Take this pager and shove it. Now.

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Abby Franquemont

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Apr 14, 1998, 3:00:00 AM4/14/98
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I'm serious about recovery. So serious, I started out to return to my
job yesterday morning following maternity leave, and decided not to.
Instead, I spent the day writing this resignation letter. Then I read
it over a couple of times, and this morning, I feel it belongs here,
in the Monastery.

It was a wonderful catharsis, and I found myself shedding not one tear
for the people who don't even remember what I did the time I lost the
NIS+ master to severe hardware failure twice in the same week, the
folks who weren't there when I saved the day with a can of cold spray
because I coudln't get new hardware, who never realized I kept a shop
running through chaos, because they weren't there. But they made the
money off my time and skills, and I'll bet ya dollars to donuts the
salespeople got bonuses.

Naturally it's on my web page as well.

And IJLS the bit about the pager.

..........

From ab...@foad.org Mon Apr 13 16:54:14 1998
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 1998 16:47:47 -0700 (PDT)
From: Abby Franquemont <ab...@foad.org>
To: x...@taos.com, y...@taos.com


This letter is to inform you of my decision to end my employment with Taos
Mountain Software, and the reasons for that decision. I will be available
to schedule a meeting when I'm able to attend, in order to conduct an exit
interview, but am loath to extend any more effort towards continuing the
work relationship than Taos really has done.

First, I would like to commend [name elided] in Human Resources, who I
really do feel made a genuine effort to address some very serious issues.
However, I don't believe I can really say anything else that's very
positive about my tenure with Taos.

It's been my observation that Taos' focus has shifted since I initially
accepted employment there in early 1997. While at that time, the focus
really did seem to include good treatment for highly skilled technical
personnel, and Taos did appear interested in retaining good people for a
longer period of time, I see nothing now to indicate that is still the
case. Certainly the following words, said to me by one Taos staff manager,
do not indicate it: "Taos doesn't make money off placing one person with 5
years experience at an assignment, we make money by placing 30 people with
little experience someplace that needs that many people."

First, that statement is erroneous. Taos _does_ make money off any
contractor who is in the field. Obviously the numbers will be higher if
you're looking at more people, right? Or is it just that it's cheaper to
employ someone with no experience to speak of? Where you can pay a
19-year-old fresh from his sophomore year in college $20 an hour, and bill
him out at $75, the margin is better than you get with a more experienced
person? Or is it that the inexperienced person is more likely to be
impressed by Taos renting a bowling alley for the night and calling that a
corporate benefit, while the more experienced and consequently very likely
older employee is more likely to be interested in real benefits and the
kind of treatment received from Taos over the long-term? A bit of both
perhaps?

Ya know, I'm not stupid. I know how much gross revenue I generated for
Taos in one year. Up until taking unpaid maternity leave, I was constantly
in the field generating income for Taos. That's what Taos paid me to do,
right? I have no problem with that. But I _do_ have a problem with being
treated as if I were not, in fact, the commodity being traded here. The
fact that I, and hundreds of others, are in the field working, is why you
have a job in the Taos home office. Without your consultants, you don't
have a business.

I would say that Taos had forgotten that, but the reality is much colder.
Taos is doing what it can to keep an easy-to-maintain staff, because the
margin is better, and is fully cognizant of what this means to their more
experienced staff. Surely Taos is aware that they now employ far more
less-skilled people than highly-skilled people?

Perhaps not. Taos doesn't have the same skilled people conducting
technical screenings anymore. I wonder if Taos really believes that the
guy who installed Redhat once is a skilled system administrator? How would
Taos know, really, at this point? I was screened by someone, in a phone
conversation that took an hour and a half, in which he put me through the
wringer asking a wide range of kinds of questions. Even though some of the
questions were frankly stupid, he was able to depart from what's
obviously a script, and learn a little more about my background, in order
to make a pretty fair assessment of my skill level. He didn't do that
based on whether or not I knew, off the top of my head, the least-used
flags for ls, however. Most of the people I've talked to have been through
a technical screening for which the best preparation would be one night's
intensive study of _UNIX for Dummies_, and scrawling "ls -ld list just the
directory information" on the palm of their hands.

So what does that tell Taos about whether or not they really have a good
sysadmin here? Absolutely nothing. Wouldn't it be better to ask a
prospective employee to describe a really meaty problem he or she once had
to solve, and what the solution was? How about to give a scenario and ask
how it would be approached? How about "When you need to know something and
you don't know it, what do you do? Where do you find the answer, and how?"
Those are things that are much more telling about whether or not someone
is a good system administrator. When I started being a system
administrator, we called someone who had pedantically memorized the
lesser-known flags for ls an educated user. Of course things were
different then -- we used to compile things instead of installing them
with third-party graphical tools.

I wonder, is there anyone left working internally at Taos who can remember
a time like that? It wasn't that long ago. And even if there isn't anyone
left at Taos who is concerned about the skill level of most of the Taos
contractors today, I'd be willing to bet Taos' customer base is concerned.
I can recall hearing concern about that very issue from people at one icon
of Silicon Valley where I was assigned.

From the Taos web page (which I note now talks about "system
administrators" and "web developers" where it used to talk about skilled
network and system administrators):

The only way to survive is to stay on top of the latest technology -
that's how we stay competitive. Providing substantial technical
resources is a major priority. Our in-house lab offers employees
the chance to explore and experiment with various systems.

I was astonished the last time I set foot in the Taos lab, to listen
to what was going on. When I first went into the Taos lab, several offices
ago on Embarcadero in Palo Alto, a technical advisor was teaching a class
on subnetting and handling routes for different subnets. Last time I was
there, one fellow boasted that he had now been in the lab for six weeks
with no assignment, then proceeded to give a bunch of incredibly incorrect
information to one person who was in the process of attempting to install
Solaris 2.5.1 and the then-current set of patches, for the first time.

Our technical advisors field questions and offer ongoing guidance.

I asked for some assistance one time, a couple of weeks into a new
assignment, saddled with a corrupted NIS+ credential. One year after I had
asked it, I coincidentally was using a search engine to find something and
came across a URL with my name in it, at Taos. Intrigued, I followed the
link and discovered it was to the discussion area where I had asked that
question a year ago -- and it had still not been answered.

Luckily for Taos' client, I am a better system administrator than to have
waited for someone else to solve my problem.

Lectures and tutorials are always on the calendar.

In a recent mailing to Taos' entire staff distribution, I find the phrase
"Lots of people are expressing a desire to learn more about NT." Who would
those people be? I don't know one single skilled UNIX admin who feels a
compelling need to be taught how to handle NT. NT isn't rocket science.
Heck, it's not even UNIX. I don't see UNIX admins crying because they
can't find work because they don't know NT. I see 'em crying sometimes
because someone is forcing them to use NT for a purpose to which it isn't
suited, but that's a matter for a different day. While technical
lectures when I started included a noted perl hacker talking about perl,
I note the most advanced, technical thing going now on the lists of
scheduled lectures is the same thing I saw happening on an impromptu
basis in the lab when I started out: talking about routing. Tutorials
include the proper use of third-party graphical tools for system
administration -- all fine and good for the entry-level admin, but boy do
I pity the company depending on someone who only knows Solstice AdminSuite
to solve a serious outage.

It's up to you - once you're on board, use our lab at night, come
to our evening Tech Talks, attend formal classes or use any of our
in-house resources. It's all at your disposal. Where else can you
crash a system just for kicks?

I'm sure that's fun and games for someone who is not the veteran of
high-availability shops that I am. I personally have some killer resources
at home because I'm such a geek, and even run my own Internet services
because I never recovered from the years of ISP work that I did, and don't
trust someone else's hands all over my sendmail and whatnot. I'm a
sysadmin to the bone, and I've already _fixed_ more systems than Taos has
in their lab to "crash... just for kicks."

I know Taos is making money. But I have to conclude that you're not making
money by having skilled system administrators in your ranks, or you'd be
interested in keeping me, and others like me, around. And that's all fine
and good, I suppose, for someone who's brand new to the industry or who
works in sales. It's not so good for the career sysadmin with solid
skills, for the real veteran who can do arcane things like "performance
tuning."

So apart from a change in focus, what has Taos done to upset me? Wow,
where to begin! I recognize that I was the first pregnant contractor in
Taos' employ, and that I should have expected a few hitches here and there
as things got figured out. And I did. But I also expected Taos to work
with me, a committed employee with considerable skills and a good
reputation in her own right, as evidenced by the fact that I never went to
an assignment where I didn't already know someone, or by the fact that a
recruiter at a large system administration conference spoke with dozens of
people who said, "Hey, I know someone who works for Taos," and mentioned
my name. What I didn't expect was for Taos to fight me every step of the
way, making every tiny thing about ten times the hassle it needed to be. I
didn't expect misinformation about my legal rights, or misrepresentation
of Taos' obligations under federal and state law. I never expected to be
receiving my first check for meager disability insurance only after my
disability was over, thanks to Taos' ineptitude with their books. I
expected the same good faith back that I gave, and that's not what
happened. In retrospect, I probably should have quit in about October and
spared myself the misery of trying to keep dealing with Taos.

Any way you look at it, during the time that Taos paid me a salary, I
earned Taos money. Even if Taos didn't see the value in really being there
for an employee who thought she had a commitment from her employer, I'm
surprised the dollar value of the time I spent in the field were
meaningless.

For the record, should Taos ever have another pregnant employee, you
should note that 12 weeks of leave, unpaid, is required of you by federal
law, and that being the case, you should no more refer to it as a
company-paid benefit than you should lighted fire exit signs or a
sprinkler system. You don't do it, you don't do business. That's the law.
You should also note that in California, a pregnant woman is entitled to 4
weeks of disability leave before her due date, and generally 6 or 8 weeks
following that depending on whether or not there were complications. And,
per the California Family Rights Act, when disability ends, a new mother
may take up to 4 months of additional unpaid leave. You should also note
that you do need to report your employees' earnings to the State of
California. Were it not for [name elided]'s efforts, I and my family
would have gone without food for the first month after my son was born.

I honestly hope that fixing these things in Taos' collective mind will
help whoever happens to be your next pregnant employee. I can't say
anything to you about what you choose to have as a business model, how you
try to widen the margin between what your employees get and what you get
out of each gross dollar, or how you represent yourselves in your sales
literature, other than that I cannot recommend anyone I know go to work
for Taos, or contract with Taos for skilled technical work -- but I do
hope that I can have helped, in some small way, with Taos learning to cope
with a very real issue facing a company of any size, namely that of how to
handle a pregnant employee.

There are countless recommendations that I could make, but I despair of
making them for lack of faith that they would see any use. The bottom
line, for me, is that as I started in to return to work this morning, I
realized I had no confidence in Taos to provide me with either work I find
meaningful, useful, enjoyable, or work which is well-suited to someone who
cares about her family, or for that matter is aged beyond the point of
still being someone else's dependent, and I have no faith whatsoever that
in the event I should need to work with Taos again to deal with any kind
of issue, that Taos would extend to me the good faith I always strove to
give. I can see that I am of no value to Taos and I prefer not to continue
in a work relationship where that is the case, as I well know there are
plenty of places which would value someone such as myself. I find upon
reflection that I would prefer to seek out such an organization, rather
than to make one more effort to deal with Taos further.

That being said, I believe I have a pager which belongs to you.

Sincerely,

Abby Franquemont <ab...@foad.org>


--
Abby Franquemont Nothing cures insomnia like the realization
J. Random BOFH that it's time to get up. --Fortune program

Timothy J. Miller

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Apr 14, 1998, 3:00:00 AM4/14/98
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ab...@ucan.foad.org (Abby Franquemont) writes:

> How about to give a scenario and ask
> how it would be approached? How about "When you need to know something and
> you don't know it, what do you do? Where do you find the answer, and how?"
> Those are things that are much more telling about whether or not someone
> is a good system administrator.

This is what got me through my interview with Advantis (when I
was with Advantis). The interviewer (who became my team lead and is now
my manager) basically asked me "sendmail is broken thusly, what do you
do?" Answer: "Do you have a copy of ORA's Sendmail book, or should I go
get mine?"

Another one was "the system crashes during boot, with this error;
what do you do?" Answer: "Where are the hardcopy manuals, or another
working system just like it?"

Other than that, kudos for forcing them through the maternity
issues; it *will* make things easier for the next person.

--
Cerebus <tmi...@ibm.net>

Paul Tomblin

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Apr 14, 1998, 3:00:00 AM4/14/98
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In a previous article, ab...@foad.org said:
[snip]

%s/Taos/CTG/g
g/maternity/d
s/Abby Franquemont/Paul Tomblin/


--
Paul Tomblin, ptom...@xcski.com.
"You're one of those condescending Unix computer users!"
"Here's a nickel, kid. Get yourself a real computer" - Dilbert.

Justin Dossey

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Apr 14, 1998, 3:00:00 AM4/14/98
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On one Tue, 14 Apr 1998 18:52:27 GMT,
Paul Tomblin <ptom...@xcski.com> did enter unto the VDT:

No, we don't need a Sysadmin's union.

--
::::::::Justin Dossey:::::: SysAdmin-Univ. of Oklahoma Computer Science
:http://zero.ou.edu/~dossey Contractor-Lucent Technologies, Inc::::::::
There's no wrong way, to eat a Rhesus. -the internet oracle

das

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Apr 14, 1998, 3:00:00 AM4/14/98
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In article <slrn6j7iqe...@zero.cs.ou.edu>,
Justin Dossey <dos...@ou.edu> wrote:
[context? Whozzat?]

>No, we don't need a Sysadmin's union.

There are some folks in VBC trying to start an internal branch of
SAGE. This has been vetoed by the PHBs because everyone knows
Guild = Union.
--
Debbie the Gruesome d...@halcyon.com
"I'm not crazy, I've just been in a very bad mood for 40 years."
_Steel Magnolias_
* Killfiling idiots since 1989 * * This post copyrighted 1998 *

Joe Thompson

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Apr 15, 1998, 3:00:00 AM4/15/98
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Ah, time to share my resignation letter to rlc.net.

BTW: Notice? A courtesy you say? Feh. A courtesy only. After I got the
contract for my current position, I declined to give notice, on the grounds
that were I to stay on until I were terminated, no such consideration would
have been shown me, as my PHB made abundantly clear on several occasions.
One time he threatened to fire me in front of my assistant; that was the
day I went home after work, updated my resume, and started job hunting...
early November I'd say.

-----

Dear [snip]:

Over approximately the past 4 months of my employment at Red Light
Communications the demands made on me have become increasingly unreasonable
and the work environment less and less hospitable. In particular I refer
to the following:

* demands for daily status reports
* demands that I clock in and clock out, despite my full-time salaried status
* demands that I sacrifice my personal time, without compensation, to work late
* accusations that I take excessively long (> 1 hour) lunch breaks, when in fact
the average is approximately 30 minutes
* accusations that I take as many as 10 personal business calls per day, when in
fact the average is approximately 1 per day
* accusations of incompetence where my diagnosis does not suit the customer (I
refer specifically to the [customer] situation)
* the tendency to drop any project on me as a last resort (I refer specifically
to the emergency repairs on the Tango/Butler[0] system during your vacation,
the configuration of the second Enterprise hub, and the setup and
configuration of the RADIUS server)

I find this environment personally and professionally insulting. If I
cannot be trusted to do my job, then I cannot do it effectively. My yearly
salary, if broken into 40-hour work weeks, yields $8.65 per hour. This is
not a suitable wage for the job I am being expected to do, especially
factoring in overtime hours. In particular I find it significant that
items 1 and 2 were demanded of no salaried employees but myself.

Finally, I do not work at the point of a gun. I will not stay one minute
longer than I must in a position where I am told that because I choose to
use my personal time as such, rather than as uncompensated work time, I
should fear for my job security; where I am expected to have a solution to
every problem or face charges of incompetence; and where I am told to have
something done by an unreasonable deadline or face termination.

I have no quarrels with other employees; in particular [snip2] has always
been helpful and [snip3] has done a great deal recently to keep the basic
account services off me so that I may concentrate on more important issues.
It is with apologies particularly to them, and to the rest of the Red Light
staff, that I resign my position at Red Light Communications, effective
immediately. My personal effects have been cleared from the office, and my
personal files have been copied from my workstation.

[snip request to switch Internet account to regular billing via credit
card, and details thereof, which amounted to, "Don't touch these three
accounts, here's the card number."]

-----

They couldn't be bothered to bill me for the three accounts I, my roommate,
and my friend Stacey used. Well, if they don't want my business, I guess
they don't want any from anyone else I know...

They lost three accounts outright in the two weeks following my
resignation, and I've prevented several signups since then, simply because
of that. If I can't access the network, I certainly can't recommend it to
folks trusting me to find them an access provider, now can I?

The customer mentioned in point six had a situation where their phone
system, to connect to its trunk lines, had some little devices called ATAs
(I think) on the lines that were preventing connections to digital dialin
servers such as our new USR hubs. It would fail to establish carrier...
you could hear it stepping all the way down to 300 baud and giving up.
They talked to the phone company, who supposedly tested the lines and
declared them fine. I stuck by my diagnosis and finally, after several
days, wrestled from the phone company tech an admission that, indeed, the
line had these little devices called ATAs, and because the ATAs were so
old, they would never be able to get above 2400 baud connections, to
*anywhere*. In fact they were rarely able to connect at over 1200 baud
even to analog modems.

The final nail in the coffin was when I was unable to connect to
Cornerstone (a former employer), who also had digital servers, but of a
different type. My connection to UVa's dialin pool was flawless, although
2400-baud flawless.

All the customer kept saying was, "The phone company can't *possibly* be
wrong, they're the PHONE COMPANY, they KNOW how these things work." My
PHB, on hearing my explanation (before we knew about the ATAs), said, "I
don't want to hear about the phone lines. It's not the phone lines. You
just can't figure it out so you're trying to pass the blame. I bet I could
go out there right now, and get them hooked up in 15 minutes."

There were a lot of other situations with similar outbursts from him. And
point two was a direct result of his belief in the truth of point four.
And the bit about "uncompensated work time" was due to his incredulity at
my having the gall to leave at my scheduled quitting time. Imagine, he
tells me I work till 6:00 and I leave at 6:00. -- Joe

[0] Tango Merchant web commerce system, using Butler SQL for database services.
It *looked* horrible, to say nothing of what it was like to try and actually
*use* it.
--
Joe Thompson | By sending commercial | Tech support is a fine
Charlottesville VA | e-mail, you agree to | art which once mastered,
Expert PC service | pay US$1000.00/item. | ensures loss of sanity.
http://kensey.home.mindspring.com/

Samuel S Thomas

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Apr 15, 1998, 3:00:00 AM4/15/98
to

Bravo!!

So, does this mean you're recovering, or will you be hitting the
streets soon, in search of a relapse?

Cheers,
Sam


Michael Turner

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Apr 15, 1998, 3:00:00 AM4/15/98
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Congradulations on your recovery from Taos. I left The Abusers Of
Sysadmins after a stint doing QC at cisco[1]. Not quite the ideal
thing for a person who would rather be fighting off crashes[2].

A friend of mine left Taos after getting stuck at S** for several
months and after many requests to get moved elsewhere he left.
He was asked if he left because he wasn't moved around enough or
wasn't paid highly enough, to which he replied 'What did you hope
I left for?'

Ahh, the joys.


[1] Clicking in netscrape 8h a day testing[3]
[2] I'm not recovered yet.
[3] Brain numbing.


--Michael Turner
(contracting through Tek Systems)
mtu...@csd.sgi.com
#include <std/disclaimer.h>

OS2 User

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Apr 16, 1998, 3:00:00 AM4/16/98
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Abby Franquemont (ab...@ucan.foad.org) wrote:

Absolutely the best letter of resignation I have _ever_ seen.
Not that I hope to use it as a template, you understand, but
I have only praise for her eloquence, her ability to identify
the issues, and her keeping a professional tone in the face of
what certainly qualifies as severe provocation.

Brava!

--

Mike Andrews
Mike.A...@fd9ns01.okladot.state.ok.us


Nir Soffer

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Apr 18, 1998, 3:00:00 AM4/18/98
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OS2 User (dsda...@DSDAPC03.okladot.state.ok.us) wrote:

: Abby Franquemont (ab...@ucan.foad.org) wrote:
:
: Absolutely the best letter of resignation I have _ever_ seen.
: Not that I hope to use it as a template, you understand, but
: I have only praise for her eloquence, her ability to identify
: the issues, and her keeping a professional tone in the face of
: what certainly qualifies as severe provocation.

What's wrong with simply writing a:

'You suck. I quit. Get lost, I hope you rot in hell.
Thank you.'

letter? That would still satisfy the notice requirement of most contracts,
won't it?

Or is there some subtle point requiring to pointificate on your reasons
and motives that I'm not aware of?
Regards,
Nir.

--
Nir Soffer AKA ScorpioS. scor...@cs.huji.ac.il
http://www.cs.huji.ac.il/~scorpios/
"If Electricity comes from Electrons, does Morality come from morons?"
Mail me with subject 'get pgp key' for my PGP Public Key.

Ingvar bah!

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Apr 18, 1998, 3:00:00 AM4/18/98
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scor...@bofh.co.il (Nir Soffer) writes:

>
> OS2 User (dsda...@DSDAPC03.okladot.state.ok.us) wrote:
> : Abby Franquemont (ab...@ucan.foad.org) wrote:
> :
> : Absolutely the best letter of resignation I have _ever_ seen.
> : Not that I hope to use it as a template, you understand, but
> : I have only praise for her eloquence, her ability to identify
> : the issues, and her keeping a professional tone in the face of
> : what certainly qualifies as severe provocation.
>
> What's wrong with simply writing a:
>
> 'You suck. I quit. Get lost, I hope you rot in hell.
> Thank you.'
>
> letter? That would still satisfy the notice requirement of most contracts,
> won't it?
>
> Or is there some subtle point requiring to pointificate on your reasons
> and motives that I'm not aware of?

Possibly a hope to make the world (or at least Taos) a better place
for just-became and will-soon-be mothers.

//Ingvar
--
Bah!

Paul Tomblin

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Apr 18, 1998, 3:00:00 AM4/18/98
to

In a previous article, afc...@texas.net (Al Castanoli) said:
>Thanks to Abby for redirecting my interest in Taos months back,
>and thanks to Paul... I *did* have an appointment for a job interview
>with ctg.

Not only are CTG scumbags, but they've recently become email spamming
scumbags.

Abby Franquemont

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Apr 18, 1998, 3:00:00 AM4/18/98
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In article <6h18ns$qur$1...@news.onramp.net>,

Samuel S Thomas <mas...@lart.net> wrote:
>
>Bravo!!
>
>So, does this mean you're recovering, or will you be hitting the
>streets soon, in search of a relapse?

I is a "software developer" now. My new employers were a pleasure to
interview with, even, and have the benefit of having been tested for
some months by my main squeeze, who they have been very good to, and
all that kinda thing. Plus they're a bastion of clue, as is even
evidenced by new employee documentation that includes phrases like,
"Now figure out how you're supposed to get e-mail, and fix all your
environment variables so everything works."

I'm expecting an interesting period of adjustment to not being the
sysadmin... though of course, I sysadmin at home in my spare time
like some kind of total ex-ISP-working dork.

Joe Thompson

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Apr 19, 1998, 3:00:00 AM4/19/98
to

In article <6hbhok$mpv$1...@ucan.foad.org>, ab...@foad.org wrote:

> I'm expecting an interesting period of adjustment to not being the
> sysadmin... though of course, I sysadmin at home in my spare time
> like some kind of total ex-ISP-working dork.

On behalf of ex-ISP-working dorks everywhere, I call forth the Inquisitor
of Shub-Internet[0] to hunt you down and adjust you[1] accordingly. -- Joe

[0] ObShub-Internet: Ia! Ia!
[1] Note that I did not say "your attitude"...

Melody Yoon

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Apr 19, 1998, 3:00:00 AM4/19/98
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In article <6h8vbg$gn7$1...@news.huji.ac.il>,
Nir Soffer <scor...@bofh.co.il> wrote:
[cut]

>
>What's wrong with simply writing a:
>
>'You suck. I quit. Get lost, I hope you rot in hell.
> Thank you.'
>
>letter? That would still satisfy the notice requirement of most contracts,
>won't it?

Yes, this would generally cover most contracts. It would probably burn some
bridges, which generally isn't always a good thing.[1]

>Or is there some subtle point requiring to pointificate on your reasons
>and motives that I'm not aware of?

Generally, but leaving a detailed letter, you can explain exactly why you
think working at a site is no longer appropriate. A letter of the type above
makes you look like a clueless moron that's just complaining and being
a prima donna generally [2]. This makes you look childish also, which isn't
a good thing when you're working for a company where you're admining a
multi-million dollar network.

Now some people probably could care less [3] since they're still in
Academia [4] and think the corporate world is a joke. To those,
this Post Isn't For You(tm).

Abby, if you're still reading this thread, I sent you email. Good luck
on your future endeavors. [5] :)

Mel

[1] It makes you feel good as hell though sometimes. :)

[2] Being a prima donna isn't always bad. You just need to know when it's
appropriate.

[3] If you don't care, why are you reading this post?

[4] *sigh* I miss it

[5] No reason this is here really. I'm just kind of drunk at the moment and
think this is funny.
--
Melody Lynn Yoon mel...@best.com | Graduate - '97 MSF
Senior SA - Taos Mountain Software, Santa Clara, CA | NRA Member
-- I do not accept commercial, unsolicited email
-- http://www.best.com/~melodyy/spam.policy.html

Simon Slavin

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Apr 19, 1998, 3:00:00 AM4/19/98
to

In article <6h8vbg$gn7$1...@news.huji.ac.il>,
scor...@bofh.co.il (Nir Soffer) wrote:

> OS2 User (dsda...@DSDAPC03.okladot.state.ok.us) wrote:
> : Abby Franquemont (ab...@ucan.foad.org) wrote:
> :

> : Absolutely the best letter of resignation I have _ever_ seen.[snip]


>
> What's wrong with simply writing a:
>
> 'You suck. I quit. Get lost, I hope you rot in hell.
> Thank you.'

The desire for another job ? The need to show your current job in
your CV ? If you write something that short there's a chance that
personnel will actually read it, understand it, and remember it
when a request for a reference comes in.

PS: Interview tomorrow. I'm crossing body-parts I'd forgotten I had.

Simon.
--
Simon Slavin -- Computer Contractor | DAMN WHO MESSED WITH MY CAPSLOCK
http://www.hearsay.demon.co.uk | KEY that's better. -- Geoff Lane
Check email address for UBE-guard. | <e8864...@swirl.mcc.ac.uk>
My s/ware deletes unread >3 UBEs/day.| Junk email not welcome at this site.

Kai Henningsen

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Apr 19, 1998, 3:00:00 AM4/19/98
to

mel...@best.com (Melody Yoon) wrote on 19.04.98 in <6hcbcd$k38$1...@shell4.ba.best.com>:

> Now some people probably could care less [3] since they're still in
> Academia [4] and think the corporate world is a joke. To those,

Well, it is. So is Academia.

Kai
--
http://www.westfalen.de/private/khms/
"... by God I *KNOW* what this network is for, and you can't have it."
- Russ Allbery (r...@stanford.edu)

Heather Garvey

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Apr 19, 1998, 3:00:00 AM4/19/98
to

Melody Yoon <mel...@best.com> wrote:

>Nir Soffer <scor...@bofh.co.il> wrote:
>>
>>What's wrong with simply writing a:
>>'You suck. I quit. Get lost, I hope you rot in hell.
>>Or is there some subtle point requiring to pointificate on your reasons
>>and motives that I'm not aware of?
>
>Generally, but leaving a detailed letter, you can explain exactly why you
>think working at a site is no longer appropriate. A letter of the type above
>makes you look like a clueless moron that's just complaining and being
>a prima donna generally [2].

Also, her struggle with the pregnancy leave should be documented,
for the sake of the other poor schmucks who are staying, and the poor
schmucks who will inevitably follow.
We're hemmorhaging people right now, to the tune of one a week
for the last year (with a slight lull for the holidays). Recently, we've
begun doubling up. :P Management won't listen to us, but HR listens to
those who make exit interviews. If you're leaving behind friends, you want
to help them out. Once your problems are recorded, management is limited
in how much it can lie about conditions to both their staff and HR.
Eventually, if HR gets enough of similar complaints, they will start
to question. The only way your suffering can help those behind you is
if you state it clearly and politely; otherwise, they will throw it out
as the rantings of a troublemaker.

-- Heather the Surly

--
Heather Garvey (ra...@xnet.com) | "I can't have this on my conscience."
INTJ and BOFH | "You don't have a conscience."
The Lady with the LART | "What I meant was, I don't feel like it."
http://www.xnet.com/~raven/ | -- Daria and Quinn Morgendorffer

Matthew Hunt

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Apr 19, 1998, 3:00:00 AM4/19/98
to

In article <6s9hy...@khms.westfalen.de>,
Kai Henningsen <kaih=6s9hy...@khms.westfalen.de> wrote:

> > Now some people probably could care less [3] since they're still in
> > Academia [4] and think the corporate world is a joke. To those,
>
> Well, it is. So is Academia.

But the punchline is different?

Vadim Vygonets

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Apr 20, 1998, 3:00:00 AM4/20/98
to

Nir Soffer (scor...@bofh.co.il) wrote:
> What's wrong with simply writing a:

> 'You suck. I quit. Get lost, I hope you rot in hell.

> Thank you.'

> letter? That would still satisfy the notice requirement of most contracts,
> won't it?

> Or is there some subtle point requiring to pointificate on your reasons


> and motives that I'm not aware of?

This one pointificates both the reasons and the motives, so I don't
know what can be wrong with it. It's even polite -- it has the
"Thank you" in the end.

Vadik.

--
Real Users know your home telephone number.

Eugene Mosburg

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Apr 22, 1998, 3:00:00 AM4/22/98
to

In article <6hbhok$mpv$1...@ucan.foad.org>,
Abby Franquemont <ab...@foad.org> wrote:

[ ... ]

>I'm expecting an interesting period of adjustment to not being the
>sysadmin... though of course, I sysadmin at home in my spare time
>like some kind of total ex-ISP-working dork.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
I resemble that remark ... except for the "ex". <bleah>

>--
>Abby Franquemont Nothing cures insomnia like the realization
>J. Random BOFH that it's time to get up. --Fortune program

Gene
__
The sysadmin has graciously declined to cast you headlong
into a pit of rabid wombats. Please bear this in mind when
composing your message or request.

Abby Franquemont

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Apr 22, 1998, 3:00:00 AM4/22/98
to

In article <6hgc9c$5v9$1...@blackice.winternet.com>,

Eric Pederson <er...@winternet.com> wrote:
>In article <6hbhok$mpv$1...@ucan.foad.org>,
>Abby Franquemont <ab...@foad.org> wrote:
>>
>>I'm expecting an interesting period of adjustment to not being the
>>sysadmin... though of course, I sysadmin at home in my spare time
> ^^^^^ ^^^^
>If you still have any of this, you won't for long.

Right, well, okay. What passes for it then.

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