Does anyone post anything about recumbent bikes here?

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mugwump

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Apr 11, 2005, 9:44:27 AM4/11/05
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It looks like the couple a-holes who were mucking this place up have
left, but I guess they chased off everyone else before they too
departed.

Anyone have a Giant Revive (I know, not a "real" recumbent)? I am
thinking of getting one for my wife. Anyone know where I can get a
deal on a new or used revive?

Thanks!

Bob Socks

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Apr 11, 2005, 3:40:02 PM4/11/05
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Rievives are great for a casual ride around the neighborhood (provided you
don't live in a hilly neighborhood).

Where to get one? Your local Giant dealer would be your obvious first
choice - and go from there. If you are looking for a used one then eBay
would be a good bet. You might try some of the recumbent for sale boards,
but as you say they aren't real recumbents.

BS

"mugwump" <mug...@interzone.com> wrote in message
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mugwump

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Apr 11, 2005, 9:02:00 PM4/11/05
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She'll probably ride it 4 times per year, just around the
neighborhood, not too hilly. I hate to blow so much money for such
minimal riding, but everytime she rides her current bike she complains
about it. All the things she complains about seem to be corrected in
the Revive.

Who knows, maybe if she like the Revive she'll ride more...

Bob Socks

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Apr 11, 2005, 10:45:56 PM4/11/05
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"mugwump" <mug...@interzone.com> wrote in message
news:6a7m51952blauij8e...@4ax.com...

From all reports the Revive is an easy bike to ride and is comfortable for
short distances. This sounds like what your wife would like.

I took a look at eBay and didn't find one there.

I suppose you have considered the EZ One and theTailwind. They would be
capable of longer rides, with greater comfort and performance over the long
haul in my opinion.

BS


Jon Meinecke

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Apr 12, 2005, 7:43:55 AM4/12/05
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"mugwump" <mug...@interzone.com> wrote

BikeE may also address the comfort issues of casual/infrequent
riders. They may be easier to locate used/cheap, for a while
there were a number of NOS (new old stock) of the discontinued
BikeE models. They still seem to appear fairly regularly on
used bike for sale lists.

BikeEs are not limited to short distance rides. I rode mine on
a number of 50 milers. BikeEs are great utility bikes, too.

Jon


mugwump

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Apr 12, 2005, 10:18:58 PM4/12/05
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I looked at Bike Es. I don't think they are suitable for her. She
will immediately complain about the chain (possibly greasing up her
pants) and rlelatively high step over height.

A "real" recumbent is also out, even though for the same price range
it would be better for distance riding. She won't ride distance, so
all the things that contribute to distance comfort and efficiency
would be a problem.

No, I need low step over hieght, flat-foot capability, covered chain,
size for 5'2" tall woman, kick stand, fenders, and maybe a basket of
some sort. Minimal gear shifting is preferred, like a 3 or 7 speed
hub would be ideal. Cushy seat, back support a plus.

I'll keep watching ebay I guess.

Thanks!

Jon Meinecke

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Apr 13, 2005, 9:04:37 AM4/13/05
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"mugwump" <mug...@interzone.com> wrote

> I looked at Bike Es. I don't think they are suitable for her. She
> will immediately complain about the chain (possibly greasing up her
> pants) and rlelatively high step over height.

The best bike for her (anyone) is the one she *will ride*, of course.
Perception is reality. The "perfect" bike, sitting unused, is by
definition, not the best bike.

> A "real" recumbent is also out, even though for the same price range
> it would be better for distance riding. She won't ride distance, so

Many of us recumbent converts are riding distances we might
unlikely have considered "BR" (before recumbent). Within 6
months of being told I'd need back surgery, I was riding 25-30
miles recumbently and avoided the surgery. 50 miles within a
year and enjoying it.

I now have a couple of other recumbents much better suited to
long-range cycling that the BikeE. Most of my BikeE rides are
now just jump-on-and-go 5-10 milers.

> all the things that contribute to distance comfort and efficiency
> would be a problem.

Not sure what this is referring to... "Real" recumbents cover a
lot of territory, design-wise, geometry-wise, etc... I wasn't
(and still don't) set any speed records riding distances
comfortably. Many of the things that contribute to distance
comfort also contribute to short-haul comfort. Some of
the things that contribute to distance efficiency and speed
may be problematic for more casual riding (bottom bracket
height, seating angle, clipless pedals, etc...)

> No, I need low step over height, flat-foot capability, covered chain,


> size for 5'2" tall woman, kick stand, fenders, and maybe a basket of
> some sort. Minimal gear shifting is preferred, like a 3 or 7 speed
> hub would be ideal. Cushy seat, back support a plus.

If lacking a covered chain is a show stopper then there are few
choices. None the less, the step-over height of the BikeE
compared to the Revive is probably only slightly higher. And
the seat height is lower for "flat footing". The seat and back
may be more supportive and comfortable in the long run than
the Revive, even for short rides. With a 20 liter plastic storage
box mounted behind the seat on mine, it is a great utility bike.
People from 6 to 70 years old and 4' to 6'6"+ tall have ridden my
BikeE. It's a very adjustable and "people friendly" design.

Have you/she ridden many recumbents? The standard advise
for people considering a recumbent (or indeed any bike) is to
try it. Try as many different styles as you can. The EZ line
of bikes and trikes might be a good place to start. Also, RANS
Tailwind, and probably others...

If the Revive is what she wants, don't let a few $$$s stand
in the way. Life it too short not to have the bike you want! %^)

Good luck,

Jon Meinecke

I bike therefore I am.


BentJay

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Apr 13, 2005, 9:07:13 AM4/13/05
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I think there's an issue with the Revives. I seem to recall that, if
you got a flat on the rear tire it was not field-repairable for some
reason. You had to bring it in to the shop. Can anyone remember what
that problem was?

BentJay

See my tour journal at: http://aroundthelake.crazyguyonabike.com

mugwump

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Apr 14, 2005, 10:46:06 AM4/14/05
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She is in medical school and has even less time for bike shopping than
for riding, so I must handle this (and all other) situation for her,
as many times as it takes until she is satisfied.

Based on what I know, she would find a real recumbent intimidating.
She must be protected from exposure to the dirty parts of a bike. She
finds managing two gear shifters overly complicated, and for the
riding she will do, it is completely unnecessary to have two. She
will never fix a tire, oil a chain, or adjust a bearing.

To give you an example of what we're dealing with, we have an older
BMW that has power adjusting seats. She drives that car most of the
time. If we are going somewhere together and taking that car, even
though she hates driving, she will usually drive anyway, citing the
trouble it is to readjust the car seat to fit her as the reason for
doing so. yes, she would rather suffer the drive than push a couple
buttons to readjust the car seat. I consider this an improvement. It
means there is something she hates more than driving.

Why does she want a bike at all, you may ask... She wants a bike
because I have two. Nevermind that I actually ride mine daily. It is
a matter of "fairness".

I wish it weren't so, but that is the situation.

mugwump

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Apr 14, 2005, 10:49:36 AM4/14/05
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On 13 Apr 2005 06:07:13 -0700, "BentJay" <JSing...@aol.com> wrote:

>I think there's an issue with the Revives. I seem to recall that, if
>you got a flat on the rear tire it was not field-repairable for some
>reason. You had to bring it in to the shop. Can anyone remember what
>that problem was?

It is really hard to imagine ANY bike design that uses pneumatic tires
and has no way for them to be repaired without a trip to the shop. I
will be doing any and all maintenance and repair work on the bike.
She will most definitely NEVER touch it.

Dave Larrington

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Apr 14, 2005, 11:13:04 AM4/14/05
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Quite. I'm sure one can always get enough of the inner tube out of the tyre
to locate the hole and bung a patch on it. /Removing/ the wheel may be more
difficult, espeically on the hub-geared versions.

--
Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
Kinder surprise! What's the surprise? Your children are now dead.


HHS

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Apr 14, 2005, 11:45:20 AM4/14/05
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Let me get this straight mugwump. Your wife is in medical school, you must
do everything for her, she finds managing a two gear bike shifter overly
complicated, and she can't figure out how to adjust the seats in her BMW.

The message I'm getting here is that maybe Mrs. Dr. Mugwump isn't exactly
cut out to be a heart surgeon.

HHS


"mugwump" <mug...@interzone.com> wrote in message

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Jon Meinecke

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Apr 14, 2005, 1:09:19 PM4/14/05
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"mugwump" <mug...@interzone.com> wrote
> She is in medical school [...]

> she would find a real recumbent intimidating.

Bodies seem more complex and intimidating "machines"
to maintain, interact with and manage than bicycles.

> She must be protected from exposure to the dirty parts of a bike.

Have you considered a set of scrubs, examination gloves, etc... %^)

> Why does she want a bike at all, you may ask... She wants a bike
> because I have two. Nevermind that I actually ride mine daily. It is
> a matter of "fairness".

Buy her the most expensive bike with the greatest resale value.
That may score you points.

After it sits in the garage for months at a time without being
ridden, or only ridden a few miles, convince her it doesn't
make sense to have such an expensive bike and not ride it
more. Sell it and buy http://www.pedicab.com/ , or
http://www.bikesatwork.com/bicycle-rickshaw/... %^)

Jon Meinecke

Larry R. Wright

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Apr 14, 2005, 2:01:15 PM4/14/05
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"HHS" <h...@nospam.com> wrote in
news:RfydnT-DROG...@giganews.com:

> Let me get this straight mugwump. Your wife is in medical school, you
> must do everything for her, she finds managing a two gear bike shifter
> overly complicated, and she can't figure out how to adjust the seats
> in her BMW.
>
> The message I'm getting here is that maybe Mrs. Dr. Mugwump isn't
> exactly cut out to be a heart surgeon.

I had much the same thought! And she wants one just because you have two -
not because she is actually interested in riding. Obviously if she had an
interest, she would be willing to shop for one. I would wait until she
would at least commit to shopping for one.

Mark Leuck

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Apr 14, 2005, 9:16:36 PM4/14/05
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"mugwump" <mug...@interzone.com> wrote in message
news:jh0t51l6rvgff7boo...@4ax.com...

By looking at the rear design it might indeed be more difficult to replace a
tire

http://www.giant.co.jp/revive/img_products/bike_small/revive_e_m.jpg


mugwump

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Apr 15, 2005, 1:20:05 AM4/15/05
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On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 10:45:20 -0500, "HHS" <h...@nospam.com> wrote:

>Let me get this straight mugwump. Your wife is in medical school, you must
>do everything for her, she finds managing a two gear bike shifter overly
>complicated, and she can't figure out how to adjust the seats in her BMW.

Actually, she knows how to adjust the seats in the car, it's just too
much trouble!

>The message I'm getting here is that maybe Mrs. Dr. Mugwump isn't exactly
>cut out to be a heart surgeon.

Funny you should mention that, she IS interested in surgery!

mugwump

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Apr 15, 2005, 1:23:07 AM4/15/05
to

>Buy her the most expensive bike with the greatest resale value.
>That may score you points.
>
>After it sits in the garage for months at a time without being
>ridden, or only ridden a few miles, convince her it doesn't
>make sense to have such an expensive bike and not ride it
>more.

No, that won't work. As long as I have a bike, she MUST have a bike,
even if it is just decorating the garage.

That would be culturally unacceptable to her.

mugwump

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Apr 15, 2005, 1:26:50 AM4/15/05
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Fortunately I have a modest collection of bike specific tools, and
know how to use most of them (nevermind about that freehub disassembly
a couple weeks ago!). I would have no trouble taking the thing apart
to swap a tire or fix a flat unless they welded the wheel's axle to
the bike frame.

Jon Meinecke

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Apr 15, 2005, 7:48:27 AM4/15/05
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"mugwump" <mug...@interzone.com> wrote
>
> [I previously wrote]

> > http://www.pedicab.com/ , or
> >http://www.bikesatwork.com/bicycle-rickshaw/... %^)
>
> That would be culturally unacceptable to her.

My wife wouldn't take cultural exception to either powering or riding
one though she grew up where such vehicles are much more common.
In any case, I presumed you would pedal, she would passenger, not
vice versa. There are also side-by-side two-pedaler pedal cars if
more egalitarian appearance is desired.

Actually a tandem might be a solution. Perhaps a 'sociable', side-by-side
model... Some people report that tandems enable their formerly
non-cycling SO's to enjoy cycling. No steering, shifting, etc. if she
didn't mind the stoker position.

Jon Meinecke

HHS

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Apr 15, 2005, 8:02:53 AM4/15/05
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"mugwump" <mug...@interzone.com> wrote in message
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Mugwump is it too late for her to transfer to Veterinary school?

HHS


Greg Dunn

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Apr 15, 2005, 1:47:34 PM4/15/05
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If you're anywhere near Dublin, CA, a local bike shop named Dublin Cyclery
has a very nice used one for sale for $399. It's a model that lists for
$699, if I remember correctly. I'm sure they would ship it, as well

Greg D


"mugwump" <mug...@interzone.com> wrote in message

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mugwump

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Apr 15, 2005, 3:46:47 PM4/15/05
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On Fri, 15 Apr 2005 10:47:34 -0700, "Greg Dunn"
<Tech...@gregdunn.com> wrote:

>If you're anywhere near Dublin, CA, a local bike shop named Dublin Cyclery
>has a very nice used one for sale for $399. It's a model that lists for
>$699, if I remember correctly. I'm sure they would ship it, as well

Not even close.

Thanks, anyway.

carol...@raines.com

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Apr 15, 2005, 4:12:15 PM4/15/05
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Mugwump, YOU, what with the bike tools skills, should be training to be
the surgeon. As for Mrs. M., veterinary schools wouldn't take her. My
advice is: divorce her and get yourself another 'bent to occupy her
side of the bed. They are clean, fast, straightforward and never
complain.

C.C.

HHS

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Apr 16, 2005, 8:18:55 AM4/16/05
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Hey mugwump,

I found a Revive for you on ebay.

http://tinyurl.com/bycx8

I looked at it closely and it seems to be longing for the solitude of the
mugwump garage. I recommend you jump on this.

By the way, and this is none of my business, but Ms. Mugwump seems to be a
hell of a person and I'm wondering where you managed to find her. Did a
newsgroup help you with this or did you do it on your own?

HHS


recumben...@gmail.com

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Aug 11, 2017, 6:47:50 AM8/11/17
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On Monday, April 11, 2005 at 7:44:27 PM UTC+6, mugwump wrote:
> I have a blog which is about totally recumbent bike related. anyone can see my recumbent blog. https://recumbentbikelab.com/

Message has been deleted

bestbi...@gmail.com

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Dec 31, 2017, 3:01:19 AM12/31/17
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I have a blog totally different types of bike related. Including recumbent bike. My website is: http://www.bestbikepicks.com/

Beach Runner

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Jan 9, 2018, 9:44:32 PM1/9/18
to
On Monday, April 11, 2005 at 6:44:27 AM UTC-7, mugwump wrote:
> It looks like the couple a-holes who were mucking this place up have
> left, but I guess they chased off everyone else before they too
> departed.
>
> Anyone have a Giant Revive (I know, not a "real" recumbent)? I am
> thinking of getting one for my wife. Anyone know where I can get a
> deal on a new or used revive?
>
> Thanks!

I would love to find an upright light weight recumbant.
Don't currently drive.
I have an old Turner Underseat Turner. It's really too small for me,
and I find underseat turning difficult to use in traffic.

Any ideas?

James R. Weber

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Feb 14, 2018, 11:39:57 PM2/14/18
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Picked up a Vision 50 and 32 a couple a weeks ago and a bunch of parts from the factory

Rolf Mantel

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Jan 8, 2019, 10:37:40 AM1/8/19
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Am 10.01.2018 um 03:44 schrieb Beach Runner:
> I would love to find an upright light weight recumbant.
> Don't currently drive.
> I have an old Turner Underseat Turner. It's really too small for me,
> and I find underseat turning difficult to use in traffic.

I'm completely happy with a ZOX 26 but it's probably not available in US.
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