Rodenberry and fanfic?

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J. Juls

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May 28, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/28/98
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Just wondering...does anybody know what Gene Rodenberry thought of fanfic?
Loved it? Worst scourge of the Earth and blatant copyright infringement?
Never heard of it?

Julie

Randy Landers

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May 28, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/28/98
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When in doubt, go to the source...

From Star Trek: The New Voyages
March 1976
published by Bantam Books
p. ix - x: "Foreward by Gene Roddenberry"

Those of us who were involved in making Star Trek are proud of our
creation. There are things we might have done differently, and
certainly there are things we might have done better, but we tried
always to make it the very best we could under the circumstances of
the television system, budget, time, fatigue, personal talent, and
other restrictions facing us.

Star Trek was not a one-man job, although it was something that was
very personal to me--my own statement of who and what this species of
ours really is, where we are now, and something of where we may be
going. I have always been particularly grateful that Star Trek became
an equally personal and meaningful thing to so many others. This
includes those who made their own invaluable contributions to the
show--from the stars and episode writers and production staff to
technicians and crew of the set. It was bone-crushing, exhausting work
that often drained every drop of creative juice and plain stamina we
had. And we wouldn't have missed it for the world.

There was a kind of magic on the set in those days. The Enterprise,
its crew, and its universe became very real to us; it became our own
affirmation that the human adventure is far from over and, in fact,
may be only in its beginnings.

Certainly the loveliest happening of all for us was the face that so
many others began to feel the same way. Television viewers by the
millions began to take Star Trek to heart as their own personal
optimistic view of the human condition and future. They fought for the
show, honored it, cherished it, wrote about it--and have continued to
do their lvel best to make certain that it will live again.

It will.

You know, it was our old joke that, contrary to the opinion of various
network executives, we thought that there must be an intelligent life
form out there beyond the television tube. But we never expected
anything like the outpouring of comments, interest, and affection that
occurred.

We were particularly amazed when thousands, then tens of thousands of
people began creating their own personal Star Trek adventures.
Stories, and paintings, and sculptures, and cookbooks. And songs, and
poems, and fashions. And more. The list is still growing. It took some
time for us to fully understand and appreciate what these people were
saying. Eventually we realized that these is no more profound way in
which people could express what Star Trek has meant to them than by
creating their own very personal Star Trek things.

Because I am a writer, it was their Star Trek stories that especially
gratified me. I have seen these writings in dog-eared notebooks of ans
who didn't look old enough to spell "cat." I have seen them in
meticulously produced fanzines, complete with excellent artwork. Some
of it has even been done by professional writers, and much of it has
come from those clearly on their way to becoming professional writers.
Best of all, all of it was plainly done with love.

It is now a source of great joy for me to see their view of Star Trek,
their new Star Trek stories, reaching professional publication here. I
want to thank these writers, congratulate them on their efforts, and
wish them good fortune on these and further of their voyages into
other times and dimensions. Good writing is always a very personal
thing and comes from the writer's deepest self. Star Trek was that
kind of writing for me, and it mioves me profoundly that it has also
become so much a part of the inner self of so many other people.

Viewers like this have proved that there is a warm, loving, and
intelligent life form out there--and that it may even be the dominant
species on this planet.

That is the highest compliment and the greatest repayment that they
could give us.

-- Gene Roddenberry

Randy Landers
ORION PRESS
----------------------------------------------------------------------
---
For 11MB of quality Classic Trek fan fiction, go to:
http://www.mindspring.com/~randylanders/archives/oaindex.html
For 2MB of quality Next Gen fan fiction, go to:
http://www.mindspring.com/~lindamarcusky/eridani/index.html
For information on ORION PRESS and its fanzines, go to:
http://www.mindspring.com/~randylanders


Randy Landers

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May 28, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/28/98
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BTW, it was this single book which launched me into fan fiction, first
by being published by various fanzines in the mid 1970's, and later in
1979, to launch my own fanzine. Over 150 zines later, and I still have
no regrets.

Tim

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May 28, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/28/98
to J. Juls


J. Juls wrote:

GR supported "Fanzines" which were mostly fic and art (with the occasional
episode review) qitue vocally.

However, he disliked the novels after the publication of (I think it was
"Triangle" by Marsjeck and Culbreath) because it had a bit of k/s (about 30
pages) in the first printing. After a fan wrote him and told him about it, he
had all copies of the book recalled and the book was eventually reissued
without the material in question. (Today, a copy of the original book with
the offensive material intacked is worth quite a sum of $$$)

After that he hired Richard Arnold to review all published ST fiction to make
sure that it idn't happen again and to make sure that the books were kept
"canonical." (Berman had him fired after the deaht or GR.)

As for fanfic, I'm not sure he ever made a specific satement on the subject.
I think he'd like a lot of it (the cannonical stuff). However it is a safe
bet that he would dispise the m/m stuff.

As for copyrite, GR didn't care much about that (viloated it himself regularly
throuout the 70's by selling scripts w/o permission or reemburseing the
authors). Paramount did not vigorously go after copyrite finringement intil
Viacom bought htem and GR was long dead.

--
Sincerely,

Tim Ryberg
STQCC List Creator/Moderator
ry...@computerpro.com
==============================================
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They are both up but still under construction.

NOTICE: I do not buy things over the NET. Please
do NOT SPAM Me! I will report you to your server
for sending nuisance mail. They are required by
the FCC to cancel your mail account upon recept
of such a report. To date I have recieved at least
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.

unread,
May 29, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/29/98
to

In article <6kkt2t$o60$1...@camel15.mindspring.com>, Randy Landers
<randyl...@mindspring.com> writes

>BTW, it was this single book which launched me into fan fiction, first
>by being published by various fanzines in the mid 1970's, and later in
>1979, to launch my own fanzine. Over 150 zines later, and I still have
>no regrets.
>

I love fanfiction as well and am quite active in the fandom, although
mainly the German fandom.

Recently one of the largest German Star Trek clubs published a long
article about New Frontier I wrote with the result that quite a few
people asked me if there will be printed New Frontier fanfiction as
well. At least in Germany fanzines are quite popular.

Because New Frontier is a special case and I would love to find printed
New Frontier fiction one day I simply asked Peter David. This is what he
said:

****


Baerbel Haddrell asks:

>Would you or Pocket Books mind seeing New Frontier
>fanfiction in print?
>
>

It's no skin off my nose. I wouldn't read it for fear of overlap. But
I don't
care if fans produce NF fanfic.

Then again, I'm not the copyright holder, so that's not my legal call to
make.
Write to John Ordover (ORD...@aol.com) and ask him.

PAD


****


I have done that and as soon as I get a reply I will post it here as
well.


>
>Randy Landers
>ORION PRESS


Baerbel Haddrell

.

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May 29, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/29/98
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In article <M9tn9HAT...@trekdata.demon.co.uk>, .
<Em...@trekdata.demon.co.uk> writes

>
>Then again, I'm not the copyright holder, so that's not my legal call to
>make.
>Write to John Ordover (ORD...@aol.com) and ask him.
>
>PAD
>
>
>****

This was John Ordover`s first reply:


All fan fiction of any kind is an illegal copyright violation. That's
really
the only answer I can give.:)


and this his second:


Correct.:)


In a message dated 5/29/98 11:22:39, you wrote:

<<In other words - there is no legal difference between fanfiction about
Classic, TNG, DS9, Voyager or New Frontier? Is that correct? >>


That was the answer I was hoping for. I hope that there will be New
Frontier fanzines available in time. I would certainly love to read
them!


Baerbel Haddrell


Randy Landers

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May 29, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/29/98
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Baerbel:

FYI: Peter David also wrote a lot of fan fiction in his day. Mary
Bloemker published a lot of it, although I seem to recall it was more
of the Gary Seven variety.

BTW: Asking Ordover about fan fiction is like asking the President
about Newt Gingrich.

--

Randy Landers

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May 29, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/29/98
to

Hmmm. Actually, we haven't gotten a single New Frontiers submission of
which I'm aware.

Randy Landers

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May 29, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/29/98
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Jowalsvi wrote:
<<NOTE: THIS IS JUST MY OPINION. I don't think that Gene Roddenberry
had an opinion one way or another. He wasn't really exposed to it all
that much -- after all, during his lifetime
the Internet wasn't available to the public, if it was even a reality
then! (Give me a break; I'm only 17 -- I don't know when the 'Net
first became popular!) The only way he could have read fanfic is if
the fans themselves sent it to him. I think that he'd see it as a
bonus -- more publicity for the shows. That's just my opinion,
though. Anyone (who is the same age or older then Roddenberry would
be now) care to comment?>>

Actually, the first fanzines were widely circulated as early as 1968.
Go read STAR TREK LIVES. It has a whole chapter devoted to the fan
fiction that developed from the original series. Before there was the
Internet, there was Interstat, a monthly fanzine consisted of
discussion. Before there was the ASC, there were fanzines (heck, what
am I talking about? I _still_ produce them!) with plenty of fiction
and stuff.

--

Randy Landers

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May 29, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/29/98
to

JoAnna says

<<. Anyone (who is the same age or older then Roddenberry would be
now) care to comment?>>

Well, I certainly ain't his age. I'm only 36. But I had my first story
published in Roberta Rogow's fanzine GRIP at the tender age of 17. :)

jowa...@sendit.sendit.nodak.edu

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May 30, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/30/98
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In article <6kkh57$bpo$2...@nntp3.interaccess.com>,

"J. Juls" <jj...@interaccess.com> wrote:
>
> Just wondering...does anybody know what Gene Rodenberry thought of fanfic?
> Loved it? Worst scourge of the Earth and blatant copyright infringement?
> Never heard of it?
>
> Julie
>
>

NOTE: THIS IS JUST MY OPINION.

I don't think that Gene Roddenberry had an opinion one way or another.
He wasn't really exposed to it all that much -- after all, during his lifetime
the Internet wasn't available to the public, if it was even a reality then!
(Give me a break; I'm only 17 -- I don't know when the 'Net first became
popular!) The only way he could have read fanfic is if the fans themselves
sent it to him. I think that he'd see it as a bonus -- more publicity for the

shows. That's just my opinion, though. Anyone (who is the same age or older


then Roddenberry would be now) care to comment?

-----== Posted via Deja News, The Leader in Internet Discussion ==-----
http://www.dejanews.com/ Now offering spam-free web-based newsreading

jowa...@sendit.sendit.nodak.edu

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May 30, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/30/98
to

In article <6kkh57$bpo$2...@nntp3.interaccess.com>,
"J. Juls" <jj...@interaccess.com> wrote:
>
> Just wondering...does anybody know what Gene Rodenberry thought of fanfic?
> Loved it? Worst scourge of the Earth and blatant copyright infringement?
> Never heard of it?
>
> Julie
>
>

NOTE: THIS IS JUST MY OPINION.

I don't think that Gene Roddenberry had an opinion one way or another.
He wasn't really exposed to it all that much -- after all, during his lifetime
the Internet wasn't available to the public, if it was even a reality then!
(Give me a break; I'm only 17 -- I don't know when the 'Net first became
popular!) The only way he could have read fanfic is if the fans themselves
sent it to him. I think that he'd see it as a bonus -- more publicity for the
shows. That's just my opinion, though. Anyone (who is the same age or older
then Roddenberry would be now) care to comment?

-- JoAnna

J. Juls

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May 30, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/30/98
to

The only way he could have read fanfic is if the fans themselves
>sent it to him. I think that he'd see it as a bonus -- more publicity for
the
>shows. That's just my opinion, though

Well, they did have zines. (BTW, I actually do know how to spell
Roddenberry, sorry everybody.)

Thanks for all the replies. I was surprised to find out that he didn't like
K/S! I would have loved to have read the original edition of Triangle. The
book as is is very boring and blah, and was the first really bad Trek book I
ever read. "Oh, when a female whatever has fully bonded, then it's too
late, yada yada yada."

Julie

FltAdm J

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May 30, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/30/98
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In article <6kn40q$qhj$1...@camel19.mindspring.com>, "Randy Landers"
<randyl...@mindspring.com> writes:

>Hmmm. Actually, we haven't gotten a single New Frontiers submission of
>which I'm aware.

I worked on a couple and I may have posted one a LONG time ago, but I couldn't
get anywhere with them. It's hard for me to fanfic books
Respectfully Submited,
J'myle Koretz

ENS Makina Jalta
NAV--USS YORKTOWN
ENS Sal'n Endos
CEO--USS SAM HOUSTON

.

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Jun 1, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/1/98
to

In article <6kn40q$qhj$1...@camel19.mindspring.com>, Randy Landers
<randyl...@mindspring.com> writes
>Hmmm. Actually, we haven't gotten a single New Frontiers submission of
>which I'm aware.
>
>

I am not really surprised. Somebody has to get the ball rolling (as we
Germans say) :-)

I know quite a few New Frontier fans (and the books haven`t even been
translated into German yet!) but people shy away from writing fan
fiction because they don`t want to get into trouble. But now that we
know that Peter David doesn`t mind and that there is no legal difference
between any Star Trek series there should be no obstacle any more.

I suggest you just mention in your next newsletter and in your websites
that you are also prepared to publish NF fan fiction if there are enough
submissions and see what happens.

John Ordover

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Jun 1, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/1/98
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On Fri, 29 May 1998 15:55:48 -0400, "Randy Landers"
<randyl...@mindspring.com> wrote:

>Baerbel:
>
>FYI: Peter David also wrote a lot of fan fiction in his day. Mary
>Bloemker published a lot of it, although I seem to recall it was more
>of the Gary Seven variety.
>
>BTW: Asking Ordover about fan fiction is like asking the President
>about Newt Gingrich.

For the 75 millionth time, I dont hate fan-fiction. If I did, would I
have moved heaven and earth to start the Star Trek; Strange New Worlds
fan-written anthology contests? The first volume hits the stores next
week; it contains rules for submission to Volume II, or you can find
the submission guidelines at www.startrekbooks.com under "features."

Here's is my position on fan fiction:

1) It is NOT, as many people think, the "farm team" for writing for
pro media-tie-in novels. Contrary to Trekfan belief, not a single
author was hired to write for the Star Trek novels without being
professionally published elsewhere first. In other words, until after
they had -stopped- writing fan-fiction and started writing and
submitting their own stuff to non-media professional venues-.

2) If you want to become a professional author, it's a bad way to go
about practicing. What you most need to know is how to introduce
-entirely new- settings, characters and storylines all at once and
that's the thing writing fan fiction won't let you practice. The
notion that you can use fan fiction as a crutch to work on other parts
of writing is false. All it will do is slow down your progress as a
writer, since time is short and you need that time to practice. It's
kind of like want to be a concert pianist and saying "I'll just
practice with my left hand for now; when I get that down, I'll work on
my right hand."

Please remember, this is coming from someone who is a widely
published short-story author and who eventually wrote a DS9 episode.:)

3) It is illegal. Do it at your own risk. That the giant is
sleeping doesn't mean that it won't wake up if you poke it hard
enough.:)

4) Finally, wouldn't you rather be the creator of a world that
everyone else wants to write it? Wouldn't you rather be a leader
rather than a follower?

And that's where I stand on fan-fiction. You may now quote me
accurately.:)


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