unreasonable women

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Darren Chng

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May 13, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/13/98
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If women got a slap round the face more often, they'd be a bit more
reasonable.
- Charlotte Rampling,
British film actress


I expect that Woman will be the the last thing civilised by man.
- George Meredith,
British author

darren

The first and last commandment is,
Don't let them scare you.
-Elmer Davis (1890-1958), But We Were Born Free, 1954.
American writer, commentator


BinneBrook

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May 14, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/14/98
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Darren wrote:
>If women got a slap round the face more often, they'd be a bit more
reasonable.-- Charlotte Rampling
>I expect that Woman will be the the last thing civilised by man.-- George
Meredith

Bin sez: Darren, that's gratuitous, and you've pissed me off.

"The silliest woman can manage a clever man; but it needs a very clever woman
to manage a fool."
--Rudyard Kipling, Plain Tales from the Hills

"--when skies are hanged and oceans drowned,
the single secret will still be man."
--e.e. cummings, One Times One

"No steel can pierce the human heart so chillingly as a period at the right
moment."
--Isaac Babel, Guy de Maupassant

"Man is the only animal that blushes. Or needs to."
--Mark Twain, Pudnhead Wilson's New Calendar

"Men and girls, men and girls:
Artificial swine and pearls."
--Gertrude Stein

"As I was going up the stair
I met a man who wasn't there.
He wasn't there again today.
I wish, I wish he'd stay away."
--Hughes Mearns, The Psychoed

"A man should be jailed for telling lies to the young."
--Lillian Hellman, libretto to Candide

"The real problem is not whether machines think, but whether men do."
--B.F. Skinner, Contingencies of Reinforcement

"As the body rolled to the ground, Tarzan of the Apes placed his foot upon the
neck of his lifelong enemy, and raising his eyes to the full moon, threw back
his fierce young head and voiced the wild and terrible cry of his people.
--Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tarzan of the Apes
Bin --- "....to die, and never have seen Brooklyn..." --Anne Sexton

Graham Weeks

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May 14, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/14/98
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BinneBrook wrote:
>
> Darren wrote:
> >If women got a slap round the face more often, they'd be a bit more
> reasonable.-- Charlotte Rampling
> >I expect that Woman will be the the last thing civilised by man.-- George
> Meredith
>
> Bin sez: Darren, that's gratuitous, and you've pissed me off.
>
> "The silliest woman can manage a clever man; but it needs a very clever woman
> to manage a fool."
> --Rudyard Kipling, Plain Tales from the Hills
>
Good stuff snipped, though I think some of the references are to
'humankind':-)

The average woman would rather have beauty than brains, because the
average man can see better than he can think. Author Unknown

When women go wrong, men go right after them. Mae West

Can you imagine a world without men? No crime and lots of happy fat
women. Nicole Hollander

He is a fool who thinks by force or skill
To turn the current of a woman's will.
Samuel Tuke (---- -1673): Adventures of Five Hours. Act v. Sc. 3.

The great question... which I have not been able to answer... is,
"Whatdoes a woman want?'' Freud

Women are just like cats. To win them, you must first make them purr.
Sam "Sully" Gehring

Only one man in a thousand is a leader of men, the other 999 follow
women. Groucho Marx

Graham J Weeks
http://www.weeks-g.dircon.co.uk/index.html
http://www.grace.org.uk/churches/ealing.html
**********************************************************************
No wonder that, when a political career is so precarious, men of worth
and capacity hesitate to embrace it. They cannot afford to be thrown out
of their life's course by a mere accident.
James Bryce (1838-1922) "The American Commonwealth," vol. 2, ch. 58,
1888.
**********************************************************************

BinneBrook

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May 14, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/14/98
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Thank you, Graham. You've out-binnied binny. Most of the reference were
intended, of course, to refer to humankind. At the height of my dudgeon, I
chose to ignore that. Is there any circumstance, by the way, in which dudgeon
is anything but high? I've never heard anyone speak of himself as being in
"low dudgeon."

Darren Chng

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May 14, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/14/98
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On 14 May 1998 04:25:22 GMT, binne...@aol.com (BinneBrook) said:
>Bin sez: Darren, that's gratuitous, and you've pissed me off.

Bin,
No need to get so worked up....the quote was from a woman anyway, and
is probably meant tongue-in-cheek. I posted it because I thought it
was amusing that a woman would make such a remark about their own
kind.......anyway, its true that there are a lot of wild women( and
men, of course) out there....they are an interesting species...love
them or hate them...its hard to ignore them.....:)


darren

I'm complicated, sentimental, lovable, honest, loyal, decent,
generous, likable, and lonely. My personality is not split; it's
shredded.
- Jack Paar


Don Olivier

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May 14, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/14/98
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Graham Weeks wrote:
> BinneBrook wrote:
> > Darren wrote:
> > >If women got a slap round the face more often, they'd be a bit more
> > > reasonable.-- Charlotte Rampling

> > Bin sez: Darren, that's gratuitous, and you've pissed me off.

> ... [good stuff snipped]


> The great question... which I have not been able to answer... is,
> "Whatdoes a woman want?''
> Freud

I love it when people start getting pissed off. It means the quotes
are getting good. I have a couple of answers to Freud's question:

The great question that has never been answered and which I have not
yet been able to answer, despite my thirty years of research into
the feminine soul, is ``What does a woman want?''
-- Sigmund Freud, Letter to Marie Bonaparte

Q: What do women want?
A: I want to own Texas and lease Colorado.
-- Rita Mae Brown

Q: What do women want?
A: None of your business.
-- Ursula Le Guin

> Women are just like cats. To win them, you must first make them purr.
> Sam "Sully" Gehring

Similar metaphor, different implication:

Foxes and goats; all beasts change when they please,
Shall women, more hot, wily, wild than these,
Be bound to one man...?
-- John Donne

And some supporting material

It is ridiculous to think you can spend your entire life with one
person. Three is about the right number. Yes, I imagine three
husbands would do it.
-- Clare Boothe Luce

I think every woman's entitled to a middle husband she can forget.
-- Adela Rogers St. Johns
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Don Olivier ** Harvard School of Public Health ** d...@hsph.harvard.edu


BinneBrook

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May 14, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/14/98
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Okay, okay, I get it. I still hate that unsolicited nudge-nudge-wink-wink
stuff. And I admit to being a mos' unreasonable woman. This is not a condition
of womanhood, however, but the result of living a lot of years on Planet
Brooklyn.

And speaking of unsolicited jabs, just to keep the pot boiling:

"The love that dare not speak its name has become the love that never knows
when to shut up.
--Robertson Davies, Murther and the Walking Spirits

Edward William Clayton

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May 14, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/14/98
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At the risk of further provoking Mary's wrath, and with the caveat that
these are meant to show the extent to which sexism has existed thru the
ages:

There's nothing so similar to one poodle dog as another poodle dog, and
that goes for women, too.
-- Pablo Picasso

All psychologists who have studied the intelligence of women... recognize
today that they represent the most inferior forms of human evolution, and
that they are closer to children and savages than to an adult, civilized
man. They excel in fickleness, inconstancy, absence of thought and logic,
and incapacity to reason. Without doubt there exist some distinguished
women, very superior to the average man, but they are as exceptional as
the birth of any monstrosity as for example, a gorilla with two heads;
consequently, we may neglect them entirely." --Gustave Le Bon, French
anthropologist, in a "scholarly" article in "Revue d'Anthropologie", 2nd
Series, Vol. 2, 1879.

"There is a good principle which created order, light and man, and an evil
principle which created chaos, darkness and woman." --Pythagoras, c. 700
B.C.

"When you see a woman, consider that you face not a human being, but the
devil himself. The woman's voice is the hiss of the snake." --St. Anthony

"Among savage beasts none is found so harmful as woman." --St. John
Crysostom

"[T]he iniquity of women surpasses all iniquities which are in the
world... the poisons of vipers and dragons are healthier and less harmful
to men than familiarity with women..." --Ecclesiastical Statute, Order of
Premontre (Catholic monastics--13th century).

I am very fond of the company of ladies. I like their beauty, I like their
delicacy, I like their vivacity, and I like their silence. -- Samuel
Johnson

Ted

BinneBrook (binne...@aol.com) wrote:
: Okay, okay, I get it. I still hate that unsolicited nudge-nudge-wink-wink

BinneBrook

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May 14, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/14/98
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Ted wrote: >>At the risk of further provoking Mary's wrath...<< Sigh. My
wrath is plumb tuckered. Uncle!

BinneBrook

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May 14, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/14/98
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From Bin's Excellent Aphorisms: "Right now I'm between divorces."

And from Dolly Parton:
"What do they mean, dumb blonde. I know I'm not dumb, and I'm certainly not
blonde."

"It takes a lot of money to look this cheap."

Graham Weeks

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May 14, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/14/98
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BinneBrook wrote:
>
> Thank you, Graham. You've out-binnied binny. Most of the reference were
> intended, of course, to refer to humankind. At the height of my dudgeon, I
> chose to ignore that. Is there any circumstance, by the way, in which dudgeon
> is anything but high? I've never heard anyone speak of himself as being in
> "low dudgeon."
>
My Shorter OED gives a 16C unknown origin and used with high, great of
deep for anger, resentment etc
--

Barry Fetter

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May 15, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/15/98
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Graham Weeks <wee...@dircon.co.uk> wrote:

>The great question... which I have not been able to answer... is,
>"Whatdoes a woman want?'' Freud

1636 Women desire six things: They want their husbands to be
brave, wise, rich, generous, obedient to wife, and lively
in bed.

Geoffrey Chaucer (1340-1400)
"The Shipman's Tale," The Canterbury Tales

+--------------------------+---------------------------------------------+
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| mcr...@quotations.com | What is matter? Never mind. |
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| Oakland, CA 94611 | Thomas Key (1799 - 1875) |
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Darren Chng

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May 15, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/15/98
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On Thu, 14 May 1998 11:48:34 -0400, Don Olivier <d...@hsph.harvard.edu>
wrote:

>
>I love it when people start getting pissed off. It means the quotes
>are getting good.

Don...this is a nice quote about quotes....can I have your permission
to use it as one of my signatures?

darren

"The man of understanding finds everything laughable." - Goethe

BinneBrook

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May 15, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/15/98
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Don wrote: >>I love it when people start getting pissed off. It means the
quotes are getting good.<< I agree, but enough with the misogyny, already.

Mary

Darren Chng

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May 17, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/17/98
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On 15 May 1998 16:53:09 GMT, binne...@aol.com (BinneBrook) wrote:

>Don wrote: >>I love it when people start getting pissed off. It means the
>quotes are getting good.<< I agree, but enough with the misogyny, already.

I don't think there are any misogynists here....on the contrary, its
out of our fondness for the female of our species that we are
showering them with so much attention in our postings.;) Its all done
in the name of fun.

Daniel P. B. Smith

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May 17, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/17/98
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In article <35724f20...@news.singnet.com.sg>,

Darren Chng <chn...@singnet.com.sg> wrote:
>On 15 May 1998 16:53:09 GMT, binne...@aol.com (BinneBrook) wrote:
>
>>Don wrote: >>I love it when people start getting pissed off. It means the
>>quotes are getting good.<< I agree, but enough with the misogyny, already.
>
>I don't think there are any misogynists here....on the contrary, its
>out of our fondness for the female of our species that we are
>showering them with so much attention in our postings.;) Its all done
>in the name of fun.

Well, Darren, suppose that out of fondness for you I make you the target
of a few jokes... in the name of fun, of course. But you'll probably take
it personally... people with no vowels in their last name usually do.


--
Daniel P. B. Smith
dpbs...@world.std.com

Don Olivier

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May 17, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/17/98
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Bin wrote:
> Don wrote: >>I love it when people start getting pissed off. It means the
> quotes are getting good.<< I agree, but enough with the misogyny, already.

Well, we've had enough recently to last a while. It's hard to resist,
though, because there's so much wonderful material out there-- even when
you don't like the content, you have to admire the craftsmanship, the
way you might admire the production values of a crummy movie.

But it would be healthy to turn our attention to dissing some other
maligned group. How about psychiatrists, for example; a lot of good
stuff there. Here's a start

I have ransacked my oldest dreams ... and let me say at once that I
reject completely the vulgar, shabby, fundamentally medieval world
of Freud, with its crankish quest for sexual symbols (something like
searching for Baconian acrostics in Shakespeare's works) and its
bitter little embryos spying, from their natural nooks, upon the
love life of their parents.
-- Vladimir Nabokov

The shrink told me I must show compassion to my fellow-creatures.
His idea of compassion was allowing every indefensible statement to
pass unchallenged and sugary self-indulgence to pass as insight. He
was a boob-- a boob with a technique, but still a boob.
-- Robertson Davies

I just want to make one brief statement about psychoanalysis:
``Fuck Dr. Freud''.
-- Oscar Levant

BinneBrook

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May 17, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/17/98
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Don wrote: >>But it would be healthy to turn our attention to dissing some
other maligned group.<<

"Mothers, don't let your children grow up to be securities traders."
--cartoon in the Wall Street Journal some years back

"The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers."
--Wm Shakespeare, Henry VI, IV:11

Darren wrote: >>If women try to be like men, why can't they be gentlemen?<<

"When Adam delved and Eve span,
Who then was the gentleman?"
--anonymous

"Why can't a woman be more like a man?"
--Lerner & Lowe, My Fair Lady

Binney sez:
A baron there was, name of Darren
His wife and his last name were barren.
He tried to adapt, in chnges was trapped:
How's the baronness' barrenness farin'?

Darren Chng

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May 17, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/17/98
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On Sun, 17 May 1998 10:39:10 GMT, dpbs...@world.std.com (Daniel P. B.
Smith) wrote:
>Well, Darren, suppose that out of fondness for you I make you the target
>of a few jokes... in the name of fun, of course. But you'll probably take
>it personally... people with no vowels in their last name usually do.

Well, Daniel, thanks for reminding me of that....someone once said it
sounds like a cash register...Now I know the way you interpreted my
last post you probably could not resist giving this reply....but what
I am trying to say all along is simply that we are here to share and
appreciate quotes of all types....don't take it sooooo
personally.....welll....I have said enough...rest my case.

darren

Dogs are our link to paradise. They don't know evil or jealousy or
discontent.
To sit with a dog on a hillside on a glorious afternoon is to be back
in Eden,
where doing nothing was not boring-- it was peace.
-Milan Kundera


Darren Chng

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May 17, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/17/98
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On 17 May 1998 16:26:35 GMT, binne...@aol.com (BinneBrook) wrote:
>Binney sez:
>A baron there was, name of Darren
>His wife and his last name were barren.
>He tried to adapt, in chnges was trapped:
>How's the baronness' barrenness farin'?

Darren sez:
Wow.


There is no religion without love, and people may talk as much as they
like about their religion, but if it does not teach them to be good
and kind to man and beast, it is all a sham.

- Anna Sewell (1820-1878) born on Mar 30
English novelist
She is best known for writing the children's classic "Black Beauty,"
1877.

Margaret Tarbet

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May 17, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/17/98
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In alt.quotations on 17 May 1998 16:26:35 GMT,
binne...@aol.com (BinneBrook) wrote:

>"When Adam delved and Eve span,
>Who then was the gentleman?"
>--anonymous

John Ball, "seynt Marys preste", 14th c. political
reformer and martyr.

BinneBrook

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May 18, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/18/98
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Margaret wrote:
>"When Adam delved and Eve span,
>Who then was the gentleman?"
>--anonymous

John Ball, "seynt Marys preste", 14th c. political
reformer and martyr.

Thanks for that, Margaret. Bartlett's sez it was a text used by John Ball in a
speech in the 14th c., which indicated to me that it is older than that.

Tom

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May 20, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/20/98
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A. P. Herbert was an English barrister who wrote satirical pieces on real
or imagined points of law. They are usually written in the form of
opinions handed down from the bench.

In his "Fardell v. Potts: the Reasonable Man," Herbert has the judge goes
on at amusing length about this improbable legal fiction until he finally
reaches his point:
"[I]t has been urged for the appellant, & my own researches incline me
to agree, that in all that mass of authorities which bears upon this
branch of the law *there is no single mention of a reasonable woman.*
...[N]o such reference is found, for the simple reason that no such
being is contemplated by the law...."

(There's more, but that will do for starters.)

Tom Parsons
--
--
t...@panix.com | The problem with any unwritten law
| is that you don't know where to go
http://www.panix.com/~twp | to erase it. --Glaser & Way

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