So what did kill nu-metal?

34 views
Skip to first unread message

tmc...@gmail.com

unread,
Jan 20, 2015, 1:38:51 AM1/20/15
to
http://officialfan.proboards.com/thread/515949/nu-metal?page=1

Post by wildojinx on 13 hours ago
While thinking about the nu-metal of the late 90s/early 2000s, i wonder what caused it to decrease in popularity. My theory is that the teen audience was growing up and going to college or starting a family, and therefore didnt have as much time or money to devote to the music, while the younger audience were more into metalcore and emo and pop punk at the time, causing the nu-metal scene to lose lots of popularity. What do you think killed the scene (i dont want some "cuz it sucked lol"-type responses, im interested in real analysis rather than opinion).

Post by Triple Confused Mark Wahlberg on 13 hours ago
I think you nailed it. The audience grew up. That, and the market was flooded like with hair metal.

Pretty soon, every band had to have a rapper and a DJ. They became indistinguishable.

Post by apocafish on 13 hours ago
The audience grew up and over-saturation of the market. You had all of these bands start to pop up and they all seemed to sound the same. Well for the most part. The audience grew up and expanded into other genres.

Post by FAN Champion SuperSweet on 13 hours ago
What killed disco? What killed hair metal? What killed grunge music? What killed the Ska boom? What killed Nu-Metal? What killed pop punk boom? What killed screamo/metalcore? What killed dubstep? What will soon kill EDM? Basically anything that explodes in popularity in a short period of time doesn't have a long shelf life in the mainstream. The lucky ones will keep a smaller but dedicated fanbase to keep it alive. Like WWE and South Park are prime examples. Both exploded in popularity in the 90's but are still surviving because they Habs a big core fanbase but it was nowhere big as it was during their peaks.

Post by StuntGranny on 13 hours ago
I think the audience growing up definitely killed it. Speaking personally, when I listen back to some of those bands I enjoyed back then, it just seems so cheesy. For the most part, it seemed like most of the lyrics were pure garbage.

Example: Disturbed. Listening to something like Stupify or Down With the Sickness as an adult makes me cringe. Down With the Sickness especially does that. That portion in the middle where he pitches a fit about his mom is one of the most embarrassing things put on record.

Post by wakko on 13 hours ago
What are we considering Nu-Metal? Are we considering rap/dj groups as Nu-Metal? Either way, yeah the audience grew up, but I still like some groups. KoRn being the one I still follow, if they are considered Nu-Metal.

Post by Hit Girl on 13 hours ago
People got bored and moved onto the next fad.

Post by Houkago on 13 hours ago
Like others have said, the audience growing up.

Also, Dragon Ball Z AMVs. :P

Post by grennel on 12 hours ago
Machine Head releasing a Nu Metal album really opened my eyes to how much of a cash and grab it became.

Post by 4real on 12 hours ago
I think most fans of nu metal got into those bands and then got into the heavier stuff and never went back or just stopped listening to metal altogether. I know I got into all sorts of hard rock music because of nu metal then as I got a bit older found myself getting into all the indie stuff that was coming out like Killers, Bloc Party, Franz Ferdinand, Arctic Monkeys etc. That was a good time for that genre I feel.

Nu Metal served it's purpose and for me I probably wouldn't be into any of the music I'm into now without it. Thank you Limp Bizkit!

Post by Warlord M.O.P. on 12 hours ago
I can still enjoy Korn and even some Linkin Park stuff. And Disturbed songs were fun to play in Rock Band.

But yeah, I was the perfect age (14-15) for Nu Metal when it exploded in popularity and I got into it. Then I grew up and expanded my horizons. Now I like all sorts of modern and classic rock, punk, certain genres of metal, hip-hop, nerdy music like soundtracks, and a bunch of other stuff.

Post by Death to Analog on 12 hours ago
StuntGranny Avatar
13 hours ago StuntGranny said:
That portion in the middle where he pitches a fit about his mom is one of the most embarrassing things put on record.

I hadn't listened to that song in almost 10 years, and my goodness did you nail that right on the head.

13 hours ago wakko said:
KoRn being the one I still follow, if they are considered Nu-Metal.

KoRn are pretty much the nu metal band. They pioneered the genre, and after experimenting with other metal sounds over the last decade seem to be moving back in that direction now that there's something of a revival happening.

Bands who got big during nu metal's boom, like Slipknot, Linkin Park, Disturbed, and Papa Roach, have all moved onto other genres with varying degrees of success.

Post by S.C. Amigo on 12 hours ago
Well, the majority of it being shit didn't help matters.

Post by There Is Nothing Left on 12 hours ago
The fact nu-metal stinks killed nu-metal. Rap-rock and useless angsty ROWRAR shit killed the medium out of the gate.

From like the mid 2000's the same band kept coming out again and again.

People tire of suburbanite yuppies that are mad.

Post by Dr. T is an alien on 12 hours ago
The audience growing up is a large part of it. It also did not help that the most visible group of the style was patently ridiculous at its core (Limp Bizkit). Don't get me wrong, I actually liked them. Unlike most of the other mainstays of the genre they did not take themselves seriously, but as a result it is impossible to take them seriously in the long run either (sort of a problem that Blink 182 had as well). Some acts can have long careers being ridiculous, but usually ridiculous was the whole point and not simply a defining feature.

Let me put it another way; Limp Bizkit's reputation as something to not take seriously was so significant that when my 15 yr old son noticed 3 Dollar Bill in my CD rotation, his response was, "Really Dad? Limp Bizkit?" He generally heavily favors my taste in music, so I think I disappointed him by having that CD. This coming from a kid that I am not certain has heard much from the band and was merely judging me by the band's reputation. I should note that I did not get a similar note of disappointment from him for having Wisconsin Death Trip and Issues in that rotation as well.

Another way to look at it is to think about what your image of the fanbase of that style was. Can you envision them? Don't they look like the most pretentious group of douchebags ever? You know who else did? Fans of Disco. Bee Gee records were ceremonially destroyed in anti-disco displays. Does that mean that the audience actually disliked Bee Gees' music? Considering the fact that Barry Gibbs (the primary songwriter for the band) wrote several hits for other people throughout the 80's and then the band had a #1 hit in the 90's suggest not. I imagine that nu-metal suffered from that some as well (though I don't see Fred Durst writing a lot of songs for other artists, though I could be surprised, I guess).

Post by The Last Wailord on 12 hours ago
Its probably because Nu Metal as a whole wasn't very good music.

Post by Hit Girl on 12 hours ago
All those angry bald white men mellowed out, stopped yelling, and decided they wanted a quiet life, with clothes that actually fit them.

http://officialfan.proboards.com/thread/515949/nu-metal?page=2

Post by virus on 12 hours ago
I blame Limp Bizkit's 'Results May Vary' album. It was the first nu-metal album I ever bought, and it was so f***ing awful that I couldn't bring myself to buy another one.

Post by ritt on 11 hours ago
13 hours ago StuntGranny said:
I think the audience growing up definitely killed it. Speaking personally, when I listen back to some of those bands I enjoyed back then, it just seems so cheesy. For the most part, it seemed like most of the lyrics were pure garbage.

Example: Disturbed. Listening to something like Stupify or Down With the Sickness as an adult makes me cringe. Down With the Sickness especially does that. That portion in the middle where he pitches a fit about his mom is one of the most embarrassing things put on record.



I remember going to a metal/nu-metal day long festival during the peak of its run. Not often you can pinpoint the exact moment you change your stance on something but that show was it for me. I am not kidding when I say seven bands in a row came out and started their set with a Disturbed style parents/authority keeping you down rant. The kids roared then went back to sitting on their hands. It was like the cheap pop of metal at the time. My father was dieing at the time and I thought f*** these suburban spoiled guys for whining about people who supported their artistic endeavors and propped them up in the garage. It was like the only trick they all had, one magician doing a trick is cool when seven in a row do the same trick it isn't impressive. Add to that that previously concerts I had gone to had an energy and a passion but this festival was just flat. And it seemed to get worse every subsequent show in the metal genres I went to, mosh pits became just a few dudebros going through motions for only the big hits then fading off. I ended up finding substance and passion in different genres.

Post by adamclark52 on 11 hours ago
I think it was a combination of the audience growing up, the market being over-saturated and a large majority of the bands just not being very good at all.

I'm glad I was coming out of my teens when nu-metal hit it's high and didn't get stuck in with that fad or amoungst people who did. I probably never would have but going to a high school with a bunch of those people would've been sad. I still like some of the music (the first two KoRn albums...that's really it).

11 hours ago ED2099 said:
12 hours ago 4real said:
I think most fans of nu metal got into those bands and then got into the heavier stuff and never went back or just stopped listening to metal altogether. I know I got into all sorts of hard rock music because of nu metal then as I got a bit older found myself getting into all the indie stuff that was coming out like Killers, Bloc Party, Franz Ferdinand, Arctic Monkeys etc. That was a good time for that genre I feel.

Nu Metal served it's purpose and for me I probably wouldn't be into any of the music I'm into now without it. Thank you Limp Bizkit!
Going by your explanation, wouldn't fans of Nu-Metal have gravitated toward super heavy stuff like Slayer or Napalm Death rather than softer and more melodic stuff like Arctic Monkeys?

I listened to very heavy stuff when I was a teenager, but toward the end of my teenage years, I began listening to rock that was less intense because I found it too distracting when I began to seriously commit to doing homework and studying to the best of my ability.


I think nu metal got a lot of people into Rock period really but for some the next step, Slayer & Napalm Death as you said were too much and 'not cool' as the trends changed so did they. The garage rock that was coming out around that time as well with The Strokes, Hives, White Stripes etc may have seemed more cooler to some. I have been guilty of following trends too but I always stayed with metal as well.

Post by ritt on 10 hours ago

I'd say Nu-Metal fans turned more towards Industrial Metal and it died off soon afterwards too but opened up a lot of influence on digital made music which is still dominant in EDM and Dubstep.

Post by wildojinx on 10 hours ago
Not to get political, but 9/11 may have been a factor as well, since all of a sudden, we had a REAL problem to deal with as opposed to suburban angst. Not to mention that people wanted more positive messages in the wake of what happened, for the most part. As for the stuff about nu-metal bands hating their parents, that's why i always liked the line in Saliva's "Superstar II": "No whining about my evil parents/they did their best to raise their only son"

Post by fuzzywarble on 10 hours ago
11 hours ago Triple Confused Mark Wahlberg said:
Please tell me Jonathan Davis isn't still whining about High School.

He's gotta be 45 by now.


Not sure, but he just put out a song called 'Hater'.

Yup, an almost-50-year-old using the word 'hater' to detract his critics.

Post by chazraps on 9 hours ago
10 hours ago wildojinx said:
Not to get political, but 9/11 may have been a factor as well, since all of a sudden, we had a REAL problem to deal with as opposed to suburban angst. Not to mention that people wanted more positive messages in the wake of what happened, for the most part. As for the stuff about nu-metal bands hating their parents, that's why i always liked the line in Saliva's "Superstar II": "No whining about my evil parents/they did their best to raise their only son".


I was going to say 9/11, but not for the reasons you mentioned.

Angst never went away, it just bled into other genres.

Rather, the wanton destruction that was the underlying theme of a significant chunk of the Nu Metal canon just felt inappropriate to listen to in the 2-3 months following the September 11th attacks. The American public got a breather, and a few months later when those bands came out with either their more melodic post-9/11 output or their even-more-aggressive pre-Iraq War output, listeners had just had enough and these bands were immediately considered distinctly September 10th.

Post by rocket on 9 hours ago
10 hours ago wildojinx said:
Not to get political, but 9/11 may have been a factor as well, since all of a sudden, we had a REAL problem to deal with as opposed to suburban angst. Not to mention that people wanted more positive messages in the wake of what happened, for the most part. As for the stuff about nu-metal bands hating their parents, thats why i always liked the line in Saliva's "Superstar II": "No whining about my evil parents/they did their best to raise their only son".


That's actually a good point. That seemed to be around the time it really started petering off.

I'll add the garage rock revival around that time didn't do nu metal any favors. To me, there came a point where more and more nu metal songs sounded the same without anything constructive to add.

Post by Wolf Hawkfield no1 NZ poster on 9 hours ago
Nu metal being a shitty fad genre of music that had a limited lifespan is what killed nu metal.

Post by Tactical Sneaking Man on 8 hours ago
As others have said, there were a bunch of different factors. I think a lot of it was due to the fact that nu-metal just was never really gonna' last as a genre. A lot of the genre's popularity was due to the oversaturation of boybands in the late 90's; to mainstream music listeners who hated the Britneys and Backstreet Boys of the world, a crude, angry, noisy alternative like Korn or Limp Bizkit would've likely been right up their alley. In 2002 or 2003 there was no such competition; post-grunge groups like Evanescence and Staind were dominating the charts, and there just wasn't really a demand for something loud and dumb.

Linkin Park's Meteora was probably the genre's last gasp, but even on that album the band was experimenting with different sounds and styles. Some pioneering groups, like the Deftones, had shed their nu-metal sound as early as 2000. Oversaturation and whatnot was obviously a part of the decline, but I think for the most part, it was because the genre was, as Fred Durst put it, "a moment in time."

http://officialfan.proboards.com/thread/515949/nu-metal?page=3

Post by Katy Perry Enthusiast CM Metal on 6 hours ago
Most rap metal sucked, but even though I don't like his newer country stuff, I think Kid Rocks Devil Without A Cause is still a pretty good album, especially the title track.

Post by RedAgony on 5 hours ago
Nu-Metal killed Nu-Metal

Post by BlindSlayer on 5 hours ago
We can hate on Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach and Disturbed all we want.

But there was also bands like Nothingface, 40 Below Summer, Sw1tched, Ill Nino, OneSideZero, Pressure 4-5 as well.... nu-metal wasn't complete crap, just that... like all music... the crap rises to the top.

Post by Heartbreaker on 5 hours ago
Now I'm thinking of when WWE spammed the hell out of Limp Bizkit back in the early 2000s. Now they spam f***ing Flo Rida.

Only nu-metal I actually listen to these days is some of Papa Roach's older stuff like "Last Resort". Like Linkin Park, they grew up and changed their direction to alternative rock. Although their latest and new album that comes out soon does have some rap elements as well as elements from other genres. Didn't Limp Bizkit release a new album a while ago that was nu-metal... In the 2010s?

Post by FAN Champion SuperSweet on 5 hours ago
5 hours ago Heartbreaker said:
Now I'm thinking of when WWE spammed the hell out of Limp Bizkit back in the early 2000s. Now they spam f***ing Flo Rida.

Only nu-metal I actually listen to these days is some of Papa Roach's older stuff like "Last Resort". Like Linkin Park, they grew up and changed their direction to alternative rock. Although their latest and new album that comes out soon does have some rap elements as well as elements from other genres. Didn't Limp Bizkit release a new album a while ago that was nu-metal... In the 2010s?

Honestly I don't think Limp Bizkit should ever change. They are the definitive Nu-Metal band people bring up when discussing Nu-Metal. Plus they don't have the reputation to strive away from the genre by doing something different like Slipknot, Linkin Park, Breaking Benjamin, Papa Roach, Mudvayne, Staind, and possibly even Marilyn Manson (with the positive buzz he's getting from his new album & 3rd day of a 7 day binge being his best single in a decade possibly giving him a career resurgence).

They should just do the Korn route and just stick to doing what they do best and doing it unapologetic. They'll never have a massive fanbase like they did in the 90's but they always have a solid semi large loyal fanbase and they'll stick out more for being the undisputed Kings of Nu-Metal and one of the few active Nu-Metal bands on the market.

Post by One Beat on 5 hours ago
Only bands I ever really cared about that might be considered "nu-metal" are Deftones and Chevelle. Deftones still put out great albums and Chevelle sounded just different enough to distinguish them from their other peers in my opinion.

Post by ED2099 on 4 hours ago
6 hours ago BlindSlayer said:
I can't speak for the genre as a whole... but at a certain point, I wanted more. I wanted solos again, I wanted singing.. not rapping.


It's funny that you implicitly contrasted nu-metal with classic heavy metal, since I remember seeing a documentary on heavy metal, and a nu-metal fan attested that the reason why he became such a big fan of nu-metal is because it lacked the Satanic imagery and symbolism that is characteristic of a lot of heavy metal. Needless to say, the guy was took said imagery and symbolism way too literally (Probably because he took the symbols of his Christian faith at face value and assumed that metal bands were using them in the same fashion). I bring his testimony up because the apparent lack of blasphemous imagery and lyrics may have enticed people into giving nu-metal a chance that they would never accord to other genres of metal. As for why said people gave up on it, maybe they felt compelled to gravitate toward Christian Rock or to cease listening to rock altogether. Perhaps nu-metal turned most of them on to Christian Rap... Who knows?

Post by crymsonfox on 4 hours ago
All the cool kids listen to Dubstep now.

Post by riseofsetian1981 on 4 hours ago
I think a lot of the individuals involved with the nu-metal movement grew up as well. There's no way Jonathan Davis, Fred Durst, Corey Taylor, Lajon Witherspoon, etc were going to remain as hungry, angry, and rebellious after making an ass of money with their music. Dee Snider said it best during Twisted Sister's peak.

"I am sitting out in the sun, living in a mansion, and having two to three brand new cars trying to write the next angry anthem. And I couldn't think of a word because I couldn't have been happier."

Plus with the emergence of bands like Coheed and Cambria, Alter Bridge, Killswitch Engage, Shadows Fall, Lamb of God, and Trivium it just managed to marginalize nu-metal into being irreverent to a degree.

Post by Juice on 3 hours ago
Nu metal was so bad an uninspired. I kinda hate myself for liking it as a teen.

http://officialfan.proboards.com/thread/515949/nu-metal?page=4

Post by Reflecto on 3 hours ago
It wasn't mentioned as much outside the OP, but emo is likely what killed nu-metal more than anything.

If there's one thing that is clear in the music world, you will never go broke pandering to teen angst, and emo was just far, far better at marketing teen angst to angsty teens than nu-metal ever could be, plus without the same aura of "I'm being miserable to the same music the people who give me shit in school are using to hype themselves up" that kills a great teen angst-fest.

Post by Juice on 2 hours ago
I think when people finally realized how f***ing stupid wide legged pants were they were like, oh nu metal f***ing sucks too for encouraging this shit.

Post by Denial Bryan Is Back! on 2 hours ago
10 hours ago chazraps said:
10 hours ago wildojinx said:
Not to get political, but 9/11 may have been a factor as well, since all of a sudden, we had a REAL problem to deal with as opposed to suburban angst. Not to mention that people wanted more positive messages in the wake of what happened, for the most part. As for the stuff about nu-metal bands hating their parents, that's why i always liked the line in Saliva's "Superstar II": "No whining about my evil parents/they did their best to raise their only son".
I was going to say 9/11, but not for the reasons you mentioned.

Angst never went away, it just bled into other genres.

Rather, the wanton destruction that was the underlying theme of a significant chunk of the Nu Metal canon just felt inappropriate to listen to in the 2-3 months following the September 11th attacks. The American public got a breather, and a few months later when those bands came out with either their more melodic post-9/11 output or their even-more-aggressive pre-Iraq War output, listeners had just had enough and these bands were immediately considered distinctly September 10th.


Slipknot's Iowa, which is to me probably the most bleak album that came out of the nu-metal subgenre, was released only a couple of weeks before 9/11.

Hell, Jay-Z's The Blueprint came out ON 9/11.

The first album I remember dealing with a post-9/11 America was The Eminem Show.

Post by The Trashman on 2 hours ago
The same thing that kills every trend in music... time.

Post by Baldobomb-Jerusalem on 2 hours ago
can't speak for anyone else but I found stuff that was both more extreme and more interesting. nu-metal was kind of a gateway thing, and it was hard to take seriously once you got into the heavier stuff.

Post by Alexander The So-so on 2 hours ago
13 hours ago StuntGranny said:
I think the audience growing up definitely killed it. Speaking personally, when I listen back to some of those bands I enjoyed back then, it just seems so cheesy. For the most part, it seemed like most of the lyrics were pure garbage.

Example: Disturbed. Listening to something like Stupify or Down With the Sickness as an adult makes me cringe. Down With the Sickness especially does that. That portion in the middle where he pitches a fit about his mom is one of the most embarrassing things put on record.


Ugh. I haven't thought of that in nearly a decade.

It's like...what purpose did it serve? It's not poetic, insightful, or even really cathartic. It's just...extremely uncomfortable to listen to.

Post by TURKEY NONSTOP ACTION! on about an hour ago
Anyways, I grew out of Nu-Metal by the time I was 16 or something and had gotten through those awkward teenage years. By then I started listening to a lot of 90's alternative rock that managed to be much more interesting and entertaining since alternative could come in so many different forms.

Post by ShaolinHandLock on about an hour ago
I was never a huge fan of nu-metal, but I did listen to it as a teenager. I actually still like the Limp Bizkit/Disturbed/Korn/Linkin Park stuff I listened to back then, which makes me feel worthless as a human being since everybody else either "grew out" of it or hates it entirely.

Post by Mozenrath on about an hour ago
Times change and burnout happens. That's always what happens.

Post by ambrose_fan on about an hour ago
The record labels. They have the final say on what's popular and once they saw a shiny new toy (Post-grunge) they put all of their hype and attention on to that and thus Nu-Metal was dead in the water as a viable commercial property.

Post by corndog on 28 minutes ago
4 hours ago riseofsetian1981 said:
I think a lot of the individuals involved with the nu-metal movement grew up as well. There's no way Jonathan Davis, Fred Durst, Corey Taylor, Lajon Witherspoon, etc were going to remain as hungry, angry, and rebellious after making an ass of money with their music. Dee Snider said it best during Twisted Sister's peak.

"I am sitting out in the sun, living in a mansion, and having two to three brand new cars trying to write the next angry anthem. And I couldn't think of a word because I couldn't have been happier."

Plus with the emergence of bands like Coheed and Cambria, Alter Bridge, Killswitch Engage, Shadows Fall, Lamb of God, and Trivium it just managed to marginalize nu-metal into being irrelevant to a degree.

I did find myself moving on to a lot of those band mentioned and I agree after a few years and a few million dollars, a lot of the bands failed to capture the same anger and energy they had when they came on in the scene. I will also say that bands like Slipknot and Mudvayne did transition a lot of the fans into a heavier sound, or at least a lot of people I knew that enjoyed them also liked the bands you mentioned.

Also like most short lived popular styles of music, the market just became over saturated and watered down. The sound went from fresh in the beginning to just annoying. Although I went from being an adolescent in '94 when it really started to an adult by the time it ended. But when Korn and Limp Bizkit came out, they were original in their sound and unlike anything else in mainstream music.

On a side note, I would like to mention I saw Sevendust in concert about two years and they can still can put on a hell of a show.

Post by ambrose_fan on 6 minutes ago
a [hideous car wreck] supreme Avatar
16 minutes ago a [hideous car wreck] supreme said:
Evanescence.

God, I can't stand that band. it seems people mostly only 'like' them because the singer's a girl, and you know, that's TOTALZ TEH HAWTZ.

Ugh.

I hate post-grunge in general.





satanict...@gmail.com

unread,
Feb 17, 2017, 1:43:11 PM2/17/17
to
The fact that nu-metal sucks probably had a lot to do with it also!
Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages