my stupid damn dream

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Lots42

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Aug 23, 2001, 6:13:05 AM8/23/01
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I dreamnt I was the first in a sacrifice planned by a bunch of insane psycho
family demons. Fifty years they had stopped by this spot and had chopped up
everyone they found in order to recieve enough power to live for another fifty
years.

I relived that incident and I really didn't want to go through this because
hey, being chopped up by axes was going to fucking hurt.

And of course, this was one of those ultra-realistic dreams.

I finally started thinking that this entire situation was too fucking weird and
*trying* to wake up wouldn't hurt anything because heck they were going to chop
me up with axes. So I tried to wake up and bam!

I woke up.


--
"If life gives a lemon, pull out a gun and start shooting."
Please spay or neuter your pet (and hot pavement hurts them)
Not all comic books are meant for kids! Read some!
"We pull pranks because we're goofy monkey children." - Recess

Joshua Hesse

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Aug 23, 2001, 9:35:58 AM8/23/01
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Lots42 <lot...@aol.comaol.com> wrote:

:And of course, this was one of those ultra-realistic dreams.

I had one like that yesterday. It involved pop-star divas (Britney, etc...)
being fed to giant demonic snakes. For some *bizzare* reason, I didn't
want to wake up.

-Josh
--
"I have also mastered pomposity, even if I do say so myself." -Kryten

UNL Anime Club: http://www.unl.edu/otaku

"I'd be proud to vote for tax increases... You bet I would." -Dick Gephardt

Dramar Ankalle

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Aug 23, 2001, 12:00:55 PM8/23/01
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Lots42 <lot...@aol.comaol.com> wrote in message
news:20010823061305...@mb-fh.aol.com...

> I dreamnt I was the first in a sacrifice planned by a bunch of insane
psycho
> family demons. Fifty years they had stopped by this spot and had chopped
up
> everyone they found in order to recieve enough power to live for another
fifty
> years.
>
> I relived that incident


Run the incident , but this time with *you* behind the glass with your hand
on the motorcycle throb volume, and the 7 Diadem visual intensity as well
.(might be fun projecting other doodads instead, and moving the cones so
other puny humans get herded into, I dunno, cash machine kiosks or something
and you can implant the desire for them to ``get out through the slot" or
something-pure laughery!)
Then yell
HOW DO YOU LIKE YOUR HALF DECADE NOW YOU PUNY EARTHLINKS???


and I really didn't want to go through this because
> hey, being chopped up by axes was going to fucking hurt.
>
> And of course, this was one of those ultra-realistic dreams.
>
> I finally started thinking that this entire situation was too fucking
weird and
> *trying* to wake up wouldn't hurt anything because heck they were going to
chop
> me up with axes. So I tried to wake up and bam!
>
> I woke up.
>
>

To be continued?

Lots42

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Aug 23, 2001, 12:34:55 PM8/23/01
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>From: "Dramar Ankalle" mika...@ix.netcom.com

>> I finally started thinking that this entire situation was too fucking
>weird and
>> *trying* to wake up wouldn't hurt anything because heck they were going to
>chop
>> me up with axes. So I tried to wake up and bam!
>>
>> I woke up.
>>
>>
>
>To be continued?

Maybe. I took another nap and dreamnt there was a family that had to evacuate
their spaceship because it was going to explode and they landed on a strange
planet and they had to leave one of the family members behind because there
wasn't enough room on the escape pod.

And this took place in 1900.

David DeLaney

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Aug 23, 2001, 2:34:45 PM8/23/01
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On 23 Aug 2001 10:13:05 GMT, Lots42 <lot...@aol.comaol.com> wrote:
>I relived that incident and I really didn't want to go through this because
>hey, being chopped up by axes was going to fucking hurt.

Correct.

>I finally started thinking that this entire situation was too fucking weird and
>*trying* to wake up wouldn't hurt anything because heck they were going to chop
>me up with axes. So I tried to wake up and bam!
>
>I woke up.

...Hmmm. Try it now, and see what happens?

Dave "chaos theory" DeLaney
--
\/David DeLaney posting from d...@vic.com "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
http://panacea.phys.utk.edu/~dbd/ - net.legends FAQ/ I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.

Glenn Knickerbocker

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Aug 23, 2001, 4:36:51 PM8/23/01
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"Lots42 " <lot...@aol.comaol.com> wrote

> I finally started thinking that this entire situation was too fucking
weird and
> *trying* to wake up wouldn't hurt anything because heck they were going to
chop
> me up with axes. So I tried to wake up and bam!
>
> I woke up.

Um, guess what?

¬("Ayup. Still dreaming.")R


Lots42

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Aug 24, 2001, 12:37:01 AM8/24/01
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>From: "Glenn Knickerbocker" No...@bestweb.net

Hell, no horrible ancient demons are waiting to chop me up with axes so I'm
find with that.


Shiro Akaishi

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Aug 24, 2001, 6:09:42 PM8/24/01
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on 23 Aug 2001, Lots42 did this!

> I dreamnt I was the first in a sacrifice planned by a bunch of insane

I dreemd too.

I was trying to stop a group of my school bullies from robbing a local
store. So I did. then one of them pulled out a machine gun and shot me in
the head three times but it didn't hurt, but it knocked me down and they
got away. Then I told various other people I know about it and they didn't
care. So I had this hole in my forehead where all three bullets had
entered, no exit wound, and presumably these three bullets in my head "in a
part of the brain I don't use anyway" which was the rationalization I had.

Then I woke up. I wish my dreams would stop being so obvious about it.

--
/\ _____________
(__\ |Shiro Akaishi| There are two extra Z's in my e-mail address.
) \. ------------- You need to remove them for my e-mail to be correct
/. But *which two*?

Jacob W. Haller

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Aug 24, 2001, 8:03:37 PM8/24/01
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I had a dream a few nights ago. I don't remember what it was about,
really. I know that it was a very frustrating dream and resulted in (or
from) me sleeping very fitfully.

One thing I do remember was that in the dream I was remembering the
different kinds of kryptonite (green, red, gold, white, and blue) and
what they did (weaken/kill superman, does something random to superman,
takes away superman's powers forever and ever, similar to green but only
affects plant life, and similar to green but only affects bizarro) and
they were really bugging me. "I mean," I thought in my dream, "how can
they know that gold kryptonite takes away Superman's powers? It's not
like we have a spare Superman to test on!" Etc. etc.

The next day I looked on the web and discovered my recollections of what
the different types of kryptonite were and what they did were correct.

Now I am considering suggesting that Apple base their next series of
iMacs on them.

-jwgh

--
"There is no known correct way to eat pistachio nuts. Nevertheless,
they are delicious. The pistachio nut must therefore be Nature's way of
teaching us self-control. If so, it doesn't work."
- Judith Martin, "Miss Manners' Guide to Excrutiatingly Correct
Behavior"

Stephenls

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Aug 25, 2001, 4:18:01 AM8/25/01
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Shiro Akaishi wrote:

> Then I woke up. I wish my dreams would stop being so obvious about
> it.

I like it when my dreams are obvious, because I like to FLY! but I can
only fly in my dreams (so far...) so whenever I realize I'm dreaming I
think to myself "Oh, that means I can fly now!" so any dream that's
obvious becomes a flying dream. Okaybye.
--
Stephenls
"Well, more like levitate I guess..."
Geek
And a quartet of round, red drops of blood, like so many tiny pebbles.
And a quartet of tiny, round, red pebbles, like so many drops of blood.
--Eric Halstrom, Chima Baifeng Shengshan Chun

Jeremy Impson

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Aug 25, 2001, 10:40:40 AM8/25/01
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On Sat, 25 Aug 2001, Stephenls wrote:

> I like it when my dreams are obvious, because I like to FLY! but I can
> only fly in my dreams (so far...) so whenever I realize I'm dreaming I
> think to myself "Oh, that means I can fly now!" so any dream that's
> obvious becomes a flying dream. Okaybye.

ME TOO! (Really.)

> "Well, more like levitate I guess..."

ME TOO!

> Geek

ME TOO!

--Jeremy

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Jeremy Impson
http://nwc.syr.edu/~jdimpson

Matt McIrvin

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Aug 25, 2001, 11:50:41 PM8/25/01
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In article <3B875F39...@dccnet.com>,
Stephenls <step...@dccnet.com> wrote:

> I like it when my dreams are obvious, because I like to FLY! but I can
> only fly in my dreams (so far...) so whenever I realize I'm dreaming I
> think to myself "Oh, that means I can fly now!" so any dream that's
> obvious becomes a flying dream. Okaybye.
> --
> Stephenls
> "Well, more like levitate I guess..."

I still occasionally get the dream in which I discover that I can
levitate about three feet across the ground, then tell myself
"Wait, this is possible in dreams, but as far as I know it's
impossible in the real world," but I don't get the connection
and spend a lot of time fretting about how it works.

--
Matt McIrvin

Stephenls

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Aug 26, 2001, 12:09:57 AM8/26/01
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Matt McIrvin wrote:

> I still occasionally get the dream in which I discover that I can
> levitate about three feet across the ground, then tell myself
> "Wait, this is possible in dreams, but as far as I know it's
> impossible in the real world," but I don't get the connection
> and spend a lot of time fretting about how it works.

I can fly /at will/ in dreams. It's just a matter of willing oneself to
levitate. Occasionally I can't get more than two feet or so off the
ground, but most of the time I can do whatever I want.

Hmm. Thought experiment. Picture a wheel on an upturned bicycle. Now,
in your head, make it spin. Get it spinning really fast.

How fast can you make the bicycle wheel pictured in your head stop
spinning?

Scroll down.

It usually takes me several seconds of concentration to make it stop
spinning. Even then, the image stays in my brain and starts up again as
soon as I stop trying to make it stay still.

Does this happen to anyone else? Not just upturned bicycles, but any
annoying repetitive mental image. Like for instance picture yourself
spinning 'round and 'round.
--
Stephenls

David DeLaney

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Aug 26, 2001, 1:08:15 AM8/26/01
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Jacob W. Haller <jw...@earthlink.net> wrote:
>One thing I do remember was that in the dream I was remembering the
>different kinds of kryptonite (green, red, gold, white, and blue) and

Hate to say this, but you missed three of them. (No, not silver, silver
was a hoax. Not a dream, not an imaginary story, but yes a hoax.)

>what they did (weaken/kill superman, does something random to superman,
>takes away superman's powers forever and ever, similar to green but only
>affects plant life, and similar to green but only affects bizarro) and
>they were really bugging me. "I mean," I thought in my dream, "how can
>they know that gold kryptonite takes away Superman's powers? It's not
>like we have a spare Superman to test on!" Etc. etc.

In the DC universe they had plenty, but they kept them real small in a
bottle, safely tucked away.

>Now I am considering suggesting that Apple base their next series of
>iMacs on them.

Dave "what exploded planet -is- Bill Gates from anyway?" DeLaney

Jacob W. Haller

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Aug 26, 2001, 10:36:34 AM8/26/01
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David DeLaney <d...@gatekeeper.vic.com> wrote:

> Jacob W. Haller <jw...@earthlink.net> wrote:
> >One thing I do remember was that in the dream I was remembering the
> >different kinds of kryptonite (green, red, gold, white, and blue) and
>
> Hate to say this, but you missed three of them.

I won't even ask.

[. . .]


> >"I mean," I thought in my dream, "how can they know that gold kryptonite
> >takes away Superman's powers? It's not like we have a spare Superman to
> >test on!"
>

> In the DC universe they had plenty, but they kept them real small in a
> bottle, safely tucked away.

But Kryptonite doesn't work on Superman when he's in Kandor (and he
doesn't have any super powers either). Though sometimes the little
Supermen folk get out of the bottle and help big Superman out, so maybe
that's how they found out? Inquiring minds sort of want to know!

-jwgh

--
"That is perhaps the best reason to get married: [to] have someone to
split a bottle of wine with."
- Markian Gooley

Lots42

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Aug 26, 2001, 11:26:03 AM8/26/01
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>From: Stephenls step...@dccnet.com
>Does this happen to anyone else? Not just upturned bicycles, but any
>annoying repetitive mental image. Like for instance picture yourself
>spinning 'round and 'round.
>--


Of course. It's like trying not to think about purple alligators dive bombing
nuns.


Matt McIrvin

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Aug 26, 2001, 9:05:57 PM8/26/01
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In article <3B887695...@dccnet.com>,
Stephenls <step...@dccnet.com> wrote:

> Hmm. Thought experiment. Picture a wheel on an upturned bicycle. Now,
> in your head, make it spin. Get it spinning really fast.
>
> How fast can you make the bicycle wheel pictured in your head stop
> spinning?

Instantly. I'm very good at thinking about upturned bicycle wheels
spinning because of childhood experience. My best buddy when I was
three, Jeffery, had a cool-looking tricycle with a sporty chrome front
wheel that he'd ride up and down the block yelling "WIPEOUT! WIPEOUT!"
and sometimes, when he was in a particularly theatrical mood, he'd
overturn the tricycle and spin the shiny front wheel manually, still
screaming "WIPEOUT! WIPEOUT!" It was truly a spectacle to amaze and
astonish all who looked upon him, and was possibly the eighth wonder
of the world, or at least of that one block in North Ridgeville, Ohio.
And it was a pretty big block.

--
Matt McIrvin

David DeLaney

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Aug 26, 2001, 10:04:06 PM8/26/01
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Jacob W. Haller <jw...@earthlink.net> wrote:
>David DeLaney <d...@gatekeeper.vic.com> wrote:
>> Jacob W. Haller <jw...@earthlink.net> wrote:
>> >One thing I do remember was that in the dream I was remembering the
>> >different kinds of kryptonite (green, red, gold, white, and blue) and
>>
>> Hate to say this, but you missed three of them.
>
>I won't even ask.

Too late: Jewel Kryptonite, which played some part in General Zod's adventures;
Anti-Kryptonite, which only affects non-superpowered Kryptonians; and X-
Kryptonite, which was the power source for Streaky the SuperCat. (IA_N_MTU,
though someone else certainly got paid to.)

>> In the DC universe they had plenty, but they kept them real small in a
>> bottle, safely tucked away.
>
>But Kryptonite doesn't work on Superman when he's in Kandor (and he
>doesn't have any super powers either).

Correct. That you'd need Anti-Kryptonite for.

> Though sometimes the little
>Supermen folk get out of the bottle and help big Superman out, so maybe
>that's how they found out? Inquiring minds sort of want to know!

Probably yes, one of the li'l expendables got expended.

Dave

Brack!

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Aug 27, 2001, 8:24:47 PM8/27/01
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On 26 Aug 2001 22:04:06 -0400, d...@gatekeeper.vic.com (David DeLaney)
wrote:

>Too late: Jewel Kryptonite, which played some part in General Zod's adventures;
>Anti-Kryptonite, which only affects non-superpowered Kryptonians; and X-
>Kryptonite, which was the power source for Streaky the SuperCat. (IA_N_MTU,
>though someone else certainly got paid to.)

http://www.sideroad.com/comics/column21.html

"Of course, it didn't stop there. You see, if Superboy had a superpet
to aid him in his adventures, then, logically, Supergirl needed one
too. So, along came Streaky the Supercat, a normal Earth cat who's
powers came from a fragment of Kryptonite-X lodged in his ball of
yarn. Don't ask."


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James Kibo Parry

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Aug 28, 2001, 12:14:23 AM8/28/01
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Stephenls (step...@dccnet.com) wrote:
> >
> > Hmm. Thought experiment. Picture a wheel on an upturned bicycle. Now,
> > in your head, make it spin. Get it spinning really fast.
> >
> > How fast can you make the bicycle wheel pictured in your head stop
> > spinning?

Do you mean if I imagine I'm stopping it with my hands, or if I imagine
I'm stopping it with the power of my MIND?

Matt McIrvin (mmci...@world.std.com) wrote:
>
> Instantly. I'm very good at thinking about upturned bicycle wheels
> spinning because of childhood experience. My best buddy when I was
> three, Jeffery, had a cool-looking tricycle with a sporty chrome front
> wheel that he'd ride up and down the block yelling "WIPEOUT! WIPEOUT!"
> and sometimes, when he was in a particularly theatrical mood, he'd
> overturn the tricycle and spin the shiny front wheel manually, still
> screaming "WIPEOUT! WIPEOUT!" It was truly a spectacle to amaze and
> astonish all who looked upon him, and was possibly the eighth wonder
> of the world, or at least of that one block in North Ridgeville, Ohio.
> And it was a pretty big block.

This wasn't one of those special deluxe plastic Big Wheel trikes with
the lever you could pull to make the vehicle fishtail, roll, and explode,
was it? I bet it wasn't, because if he had one of those he wouldn't
have enjoyed the concept of wipeouts so much. He would have been one
big scab with bones sticking out of it in two or three places where
the arms and legs used to be. I never had one of those toys, but I
knew from the commercials that they were incredibly dangerous. Besides,
if they weren't that dangerous, why would anyone bother pulling the
lever? "Waah! I pulled the lever and nobody got hurt!"

Steve Jobs says a computer is a bicycle for the mind. I say it's a
"this is not a pipe" for a fish. Or vice versa. I'm not sure.
Sometimes it's hard to understand what Steve Jobs is talking about.
I understand the parts that are exactly the opposite of everything
Bill Gates says, but the other stuff doesn't make sense even if I
invert it. For instance, I don't know why Bill Gates would say
that a computer is NOT a bicycle for the mind. No, wait, he'd say
that because he's unimaginative and literal. But I still don't know
what it means except that I think Steve Jobs wants to sniff your
computercycle's seat.

None of this is to be confused with that kid in second grade who
went around yelling "DIAPERS! DIAPERS!", and at the time, he wasn't me.
I did have this book about alligators living in the New York City
sewers that showed baby alligators being flushed down toilets
accompanied by a "SHIK!" sound, so I spent a day shouting "SHIK!"
until I got busted for saying a swear word I hadn't actually learned
to use in conversation yet. This oft-told story of how the school's
playground matron increased my vocabulary is true, no shit.

-- K.

Matt, was this the same kid
who liked to say "DICK! STRIP!
DICK! STRIP!"? And if so,
was he Chester Gould?

Talysman the Ur-Beatle

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Aug 28, 2001, 2:45:53 PM8/28/01
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ki...@world.std.com (James "Kibo" Parry) wrote in message news:<kibo-28080...@ppp0b015.std.com>...

[ a whole bunch of stuff about Big Wheels ]

> Steve Jobs says a computer is a bicycle for the mind. I say it's a
> "this is not a pipe" for a fish. Or vice versa. I'm not sure.
> Sometimes it's hard to understand what Steve Jobs is talking about.
> I understand the parts that are exactly the opposite of everything
> Bill Gates says, but the other stuff doesn't make sense even if I
> invert it. For instance, I don't know why Bill Gates would say
> that a computer is NOT a bicycle for the mind. No, wait, he'd say
> that because he's unimaginative and literal. But I still don't know
> what it means except that I think Steve Jobs wants to sniff your
> computercycle's seat.

I think Steve Jobs thinks that a bicycle is the ultimate creator
of physical fitness, or at least thinks that saying "a computer is
a stairmaster for the mind" would sound stupid.

stupider.

and "a computer is a thighmaster for the mind" just leads to lots
of unsettling imagery involving Suzanne Summers singing about
hard drives.

anyways, it's all silly, because when some people (me) think about
bicycles in terms of physical fitness, we think about exercycles,
which usually are used for three days, then get put in the corner
to gather dust before being sold at a yard sale. which is sort of
what happens to many people's computers, so maybe he's right.

when I think of people using bicycles for exercise, I also sometimes
think about those people who are cycling fanatics. unfortunately,
they ride their bicycles so much they become thin and gaunt.

I suppose the equivalent to this in the Steve Jobs universe would
be people who used their computers so much, they become Talosians.

> None of this is to be confused with that kid in second grade who
> went around yelling "DIAPERS! DIAPERS!", and at the time, he wasn't me.

when did he become you?

Glenn Knickerbocker

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Aug 28, 2001, 3:53:22 PM8/28/01
to
James Kibo Parry wrote:
> Steve Jobs says a computer is a bicycle for the mind.

I say we need computer monitors powered by exercise bikes.

ŹR

James Kibo Parry

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Aug 28, 2001, 5:16:57 PM8/28/01
to
Talysman the Ur-Beatle (taly...@globalsurrealism.com) wrote:

>
> James "Kibo" Parry (ki...@world.std.com) wrote:
> >
> > Steve Jobs says a computer is a bicycle for the mind. I say it's a
> > "this is not a pipe" for a fish. Or vice versa. I'm not sure.
> > Sometimes it's hard to understand what Steve Jobs is talking about.
> > I understand the parts that are exactly the opposite of everything
> > Bill Gates says, but the other stuff doesn't make sense even if I
> > invert it. For instance, I don't know why Bill Gates would say
> > that a computer is NOT a bicycle for the mind. No, wait, he'd say
> > that because he's unimaginative and literal. But I still don't know
> > what it means except that I think Steve Jobs wants to sniff your
> > computercycle's seat.
>
> I think Steve Jobs thinks that a bicycle is the ultimate creator
> of physical fitness, or at least thinks that saying "a computer is
> a stairmaster for the mind" would sound stupid.
>
> stupider.
>
> and "a computer is a thighmaster for the mind" just leads to lots
> of unsettling imagery involving Suzanne Summers singing about
> hard drives.

I like to think of my computer as a RangeFinder for the mind, because
it keeps going "ding ding DING ding ding DING ding ding DING" and when
I stop it I can't restart it for 24 hours.

> anyways, it's all silly, because when some people (me) think about
> bicycles in terms of physical fitness, we think about exercycles,
> which usually are used for three days, then get put in the corner
> to gather dust before being sold at a yard sale. which is sort of
> what happens to many people's computers, so maybe he's right.

I thought present-day computers (no matter how unloved or broken)
just went into the closet and stayed there because WE CAN'T THROW
IT AWAY BECAUSE IT'S A COMPUTER! Every business I've ever worked
at has had stacks of computers that are old and broken and not
worth repairing but they can't throw them out because they PAID
MONEY for them once upon a time. Of course, Massachusetts recently
passed a law making it illegal to throw out anything like a computer,
which I think was a clever bit of reverse-psychology to get people
to clean out those closets.

Pre-Windows computers, on the other hand (things like TI-99/4A's)
do show up at garage sales all the time. This is because every
computer is either worth five dollars to is too valuable to ever
through out even if most of the insides are missing.

> when I think of people using bicycles for exercise, I also sometimes
> think about those people who are cycling fanatics. unfortunately,
> they ride their bicycles so much they become thin and gaunt.

And they have legs shaped like Popeye's but their arms still look
like Olive Oyl's.

> I suppose the equivalent to this in the Steve Jobs universe would
> be people who used their computers so much, they become Talosians.

I think that instead of calling nerds "nerds" we should call them "Talosers"
from now on.

> > None of this is to be confused with that kid in second grade who
> > went around yelling "DIAPERS! DIAPERS!", and at the time, he wasn't me.
>
> when did he become you?

Someday I will learn that whenever I hold The Obvious Door open,
normal people will walk through it. I have trouble understanding
that other people don't operate on reverse psychology the way
sitcom people do.

-- K.

I wish people had NO psychology.

That will be the only way we
will ever achieve free will!

"It's got more power and all the hype, but should you really care
about Intel's new chip?" -- Headline News headline

Matt McIrvin

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Aug 29, 2001, 1:00:42 AM8/29/01
to
In article <kibo-28080...@ppp0b015.std.com>,

ki...@world.std.com (James "Kibo" Parry) wrote:

> Matt McIrvin (mmci...@world.std.com) wrote:
> >
> > Instantly. I'm very good at thinking about upturned bicycle wheels
> > spinning because of childhood experience. My best buddy when I was
> > three, Jeffery, had a cool-looking tricycle with a sporty chrome front
> > wheel that he'd ride up and down the block yelling "WIPEOUT! WIPEOUT!"

[...]


>
> This wasn't one of those special deluxe plastic Big Wheel trikes with
> the lever you could pull to make the vehicle fishtail, roll, and explode,
> was it?

Nah, it was really, really shiny. Or maybe my memory is just playing
tricks on me, because I was three at the time.

> Matt, was this the same kid
> who liked to say "DICK! STRIP!
> DICK! STRIP!"? And if so,
> was he Chester Gould?

That was much later, after I had moved to Virginia.
The DICK! STRIP! kid was at the far more sophisticated
age of about seven. Or maybe eight or nine-- I think that one was
one of the kids who got held back a lot and ended up bigger than
everybody else.

--
Matt McIrvin

Talysman the Ur-Beatle

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Aug 29, 2001, 1:41:47 PM8/29/01
to
ki...@world.std.com (James "Kibo" Parry) wrote in message news:<kibo-28080...@ppp0c012.std.com>...

> I thought present-day computers (no matter how unloved or broken)
> just went into the closet and stayed there because WE CAN'T THROW
> IT AWAY BECAUSE IT'S A COMPUTER!

[ ... ]

> Pre-Windows computers, on the other hand (things like TI-99/4A's)
> do show up at garage sales all the time. This is because every
> computer is either worth five dollars to is too valuable to ever
> through out even if most of the insides are missing.

well, yeah, you stack computers in the closet if you're a GEEK.
but ordinary people who know nothing about computers but buy
one anyway because the next door neighbors jumped off a cliff,
they usually use their spiffy new toy a few days, then say,
"math is hard!" and ignore it.

if they have kids, the kids wind up using it.

otherwise, it's just a cutting edge doorstop.

... or maybe they figure out how to log onto the internet
(just barely), write letters, and download porn, but that's
it. then, the next door neighbor jumps off an even BIGGER
cliff, so they start saying "I need a more powerful computer.
if I had a 2 gigglyhertz pentium, I would be able to type
email faster!"

> I think that instead of calling nerds "nerds" we should call them "Talosers"
> from now on.

yes, but... WE'RE TALOSERS!

I think we should start calling nerds "bald big-headed telepaths"
without ever explaining the reasoning behind it. we should
even organize public demonstrations against the proliferation
of bald big-headed telepaths in the computer industry. we should
publicly call bill gates and scott mcnealy bald big-headed
telepaths.

ZDNet would love it.

Jacob W. Haller

unread,
Aug 29, 2001, 9:19:36 PM8/29/01
to
David DeLaney <d...@gatekeeper.vic.com> wrote:

[. . .]


> > Though sometimes the little
> >Supermen folk get out of the bottle and help big Superman out, so maybe
> >that's how they found out? Inquiring minds sort of want to know!
>
> Probably yes, one of the li'l expendables got expended.

Seems awful dark for the era we're talking about.

-jwgh

--
"[. . .] TV is never wrong about anything, although they come close
whenever they talk about typography."
- James "Kibo" Parry, alt.religion.kibology 12 May 2001

David DeLaney

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Aug 30, 2001, 3:24:09 AM8/30/01
to
Jacob W. Haller <jw...@earthlink.net> wrote:
>David DeLaney <d...@gatekeeper.vic.com> wrote:
>[. . .]
>> > Though sometimes the little
>> >Supermen folk get out of the bottle and help big Superman out, so maybe
>> >that's how they found out? Inquiring minds sort of want to know!
>>
>> Probably yes, one of the li'l expendables got expended.
>
>Seems awful dark for the era we're talking about.

They probably only ever referred to it in flashbacks, or news stories (didja
ever notice that they had PDAs in Kandor about 30 years ago?), or the like.
Getting killed onstage was only done in, say, Adam Strange, or Legionb of
Superb-Heroebs, back then (I'm remembering a particular icky panel featuring
a pair of booted legs sticking out of the maw of a giant Venus-Flytrap-type
plant...).

It wasn't until after the Dark Knight Returned that they felt it was okay to
show Zod and his two friends killing off an entire planetful of alternate
Earthlings, remember.

Dave "horribly scarred survivors that GOT ALL BETTER MAGICALLY BY
SHAPESHIFTING" DeLaney


--
\/David DeLaney posting from d...@vic.com "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>

http://www.vic.com/~dbd/ - net.legends FAQ & Magic / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.

Jacob W. Haller

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Aug 30, 2001, 11:29:26 PM8/30/01
to
James "Kibo" Parry <ki...@world.std.com> wrote:

[. . .]


> I thought present-day computers (no matter how unloved or broken)
> just went into the closet and stayed there because WE CAN'T THROW
> IT AWAY BECAUSE IT'S A COMPUTER! Every business I've ever worked
> at has had stacks of computers that are old and broken and not
> worth repairing but they can't throw them out because they PAID
> MONEY for them once upon a time.

Yay! One of my .sigs is suddenly and unexpectedly relevent!

"If Americans treated dead people the way they treat dead computers,
their basements and closets would be cluttered with family corpses."
--Carey Goldberg,
"Where Do Computers Go When They Die", New York Times 3/12/98

So Kibo is corraborated by the New York Times, so they BOTH WIN!
JOURNALISM WAS SAVED!

[. . .]


> Pre-Windows computers, on the other hand (things like TI-99/4A's)
> do show up at garage sales all the time. This is because every
> computer is either worth five dollars to is too valuable to ever
> through out even if most of the insides are missing.

The invisible hand of economics as instantiated by eBay seems to think
that they're worth a LOT MORE than that, bucko!
http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1268361508

[. . .]


> > > None of this is to be confused with that kid in second grade who
> > > went around yelling "DIAPERS! DIAPERS!", and at the time, he wasn't me.
> >
> > when did he become you?
>
> Someday I will learn that whenever I hold The Obvious Door open,
> normal people will walk through it. I have trouble understanding
> that other people don't operate on reverse psychology the way
> sitcom people do.

The only solution is AVERSION THERAPY! ONLY THROUGH PAINFUL
CONDITIONING CAN PEOPLE ACHIEVE FREE WILL!

Man in lab coat: "At the time, he wasn't me."
Subject: "When did he become you?" BZZT "GAH!"
Man in lab coat: "Again!"

[SUBJECT turns into a TELETUBBY and skips away happily.]

Man in lab coat: "The experiment was a success!"

[He turns toward the camera.]

Man in lab coat: "...or WAS IT?"

[DAVID LETTERMAN giggles unconvincingly and throws a notecard at the
camera.]

-jwgh

--
My only problem is that the letter sounds vaguely menacing -- sort of
like receiving a threat from a post-modernist gangster, who makes you an
offer you can't understand.
- Charlie Stross in alt.sysadmin.recovery 17 Dec 1999

Zixia

unread,
Sep 5, 2001, 2:22:40 PM9/5/01
to
taly...@globalsurrealism.com (Talysman the Ur-Beatle) wrote in
news:49699b6a.0108...@posting.google.com:

> ... or maybe they figure out how to log onto the internet
> (just barely), write letters, and download porn, but that's
> it. then, the next door neighbor jumps off an even BIGGER
> cliff, so they start saying "I need a more powerful computer.
> if I had a 2 gigglyhertz pentium, I would be able to type
> email faster!"

Or they overclock their mashines to get an extra fps to play their 1337
g4m35!

Also, http://www.google.com/intl/xx-hacker/

Although, I will only be using this other one for searches from now on:

http://www.google.com/intl/xx-bork/


--
Zixia IQC# 52428759 ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^
All would live long, ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^
But none would be old. o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
zi...@btinternet.com /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\

Talysman the Ur-Beatle

unread,
Sep 6, 2001, 12:33:01 PM9/6/01
to
Zixia <zi...@btinternet.com> wrote in message news:<Xns9113C4600144...@130.133.1.4>...

> Also, http://www.google.com/intl/xx-hacker/
>
> Although, I will only be using this other one for searches from now on:
>
> http://www.google.com/intl/xx-bork/

ehoah, I knew about the Bork option, but didn't know you
could access it by URL instead of by cookie... and I didn't
realize they added a l33t hax0r language.

btw, if anyone doesn't know about

http://images.google.com/

they should be spanked.

Kevin S. Wilson

unread,
Sep 6, 2001, 3:15:31 PM9/6/01
to
On 6 Sep 2001 09:33:01 -0700, taly...@globalsurrealism.com (Talysman
the Ur-Beatle) wrote:

>Zixia <zi...@btinternet.com> wrote in message news:<Xns9113C4600144...@130.133.1.4>...
>
>> Also, http://www.google.com/intl/xx-hacker/
>>
>> Although, I will only be using this other one for searches from now on:
>>
>> http://www.google.com/intl/xx-bork/
>
>ehoah, I knew about the Bork option, but didn't know you
>could access it by URL instead of by cookie... and I didn't
>realize they added a l33t hax0r language.

What is the URL (pronounced "Earl") that displays Google in pig latin?

>btw, if anyone doesn't know about
>
>http://images.google.com/
>
>they should be spanked.

Okay. But I get to choose who does the spanking.


Kevin S. Wilson
Tech Writer
Instructional Technology Center--Boise State University
But only a kook would think I speak for my employer.

Tobias Kellner

unread,
Sep 6, 2001, 3:44:09 PM9/6/01
to
"Kevin S. Wilson" wrote:
>
> [...]
> What is the URL (pronounced "Earl") that displays Google in pig
> latin?

hmm, lessee...
if hax0r-style is http://www.google.com/intl/xx-hacker/
and Bork, bork, bork! is http://www.google.com/intl/xx-bork/
there is the remote possibility that pig-latin could be found at
http://www.google.com/intl/xx-piglatin/

hth :)
A Bee Skin Troll

-----BEGIN GEEK CODE BLOCK-----
Version: 3.12
GCS d-(+)@ s:- a-- C+++ UL+++ P+ L+>++ E- W+>+++ N++ o K w !O !M !V
PS++ PE+ Y+ PGP t+ 5 X R>+ tv+ b+>++ DI++ UF++ D++ G++ e h! r++ y+
------END GEEK CODE BLOCK------

Kevin S. Wilson

unread,
Sep 6, 2001, 4:17:17 PM9/6/01
to
On Thu, 06 Sep 2001 21:44:09 +0200, Tobias Kellner
<tkel...@hyperwave.com> wrote:

>"Kevin S. Wilson" wrote:
>>
>> [...]
>> What is the URL (pronounced "Earl") that displays Google in pig
>> latin?
>
>hmm, lessee...
>if hax0r-style is http://www.google.com/intl/xx-hacker/
>and Bork, bork, bork! is http://www.google.com/intl/xx-bork/
>there is the remote possibility that pig-latin could be found at
>http://www.google.com/intl/xx-piglatin/

I feel dum. I tried that, having cleverly noted the pattern you've
identified here, but I forgot to put a / (pronounced "Axle Rose") at
the end.

Joe Manfre

unread,
Sep 6, 2001, 5:23:25 PM9/6/01
to
Kevin S. Wilson (res...@micron.net) wrote:

> Tobias Kellner <tkel...@hyperwave.com> wrote:

>>Kevin S. Wilson wrote:
>>>
>>> [...] What is the URL (pronounced "Earl") that displays Google in
>>> pig latin?
>>
>>hmm, lessee... if hax0r-style is
>>http://www.google.com/intl/xx-hacker/ and Bork, bork, bork! is
>>http://www.google.com/intl/xx-bork/ there is the remote possibility
>>that pig-latin could be found at
>>http://www.google.com/intl/xx-piglatin/
>
> I feel dum. I tried that, having cleverly noted the pattern you've
> identified here, but I forgot to put a / (pronounced "Axle Rose") at
> the end.


Er .... how come the page has no "Ooglegay" on it?

Fraidy-cats. Don't wanna dilute the OH-SO-VALUABLE dopey New
Economy(tm) trademark, eh?

Oh, how delighted I'll be if Google goes out of business.


JM

--
Joe Manfre, Hyattsville, Maryland.
"An ouect im motion's fibration makes knoetic energy biger."
-- tj Frazir

Zixia

unread,
Sep 6, 2001, 6:11:12 PM9/6/01
to
man...@flash.net (Joe Manfre) wrote in news:9n8pgb$5u6ja$2@ID-
81441.news.dfncis.de:

> Er .... how come the page has no "Ooglegay" on it?
>
> Fraidy-cats. Don't wanna dilute the OH-SO-VALUABLE dopey New
> Economy(tm) trademark, eh?
>
> Oh, how delighted I'll be if Google goes out of business.

Be fair -- they also have an Elmer Fudd version:

http://www.google.com/intl/xx-elmer/

Glenn Knickerbocker

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Sep 6, 2001, 6:58:51 PM9/6/01
to
Joe Manfre wrote:
> Er .... how come the page has no "Ooglegay" on it?

I bet this is not so much about trademark protection as about the
interfaces to their language parsers. They probably have the same
problem with other languages with strict phonetic rules, like Japanese.

¬(Guguru!)L

Paula

unread,
Sep 7, 2001, 12:36:38 AM9/7/01
to
On 9/6/01 12:15 PM, Kevin S. Wilson tried to make me believe that:

> Kevin S. Wilson
> Tech Writer
> Instructional Technology Center--Boise State University
> But only a kook would think I speak for my employer.

But you're not speaking, you're writing. And only a kook would think a tech
writer doesn't write for his employer.

Paula
Thanks for the candy, Boise State University

Rid

unread,
Sep 7, 2001, 3:17:30 AM9/7/01
to
On 6 Sep 2001 21:23:25 GMT, man...@flash.net (Joe Manfre) wrote:

>Er .... how come the page has no "Ooglegay" on it?

not that there's anything wrong with that.
--
Philip parked, unbuckled the seat belt, exhaled. Work. It could be worse.
It had been. This was safe harbour. So far, he had seen no signs
of Cthulhu or Yog-Sothoth or his dread messenger, Nyarlathotep.
- William Browning Spencer _Resume with Monsters_

Kevin S. Wilson

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Sep 7, 2001, 11:24:59 AM9/7/01
to
On Fri, 07 Sep 2001 04:36:38 GMT, Paula <MmmTob...@earthlink.net>
wrote:

>On 9/6/01 12:15 PM, Kevin S. Wilson tried to make me believe that:
>
>> Kevin S. Wilson
>> Tech Writer
>> Instructional Technology Center--Boise State University
>> But only a kook would think I speak for my employer.
>
>But you're not speaking, you're writing. And only a kook would think a tech
>writer doesn't write for his employer.

Indeed. The kook in question is a loon by the name of Doug Wiser
<drw...@socal.rr.com>, who has been stinking up
news.admin.net-abuse.email for the past week or so. He came in there
whining that . . . are you ready for this?. . . somebody on Usenet
called him . . . brace yourself . . . a pedophile! Yes, I know.
Unheard of. Unimaginable. But true nonetheless.

The last line of my .sig used to contain the URL of my department's
web site. But apparently I angered the kook by suggesting that he read
the charter for news.admin.net-abuse.email and then promptly piss off.
True to his kook nature, he clicked with his mouse on the URL and
fired off the following note to the first e-mail address he
encountered:

"Is this really how your want your school services, and its staff,
considered?

"Maybe a short talk with Kevin S. Wilson could be fruitful and you
could explain that using the school's web page under circumstances
such as being used to tell folks to piss off is not really in the
school's best interest."

This kook has some difficulty distinguishing between web sites,
Usenet, and his own computer. For some reason, the presence of a URL
in my .sig has him convinced that I'm using our web site to post to
Usenet. When last we heard from him, he was further confused by my new
.sig, which led him to ask, "So are you saying that Boise State is
your employer?"

I tell you, it's just one thing after another on this here interweb.
BTW, the recipient of the kook's e-mail (a cow-orker) did have a short
talk with me. It went something like this:

HIM: Kevin, it looks like you got into a flame war with someone on
Usenet and he saw your signature and mailed me about it.

ME: Whuh?

HIM: Some guy named Doug Wiser.

ME: Oh, yeah. He's a loon. Listen, I have to go meet my wife for
lunch.

HIM: Okay. Talk to you later.

>Thanks for the candy, Boise State University

Anytime. Except Wednesday.

Kevin S. Wilson
Tech Writer
Instructional Technology Center--Boise State University

But only a kook <drw...@socal.rr.com> would think I speak for my employer.

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