Tax Serfs Arise!

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Gary - KJ6Q

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May 5, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/5/96
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f...@tamu.edu (Frank R. Hipp) wrote:

>AND, there are people that fully support all of these taxes and many of them
>think that they should be *raised* !!
>
>Frank R. Hipp
>
>
AIN'T it a *FACT!* Take gasoline for instance, in the current furor over
the radical increase in gas prices, some here have stated (STUPIDLY!)
that it was "about time" we began to pay somewhere near what Eropean
drivers are forced to for fuel. I wish to God we could take up a
collection, and *EXPORT* these idiots to Europe so they can live in
apartments because private ownership of homes is relatively rare, be
*FORCED* to walk, bicycle, or bus to work, because they can neither
afford the highly taxed price for a private auto, OR it's fuel. And not
just THESE items, but *EVERYTHING* there is higher compared to the U.S.,
and these Europeans visiting this country go "hawg wild" when they hit
our shores, loading up with anything not nailed down, to haul back to
their country, where it is taxed out of availability.

AND some of our own numbskulls here would wish we were "more like them"!


--
Gary... KJ6Q...I am the NRA | The NRA doesn't vote - but it's
============================ | MEMBERS do, *ABUNDANTLY!"
Those who choose to "beat |==================================
their swords into plowshares"| "It's *EASY* to be a liberal, it's
will end up *PLOWING* for | OTHER people's money you are giving
those who DON'T! | away! (or living off of!)

J Elizabeth Smith

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May 6, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/6/96
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Gary - KJ6Q (te...@thereporter.com) wrote:

: f...@tamu.edu (Frank R. Hipp) wrote:

: >AND, there are people that fully support all of these taxes and many of them
: >think that they should be *raised* !!
: >
: >Frank R. Hipp
: >
: >
: AIN'T it a *FACT!* Take gasoline for instance, in the current furor over
: the radical increase in gas prices, some here have stated (STUPIDLY!)
: that it was "about time" we began to pay somewhere near what Eropean
: drivers are forced to for fuel. I wish to God we could take up a
: collection, and *EXPORT* these idiots to Europe so they can live in
: apartments because private ownership of homes is relatively rare, be
: *FORCED* to walk, bicycle, or bus to work, because they can neither
: afford the highly taxed price for a private auto, OR it's fuel. And not
: just THESE items, but *EVERYTHING* there is higher compared to the U.S.,
: and these Europeans visiting this country go "hawg wild" when they hit
: our shores, loading up with anything not nailed down, to haul back to
: their country, where it is taxed out of availability.

your post seems to be indicative of the mainstream ideas in the united
states that have gotten us into the rut of having too much stuff and not
knowing what to do with it. why is it so important to us (us meaning the
collective us, not the newsgroup or anyone else specifically, i felt like
i had to clarify after the vegetarian thing) to have our *own* house and
our *own* car? i honestly think that if people concentrated more on
community rather than their own desires in this country, we'd be a lot
better off. but alas, capitalism is not conducive to this mindset it seems.

but, i also think the sense of community is lost here in other ways....
it goes farther than not wanting to use public transport. you don't
really see community-based businesses anymore. in auburn, and in the
south in general, there is such a high percentage of chain restaurants
and stores it's pathetic. for a region with so much local flavor, it
amazes me that people not only allow, but embrace these no-character,
non-caring type businesses to invade the landscape.

since i have been in college, companies have built new structures
to house chili's, an applebee's, a ruby tuesday's, an outback steakhouse, a
new wal-mart, two new grocery stores which are based in georgia (winn-dixie),
a food world, 3 new motels, countless chain gas stations, 4 or 5 fast
food chains and probably some other stuff that i'm probably forgetting
about. but also in that time, i have seen stores which are owned by
people in the community go out of business as a result of this big-name
competition. it makes me extremely sad. first of all because i see my
community turning into one huge strip mall and there's nothing i can do about,
and secondly because i know this is not the only place it's going on.

okay, so i've gotten a little off the subject...sorry.

: AND some of our own numbskulls here would wish we were "more like them"!

i do wish we could emulate the european sense of community and family. i
think we're the ones who are losing out because we've forgotten how
important people are, instead *stuff* has aken their place....

[god, guns, guts and glory .sig snipped]

elizabeth, who seems to be in a contant state of nostalgia these days

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
j. elizabeth smith http://www.duc.auburn.edu/~smitjel
smi...@mail.auburn.edu http://www.duc.auburn.edu/~plainsm

"oh let it be a night of lyric rain" --dorothy parker
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


Brian K. Yoder

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May 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/7/96
to

In article <Dr088...@mail.auburn.edu> smi...@mail.auburn.edu (J Elizabeth Smith) writes:
>Gary - KJ6Q (te...@thereporter.com) wrote:
>:f...@tamu.edu (Frank R. Hipp) wrote:

>:>AND, there are people that fully support all of these taxes and many of them
>:>think that they should be *raised* !!

>: AIN'T it a *FACT!* Take gasoline for instance, in the current furor over

>: the radical increase in gas prices, some here have stated (STUPIDLY!)
>: that it was "about time" we began to pay somewhere near what Eropean
>: drivers are forced to for fuel. I wish to God we could take up a
>: collection, and *EXPORT* these idiots to Europe so they can live in
>: apartments because private ownership of homes is relatively rare, be
>: *FORCED* to walk, bicycle, or bus to work, because they can neither
>: afford the highly taxed price for a private auto, OR it's fuel. And not
>: just THESE items, but *EVERYTHING* there is higher compared to the U.S.,
>: and these Europeans visiting this country go "hawg wild" when they hit
>: our shores, loading up with anything not nailed down, to haul back to
>: their country, where it is taxed out of availability.

>your post seems to be indicative of the mainstream ideas in the united
>states that have gotten us into the rut of having too much stuff and not
>knowing what to do with it. why is it so important to us (us meaning the
>collective us, not the newsgroup or anyone else specifically, i felt like
>i had to clarify after the vegetarian thing) to have our *own* house and
>our *own* car?

Maybe because we want to be independent and happy?

Am I correct that you are the very same person who jsut a few days ago was
all outraged over having to pay a few pennies more for a gallon of gas?
How quickly you change. One day you whine over not being able to get quite
as many material things (by a tiny increment and for a brief period of
time) as if it were the end of the world and the next you claim you
have so much that you don't know what to do with it all. The two positions
are strangely consistent, but not in the way I think you intended.

>i honestly think that if people concentrated more on
>community rather than their own desires in this country, we'd be a lot
>better off.

No, we would be right in the same place as when Germany, Russia, Cuba,
China, and Cambodia tried the same thing.

>but alas, capitalism is not conducive to this mindset it seems.

Thank god.

>but, i also think the sense of community is lost here in other ways....
>it goes farther than not wanting to use public transport. you don't
>really see community-based businesses anymore. in auburn, and in the
>south in general, there is such a high percentage of chain restaurants
>and stores it's pathetic. for a region with so much local flavor, it
>amazes me that people not only allow, but embrace these no-character,
>non-caring type businesses to invade the landscape.

Why does it amaze you? Busses and trains in most circumstances are
inefficient and time-consuming to use (not to mention distasteful given
the cleanliness of the things). They generally aren't where you are nor
do they take you to where you want to be. Is it really so shocking that
people generally don't want to use them?

As for mom and pop restaurants, why is this suh a mystery to you? Most of the
time people want to eat out it is for convenience, not quaint style. They
want somewhere close by, somewhere they can depend on a certain level of
quality and service, and somewhere they can get in and out in a predictable
period of time. These are genuinely imporant to people most of the time.
Are you unaware of this? Do you dislike the fact that they have such
choices to make for themselves? Restaurant chains offer people what they want
and they therefore thrive. The smaller unique ones are in less demand
and therefore are less common. How would you prefer to see things done?

>since i have been in college, companies have built new structures
>to house chili's, an applebee's, a ruby tuesday's, an outback steakhouse, a
>new wal-mart, two new grocery stores which are based in georgia (winn-dixie),
>a food world, 3 new motels, countless chain gas stations, 4 or 5 fast
>food chains and probably some other stuff that i'm probably forgetting
>about. but also in that time, i have seen stores which are owned by
>people in the community go out of business as a result of this big-name
>competition.

That sounds great. Do you have something against economic growth?

>it makes me extremely sad. first of all because i see my
>community turning into one huge strip mall and there's nothing i can do about,
>and secondly because i know this is not the only place it's going on.

What do you have against "strip malls"? Do you want to see someone put
a stop to them? Where should people buy their stuff? Where should they
find their first job?

>okay, so i've gotten a little off the subject...sorry.

Quite alright. It happens around here all the time.

>: AND some of our own numbskulls here would wish we were "more like them"!

>i do wish we could emulate the european sense of community and family. i
>think we're the ones who are losing out because we've forgotten how
>important people are, instead *stuff* has aken their place....

If that's what you want the easiest way to get it would be to move to
Europe. There must be something that keeps you here, right?

>elizabeth, who seems to be in a contant state of nostalgia these days

Nostalgia? You mean for the good old days before cheap clothing, indoor
toilets, telecommunication, air travel, high wages, plentiful food, effective
medicine, electric lights, and the Internet? The world today is far from
perfect, but all together things now are a lot better than they have been in
history.

--Brian

--
+------------------+---------------------------------------------------------+
| Brian K. Yoder | "Necessity is the plea for every infringement of human |
| byo...@netcom.com| freedom. It is the argument of tyrants; it is the |
| US Networx, Inc. | creed of slaves." -- William Pitt |
| LAN Doctor | http://www.primenet.com/~byoder/ |
+------------------+---------------------------------------------------------+

Chuck Fletcher

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May 10, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/10/96
to

J Elizabeth Smith (smi...@mail.auburn.edu) wrote:
[snip]
: but, i also think the sense of community is lost here in other ways....
[snip]
: i do wish we could emulate the european sense of community and family. i

If this were the sixties, you'd probably have your own personal spook
following you around for COMMents like that.

--
Chuck Fletcher chu...@interaccess.com
=============================================
| L i f e , I t ' s A l l I c i n g ! |
=============================================

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