GREETINGS FROM A SURV 2/3

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dennis....@support.com

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Jul 24, 1994, 6:35:52 PM7/24/94
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interns. They just weren't up to his standard or that of Flag
auditors. Those few who survived the indoctrination, gruelling
hours, retreads, retrains and the constant shifting politics of
being Flag crew were at least treated like they were somebody.
Outer org students and interns were not.
Brian and Jeff were the two individuals who trained me when
I first arrived on Flag. They were my "models" of how staff were
to behave. I won't go into any detail on what it took to survive
this indoctrination, win their respect and become a valuable
member of the "team." It did, however, take some severe
personality readjustment.
While I was still "green" at Flag, having only been there
less than a year, I was posted as Jeff Walker's junior: Intern
Cramming Officer, FSO [Flag Service Org]. What a thrill!
Imagine getting to be trained by the most senior Cramming Officer
in the world! It had been my dream before coming to Flag, to be
trained in Cramming by Jeff. Here I was! Right under him. Oh,
what I would learn!
Well, the arrangement was a lot better for Jeff than it was
for me. He got to stop handling those stupid outer-org interns,
and I had to start.
He didn't even talk to me for several months, except to
grunt his disgust at me and the scum I was handling. I had to
fend for myself, which was fine with me because Jeff was [and is]
one of the most unpleasant individuals I had ever met and I
didn't miss his charming repartee.
Apparently LRH didn't think much of him either, because two
months after I was on post as Intern Cramming Officer, Hubbard
busted Jeff and posted me in his place as Chief Cramming Officer,
Flag. I was totally unprepared for what was to follow.
I had to cram every auditor in the HGC including the Class
XIIs. Since I was only a class IV, I had to quickly study and
check out on all of the material up through Class XII. I had a
person posted as my junior to handle the interns, who was even
greener than I. What a responsibility! I was now the most
senior Cramming Officer in all of Scientology. It was just what
I had wanted . . .
I found out what was meant by the saying "Be careful of what
you want . . . you just may get it." What a nightmare! The
pressure was so great on me that I don't think I said more than a
12 sentences to my wife during my first month on post. At the
end of my 18 hour day, I would drag myself to my room, too
overwhelmed to speak to or be touched -- a total vegetable.
Then the disaster happened. It was bad enough to have to
confront and cram the likes of Brian Livingston [who had since
been busted to HGC auditor] and Jeff Walker [who had worked his
way back up to the HGC after his LRH bust], but finally the
supreme test -- I had to cram the Commodore's own son, Quentin,
who was also one of the Class XIIs.
Quentin was sent to Cramming by the HGC C/S for failing to
get all the reads on a C/S Series 53 when he first assessed it to
an FNing list. PC didn't progress, so the C/S ordered him to go
back and assess it again. He found the 53 still reading, which
indicated that reads had been missed the first time he FNed it.
[Those of you who don't understand what this was all about, are,
as I said before, better off. Suffice it to say that he'd goofed
up on someone paying many hundreds of dollars an hour for his
"counselling."]
I was supposed to check his TRs, assessment and metering and
see why he messed up. It was a routine cram, but having to do it
on LRH's son made it something more.
Quentin, or "Q" as his friends called him, was 22 at the
time. He looked 15 and acted 5. He was slight, blonde and
effeminate in manner. While he sat if front of me in Cramming,
he was constantly zooming his hand through the air between us and
making noises simulating, much as a 5 year old would, the sound
and motion of an airplane. I had been told that he was
infatuated with flying, but I was unprepared for this: he did
not stop his motions or noises through the entirety of our
conversation.
That conversation was, to the best of my recollection, as
follows:
DENNIS: "I see that you got some more reads on the 53 after
it had FN'd." [swallowing] "How do you think this happened?"
Q: "I false reported." [still zooming his hand through the
air]
DENNIS: "You . . false . . . reported?" [beginning to
stutter] "Uh-on the w-worksheets?" [knowing that this was one of
the highest crimes an auditor could commit, and would require
ethics handling and retraining "from the bottom up"]
Q: "Yea. I false reported that the 53 FNed." [this said
as casually as if telling me he ate cereal for breakfast]
DENNIS: "Uh . . . " [struck with the import of the moment]
Q: "I always do."
DENNIS: "You mean . . ."
Q: "I mean I always false report when I have to FN a 53. I
disagree with having to do that on pcs. It never does anything
for the pc and it costs him hours of auditing. I think it's
better to just false report and get on with it."
DENNIS: "?......." [dumbstruck]
Q: "I think a lot of my father's stuff doesn't work. So I
false report whenever I need to. Personally, I think my father's
crazy."
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