Mafia $2,000,000 L. Ron HUBBARD Forged Check??

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Tigger

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Sep 12, 2009, 8:55:12 AM9/12/09
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LOL....The Mafia Tried to Screw the Founder of a ConGame??

Quote:

He was also charged with a variety of other crimes, including
possessing counterfeit money, trying to purchase several thousand
pounds of marijuana, conspiring in a $12 million check fraud scheme
and leading a check forgery scheme involving trying to deposit a check
for as much as $2 million drawn from the account of L. Ron Hubbard,
founder of the Church of Scientology.

Reynolds eventually became a government informant and wore a recording
device to implicate a Mafia figure in the Scientology scheme. He was
then admitted to the witness protection program, where he has
remained, because a Mafia member was planning to execute him, the
filing claims.

Reynolds' fraud and drug cases were consolidated, and he ultimately
served 13
End of Quote

Found on second page:

Petters cites U.S. secrecy in dismissal motion | StarTribune.com

http://www.startribune.com/local/59084527.htmlelr=KArks:DCiUHc3E7_V_nDaycUiD3aPc:_Yyc:aUU

Tigger

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Sep 12, 2009, 9:13:33 AM9/12/09
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Ooops. I didn't notice Tilman had posted this.

Go here for more background information:

fwd: Possible comeback of Larry Reservitz - alt.religion.scientology |
Google Groups

http://groups.google.com/group/alt.religion.scientology/browse_thread/thread/f080b3099098325e/8137403c77daa0a5?show_docid=8137403c77daa0a5#

http://tiny.cc/tKXdO

Android Cat

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Sep 12, 2009, 9:32:56 AM9/12/09
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2 million check, puzzling clues, tangled trails
January 28, 1984, Glenn Fowler, New York Times
http://select.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=FA0F11F93D5F0C7B8EDDA80894DC484D81
(pay per view)

One morning in the spring of 1982, two young men walked into the New York
branch of the Middle East Bank and presented a check for $2 million. The
check was signed by L. Ron Hubbard, the reclusive founder of the Church of
Scientology, who has not been seen ...

[Does anyone have a copy of that?]

Of course CoS tried to pin that on the top of the Enemies List.

Lawyer says Scientologists are seeking to 'frame' him
September 3, 1984, Robert Lindsey, New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com/1984/09/03/us/lawyer-says-scientologists-are-seeking-to-frame-him.html
(pay per view)
http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~dst/Krasel/cooper/bast/bast33 (secondary copy)

Most recently, Eugene M. Ingram, a private investigator for the Church of
Scientology who was discharged from the Los Angeles Police Department in
1981, has given the Federal authorities an affidavit signed by a citizen of
the United Arab Emirates who asserts that he once collaborated with Mr.
Flynn to pass a forged $2 million check.

In an interview, Mr. Flynn, who in the past five years has filed 20 lawsuits
against the church on behalf of former members and has himself been sued 13
times by the church, said: ''It's an outrageous attempt by the church to
frame me. They've been traveling around the country giving press conferences
about me. What they say is 100 percent false.''
[more Ingram sleeze]

--
Ron of that ilk.

Out_Of_The_Dark

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Sep 12, 2009, 10:12:06 AM9/12/09
to
On Sep 12, 9:32 am, "Android Cat" <androidca...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> Tigger wrote:
> > LOL....The Mafia Tried to Screw the Founder of a ConGame??
>
> > Quote:
>
> > He was also charged with a variety of other crimes, including
> > possessing counterfeit money, trying to purchase several thousand
> > pounds of marijuana, conspiring in a $12 million check fraud scheme
> > and leading a check forgery scheme involving trying to deposit a check
> > for as much as $2 million drawn from the account of L. Ron Hubbard,
> > founder of the Church of Scientology.
>
> > Reynolds eventually became a government informant and wore a recording
> > device to implicate a Mafia figure in the Scientology scheme. He was
> > then admitted to the witness protection program, where he has
> > remained, because a Mafia member was planning to execute him, the
> > filing claims.
>
> > Reynolds' fraud and drug cases were consolidated, and he ultimately
> > served 13
> > End of Quote
>
> > Found on second page:
>
> > Petters cites U.S. secrecy in dismissal motion | StarTribune.com
>
> >http://www.startribune.com/local/59084527.htmlelr=KArks:DCiUHc3E7_V_n...

>
> 2 million check, puzzling clues, tangled trails
> January 28, 1984, Glenn Fowler, New York Timeshttp://select.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=FA0F11F93D5F0C7B8EDDA...

> (pay per view)
>
> One morning in the spring of 1982, two young men walked into the New York
> branch of the Middle East Bank and presented a check for $2 million. The
> check was signed by L. Ron Hubbard, the reclusive founder of the Church of
> Scientology, who has not been seen ...
>
> [Does anyone have a copy of that?]
>
> Of course CoS tried to pin that on the top of the Enemies List.
>
> Lawyer says Scientologists are seeking to 'frame' him
> September 3, 1984, Robert Lindsey, New York Timeshttp://www.nytimes.com/1984/09/03/us/lawyer-says-scientologists-are-s...
> (pay per view)http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~dst/Krasel/cooper/bast/bast33(secondary copy)

>
> Most recently, Eugene M. Ingram, a private investigator for the Church of
> Scientology  who was discharged from the Los Angeles Police Department in
> 1981, has given the Federal authorities an affidavit signed by a citizen of
> the United Arab Emirates who asserts that he once collaborated with Mr.
> Flynn to pass a forged $2 million check.
>
> In an interview, Mr. Flynn, who in the past five years has filed 20 lawsuits
> against the church on behalf of former members and has himself been sued 13
> times by the church, said: ''It's an outrageous attempt by the church to
> frame me. They've been traveling around the country giving press conferences
> about me. What they say is 100 percent false.''
> [more Ingram sleeze]
>
> --
> Ron of that ilk.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

wow!

rhill

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Sep 12, 2009, 10:33:10 AM9/12/09
to
Android Cat wrote:
> 2 million check, puzzling clues, tangled trails
> January 28, 1984, Glenn Fowler, New York Times
> http://select.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=FA0F11F93D5F0C7B8EDDA80894DC484D81
> (pay per view)
>
> One morning in the spring of 1982, two young men walked into the New
> York branch of the Middle East Bank and presented a check for $2
> million. The check was signed by L. Ron Hubbard, the reclusive founder
> of the Church of Scientology, who has not been seen ...
>
> [Does anyone have a copy of that?]

/=====


One morning in the spring of 1982, two young men walked into the New
York branch of the Middle East Bank and presented a check for $2 million.

The check was signed by L. Ron Hubbard, the reclusive founder of

the Church of Scientology, who has not been seen in public for many
years. It was made out to one of the men, who gave his name as Aquil
Abdulamiar.

"We asked them for identification, but they had none," said Kaiser
Jaffery, the bank's officer in charge of the credit department. The men
disappeared, leaving the check behind and setting in motion a mysterious
chain of events involving a Wall Street brokerage firm, a Boston bank, a
California tax shelter and a possible connection to a drug-smuggler in
Florida.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation believes that the $2 million
check was a forgery and the two men imposters. But - as the outlines of
the mystery begin to emerge from interviews with many of those involved
- it appears the check had taken a long and tangled path from California
to the Middle East Bank on the 25th floor of a Madison Avenue office
building.

Reward Offered for Data

The agency says it is not giving high priority to the case, since
after all the theft was unsuccessful. Yet this week prominent
advertisements appeared in The New York Times and other newspapers in
New York, Boston and Washington offering a $100,000 reward for information.

The advertisements were placed by a private investigator hired by
the Church of Scientology, an organization claiming 6 million
"communicants" in 35 countries. Its president, Heber Jentzsch, reached
at the church's Los Angeles

headquarters, said he was worried that other attempts would be made to
steal money from the church.

"Where does this lead?" he said.

The trail began early in 1982 with a real check, apparently written
by the reclusive Mr. Hubbard on his personal money-management account
with E. F. Hutton, the Wall Street brokerage firm.

The check was evidently made out for between $1 million and $2
million, payable to a tax-shelter investment in California. It was duly
processed by the Bank of New England in Boston, which handles checks
written by holders of E.F. Hutton's cash reserve management accounts.
The money was transferred by the bank to the tax shelter.

Check Apparently a Photocopy

The check brought to the Middle East Bank in June 1982 was
apparently a high-quality photocopy of the original check, with an
altered date, the new payee and the amount raised to $2 million.

When the bank asked the men for identification, they left. And the
next day the bank got a telephone call from an "uncle" vouching for the
men but
offering no solid identification. The bank turned the check over to the
F.B.I.

The Church of Scientology says it is surprised that law enforcement
authorities are not more concerned about the case.

"How can someone pull a check off the line at a bank, make a copy
for fraudulent purposes and not be pursued?" Mr. Jentzsch asked. "We
have accounts all over the world. We'd like to know how something like
this can happen."

The church was founded in the 1950's by Mr. Hubbard, whose book
"Dianetics" set forth its program, which is carried out through teaching
and counseling centers. Scientology has been embroiled in controversy
in recent years, with some former members charging that its leaders have
amassed assets of more than $300 million, much of it tax-exempt, around
the world.

Mr. Hubbard's estranged son was closely associ ated with his father
in the early years of Scientology but later broke with Mr. Hubbard and
changed his name to Ronald E. DeWolf. He asserted in 1982 that his
father was dead or mentally incompetent and manipulated by the present
church hierarchy.

A California court rejected the allegations.

Mr. Jentzsch said he did not know the whereabouts of Mr. Hubbard,
whom he described as "a very private person." But he said he had
recently conveyed to a court legal documents signed by Mr. Hubbard that
bore the church founder's fingerprint to certify his identity.

Because of its concern about the altered check, the church has
engaged a private investigator, Eugene M. Ingram, to track it. Mr.
Ingram said his investigation had established that the genuine Hubbard
check payable to the tax shelter had been routinely deposited, processed
through the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston on March 9, 1982, and
delivered by courier to the Bank of New England two days later. The
canceled check was, as is customary, returned at the end of the month to
Mr. Hubbard, according to the investigator.

F.B.I. Notified by the Bank

"Some time after it had arrived at the bank the check was removed,
copied and replaced," Mr. Ingram said. "It was then altered and found
its way to the person who tried to deposit it on June 7 at the Middle
Eastern Bank."

The Bank of New England has refused a request by Mr. Ingram to
interview its employees, according to Denise Lane, vice president for
advertising and public relations.

"We notified the F.B.I. and conducted an internal investigation when
we learned of the bogus check," she said. "We found no evidence of
wrongdoing and no misapplication of procedures."

There was, she said, "no evidence that the check in question was
copied." She said it was not known where the false check had come from.
The bank referred Mr. Ingram to the F.B.I.

F.B.I. Still Investigating

Joseph Valiquette, spokesman for the F.B.I. in New York, confirmed
that a New York-based agent, Glenn Prinsze, was looking into the matter
but that no suspects had been charged. The F.B.I. is involved because
attempted bogus check-passing constitutes interstate transportation of
stolen goods.

"The newspaper ads this week are about the only new thing in this
case," Mr. Valiquette said.

Mr. Ingram, meanwhile, said he had been told by former employees of
the Bank of New England that two people - a Boston lawyer and a relative
of the lawyer "who is now a Washington restaurateur" - were seen in the
Bank of New England section that processes the E.F. Hutton cash reserve
management account in March 1982, at the time the legitimate check from
Mr. Hubbard was processed.

He said that a second check "for more than $500,000," drawn on
another E. F.Hutton account maintained by an orange-juice processing
company in the Southeast, had also been altered and an attempt had been
made to deposit it at the same time as Mr. Hubbard's altered check.

Trail Leads to Florida

Neither the Middle East Bank nor the Bank of New England would
confirm the existence of the second bogus check.

Mr. Ingram's trail has also led to a cousin of the Boston lawyer and
the Washington restaurateur who, he said, is in jail for drug-smuggling
in Florida.

"I want to find out if the forged check had anything to do with
that," he said.

Mr. Jaffery of the Middle East Bank described "Mr. Abdulamiar" and
his companion as Arabic men about 30 years old. They have not been seen
again by anyone connected with the investigation.

Mr. Ingram said he was satisfied that E.F. Hutton and the Federal
Reserve Bank of Boston were not in any way involved in the alteration of
the Hubbard check. James Tricarico, assistant general counsel for the
brokerage firm, said that Hutton's own investigation had found nothing
to indicate where the bogus check came from.

Apart from the $100,000 reward, the effort to trace the forged
Hubbard check has cost Mr. Ingram's client, the Church of Scientology,
tens of thousands of dollars for advertising as well as other
investigative expenses.

Copyright 1984 The New York Times Company
\=====

--
Ray.

Nook Encranny

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Sep 12, 2009, 1:10:12 PM9/12/09
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http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/U.S._v._Kattar_840_F.2d_118_%281988%29

Notice how the FBI got the goods on Eugene Ingram:

"At this point Reservitz, the actual mastermind of the check scheme,
became a cooperating witness and operative of the government. Reservitz
testified that he approached Church investigators to see if they would
attempt to procure false testimony from him. In effect, he was to be
bait for possible illegalities by the Church. Church investigator Ingram
did in fact try to get Reservitz to implicate Flynn. Reservitz, while
wearing a body recorder provided by the FBI, negotiated with the Church
investigators about how much he was to be paid for his incriminating
statements."

But the FBI never prosecuted him, or the church.

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