"A fear of weapons is a sign of retarded sexual and emotional maturity."  

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aurator

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Nov 21, 2001, 11:21:01 PM11/21/01
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"A fear of weapons is a sign of retarded sexual and emotional
maturity."  
--Sigmund Freud, General Introduction to Psychoanalysis (1952)

It looks like my foot is firmly planted in my mouth. Someone gave this
quote, I said it looked spurious, but, of course this fellow then dug up
dozens of "sources" on the web as above.


Did Dr Freud •actually• say this?

aurator

aubquote:


"Dr Freud relates that there are peculiar reasons deep in our
subconscious why gold in particular should satisfy strong instincts
and serve as a symbol."
John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946) ‘The Return to Gold.’ Essays in
Persuasion 1933, pt III p 182.

The Sanity Inspector

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Nov 21, 2001, 11:28:47 PM11/21/01
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On Thu, 22 Nov 2001 17:21:01 +1300, aurator <Gol...@foot.in_mouth>
shared with usenet this thought:

>"A fear of weapons is a sign of retarded sexual and emotional
>maturity."  
>--Sigmund Freud, General Introduction to Psychoanalysis (1952)
>
>
>
>It looks like my foot is firmly planted in my mouth. Someone gave this
>quote, I said it looked spurious, but, of course this fellow then dug up
>dozens of "sources" on the web as above.
>
>
>Did Dr Freud •actually• say this?

Hey, if you can't trust a geocities quote site, what can you trust?

ObJustForAuratorGoldQuote:
It is doubtful whether mankind are most indebted to those who
like Bacon and Butler dig the gold from the mine of literature, or to
those who, like Paley, purify it, stamp it, fix its real value, and
give it currency and utitlity.
-- Charles Caleb Colton

--
bruce
The dignified don't even enter in the game.
--The Jam

Erica

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Nov 22, 2001, 9:10:19 AM11/22/01
to
"A fear of weapons is a sign of retarded sexual and emotional
> maturity."
> --Sigmund Freud, General Introduction to Psychoanalysis (1952)

> Did Dr Freud .actually. say this?
________________________________

Apparently he did in the 10th Lecture of " A General Introduction to
Psychoanalysis" (1916-17)

In these other passages Freud associates retarded sexual and
emotional development not with gun ownership, but with fear and loathing of
weapons.
~Don B. Kates, Jr., Guns, Murders, and the Constitution -- A Realistic
Assessment of Gun Control (Don Kates is a San Francisco criminologist and
civil liberties lawyer).

And it fits with the *phallic symbols* of dream interpretation.....

All elongated objects, sticks, tree-trunks, umbrellas (on account of the
opening, which might be likened to an erection), all sharp and elongated
weapons, knives, daggers, and pikes, represent the male member.
~Sigmund Freud , The Interpretation of Dreams (1900)
Chapter 6. Representation in Dreams by Symbols: Some Further Typical Dreams

So , according to Freud a fear of guns equates with a fear of the erect
penis....?
And gun-lovers.....?

The traditional Freudian theory is that men are very attracted to phallic
extensions and they have a set of fantasies that originates in their
bodies -- fantasies that tend toward power and aggression.
There isn't a lot of organized psychological theory about the relationship
between men and guns but in men's dreams, guns frequently play a role and,
when they do, it is likened to the penis and all that that means to them.
~Dr. Nancy McWilliams, interview (1999)

Erica
______________________________________


Tom

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Nov 22, 2001, 10:10:48 AM11/22/01
to
Erica <ei...@chariot.net.au> wrote:

> All elongated objects, sticks, tree-trunks, umbrellas (on account of the
> opening, which might be likened to an erection), all sharp and elongated
> weapons, knives, daggers, and pikes, represent the male member.
> ~Sigmund Freud , The Interpretation of Dreams (1900)
> Chapter 6. Representation in Dreams by Symbols: Some Further Typical Dreams

See if I can jump in with this counter-quote before thousands of
others do... :-)

"Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar."
--attributed to Freud

Tom Parsons

--
--
t...@panix.com | A man who does not think for himself
| does not think at all.
http://www.panix.com/~twp | --Oscar Wilde

Erica

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Nov 22, 2001, 4:30:17 PM11/22/01
to
> "Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar."
> --attributed to Freud
_____________________________

Indeed it is , and......

I have made it a rule never to smoke more than one cigar at a time.
- Mark Twain

Erica ;-)
______________________________


Graham J Weeks

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Nov 24, 2001, 1:36:36 PM11/24/01
to
In article <3bfd07cc$1...@news.chariot.net.au>, "Erica"
<ei...@chariot.net.au> wrote:

>
> The traditional Freudian theory is that men are very attracted to phallic
> extensions and they have a set of fantasies that originates in their
> bodies -- fantasies that tend toward power and aggression.
> There isn't a lot of organized psychological theory about the relationship
> between men and guns but in men's dreams, guns frequently play a role and,
> when they do, it is likened to the penis and all that that means to them.
> ~Dr. Nancy McWilliams, interview (1999)
>

Being born in the middle of the 20th century, Boomer's education and
outlook have been strongly influenced by the towering presence of two
revolutionary figures : Freud and Einstein. Despite many Boomers not
having formally studied or even been aware of the work of either of these
men, The Freudian and Einsteinian views of the world have been deeply
embedded into the culture which has shaped their generation. Freud and
Einstein, from their utterly different perspectives, have influenced
Western popular culture by generating two powerful beliefs: the belief
that all the answers to our psychological (and even spiritual) questions
are within us: and the belief that everything (not just time and space,
but knowledge and morality as well) is relative.
Hugh Mackay (1938-) Generations: Baby Boomers, their parents and their
children. Ch.3. (1997)

Marx and Freud are the two great destroyers of Christian civilization, the
first replacing the gospel of love by the gospel of hate, the other
undermining the essential concept of human responsibility.--Malcom
Muggeridge, My Life in Pictures, NY: William Morrow & Co., 1987, p. 94

Sometimes a cigar is just a c1gar - Sigmund Freud.
( a pre-Clinton one I fear)

--
Graham J Weeks M.R.Pharm.S.
http://www.weeks-g.dircon.co.uk/ My homepage of quotations
http://www.grace.org.uk/churches/ealing.html Our church
-------------------------------------------------
Warning: the Internet may contain traces of nuts.
-------------------------------------------------

Paul Marrane

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Nov 24, 2001, 9:49:06 PM11/24/01
to
And who could possibly remember the famous quotation from Virgule:

"Timeo Danaos et dona armam"

(I fear the Greeks even when they bear arms)

--
Paul Marrane What's green, hangs on the wall, and whistles? A
paul_m...@hotmail.com red herring. But it isn't green! Well, you could
paint it green. But it doesn't hang on the wall!
What, there's a law you can't hang it on the wall?
But it doesn't whistle! Nu, so it doesn't whistle.

Michael Conover

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Nov 26, 2001, 7:31:51 AM11/26/01
to

> The traditional Freudian theory is that men are very attracted to phallic
> extensions and they have a set of fantasies that originates in their
> bodies -- fantasies that tend toward power and aggression.
> There isn't a lot of organized psychological theory about the relationship
> between men and guns but in men's dreams, guns frequently play a role and,
> when they do, it is likened to the penis and all that that means to them.
> ~Dr. Nancy McWilliams, interview (1999)


"You can take my Internet pornography when you pry it from
my...........nevermind."


---Michael


Donna L. Bridges

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Nov 26, 2001, 12:00:12 PM11/26/01
to
On 22 Nov 2001 15:10:48 GMT, in alt.quotations
<9tj4ho$8bu$1...@news.panix.com> Tom <t...@panix.com> wrote:

>Erica <ei...@chariot.net.au> wrote:
>> All elongated objects, sticks, tree-trunks, umbrellas (on account of the
>> opening, which might be likened to an erection), all sharp and elongated
>> weapons, knives, daggers, and pikes, represent the male member.
>> ~Sigmund Freud , The Interpretation of Dreams (1900)
>> Chapter 6. Representation in Dreams by Symbols: Some Further Typical Dreams
>

>"Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar."
> --attributed to Freud

Sometimes a quote is just a cigar?

--
DonnaB <*> shallotpeel on Yahoo 8^>

"Remember as far as anyone knows, we're a nice normal family." - Homer
Simpson

William C Waterhouse

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Nov 29, 2001, 3:46:37 PM11/29/01
to
In article <paul_marrane-D786...@news.cis.dfn.de>,
Paul Marrane <paul_m...@hotmail.com> writes:
> And who could possibly remember the famous quotation from Virgule:
>
> "Timeo Danaos et dona armam"
>
> (I fear the Greeks even when they bear arms)

\beginPedantry
The original of course is "et dona ferentes" , meaning "even when they
bear gifts". Unfortunately, word order in Latin is not the same as in
English: it's "dona" that means "gifts" (Compare English "donate".)
The meaning here would have to be represented as "et arma ferentes".
\endPedantry


William C. Waterhouse
Penn State

ObQuote:

BEN BATTLE was a soldier bold,
And used to war's alarms:
But a cannon-ball took off his legs,
So he laid down his arms.

Thomas Hood (1799-1845), "Faithless Nelly Gtay. A Pathetic Ballad", 1-4.

Paul Marrane

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Nov 29, 2001, 8:45:55 PM11/29/01
to
In article <9u66rd$1b...@r02n01.cac.psu.edu>, w...@math.psu.edu wrote:

> In article <paul_marrane-D786...@news.cis.dfn.de>,
> Paul Marrane <paul_m...@hotmail.com> writes:
> > And who could possibly remember the famous quotation from Virgule:
> >
> > "Timeo Danaos et dona armam"
> >
> > (I fear the Greeks even when they bear arms)
>
> \beginPedantry
> The original of course is "et dona ferentes" , meaning "even when they
> bear gifts". Unfortunately, word order in Latin is not the same as in
> English: it's "dona" that means "gifts" (Compare English "donate".)
> The meaning here would have to be represented as "et arma ferentes".
> \endPedantry
>

Darn.

And here I was worrying about whether it should be "arma" or "armam."

Clot...@ieee.org

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Nov 29, 2001, 11:19:38 PM11/29/01
to
On Mon, 26 Nov 2001 12:00:12 -0500, Donna L. Bridges <shall...@rcn.com>
wrote:

>On 22 Nov 2001 15:10:48 GMT, in alt.quotations
><9tj4ho$8bu$1...@news.panix.com> Tom <t...@panix.com> wrote:
>
>>Erica <ei...@chariot.net.au> wrote:
>>> All elongated objects, sticks, tree-trunks, umbrellas (on account of the
>>> opening, which might be likened to an erection), all sharp and elongated
>>> weapons, knives, daggers, and pikes, represent the male member.
>>> ~Sigmund Freud , The Interpretation of Dreams (1900)
>>> Chapter 6. Representation in Dreams by Symbols: Some Further Typical Dreams
>>
>>"Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar."
>> --attributed to Freud

Or was it a Whitehouse aide who said this?...Clothaire

Digiti Separatim Edendi

unread,
Dec 1, 2001, 9:38:53 AM12/1/01
to
In <paul_marrane-F1BBEE.20455529112001@news>, paul_m...@hotmail.com wrote:
> In article <9u66rd$1b...@r02n01.cac.psu.edu>, w...@math.psu.edu wrote:
>
> > The original of course is "et dona ferentes" , meaning "even when they
> > bear gifts". Unfortunately, word order in Latin is not the same as in
> > English: it's "dona" that means "gifts" (Compare English "donate".)
> > The meaning here would have to be represented as "et arma ferentes".
>
> And here I was worrying about whether it should be "arma" or "armam."

You were probably thinking of the opening line, "Arma virumque cano ...".
By the way, it's Vergil or Virgil, not Virgule. A virgule is a slanted line
used for punctuation. You may have an overzealous spelling checker.

The Trojans might have been less suspicious if the Greeks had called the
Horse a "free gift".

-:-
It's never too late
To be up to date.
You can get it now!
But you'll have to wait.

--Dan Hicks, "Long Comma Viper"
--
Col. G. L. Sicherman
home: col...@mail.monmouth.com
work: gsic...@elity.com
web: <http://www.monmouth.com/~colonel/>

bondtu...@gmail.com

unread,
Sep 18, 2014, 12:55:06 PM9/18/14
to
On Thursday, November 22, 2001 3:36:49 AM UTC-6, aurator wrote:
> "A fear of weapons is a sign of retarded sexual and emotional
> maturity."
> --Sigmund Freud, General Introduction to Psychoanalysis (1952)
>
>
>
> It looks like my foot is firmly planted in my mouth. Someone gave this
> quote, I said it looked spurious, but, of course this fellow then dug up
> dozens of "sources" on the web as above.
>
>
> Did Dr Freud *actually* say this?
>
>
>
> aurator
>
> aubquote:
>
>
> "Dr Freud relates that there are peculiar reasons deep in our
> subconscious why gold in particular should satisfy strong instincts
> and serve as a symbol."
> John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946) 'The Return to Gold.' Essays in
> Persuasion 1933, pt III p 182.

No, Freud didn't say that--at least, no place in his General Introduction to Psychoanalysis.

oron...@gmail.com

unread,
Jun 24, 2016, 8:12:56 PM6/24/16
to
Wouldn't this be more in line with a female's perception or thought of a penis? Where a gun is power and protection. The sword, would be the same. Intimidating, but yet satisfying in it's protection, size, and shape. Giving a sense of comfort from the objects history.

Rw

David C Kifer

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Jun 25, 2016, 12:23:39 PM6/25/16
to
Additionally, it is true that these weapons are “weapons of war,” as many are so fond of pointing
out. Historically, this title places them in the same category as bolt-action rifles, crossbows,
swords, and rocks. Every weapon is a “weapon of war,” and we own them for a reason.
In all of human society, and equally if not more so in the West, men have always had a powerful
attachment to weapons. Weapons are a near-sacred aspect of the Western tradition, depicted in our
art and enshrined in our stories. Many men in modern society know this without ever bothering to ask
why. It’s a truth as clear and fundamental as any other: free men own weapons, slaves do not. They
are instruments of life more than of death, the method by which we fulfill our role as shepherds and
caretakers, and our birthright as Westerners. [...]
Behind the surface of America’s “gun culture” exists a grim and simple truth: There is no
protector; there is no guardian; there is no defender except oneself. We hide ourselves from this
truth, we don’t talk about it. We have faith in our military and police, and rightly so: They are
men and women of honor, who sacrifice far more than we to fulfill the role of protector. But they
are few, and there are wolves among us. It is up to each individual to ensure that he or she is
prepared to meet whatever threat, foreign or domestic, and to do so with appropriate force.
Many attempt to delude themselves, suggesting that the right to bear arms is a relic of another
time. They insist we have changed, and have made progress enough to toss aside those old principles
from another era. There is but one question to ask in response: In light of the events in Orlando,
Newtown, and elsewhere, how much can we truly claim to have changed? These acts were as savage and
evil as any in our history. Our protectors, valiant as they are, cannot prevent these acts of
brutality until it is already too late. No law or institution has done anything to stop the wolves
from preying on us, as is clearly demonstrated by the attacks in Paris and Brussels. The grim,
horrifying truth remains unchanged: We, each of us, are our only protectors.
That is why we arm ourselves. We are charged with defending ourselves, our families, our
communities, and our nation. The vast might of our military and the commendable efforts of our
police do nothing to diminish that truth. We are the men of the West. Regardless of race, religion,
or sexual preference, our lives, liberty, and principles exist only insofar as we are willing to
take up arms to protect them. [...]
The people of the West desperately need a reality check. We are so comfortable, so happy, and so
ignorant of our own good fortune that we begin to believe humanity has changed. But more and more it
becomes clear that this belief is unfounded, put to lie by the violence visited upon innocents
across our nation. The wolves are among us once more, and no law will protect you. You are
responsible for yourself.
--John Donovan, Why We Will Always Need To Own Guns
http://thefederalist.com/2016/06/24/why-we-will-always-need-to-own-guns/

--
Dave
"Tam multi libri, tam breve tempus!"
(Et brevis pecunia.) [Et breve spatium.]

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