people of Afro-Caribbean descent who, when trying
> to sound like their parents, sound a bit like Kendra.

Fair enough. Although, I have met a few people from the Caribbean and
even though they have a specific dialect, they sounded nothing like
Kendra to me.

Eric Hunter

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 12:08:53 PM2/12/06
to
Daniel Damouth wrote:
> "Arbitrar Of Quality" <tsm...@wildmail.com> wrote in
> news:1139720676.8...@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:
>
>> A reminder: Please avoid spoilers for later episodes in these
>> review threads.

>> Lots of stuff happening, many cool, not-cool, and okay ways it


>> could go. In the end, what matters is that I'm interested in
>> watching on, though not waiting with baited breath or anything.
>
> It's "bated breath", as in "abated". Shakespeare, "The Merchant of
> Venice," Act I, Scene 3.

"Baited breath" is a punny reference to the worm-guy. ;-)

Eric.
--

Eric Hunter

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 12:24:23 PM2/12/06
to

I agree that you should post separate reviews, but for
those of us commenting on your reviews, it would
be much easier to avoid spoilers if you posted both
reviews in quick succession, rather than waiting for
discussion of Part I to die down before posting your
review of Part II.

Eric.
--

kenm47

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 12:56:38 PM2/12/06
to

IAWTP

Ken (Brooklyn)

Shuggie

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 1:37:59 PM2/12/06
to
vague disclaimer <l64o...@dea.spamcon.org> wrote:
>
> Marsters gives the impression of someone who has put some thought into
> his accent. The result, although far from perfect, gets points for that
> effort.
>

My fanwank is that Spike would have a transatlantic mix of accents given
how much time he's spent in the US so Marsters's accent actually fits the
character.

--
Shuggie

blog: http://www.livejournal.com/users/shuggie/

Shuggie

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 1:57:49 PM2/12/06
to
Arbitrar Of Quality <tsm...@wildmail.com> wrote:
> Also, the kiss while he's in
> vamp-face (and the stuff leading up to it, where it's so bizarre for
> someone who looks like that to be talking so quietly) is nice because
> it gives us a good luck at what she means to him; we're usually more
> familiar with Buffy's feelings than with Angel's.
>

You mean 'cos SMG can act whereas DB has got that brooding almost-scowl
down. :)

Actually I shouldn't be mean about DB's acting, you're about to see some
of the best examples of it.

<snip>

> Well, he has a good day for getting the last
> word in the wordplay duals he's involved in. He hits the right
> punchlines be they flippant ("well, I'm glad you feel comfortable
> enough to be so honest with
> me. And I can only hope that one day I'm in the position to be that
> honest with you.") or more serious (at least he cares about whether
> Buffy's okay).

Having Xander stand up to Snyder but know just how far to push it and
get away with it caused him to go way up in my estimation.

>
> Meanwhile, Willow and Oz get dragged away by some computer types for...


> something. At first I thought she'd been chosen to be a CIA agent or
> something, which would have been appallingly silly. As it is, I'm
> just confused by this whole subplot and don't know what it's doing

> in this episode. Part Two got isself some serious 'splainin to do,
> ah tell you hwhut.

Va gur raq vg nccrnef gb whfg gb or n ernfba gb trg Jvyybj naq Bm nybar
gbtrgure. V jnf nyjnlf qvfnccbvagrq gung jr arire unq n znq pbzchgre
travhf fgnaq-nybar. Bu jnvg... lbh xabj jung V zrna :)

>
> And meanwhile in vamp-land, Spike is taking an active interest in
> curing Drusilla. He's also beating up his underlings when he gets
> unhappy (which doesn't make him seem like a stock villain at all,
> nope).

There's just some things villains gotta do stock or no.

> The
> first hitman (the guy who looks like a large trucker or member of a
> southern rock band) has a great look for such a part, and he's
> dispatched in a manner that involves the best misuse of an ice skate
> that I've had the privilege of seeing in my short time on Earth.

Shame they couldn't show at least a bit of blood. Funny thing is, in my
memory they do, but on re-watching of course they didn't.

> Now, I don't know if we should credit Bianca Lawson, her stunt
> double, or the choreographers, but both fights involving Kendra
> (particularly the first one) crackle with energy. I do wonder what
> universe Joss lives in where there are conveniently usable chain-link
> fences everywhere in sight.

See this is where I think you could rightfully call inconsistency. When
we had the discussion about Buffy's strength varying I argued that her
success in fights can vary without it meaning her strength does
(actually she's about to give a reason why in part 2). But here we have
a full grown vampire held back by what looks like chicken wire.

> AOQ rating: Good

For some reason I've always found WML a bit blah. There's good stuff in
it, especially part 2, but it feels padded. I think that there's
probably a really good hour (real hour not US TV hour i.e. 42 minutes)
of TV here but rather than cut it to a single ep they seem to have
padded it to 2.

I've more to say but like so many others, it's more relevant to part 2.

(I gave both 3.5/5)

EGK

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 2:18:23 PM2/12/06
to
On Sun, 12 Feb 2006 18:57:49 +0000, shu...@gmail.com (Shuggie) wrote:

>Arbitrar Of Quality <tsm...@wildmail.com> wrote:
>> Also, the kiss while he's in
>> vamp-face (and the stuff leading up to it, where it's so bizarre for
>> someone who looks like that to be talking so quietly) is nice because
>> it gives us a good luck at what she means to him; we're usually more
>> familiar with Buffy's feelings than with Angel's.
>>
>
>You mean 'cos SMG can act whereas DB has got that brooding almost-scowl
>down. :)
>
>Actually I shouldn't be mean about DB's acting, you're about to see some
>of the best examples of it.

Just curious if you happen to watch Bones on Fox? I meant to when it
premiered but kept forgetting it was on. I've caught a few since just
before Christmas and have been very pleasently surprised at how good it was.
Boreanaz probably got cast on Buffy for his looks but he's really come in to
his own as an actor.
--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

"There would be a lot more civility in this world if people
didn't take that as an invitation to walk all over you"
(Calvin and Hobbes)

arnold kim

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 2:44:24 PM2/12/06
to

"Daniel Damouth" <dam...@san.rr.com> wrote in message
news:Xns9768F6D5B406...@66.75.164.120...
> This is one of my favorite sequences. First, SMG can actually skate,
> which is fortunate and nice to see.
>
> When Angel says "you shouldn't have to touch me when I'm like this",
> and Buffy replies "Oh. I didn't even notice", takes off her glove,
> and gently touches his face, I choke up a little. For a viewer who
> considers himself ugly, this is a magical "Beauty and the Beast"
> moment.

>
> On another note, I always wished that the final shot of that scene
> included an enlarging pool of blood on the ice, considering that
> Buffy slit the bad guy's throat with the blade of her skate.

Fanwank: the bad guy isn't human, but a bloodless humanlike demon. :)

Arnold Kim


a2zmom

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 2:52:23 PM2/12/06
to
Couple of points that no one else has mentioned.

Spike/Dru is a big parallel here to Angel/Buffy. Spike's motivations
are pretty much driven by his devotion to Dru.

The worm man modus operandi is possibly to gross out people to death.
It would have worked on me.

I love the opening Buffy/Angel conversation. It subtly points out the
problems inherant in their relationship. She looks in the mirror and
he's not even there.

I was always a little sorry that Boreanaz didn't get to skate also. (He
plays ice hockey on a regular basis, so he's a solid skater). I guess
no matter how hard they tried, the writers could no come up with a
valid excuse for a vampire owning ice skates.

KenM47

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 3:00:13 PM2/12/06
to
"arnold kim" <arno...@optonline.net> wrote:

What did they do with the body?

Ken (Brooklyn)

vague disclaimer

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 3:05:36 PM2/12/06
to
In article <qYWdnfYS9rb7-3Le...@comcast.com>,
"MBangel10 (Melissa)" <mban...@comcast.net> wrote:

> > That's what you get for frequenting US dominated groups.
>
> Actually, that is not true. I've found that a large percentage of the
> participants in the groups I've followed (and ones I still do) are from
> the UK and Australia. Just because I'm American, doesn't mean all the
> posts I read are from Americans.
> >

<snip>

> > Landau gives the impression that, because she spent several years of her
> > youth in the UK (while Pops filmed Space: 1999 etc), she doesn't have to
> > try and can safely model her accent on that of a character played by a
> > native of West Plains, Missouri. The result is approximately akin to
> > having finger nails scraped down a blackboard.
>
> Her accent never bothered me. Now, her shrieks on the other hand.....

I wouldn't expect it to. You have no idea what the accent she is aping
actually sounds like. Hardly your fault, since, evidently, JL doesn't
either. The point is that you will find no native UK English speaker
willing to defend it on grounds of accuracy (although I have seen a
hugely unconvincing "it's all part of her being bonkers" fanwank).

We can agree on the shrieks, btw :).


> > Chim Chimerney, chim chimmerney, chim chim cheroo....

Don Sample

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 3:25:19 PM2/12/06
to
In article <HbHHf.87683$zt1....@newsfe5-gui.ntli.net>,
"John Briggs" <john.b...@ntlworld.com> wrote:

> MBangel10 (Melissa) wrote:
> >
> > Kendra - I believe, owns the award for worst fake accent in the
> > Buffyverse.
>

> No, it has been established that this is a completely accurate accent.
> Unfortunately, it is from somewhere (Montserrat) that no one has heard of
> :-)

Hey, I've heard of it.

--
Quando omni flunkus moritati
Visit the Buffy Body Count at <http://homepage.mac.com/dsample/>

Don Sample

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 3:30:15 PM2/12/06
to
In article <KZOdnawkoZrB0nLe...@comcast.com>,
"MBangel10 (Melissa)" <mban...@comcast.net> wrote:

The worms were speedy little devils.

drifter

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 3:31:09 PM2/12/06
to

I assumed he killed the gal who owned the first house he went to.
Somehow.

--

Kel
"I reject your reality, and substitute my own."


Don Sample

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 3:36:43 PM2/12/06
to
In article <pt4vu1tege0iqlkuq...@4ax.com>,
KenM47 <Ken...@ix.netcom.com> wrote:

Left it there. The Sunnydale Body Collection Agency (AKA the Police)
would be along eventually.

Jeff Jacoby

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 4:05:10 PM2/12/06
to
On Sun, 12 Feb 2006 20:00:13 GMT, KenM47 <Ken...@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
> "arnold kim" <arno...@optonline.net> wrote:

[snip]

>>Fanwank: the bad guy isn't human, but a bloodless humanlike demon. :)
>>
>>Arnold Kim
>>
>
> What did they do with the body?

It was put on ice.


Jeff

KenM47

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 4:11:02 PM2/12/06
to
Jeff Jacoby <jjaco...@yahoo.com> wrote:


LOL

Ken (Brooklyn)

Mel

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 4:21:10 PM2/12/06
to

Well, they already broke into the ice rink, so it shouldn't be any worse
for them to "borrow" some skates while there. Maybe they just thought it
would be too weird/non-believable for a vamp to even know how to skate
(especially one who spent 100 years honing his brooding skills).

Of course, that kind of begs the question -- just how did Angel know the
rink was closed on Tuesdays? Did he lurk there also, or does he have a
secret passion for triple toe loops??? ;-)


Mel

Mel

unread,
Feb 12, 2006, 4:22:15 PM2/12/06
to

KenM47 wrote:


Probably Angel disposed of it between the end of that scene and the next
one with Buffy back in the library showing Giles the ring.


Mel

a2zmom

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Feb 12, 2006, 4:41:22 PM2/12/06
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Of course, that kind of begs the question -- just how did Angel know
the
rink was closed on Tuesdays? Did he lurk there also, or does he have a
secret passion for triple toe loops??? ;-)

I assumed he noticed when he was out patrolling one night. Let's face
it, observing things is just about about all he has to do with his
time, not like he spends it watching must see TV.

John Briggs

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Feb 12, 2006, 4:48:33 PM2/12/06
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Don Sample wrote:
> In article <HbHHf.87683$zt1....@newsfe5-gui.ntli.net>,
> "John Briggs" <john.b...@ntlworld.com> wrote:
>
>> MBangel10 (Melissa) wrote:
>>>
>>> Kendra - I believe, owns the award for worst fake accent in the
>>> Buffyverse.
>>
>> No, it has been established that this is a completely accurate
>> accent. Unfortunately, it is from somewhere (Montserrat) that no one
>> has heard of :-)
>
> Hey, I've heard of it.

And more than one person who has heard the accent has said that Kendra's is
a very accurate copy of it.
--
John Briggs


John Briggs

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Feb 12, 2006, 4:49:59 PM2/12/06
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Except during the daytime, of course.
--
John Briggs


vague disclaimer

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Feb 12, 2006, 8:09:12 PM2/12/06
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In article <R2OHf.41697$Rw6....@newsfe7-gui.ntli.net>,
"John Briggs" <john.b...@ntlworld.com> wrote:

> Don Sample wrote:
> > In article <HbHHf.87683$zt1....@newsfe5-gui.ntli.net>,
> > "John Briggs" <john.b...@ntlworld.com> wrote:
> >
> >> MBangel10 (Melissa) wrote:
> >>>
> >>> Kendra - I believe, owns the award for worst fake accent in the
> >>> Buffyverse.
> >>
> >> No, it has been established that this is a completely accurate
> >> accent. Unfortunately, it is from somewhere (Montserrat) that no one
> >> has heard of :-)
> >
> > Hey, I've heard of it.
>
> And more than one person who has heard the accent has said that Kendra's is
> a very accurate copy of it.

Given that before its volcano went ka-blooey Montserrat was a kinda
popular location with the wealthily artistic, it isn't beyond the realms
of credibility that Bianca Lawson visited the place along with many
other wannabees and/ or hangers-on. Or just, you know, took a holiday
there.

Daniel Damouth

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Feb 12, 2006, 8:34:21 PM2/12/06
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vague disclaimer <l64o...@dea.spamcon.org> wrote in
news:l64o-1rj5-4B860...@mercury.nildram.net:

A poster named Lily Huang reported (long ago) that the question of
Kendra's accent came up at a convention (Conrad), and Anthony Head
replied that the "accent man" (voice coach) was adamant about how it
should sound, and that he was shooting for Irish Jamaican (or "Black
Irish").

So the accent is deliberate, if this is to be believed.

As far as the vampires go... these are very old vampires, who have
been in lots of places. They should have accents that are no longer
heard anywhere on the planet. To complain that their accents don't
match up with a certain dialect from somewhere in England is
ridiculous.

As far as I'm concerned the worst accent in the show is Angel's,
because he has not the slightest trace of anything outside of the
United States. Sure, some (very few) people pick up accents very
well, but even they don't give up all traces of their lives. I'm
talking about inflection, word order, slang usage, and, more
generally, knowledge and attitude.

-Dan Damouth

a2zmom

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Feb 12, 2006, 8:43:03 PM2/12/06
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As far as I'm concerned the worst accent in the show is Angel's,
because he has not the slightest trace of anything outside of the
United States. Sure, some (very few) people pick up accents very
well, but even they don't give up all traces of their lives. I'm
talking about inflection, word order, slang usage, and, more
generally, knowledge and attitude.

spoiler alert:

Vs lbh'er tbvat ol gung, gur gur jbefg npprag bs nyy vf Qneyn. V svaq
vg uneq gb oryvrir gung nalbar sebz gur Nzrevpna pbybavrf onpx va 1750
fbhaqrq yvxr n Pnyvsbeavna inyyrl tvey qhevat gung crevbq.

I would say it's a waste of time to get bent out of shape regarding
the awful accents. The show is not above being a bit cheesy at times,
this is one of them.

Point of interest - Spike's accent is fairy close to Tony Head's real
accent. Tony was his dialog coach.

Mike Zeares

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Feb 12, 2006, 10:18:42 PM2/12/06
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Arbitrar Of Quality wrote:

> As far as I'm concerned, if two episodes have separate directors,
> separate sets of credits, etc., they count as two shows, not one.

Some of the Buffy 2-parters have separate writers.

> >
> > It's "bated breath", as in "abated". Shakespeare, "The Merchant of
> > Venice," Act I, Scene 3.
>

> Ah, thank you. That's worth knowing. Gotta take a stand against the
> abuse of the language (i.e. the "should of" and "for all intensive
> purposes" people). "Just deserts" (there should only be one 's'; it's
> a separate word from either cactus-type 'desert' or chocolate-type
> 'dessert') is another one we've almost lost already.

I did not know that. So a "desert" is a thing that is deserved, I take
it.

One that drives me crazy is "phase" for "faze." And on a completely
separate rant on things I see on the internet/letters to editors that
drive me crazy, the words "jury of ones peers" appear nowhere in the
U.S. Constitution, so you are not in fact guaranteed a jury made up of
people just like you, so stop claiming that you are. "Peers" in the
Magna Carta referred to social rank, i.e. nobles. Since we don't have
official social ranks in this country, your "peers" are all of your
fellow citizens, from the hobo in the park who talks to Jesus to the
POTUS. Who also talks to Jesus. ;-)

-- Mike Zeares

Arbitrar Of Quality

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Feb 12, 2006, 11:01:42 PM2/12/06
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Eric Hunter wrote:
>
> I agree that you should post separate reviews, but for
> those of us commenting on your reviews, it would
> be much easier to avoid spoilers if you posted both
> reviews in quick succession, rather than waiting for
> discussion of Part I to die down before posting your
> review of Part II.

That makes sense. I'll try to have Part II up later tonight, and we
can wait a longer on "Ted" to make up for it sopr something.

-AOQ

Don Sample

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Feb 12, 2006, 11:04:52 PM2/12/06
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In article <Xns9768B2C12697...@66.75.164.120>,
Daniel Damouth <dam...@san.rr.com> wrote:

> As far as I'm concerned the worst accent in the show is Angel's,
> because he has not the slightest trace of anything outside of the
> United States. Sure, some (very few) people pick up accents very
> well, but even they don't give up all traces of their lives. I'm
> talking about inflection, word order, slang usage, and, more
> generally, knowledge and attitude.

Or it's simple natural selection. The vamps that aren't good at
learning to blend in with their surroundings don't last very long.

Angel has resided in the US for something like 80 years. Lots of time
to pick up the accent.

Sam

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Feb 12, 2006, 11:22:52 PM2/12/06
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It's also probably worth mentioning that several of Buffy's two-parters
actually aired back to back as a single two-hour block, and generally
weren't intended to be viewed separately. They're only credited as two
separate episodes so that they can be broken up for re-airing in
syndication.

I don't recall such being the case with any of the two-parters in
season 2, but a lot of the two-parters that begin or end later seasons
actually did air as multiple hour blocks.

--Sam

KenM47

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Feb 12, 2006, 11:47:10 PM2/12/06
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"Sam" <hyperevol...@gmail.com> wrote:

I don't recall this except for WitH and TH, the first two episodes.

I think you're remembering two parters where the 2d part was on
"Angel" when that show immediately followed "Buffy" on the WB Tuesday
nights. There were a couple of those IIRC.


Ken (Brooklyn)

Sam

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Feb 13, 2006, 12:00:23 AM2/13/06
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KenM47 wrote:
>
> I don't recall this except for WitH and TH, the first two episodes.
>
> I think you're remembering two parters where the 2d part was on
> "Angel" when that show immediately followed "Buffy" on the WB Tuesday
> nights. There were a couple of those IIRC.
>

Off the top of my head, the first two episodes of season six aired as
one block, as did the last two. I think there were more, but I might be
mistaken.

--Sam

Clairel

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Feb 13, 2006, 12:20:20 AM2/13/06
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kenm47 wrote:
> "As far as I'm concerned, if two episodes have separate directors,
> separate sets of credits, etc., they count as two shows, not one.
> [Finding a way to bring Trek into the conversation for the 4619th time,
> the halves of TNG two-parters were often written months apart, and the
> "to be continued" and fadeout was a major part of their rhythm, so it
> always cheesed me off when videotapes would try to jam the two episodes
> together as if they were a single movie.] "
>
> Let me suggest there's a big difference here. The ST two parters were
> used, IIRC, as season ending cliffhangers to supposedly draw the
> friends back to the new season.
>
> In "Buffy" the second part was the following week (except for WttH and
> TH shown together originally), building suspense and the "gotta know"
> factor a lot better than a three or four month hiatus. The Buffy
> two-parters were more an organic two hour show forced to be split by
> the one hour time slot.

--Bearing that in mind, here's a hypothetical question for AOQ: if you
were told that two hours of BtVS, the first hour with a title such as,
say, "Onetnvavat I" and the second hour with the title "Onetnvavat II,"
were aired both together on one night, the second hour coming right
after the first hour, would you watch both hours together and then
write one review for the two-hour show?

Because that could happen, couldn't it? I'm not saying whether or not
it ever did happen (that might be considered too spoilery), but I am
saying it could.

Clairel.

Don Sample

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Feb 13, 2006, 12:34:51 AM2/13/06
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In article <1139806823.8...@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
"Sam" <hyperevol...@gmail.com> wrote:

Actually, they cut some stuff from 'Bargaining,' and moved some other
bits around to make it into two episodes, for later re-runs. The DVDs
have the two hour cut on them.

Clairel

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Feb 13, 2006, 12:37:08 AM2/13/06