13 Sept 1975 "Church of Scientology to warn of Interpol dangers" Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado

11 views
Skip to first unread message

Maureen

unread,
Nov 7, 2009, 10:01:27 PM11/7/09
to

Didn't see this one on the 'net
Text from scan:

http://www.lisamcpherson.org/scans/interpol_article_1975.pdf [pdf]


Rocky Mountain News
Saturday, September 13, 1975 Denver, Colo

Church of Scientology to warn of Interpol dangers

By Gary Gerhardt
News Staff

Members of the Church of Scientology will be in Denver this weekend to
alert police chiefs nationwide to the dangers of cooperating fully
with Interpol, the International Police Organization based in France.

The church members will attempt to influence the 3,000 peace officers
who will attend the International Association of Chiefs of Police
(IACP) conference, which opens Saturday in Currigan Exhibition
Complex.

Louis B. Sims, head of the U.S. Interpol office, also is expected to
attend.

Jeff Friedman of Los Angeles, chairman of the church's national
commission on law enforcement and social justice, is in Denver to
present the church's objections to the world police organization.

"Interpol's affiliations are detrimental to the rights of all citizens
and the integrity of law enforcement," Friedman said in an interview
Friday.

"This organization has 120 countries as members and adheres to no
national origin, which means it answers to no government.

"But, we have documented, and recently appeared before two U.S.
congressional subcommittees to present our findings that Interpol was
an organization that has strong Nazi ties and presently shares
information with such Communist-bloc countries as Cuba, Yugoslavia,
Romania and Vietnam as well as terrorist nations such as Syria."

Friedman said Interpol has access to FBI records through the National
Crime Information Center (NCIC) and often calls upon local police
intelligence agencies for information.

"Interpol has no powers of arrest in any country, but acts as an
international information file for all member countries," Friedman
said.

"The real threat comes from local police who willingly give ut
information to Interpol without questioning where the information is
going or who is going to use it."

Friedman said Interpol was formed in 1924 by Dr. Oskar Dressler, who
was working with Hitler as late as 1944 despite the fact Interpol
claims it suspended operations during World War II.

"We have Interpol magazines which show pictures of Interpol presidents
in the years from 1938 to 1942. Those presidents were Reinhard
Heydrich and Otto Steinhausl, who appear on the covers of the
magazines in full Nazi SS dress."

"In 1946, after the war, the U.S. rejoined Interpol and the late Edgar
J. Hoover was a vice president of the organization, then headed by
F.E. Louwage of Belgium - the same man that was head of the Belgium
police under Hitler."

Friedman said there is also documentation to show a great deal of
funding after the war came from persons in Brazil and Venezuela, known
retreats for Nazi's secreted out of Germany.

"Interpol refuses to help capture Nazi war criminals saying they don't
mix in anything political, racial, military or religious.

"Yet in 1969, Interpol was in Bermuda to help local authorities
identify black power delegates attending a conference, which I think
is racial.

"It refuses to assist in the curbing of terrorists because that is
political, but allows Syria to become a member.

"Down the line Interpol is trying to lie to cover up its Nazi past,
and I think the chiefs who are sending the organization information
should know this."

-----

(sounds like the elephant trying to persuade the living room its not
there. Where did the cult get all that information from? Beings t
sound like In-Comm)

Maureen

Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages