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The Mystic Mongoose

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Sep 28, 1993, 10:52:32 AM9/28/93
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(Sorry for the delay, folks- the router was down.)

Intro Lyric: (couldn't catch it) Had YW&D dressed in Londoneque fashion,
in smoking jackets, sitting in comfy chairs.

No Pain No Painting
Paris 1905. The studio of Pablo Picasso. Right there starts a huh? I
thought that Pablo was prinipally Spanish, but ICBW. 'Guernica' sticks
out in my mind. Our second 'painter' cartoon runs just a little shy of
the first. The 'Dogs Playing Poker' bit was well done (listen carefuly to
the dogs dialouge). Frere Warner- needless but somewhat enjoyable. "What
does Christie Brinkley have that I don't?" "Billy Joel." The urinary
humor in the episode was completely superb. ROTFL. "Boy, the stuff they
get away with in these cartoon shows." If you look real carefully at
Picasso's earlier paintings, you see those Black Velvet Clowns and a
Norman Rockwell painting.
Picasso: "Willyou leave if give you some francs?"
Yakko: "I've got the beans."
Wakko: "I've got the ketchup."
Dot: "And I've got the *buns*" (gratuitous Eric Schwartz-pleasin skirt
peek)
Yakko: " Sez you ."
The Pictionary bit was good, but after seeing HOaC and "Cookies for
Einstein", It was a bit predictable. Still funny. The conclusion was
inevitable, and a little trite, but still good. I like this format of
toon: YW&D pester some historical figure who is at a crisis, and solve
his problem completely by accident, after they finish pestering him.

Les Misleranimals
If I knew more about the play, I would probably be splitting my
sides. As it was, I was impressed. Another MBE (Marx-Brothers-Esque) name
or two: Camenbert, Runt VanRunt. The storyline was solid and coherent,
the singing well-done, the humor minimal but good.
"Oh, save us God! We're living with a Sweeney Todd!"
The tail bit was great, as was "Ouch. Owie." DYN: Rita has a
Furrball-esque notch in her left ear. This relationship theory is a
possibility. Overall, enjoyable, but I wish I'd have seen the play/read
the book- I would indubitably laughed more.


Filler:
Escape from the tower: Utilization of 'Acme HumOngo Bubble'. OK.
Back into tower: The non sequitur lives in Animaniacs! <Cliff Claven
voice on> When the kids flip the switch, the escalator drops down, but
when the guard does it, an anvil falls on him. What's up with that?


Overall: Palnt yer butt on the couch and watch!
No Pain No Painting: A
Les Miseranimals: B if you haven't seen it, probably an A- or A if you
have.
Filler: B

KP: Dallas Cowboys Fan
(one of the lower lifeforms of all)
Endtag: "I'm Yakko!" "I'm Wakko!" "And I'm *cute*."

|The Mystic Mongoose | ____________ |Contemplation is the
|(Email address coming) | / _______ |fornication of the mind.
|Robert W. Armstrong | | ______ | -Gary Benson
|125 Dogwood Lane | | _____ |And the Baylor faculty
|Mystic, Ct 06355-1040 | \__ _____ |practices abstinence.

Paul Hendry

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Sep 28, 1993, 1:56:31 PM9/28/93
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In article <289j3g$n...@louie.udel.edu>,

The Mystic Mongoose <R...@bilbo.baylor.edu.coming.soon> wrote:
>
>Intro Lyric: (couldn't catch it) Had YW&D dressed in Londoneque fashion,
>in smoking jackets, sitting in comfy chairs.

I think they said "How urbane-y".

>Filler:
>Escape from the tower: Utilization of 'Acme HumOngo Bubble'. OK.
>Back into tower: The non sequitur lives in Animaniacs! <Cliff Claven
>voice on> When the kids flip the switch, the escalator drops down, but
>when the guard does it, an anvil falls on him. What's up with that?

The filler segements are actually called wraparounds.
The "Newsreel of the stars" and the other things they do before
the theme song are called cold openings.

>KP: Dallas Cowboys Fan
>(one of the lower lifeforms of all)

Actually, you can't take these literally. She doesn't drive a jeep,
and so she probably isn't a Dallas Cowboy Fan either.

I liked "No Pain, No Painting", though somewhat less so than the average
YW&D cartoon so far. "Les Miseranimals" seemed to be a trifle too
Disney-esque in some places for my taste, though the singing was great.
--
-- \ - Standard disclaimer: "I just can't help myself!" - Babs - / --
-- \- Paul Hendry hen...@physics.utoronto.ca Hello nurse! -/ --
-- /- le *sigh* Fifi == SEXIUS SKUNKIUS What a yutz! -\ --
-- / - "Or maybe... a bit more *bunny* heat?" - Babs - \ --

Will Bell

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Sep 28, 1993, 3:30:37 PM9/28/93
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In a previous article, The Mystic Mongoose <R...@bilbo.baylor.edu.coming.soon> wrote:
>
>Intro Lyric: (couldn't catch it) Had YW&D dressed in Londoneque fashion,
>in smoking jackets, sitting in comfy chairs.

I'd have to say "how urbane-y", but it took two or three replays to
figure it out. Any other guesses?

WBB
--
Will Bell -- be...@cs.tamu.edu -- Live from the heart of Scenic Central Texas
Slappy Squirrel is my earth goddess.

David W. Tamkin

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Sep 28, 1993, 4:51:52 PM9/28/93
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be...@cs.tamu.edu (Will Bell) wrote in <28a3ct$4...@tamuts.tamu.edu>:

| In a previous article, [Robert Armstrong] wrote:
| >
| >Intro Lyric: (couldn't catch it) Had YW&D dressed in Londoneque fashion,
| >in smoking jackets, sitting in comfy chairs.
|

| I'd have to say "how urbane-y", but it took two or three replays to
| figure it out. Any other guesses?

I was sure it was "how urbane-y" the first time I heard it, but it was so
muffled that I did replay it. Now I'm positive.

The opening with "De plane, de plane-y" was tabled, of course, because of
Herve Villechaize's recent suicide. I wonder whether they'll ever use it.

David W. Tamkin Box 3284 Skokie, Illinois 60076-6284 312-714-5610
dat...@genesis.mcs.com CompuServe: 73720,1570 MCI Mail: 426-1818

Paul Hendry

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Sep 28, 1993, 7:10:13 PM9/28/93
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In article <28a858$5...@genesis.MCS.COM>,

David W. Tamkin <dat...@genesis.mcs.com> wrote:
>
>The opening with "De plane, de plane-y" was tabled, of course, because of
>Herve Villechaize's recent suicide. I wonder whether they'll ever use it.

How do you know about which lines they may or may not use in that line
of the song?

T. Erik Browne

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Sep 28, 1993, 9:12:41 PM9/28/93
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In article <CE2sI...@helios.physics.utoronto.ca> hen...@helios.physics.utoronto.ca (Paul Hendry) writes:
>In article <289j3g$n...@louie.udel.edu>,
>The Mystic Mongoose <R...@bilbo.baylor.edu.coming.soon> wrote:
>>
>>Intro Lyric: (couldn't catch it) Had YW&D dressed in Londoneque fashion,
>>in smoking jackets, sitting in comfy chairs.
>
>I think they said "How urbane-y".

Yup.


>
>>KP: Dallas Cowboys Fan
>>(one of the lower lifeforms of all)
>
>Actually, you can't take these literally. She doesn't drive a jeep,
>and so she probably isn't a Dallas Cowboy Fan either.

Thank god, since Mongoose had it right. :>

>
>I liked "No Pain, No Painting", though somewhat less so than the average
>YW&D cartoon so far. "Les Miseranimals" seemed to be a trifle too
>Disney-esque in some places for my taste, though the singing was great.

Not a bad episode. The shorts weren't amazingly funny, but I still enjoyed
them.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
T. Erik Browne | Harvey Mudd College
tbr...@hmcvax.ac.hmc.edu | Claremont, CA 91711
Erik_...@hmc.edu | Best college west of Upland
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Do you find me pleasing?"

Sally Smith

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Sep 28, 1993, 9:25:56 PM9/28/93
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In article <28a3ct$4...@TAMUTS.TAMU.EDU> be...@cs.tamu.edu (Will Bell) writes:

>I'd have to say "how urbane-y", but it took two or three replays to

One more vote for that.

Sally
--
Sally Smith (510)790-0608 sal...@netcom.com (I was sa...@tardis.tymnet.com)
I'm unemployed--these opinions *must* be mine!
"Don't investigate this too closely." -- Don Bellisario, re: "Quantum Leap"

DAVE ROSSELL

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Sep 28, 1993, 10:55:00 PM9/28/93
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>I liked "No Pain, No Painting", though somewhat less so than the average
>YW&D cartoon so far. "Les Miseranimals" seemed to be a trifle too
>Disney-esque in some places for my taste, though the singing was great.

I'm a big Les Mis/Stephen Sondheim fan, so I didn't stop laughing for the
whole Les Miseranimals toon. You sort of have to have seen it on stage to
appreciate all the visual gags, including the lighting and circling ValRunt/
Javert Dog (whatever his name was). The Javert dog even *looked like*
(in a vague way) the Javerts I've seen. They even had parodies within
parodies, mocking Sweeny Todd (which revolves around cannibalism in a pie
shop--a grossly oversimplified explanation) and Disney animation!

I've thought of writing to fox to find out if it's available on some videotape
somewhere. This episode was up there with the Tiny Toons "Kon Ducky"

It was a masterpiece!!!

********************************************************************************

Dave Rossell "When you lay your dreams to rest,
v011...@ubvms.cc.buffalo.edu you can get what's second best,
but it's hard to get enough."
-David Wilcox

********************************************************************************

Eric A. Schwartz

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Sep 29, 1993, 1:26:47 AM9/29/93
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In article <289j3g$n...@louie.udel.edu>,
The Mystic Mongoose <R...@bilbo.baylor.edu.coming.soon> wrote:
>
>No Pain No Painting
> Paris 1905. The studio of Pablo Picasso. Right there starts a huh? I
>thought that Pablo was prinipally Spanish, but ICBW. 'Guernica' sticks
>out in my mind.

He was Spanish, but lived elsewhere because he refused to return to
Spain until Franco was out of power. I think it was France he lived in.

>Frere Warner- needless but somewhat enjoyable.

Even funnier since it means "Brother Warner."

>The urinary humor in the episode was completely superb. ROTFL.

I agree. Dot's "Ewww" was a nice touch, too.

>Picasso: "Willyou leave if give you some francs?"
>Yakko: "I've got the beans."
>Wakko: "I've got the ketchup."
>Dot: "And I've got the *buns*" (gratuitous Eric Schwartz-pleasin skirt
>peek)
>Yakko: " Sez you ."

(I'm famous! :-) And Sez me too. :-) And I'm sure a lot of other folks.

>I like this format of
>toon: YW&D pester some historical figure who is at a crisis, and solve
>his problem completely by accident, after they finish pestering him.
>

I was thinking tonight that Animaniacs reminded me a lot of Rocky
and Bullwinkle in some ways. This is essentially the idea of
Sherman and Peabody. The animation is much better here, though.

E.S.

Payson

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Sep 29, 1993, 2:25:13 AM9/29/93
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In article <289j3g$n...@louie.udel.edu> The Mystic Mongoose <R...@bilbo.baylor.edu.coming.soon> writes:
>
>Overall: Palnt yer butt on the couch and watch!
>Les Miseranimals: B if you haven't seen it, probably an A- or A if you
>have.

[following text was prepared offline.]
-------------------------------
LES MISERANIMALS
----------------
WOW! If any episode deserves a 10 [or 11] it's this one. To fully
appreciate it, one needs to be familiar with the musical, but the
adaptation is truly magnificent for an eleven minute piece, and it
touches no less than a dozen songs from the original musical! The
animation was also done well, and of course Rita was excellent as a
combination Eponine/Cosette.

For those who are not especially familiar with the musical, or those
who are curious as to the details of adaptation, I give below my
observations about the individual songs, and other references gleaned
from the text. For each song I rate the suitability of application
[does the original song suit this meaning] and recognizability of the
music [how well does it contain the "essence" of the original]. The
names of the songs from the original are enclosed in <angle brackets>.

Numbers in asterisks represent footnote references, found at the end
of this post.

Note also:
Jean Valjean = Runt Valrunt
Javert = Camembert
Eponine/Cosette = Rita
M. Thernadier = M. Tristesse [btw, tristesse = sadness]

App Mus Title/Notes
--- --- -----------
8 8 Opening <Prologue>
The music conveys the right mood; in the musical Jean
Valjean is paroled (and later breaks parole)

8 6 "I'll track you down I swear" <followup to "Come to Me">
Fairly good match, but took me awhile to place it. Original
is a duet between JV and Javert

QUOTE "Welcome to the French Revolution."
Wrong--Bzzzt--Ouch!--<Cringe>
The essential part of Les Miserables took place 1815-1832.
This was long after the French Revolution (1789). Not to be
overly picky, but I cringed when I heard that line.

7 9 "At the end of my fork" <At the end of the day>
Clearly recognizable tune. The original discussed problems
of the poor, including hunger. Not too far from this
version, though different context.

QUOTE "He stole a bone."
Jean Valjean did nineteen years in prison for stealing a
loaf of bread.

10 10 "Look at Rita" <Lovely Ladies>
Perfect match! Complete with the recitatives [talking about
M. Tristesse's Fat Cat souffles, etc]

10 10 "There is a flat in gay Paris" <[Castle on a cloud>
Another excellent match. The original is in 5/4 instead of
4/4, but the rhythm within each line is right. Good lyric
matchup as well. *1*

6 7 "Who are you/I'm Runt Valrunt" <Who am I>
The original was a soliloquy; the only line of the song
recongnizable was the last one, which was a dead ringer.

7 10 "Rita, Glad I found ya.../Runt, where..." <Red and Black>
The original was sung antiphonally, as was this. The music
was a good match for Red and Black, but I would have
selected a different song to go here. *2*

7 9 "Please don't be upset" <A little fall of rain>
Clearly recognizable tune; in the original Eponine has just
been morally shot--this is her dying song. The second-to-
last line is a dead ringer from the show.

7 10 Underscoring: "Where's Runt Valrunt" <leadin to "On My Own">
No lyrics, but the music is a dead ringer for the orchestral
leadin to "On My Own".

10 10 "Do you hear the poodles bark" <Do you hear the people sing>
A perfect match. In the show this is a revolutionary song,
as it is here. Voice solo placement matches too.

6 10 "Dig down, Dig deep" <Look down>
The original song was a tableau of Paris *3*; the voice solo
placement matches, however.

8 10 "Bitten in the gut" <Master of the House>
The original song occurs three times in the show; although
never in this context, it fits very well.

10 10 Confrontation <Confrontation>
Perfect yet again! The original was a duet with voice
overlap quite similar to that exhibitted here. Good lines
too.

7 9 At the end of the road [reprise] <At the end of the day>
Not the same context as the musical, but it "feels" like it
fits very well here.

Pretty amazing level of inclusion for an 11-minute short! There were
a number of songs not touched [I had a dream, Thernadier Walz of
Treachery, Stars, In my life, A heart full of love, One day more,
Drink with me, Javert's solliloquy] but given the 16-to-1 time
compression, this is to be expected.

Footnotes:
*1* First and last line of each stanza from original:
"There is a castle on a cloud" /
"Not in my castle on a cloud."
"There is a lady all in white" /
"She says, Cosette, I love you very much"
"I know a place where no one's lost" /
"Not in my castle on a cloud."

*2* I'd have used a near-variant on "Voila, le soir qui tombe" which
is used as the leadin to "A little fall of rain" in the musical
[note: this does NOT appear in the London or Broadway cast
recordings] :
"Cosette, what are you doing? Cosette Have you no fear?
Have you seen my beloved? Why have you come back here?"

*3* Opening lyrics:
"Look down and see the beggars at your feet.
Look down and show some mercy if you can.
Look down and see the sweepings of the street.
Look down, look down, upon your fellow man."


--
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
pay...@cs.wisc.edu | "Je crois que je ne vais jamais voir... | J\_/L
John Payson | Un animal si beau qu'un chat." | ( o o )

Mark Hadley

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Sep 29, 1993, 12:48:02 AM9/29/93
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In article <CE3HD...@acsu.buffalo.edu>,

DAVE ROSSELL <v011...@ubvms.cc.buffalo.edu> wrote:
>I'm a big Les Mis/Stephen Sondheim fan, so I didn't stop laughing for the
>whole Les Miseranimals toon. You sort of have to have seen it on stage to
>appreciate all the visual gags, including the lighting and circling ValRunt/
>
>It was a masterpiece!!!
>
"Masterpiece" is just the word I had in mind after seeing this cartoon as well!
I've never seen the show on stage, but I've heard songs from it and loved the
Animaniacs versions. "There is a flat in gay Paris" was wonderfully crafted
from the original "Castle on a Cloud!" The line: "He says, 'Rita, you're my
beloved pet!'" made me both laugh at the parody and feel heartbroken for poor
Rita at the same time. Genius!

I really liked Rita after seeing R&R's intro, but I never would'a thought
the "pal around for a while" premise would lead to something this good!

After "King Yakko" I had to go rent "Duck Soup" to see the similarities.
Now I must either rent a video or see Les Mis on stage.... Who sez this stuff
doesn't enrich one's mind? =]
--
Mark Hadley | "Pinky, please! I've got to plan for tomorrow night!"
had...@storm.cs.orst.edu| "Why? What are we doing tomorrow night, Brain?"
My opinions are void | "The same thing we do every night, Pinky: Try to
where prohibited by law | take over the world!" -- Animaniacs

Ron Asbestos Dippold

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Sep 29, 1993, 5:16:57 PM9/29/93
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pay...@dr-hibbert.cs.wisc.edu ( Payson) writes:
> 7 9 "Please don't be upset" <A little fall of rain>
> Clearly recognizable tune; in the original Eponine has just
> been morally shot--this is her dying song. The second-to-
^^^^^^^^^^^^

I take it this is in the X-rated off-Broadway production? A snuff film!
--
If people are basically good, you don't need a government. If people are
basically evil, you don't dare have one.

DAVE ROSSELL

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Sep 29, 1993, 8:49:00 PM9/29/93
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>-------------------------------
>LES MISERANIMALS
>----------------
>WOW! If any episode deserves a 10 [or 11] it's this one. To fully
>appreciate it, one needs to be familiar with the musical, but the
>adaptation is truly magnificent for an eleven minute piece, and it
>touches no less than a dozen songs from the original musical! The
>animation was also done well, and of course Rita was excellent as a
>combination Eponine/Cosette.
>
An additional note:

The toon also parodied the Stephen Sondheim musical Sweeney Todd, which is
about a barber who, after returning from prison, goes a little loopy and
starts killing random victims in his search for the man who raped his wife
and sent him away to the prison ships. Sweeney hooks up with a baker
whose meat pies are so bad, no one will eat them. She and Sweeney come up
with a way to dispose of the corpses and improve her meat pie business.
Business booms along with the Fleet St. cannibalism rate.

Angela Landsbury played the baker in the original cast, in case you're
curious.

Scott Tadman

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Sep 29, 1993, 10:31:42 PM9/29/93
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In article <CE567...@acsu.buffalo.edu>,
DAVE ROSSELL <v011...@ubvms.cc.buffalo.edu> wrote:
>>-------------------------------
>>LES MISERANIMALS
>>----------------

Regardin the cat-killing chef - Doesn't he bear a remote resemblance to
John Cleese? Maybe not.

=== (Scott Tadman) tad...@ecf.toronto.edu ====================================
Slappy drives a Viper?!

Payson

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Sep 30, 1993, 1:42:45 AM9/30/93
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In article <rdippold.749337417@qualcom> rdip...@qualcomm.com (Ron "Asbestos" Dippold) writes:
>pay...@dr-hibbert.cs.wisc.edu ( Payson) writes:
>> 7 9 "Please don't be upset" <A little fall of rain>
>> Clearly recognizable tune; in the original Eponine has just
>> been morally shot--this is her dying song. The second-to-
> ^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
>I take it this is in the X-rated off-Broadway production? A snuff film!

To quote myself:
Wrong--Bzzzt--Ouch--<Cringe> [or something like that]

I also realized after I posted it that I had edited it in two sessions and
forgotten to turn on the background spell-checking the second time, so
there are probably other typos in there too [not that a spellchecker would
have helped that oops...] Oh well.

PS--what did you think of the rest of it? At least you seem to have read it...

Payson

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Sep 30, 1993, 1:47:11 AM9/30/93
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In article <CE567...@acsu.buffalo.edu> v011...@ubvms.cc.buffalo.edu (DAVE ROSSELL) writes:
>>-------------------------------
>>LES MISERANIMALS
>>----------------
>>WOW! If any episode deserves a 10 [or 11] it's this one. To fully
>>appreciate it, one needs to be familiar with the musical, but the
>>adaptation is truly magnificent for an eleven minute piece, and it
>>touches no less than a dozen songs from the original musical! The
>>animation was also done well, and of course Rita was excellent as a
>>combination Eponine/Cosette.
>>
>An additional note:
>
>The toon also parodied the Stephen Sondheim musical Sweeney Todd, which is
>about a barber who, after returning from prison, goes a little loopy and
>starts killing random victims in his search for the man who raped his wife
>and sent him away to the prison ships. Sweeney hooks up with a baker
>whose meat pies are so bad, no one will eat them. She and Sweeney come up
>with a way to dispose of the corpses and improve her meat pie business.
>Business booms along with the Fleet St. cannibalism rate.

Thanks for filling me in on that.


>
>Angela Landsbury played the baker in the original cast, in case you're
>curious.
>

Why would I be curious? Is there some other sinister connection I'm not
grasping?

Robert Henney

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Sep 30, 1993, 2:01:07 AM9/30/93
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sch...@rebecca.its.rpi.edu (Eric A. Schwartz) writes:
> In article <289j3g$n...@louie.udel.edu>,
> The Mystic Mongoose <R...@bilbo.baylor.edu.coming.soon> wrote:
> >
> >The urinary humor in the episode was completely superb. ROTFL.
> I agree. Dot's "Ewww" was a nice touch, too.

Wee wee, I totally agree. :)

> >Picasso: "Willyou leave if give you some francs?"
> >Yakko: "I've got the beans."
> >Wakko: "I've got the ketchup."
> >Dot: "And I've got the *buns*" (gratuitous Eric Schwartz-pleasin skirt
> >peek)
> >Yakko: " Sez you ."

Dot *is* cute, but I can't seem to get the reaction from her that babs
would. For example, imagine Babs doing that EXACT gag... woahhh! :) :)
Rump beats toes anytime... :) :) :)

> >I like this format of
> >toon: YW&D pester some historical figure who is at a crisis, and solve
> >his problem completely by accident, after they finish pestering him.

I doubt is was entirely an accident, even for the warners. I suspect
that they were just being extremely crafty. They *love* to drive people
insane ya know. I have no belief that they're twisted enough to not
recogize the guitar or cow.
--
| Robert Henney (NHTI) Concord, NH EMAIL:lin...@linear.mv.com |

Steve Miller

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Sep 30, 1993, 5:19:22 AM9/30/93
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In <289j3g$n...@louie.udel.edu> The Mystic Mongoose <R...@bilbo.baylor.edu.coming.soon> writes:

>The Pictionary bit was good, but after seeing HOaC and "Cookies for
>Einstein", It was a bit predictable. Still funny. The conclusion was
>inevitable, and a little trite, but still good. I like this format of
>toon: YW&D pester some historical figure who is at a crisis, and solve
>his problem completely by accident, after they finish pestering him.

"Quantum Leap: The Next Generation"! YW&D travel through time,
accidentally making sure history plays itself out correctly and
hilariously. Now all we need is a guest cameo by Scott Bakula! But,
y'know, I bet this is one way the A! folks get past the FCC's "educational
content" requirement without bonking us on the head with morals (except, of
course, those that come off the Wheel of Morality's dye-sublimation
printer). This way, they can claim they're teaching about important people
in history, thereby satisfying FCC regs, yet still entertaining everyone
until they bust a gut! Neat!

>DYN: Rita has a
>Furrball-esque notch in her left ear. This relationship theory is a
>possibility.

Aha! I knew it!

--
__ | ata...@cats.ucsc.edu | "Oh no! Toonces, look out! AIIIEEEE!" --SNL
(_ | Delphi: ATARIO | "This is only an exhibition. This is not a
__)teve | "Happy happy! | competition. So please . . . no wagering."
| Joy joy!" --R & S | --Late Night with David Letterman

Steve Miller

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Sep 30, 1993, 5:22:10 AM9/30/93
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>The filler segements are actually called wraparounds.
>The "Newsreel of the stars" and the other things they do before
>the theme song are called cold openings.

Neat! Real terminology! Did you call up Warner's or something? (BTW,
would that make the host segments on TTA "wraparounds"?

Steve Miller

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Sep 30, 1993, 5:28:30 AM9/30/93
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In <28b6an$j...@usenet.rpi.edu> sch...@rebecca.its.rpi.edu (Eric A. Schwartz) writes:

>>I like this format of
>>toon: YW&D pester some historical figure who is at a crisis, and solve
>>his problem completely by accident, after they finish pestering him.

>I was thinking tonight that Animaniacs reminded me a lot of Rocky
>and Bullwinkle in some ways. This is essentially the idea of
>Sherman and Peabody.

Usenet is so great. That comparison is so completely correct and obvious,
but I hadn't even thought of it even though I'd thought of comparing Rocky
and Bullwinkle to Animaniacs. THANK YOU!

>The animation is much better here, though.

Ehe . . . well. NTTAWWT.

Mark Hadley

unread,
Sep 30, 1993, 2:42:56 AM9/30/93
to
In article <CE5B0...@ecf.toronto.edu>,

Scott Tadman <tad...@ecf.toronto.edu> wrote:
>Regardin the cat-killing chef - Doesn't he bear a remote resemblance to
>John Cleese? Maybe not.
Maybe so! Cleese's French guard in the Python movie Holy Grail came to mind
when I saw this guy. Especially the voice, but the looks helped. The line
(roughly) "Oh, it ees true! Ah have no more meat fohr my meaty-meat pehys!"
seemed very similar to "Go ah-way! Ah *fahrt* een your generah direc-sho!"

> Slappy drives a Viper?!
Faboo! Her early cartoons musta paid pretty well! I wish my Dodge was this
sleek...

Ron Asbestos Dippold

unread,
Sep 30, 1993, 3:30:57 PM9/30/93
to
pay...@dr-hibbert.cs.wisc.edu ( Payson) writes:
>In article <rdippold.749337417@qualcom> rdip...@qualcomm.com (Ron "Asbestos" Dippold) writes:
>>I take it this is in the X-rated off-Broadway production? A snuff film!

>PS--what did you think of the rest of it? At least you seem to have read it...

Sorry, all that good text and all I did was make a funny. I've seen the
musical as well, and thought your analysis was right on. I would hope
whoever is maintaining the reference lists would grab that and include it -
otherwise someone else is going to have to do it again!

--
The illegal we do immediately. The unconstitutional takes a little longer.
-- Henry Kissinger

Payson

unread,
Sep 30, 1993, 4:58:00 PM9/30/93
to
Glad you liked it. Do you think I should do one for West Side Pigeon? It
actually followed the musical very closely until the ending, and used the
songs for their intended purposes. Had it been anyone other than Goodfeathers
and had it been given a "right" ending, it would have scored a solid "A" or
"A+" in my book. As it is I give it a B+.

Admittedly, one can't fault the writers TOO much for the ending. How can one
realistically deign to end West Side Story without someone actually getting
killed [a major network cartoon no-no] or dragged away against their will and
never rescued [another no-no]. Perhaps they could have had Squit and Carloota
get married and live happily ever after, forming a union of pigeons and
sparrows. Does anyone else think this would have worked?

The Mystic Mongoose

unread,
Sep 30, 1993, 8:01:15 PM9/30/93
to
Subject: Re: AN 111, 9/27/93
From: Payson, pay...@dr-hibbert.cs.wisc.edu
Date: Thu, 30 Sep 1993 20:58:00 GMT
In article <1993Sep30.2...@cs.wisc.edu> Payson,

pay...@dr-hibbert.cs.wisc.edu writes:
>Glad you liked it. Do you think I should do one for West Side Pigeon?
It
>actually followed the musical very closely until the ending, and used the
>songs for their intended purposes. Had it been anyone other than
Goodfeathers
>and had it been given a "right" ending, it would have scored a solid "A"
or
>"A+" in my book. As it is I give it a B+.
>
>Admittedly, one can't fault the writers TOO much for the ending. How
can one
>realistically deign to end West Side Story without someone actually
getting
>killed [a major network cartoon no-no] or dragged away against their
will and
>never rescued [another no-no]. Perhaps they could have had Squit and
Carloota
>get married and live happily ever after, forming a union of pigeons and
>sparrows. Does anyone else think this would have worked?

No, but Disney would do it that way if they had the shot.

The Mystic Mongoose | ____________ |Contemplation is the
(Email address coming) | / _______ |fornication of the mind.

Snail Mail to: | | ______ | -Gary Benson
Robert W. Armstrong | | _____ |Save the whales- they
125 Dogwood Lane | \__ _____ |make great leftovers!
Mystic, Ct 06355-1040 | | -W.H.Armstrong, Jr.

Felix Lee

unread,
Sep 30, 1993, 10:33:58 PM9/30/93
to
John Payson:

> Perhaps they could have had Squit and Carloota
> get married and live happily ever after, forming a union of pigeons and
> sparrows. Does anyone else think this would have worked?

Probably not. That's still too different from the original. To be
reasonably faithful, Squit and Carloota do have to be separated
somehow.

I was thinking, the ending they had might have worked if it had been
telegraphed earlier. As it is, it's just too out-of-the-blue and
different from West Side Story for people to be happy with it.

Maybe if they had fiddled with the "mistaken death" idea. There was a
trace of it in Squit's encounter with the Godpigeon, and I guess
that's faithful to WSS, but if they could have reverted to something
more like Romeo and Juliet, it might have worked. Well, not death,
but some sort of misunderstanding.

But enough beating this idea to death...
--

Payson

unread,
Oct 1, 1993, 12:58:12 AM10/1/93
to
In article <28fs0b$c...@louie.udel.edu> The Mystic Mongoose <R...@bilbo.baylor.edu.coming.soon> writes:
>>Glad you liked it. Do you think I should do one for West Side Pigeon?
>It
>>actually followed the musical very closely until the ending, and used the
>>songs for their intended purposes. Had it been anyone other than
>Goodfeathers
>>and had it been given a "right" ending, it would have scored a solid "A"
>or
>>"A+" in my book. As it is I give it a B+.

Actually, I think I'll downgrade it to a B-. I watched it for the second
time today and found myself really un-enjoying it [i.e. wanting to turn it
off parts of it annoyed me so much]. The WSS bits aren't bad, but the
voiceover at the beginning and related "Goodfeathers" stuff really annoy
me. Les Miseranimals, by contrast, I have watched four times [and certain
parts like "Flat in Gay Paris" I've watched even more]. That episode I
enjoyed practically every minute--even on the fourth viewing. I can think
of few episodes from so far I'd want to watch more than once, and even
fewer more than twice--Les Miz, however, is definitely one of them [and
WSP definitely not].

Richard Chandler

unread,
Sep 30, 1993, 11:17:03 PM9/30/93
to
I have one question.

Is every Rita & Runt short gonna be such a bummer? (Plot-wise I mean).
Every short so far has her locked up in some pound or enclosure facing
imminent extinction (Gassing or Baking), but eventually breaking out.

Gee, in a way, she's kind of a kinky kitty.... Just no chains.


--
Have you ever seen a disclaimer say "my opinions ARE my employer's."?
"Wait a minute, you expect us innocent children to climb up dangerous
scaffolding and paint naked people all over a church? We'll do it!!"
-- Yakko Warner, Animaniacs

Trevor Wagler u

unread,
Oct 1, 1993, 9:01:29 AM10/1/93
to
In article <289j3g$n...@louie.udel.edu> The Mystic Mongoose <R...@bilbo.baylor.edu.coming.soon> writes:
>Les Misleranimals
> If I knew more about the play, I would probably be splitting my
>sides. As it was, I was impressed. Another MBE (Marx-Brothers-Esque) name
>or two: Camenbert, Runt VanRunt. The storyline was solid and coherent,
>the singing well-done, the humor minimal but good.
>"Oh, save us God! We're living with a Sweeney Todd!"
>The tail bit was great, as was "Ouch. Owie." DYN: Rita has a

>Furrball-esque notch in her left ear. This relationship theory is a
>possibility. Overall, enjoyable, but I wish I'd have seen the play/read
>the book- I would indubitably laughed more.

You're right in thinking that a knowledge of Claude-Michel
Schoenbergs musical would make a difference. I've seen the musical three
times, and the Animaniacs short just *killed* me. Each of the songs is a
direct parody of one of the songs from the play, and while the tunes are not
direct rip-offs (for copyright reasons), there are enough rhythmic and
textual similarities to draw connections.
BTW, Camenbert is a play on the original character Javert, the
prison guard whose plot purpose is to track down Jean Valjean (aka Runt
Valrunt) and throw him back in prison.
Email me if you're interested, I can provide a complete connections
list from the play to the animated short (songs, character parodies, etc.)

Trevor P. Wagler


>|The Mystic Mongoose | ____________ |Contemplation is the
>|(Email address coming) | / _______ |fornication of the mind.

>|Robert W. Armstrong | | ______ | -Gary Benson
>|125 Dogwood Lane | | _____ |And the Baylor faculty
>|Mystic, Ct 06355-1040 | \__ _____ |practices abstinence.


Ronnie Simonds

unread,
Oct 1, 1993, 2:12:43 PM10/1/93
to
The Mystic Mongoose <R...@bilbo.baylor.edu.coming.soon> writes:
>Each of the songs is a
>direct parody of one of the songs from the play, and while the tunes are not
>direct rip-offs (for copyright reasons), there are enough rhythmic and
>textual similarities to draw connections.

Why can Weird Al Yankovic (to take a well known example) use the exact music
for songs in parodies, but A! can't? Aren't parodies exempt to a certain
extent from copyright laws as long as it's used 'solely for satirical
purposes'?

-Ronnie Simonds, all Slappy Fan Club members owe dues for October (a friendly
message from your Treasurer)

Payson

unread,
Oct 1, 1993, 5:08:40 PM10/1/93
to
In article <28hrur$h...@cville-srv.wam.umd.edu> nich...@wam.umd.edu (Ronnie Simonds) writes:
>The Mystic Mongoose <R...@bilbo.baylor.edu.coming.soon> writes:
>>Each of the songs is a
>>direct parody of one of the songs from the play, and while the tunes are not
>>direct rip-offs (for copyright reasons), there are enough rhythmic and
>>textual similarities to draw connections.
>
>Why can Weird Al Yankovic (to take a well known example) use the exact music
>for songs in parodies, but A! can't? Aren't parodies exempt to a certain
>extent from copyright laws as long as it's used 'solely for satirical
>purposes'?

Wierd Al pays the copyright-holders of the songs he parodies. The critical
item here is that if they just took the music, they'd be "just taking" the
music, and one is not allowed to directly copy part of a work for purposes
of parodying another part. [music == one part of a song; lyrics == other
part]

Robert Henney

unread,
Oct 1, 1993, 2:55:03 AM10/1/93
to
ata...@cats.ucsc.edu (Steve Miller) writes:

> In <289j3g$n...@louie.udel.edu> The Mystic Mongoose <R...@bilbo.baylor.edu.com
>

> >DYN: Rita has a
> >Furrball-esque notch in her left ear. This relationship theory is a
> >possibility.
>
> Aha! I knew it!

What a strange genericly passed trait.

Will Bell

unread,
Oct 2, 1993, 4:21:54 PM10/2/93
to
In a previous article, nich...@wam.umd.edu (Ronnie Simonds) wrote:
>
>Why can Weird Al Yankovic (to take a well known example) use the exact music
>for songs in parodies, but A! can't?

I am almost positive that Al secures permission from the people being
parodied before he does it. All his albums thank or acknowledge them.
How else could he get away with it? Most artists consider it an honor
to be Weird-Al-ized. :)

But that still doesn't explain why A doesn't use real songs. For examplem
I have never heard (in A or TTA) the correct version of Raymond Scott's
"Powerhouse". They always use a song that is "close" to it, which is
clearly meant to convey the same feeling as Powerhouse. I do wonder
why they don't use the real thing.

WBB
--
Will Bell -- be...@cs.tamu.edu -- Live from the heart of Scenic Central Texas
"I can't believe you guys are looking for character development in three
characters whose near-first words were 'Boingee, boingee, boingee!'" -D. McBride

The Mystic Mongoose

unread,
Oct 2, 1993, 4:51:46 PM10/2/93
to
In article <28hrur$h...@cville-srv.wam.umd.edu> Ronnie Simonds,

nich...@wam.umd.edu writes:
>The Mystic Mongoose <R...@bilbo.baylor.edu.coming.soon> writes:
No I didn't! Trevor Wagler did. I don't know why he quoted my .sig,
tho...

>>Each of the songs is a
>>direct parody of one of the songs from the play, and while the tunes
are not
>>direct rip-offs (for copyright reasons), there are enough rhythmic and
>>textual similarities to draw connections.

>Why can Weird Al Yankovic (to take a well known example) use the exact
music

>for songs in parodies, but A! can't? Aren't parodies exempt to a certain
>extent from copyright laws as long as it's used 'solely for satirical
>purposes'?

Nay. WAY gets permission from artists before parodizing their songs. If
your local morning show does a parody, I think that is legal, but people
*buy* WAY tapes. That's a source of revenue, and Al therefore has to get
permission.

T. Erik Browne

unread,
Oct 2, 1993, 5:58:01 PM10/2/93
to
In article <28knt2$j...@TAMUTS.TAMU.EDU> be...@cs.tamu.edu (Will Bell) writes:
>
>But that still doesn't explain why A doesn't use real songs. For examplem
>I have never heard (in A or TTA) the correct version of Raymond Scott's
>"Powerhouse". They always use a song that is "close" to it, which is
>clearly meant to convey the same feeling as Powerhouse. I do wonder
>why they don't use the real thing.

Informational query: Which song is "Powerhouse"?


------------------------------------------------------------------------------
T. Erik Browne | Harvey Mudd College
tbr...@hmcvax.ac.hmc.edu | Claremont, CA 91711
Erik_...@hmc.edu | Best college west of Upland
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Do you find me pleasing?"

Quozl

unread,
Oct 2, 1993, 10:17:00 PM10/2/93
to
**}}TO: All
**}}FROM: T. Erik Browne
**}}SUBJECT: Song Parodies (Was Re
**}}ON: 10-02-93 18:32

TEB> Informational query: Which song is "Powerhouse"?

"Powerhouse" was a composition that was routinely used in the old WB cartoons
(go get the Carl Stalling Project on cassette or CD- this is the classic music
of the WB cartoons, and I highly recommend this 78-minute-long CD...), and
was used as the opening theme for Disney's "Honey, I Shrunk The Kids"...

I hope that helped, somewhat...

....Quozl!
(qu...@teamhbbs.com)
(denni...@teamhbbs.com)
(Denni...@f313.n161.z1.fidonet.org)
(Dennis Falk @ 1:161/313.0 @ Fidonet/FurNet)


... "Which way to the skunks! I want to raise a little stink!" :)
---
. Blue Wave/QWK v2.12 .

{ Team H BBS - Richmond, CA - 510-236-5114 - Anonymous accounts available }
{ Japanese Animation & Adult *** Stories, Pictures, Conversation }
{ Also supporting Pagan, Fat, and GLB issues }

Will Bell

unread,
Oct 3, 1993, 7:17:58 PM10/3/93
to
In a previous article, tbr...@jarthur.claremont.edu (T. Erik Browne) wrote:
>
>Informational query: Which song is "Powerhouse"?

That's the song that they play when you see some "construction" type
activity going on -- cranes lowering girders, bulldozers pushing dirt,
etc.

It has a very familiar bass line -- C E Eb F# F D Eb E all eighth notes.
I know you have heard it a hundred times. IT's on both "The Carl Stalling
Project" and "The Raymond Scott Project" -- both of which are very good
discs for cartoon music fans.

Steve Miller

unread,
Oct 4, 1993, 3:17:42 AM10/4/93
to

In <28a858$5...@genesis.MCS.COM> dat...@genesis.MCS.COM (David W. Tamkin) writes:

>The opening with "De plane, de plane-y" was tabled, of course, because of
>Herve Villechaize's recent suicide. I wonder whether they'll ever use it.

Um . . . dumb question: How do you know they were going to use "De plane,
de plane-ee"?

Quozl

unread,
Oct 3, 1993, 11:44:00 PM10/3/93
to
**}}TO: All
**}}FROM: Will Bell

**}}SUBJECT: Song Parodies (Was Re
**}}ON: 10-03-93 18:21

WB> It has a very familiar bass line -- C E Eb F# F D Eb E all eighth
WB> notes. I know you have heard it a hundred times. IT's on both "The
WB> Carl Stalling Project" and "The Raymond Scott Project" -- both of which
WB> are very good discs for cartoon music fans.

*eeeep!* They *did* get to their second CD after all! I never got word (or
even seen) the Raymond Scott Project disc, and didn't even know of its
existance until now! :( (*help!!*)

(Like I said, I highly recomment the Carl Stalling disc! :) It's a gas! :) )

....Quozl!
(qu...@teamhbbs.com)
(denni...@teamhbbs.com)
(Denni...@f313.n161.z1.fidonet.org)
(Dennis Falk @ 1:161/313.0 @ Fidonet/FurNet)


... "Such a dear! And you not nervous as usual!" -Mlle. Hepzibah

Adams Douglas

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Oct 4, 1993, 10:29:28 AM10/4/93
to
Quozl (qu...@teamhbbs.com) wrote:
: *eeeep!* They *did* get to their second CD after all! I never got word (or

: even seen) the Raymond Scott Project disc, and didn't even know of its
: existance until now! :( (*help!!*)

I have a CD called "The Music of Raymond Scott" which has all of the original
classics. I haven't seen "The Raymond Scott Project" is it new?

--
=====================================================================
Adams Douglas | Always tell the truth, | You can die like the rest,
adamsd@ | then you make it the | or be one of the best.
crash.cts.com | other bloke's problem! | - Cyndi n'ha June, 1992
San Diego, CA | - Sean Connery, 1971 |



Will Bell

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Oct 4, 1993, 3:41:59 PM10/4/93
to
In a previous article, ada...@crash.cts.com (Adams Douglas) wrote:
>
>I have a CD called "The Music of Raymond Scott" which has all of the original
>classics. I haven't seen "The Raymond Scott Project" is it new?

Just to clarify my original post, there are apparently 2 Raymond Scott
CDs out.

The first one was on some obscure label (Stash, if I recall), was available
only from Whole Toon, and was called "The Raymond Scott Project".

The second one, more recent, is on a major label (Columbia), and is called
something like "The Music of Raymond Scott: Turkish Themes & (something)".
This is the one I was talking about.

The second one has a very interesting history of Raymond Scott in the
liner notes. He was quite the innovator, both in musical style
and in musical hardware (playback mechanisms). Highly recommended.

Adams Douglas

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Oct 4, 1993, 10:50:58 PM10/4/93
to
Will Bell (be...@cs.tamu.edu) wrote:
: The second one, more recent, is on a major label (Columbia), and is called

: something like "The Music of Raymond Scott: Turkish Themes & (something)".
: This is the one I was talking about.
:
: The second one has a very interesting history of Raymond Scott in the
: liner notes. He was quite the innovator, both in musical style
: and in musical hardware (playback mechanisms). Highly recommended.

That's the one I have. I was astonished to find out that the last known
Raymond Scott composition was a MIDI sequence from 1986! He had a stroke
shortly after and is now hospitalized (yes, he's still alive).

Anyone want to try to send him a group get-well (or thank you) card?

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