arthritis caused by diseased teeth, etc.

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Barbara Endfinger

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Nov 18, 1998, 3:00:00 AM11/18/98
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Shakeman, you posted in here with the heading "arthritis caused by
diseased teeth" well, I just went into the diabetes ng and you posted
the same article but changed it to "diabetes caused by diseased teeth".
I wasn't aware that diseased teeth would cause either one.
Barbara
Ga


sha...@my-dejanews.com

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Nov 19, 1998, 3:00:00 AM11/19/98
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Dear alt.support.arthritis readers:

In the 6th Century B.C., the physician to King Ashurbanipal of
Assyria advised the king to have his diseased teeth pulled in order
to relieve his (rheumatic) aches and pains.

This same knowledge, known as the concept of focal infection,
was also responsible for physician Benjamin Rush's ascendence to
the top of his profession in the post-revolutionary U.S. Within
weeks following implementation of Rush's recommendation that their
diseased teeth be extracted, a number of severely crippled
arthritis victims were once again able to walk without assistance.

In the early years of the current century, this concept was
brought to new levels of sophistication, and irrefutable
validation, by the great works of Frank Billings and his fine
associates. Billings, President of the AMA in 1902 and generally
acknowledged as the father of modern American Medical Education,
regarded his work with focal infection as his greatest
accomplishment, as reflected in his 1916 book FOCAL INFECTION.
Billings early work on the subject involved investigation of the
relation between diseases of the oral foci, particularly in and around teeth,
and arthritis.

Many fine physicians and dentists worked with Billings and/or
followed in his footsteps. In particular, bacteriologist E.C.
Rosenow, who had worked with Billings for more than a decade,
subsequently went on to serve nearly three decades with the Mayo
Foundation as head of experimental bacteriology. Rosenow and
associates went far beyond merely fulfilling Koch's postulates for
a wide range of diseases, establishing for all time the definite
role of infections in oral foci (teeth and tonsils). Former AMA
President (in 1934) Walter Bierring asserted in 1938, in JAMA, that
it is safe to assume that the monumental works of Rosenow and
Billings et. al. would become the medical guide of the future.

For more information on the works of Billings and Rosenow, as
well as an overview of the tragic circumstances that have
temporarily obscured their grand legacy, please visit <a href =
"http://www.instituteofscience.com">www.InstituteOfScience.com</a>

Best wishes and kind regards,

Sincerely yours,
S. Hale Shakman
Executive Director
INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE
P.O. Box 382
Santa Monica, CA 90406-0382

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Don Kirkman

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Nov 19, 1998, 3:00:00 AM11/19/98
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It seems to me I heard somewhere that Barbara Endfinger wrote in article
<29091-36...@newsd-112.bryant.webtv.net>:

Good catch, Barbara. Mr. Shakman's doctorate, according to his Web
page, is in Religion, his background work was with the Department of
State in Asia in matters of medicine and public health, and a link on
the page seems to imply (or state outright) that AIDS is also caused by
oral focal disease. The statement on the home page strongly suggests
that the Institute of Science exists largely to 'debunk' contemporary
medical views.
--
Don

sha...@my-dejanews.com

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Dec 2, 1998, 3:00:00 AM12/2/98
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In article <29091-36...@newsd-112.bryant.webtv.net>,

Bendf...@webtv.net (Barbara Endfinger) wrote:
> Shakeman, you posted in here with the heading "arthritis caused by
> diseased teeth" well, I just went into the diabetes ng and you posted
> the same article but changed it to "diabetes caused by diseased teeth".
> I wasn't aware that diseased teeth would cause either one.
> Barbara
>
>
>
Dear Barbara Endfinger,

Yes, the articles are largely the same, but there are some differences. In
particular, the diabetes post listed a number of citations in which Rosenow
specifically discussed diabetes. This was not done in the case of arthritis,
insofar as the relation between diseased teeth and arthritis is more widely
known and has been for more than 2500 years.

Until becoming involved with these studies, I likewise was not aware of the
common origin of these diseases. Recognition of the oral focal concept seems
to go in cycles, but it has been pretty common knowledge throughout virtually
all of written medical history. Here's a couple links with some related
information: <a href = "http://www.zip.com.au/~rgammal/FocalInfection.html">
Focal Infection</a> <a href = "http://www.altcorp.com/articles.htm"> Articles
List</a>

With kind regards,
S. Hale Shakman

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sha...@my-dejanews.com

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Dec 2, 1998, 3:00:00 AM12/2/98
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In article <366182ee...@news.newsguy.com>,
new...@abac.com wrote:
> Good catch, Barbara. ... The statement on the home page suggests the

> Institute of Science exists largely to 'debunk' > contemporary medical views.


Dear Don Kirkman:

Thank you for taking the time to visit InstituteOfScience.com and post your
observations. However, the suggestion that "the Institute Of Science exists
largely to debunk contemporary views" is not correct. Rather, it was
established in the first instance as a dba in order to publish materials
pertaining to the history of autologous medicine and the works of E.C.
Rosenow & his associates, this in direct response to requests by dental and
medical professionals to make this information available in a timely fashion.

The name, Institute of Science, was chosen so as to also encompass the subject
of hydration and related works of L.H. Flint.

In the light of Rosenow's work, such (contemporary) latter-day theories, such
as the so-called auto-immune disease theory, is shown to be unnecessary. The
same is true, relative to the light of Flint's work, of chemistry's
ion-channels theory, and physics's protein jump hypothesis.

Regarding the suggestion that AIDS is an oral focal disease, this is the
unavoidable conclusion that follows from study of the historical focal
infection literature and the latest information on AIDS. This is discussed
in greater detail in the AIDS article at <a href =
"http://www.instituteofscience.com"> InstituteOfScience.com</a>.

This is not saying that the causative organisms originated in the oral focus
spontaneously. Rather, harmful or potentially-harmful strains of organisms
that have gained access to the bloodstream, however this access came about,
have a tendency to locate in and colonize, in the first instance, places
where the body is already wounded (e.g., commonly and prominently, oral
foci). Such colonies may cause a local reaction that demands their removal,
or they may tend to continually leak offspring into the bloodstream causing
secondary infections elsewhere.

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