If Bush Wasn't A Deserter, What Was He?

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Jane Sandringham

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Feb 4, 2004, 7:28:51 PM2/4/04
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George W. Bush was the son of privilege who did not want to go to
Vietnam.

I can not fault him for not wanting to go to Vietnam. Few did. What
I fault him for not having the courage to admit his military service
was a fancy set-up dodge for very few privileged. A loophole. Made
possible for the well-connected, by the powerful few.

If you were poor or middle class, and did not want to go to Vietnam,
your life became more complicated as your options carried with them
more life-defining consequences. It is of this group that we find the
real heroes and people of courage and character. It is from this
group that we should be electing our leaders and heads of State. (No,
not from those who went and fought as they were told – those are "say
‘yes' to authority" robots who blindly adhere to the status quo,
incapable of thinking outside of the box.)

Vietnam was yet another war that conservatives wanted to wage using
everybody else's children but their own. It was around the draft
system and the war in Vietnam in the 1960s that this nation found
another reason to divide.

Amongst the options for avoiding going to Vietnam:

-You enlisted before your draft number came up because if you did get
drafted you had a chance to cut yourself a better deal – after
volunteering, passing pre-induction physicals you could choose which
branch of the military to serve (Air Force, Navy) over Army or Marine
Corps. Your chances of going to Vietnam were more certain if you were
in the Army or the Marine Corps. The longer the war went on, the less
viable this option was.

Myra MacPherson, author of "Long Time Passing:Vietnam and the Haunted
Generation, cited in a 1970 report showing that 234 sons of senators
and congressmen came of age after the U.S. got involved in Vietnam:
"Only twenty-eight of that 234 were in Vietnam. Of that group, only
nineteen ‘saw combat' – circumstances undescribed. Only one, Maryland
Congressman Clarence Long's son, was wounded. That was the closest
any of the 535 members of Congress came to personal grief."

Barry Goldwater, Jr., did "alternative service" in the House of
Representatives.

Six senators' sons flunked physicals.

Among the twenty-eight sons of the U.S. Congress who actually served
in Vietnam was Al Gore, Jr., who "felt an obligation to go to the war
he detested so that his father's position would not be compromised" –
Tennessee Senator Al Gore, Sr., had openly bucked his conservative
Tennessee constituency and opposed the war. His son served six months
as an Army journalist at Bien Hoa in Vietnam.

There are those conservatives who mock Gore's service in Vietnam –
that unless your orders are to directly kill enemy combatants you were
a dodger, an evader. Read this, and then ask yourself "Is the soldier
who has Gore's job now in Iraq and Afghanistan an war evader"?
http://www.evote.com/index.asp?Page=/news_section/2000-07/07052000Gore2.asp

-You went to college. (The exemption and deferment system stated
whether or not someone was eligible for service and the priority in
which they would be used. It also granted deferments for a variety of
reasons ranging from student status, to a needed civilian occupation
in the United States, to being a minister, to not being qualified at
all.)

College students were eligible for II-S deferments until they
fulfilled their degree requirements or reached their twenty-fourth
birthday, whichever came first.

Initially, it was up to local boards to decide annually whether a
student was making satisfactory progress toward a degree. Generally,
boards granted a deferment to anyone who could prove that he was
enrolled full time in an accredited college or university. However, in
early 1966, the Selective Service System initiated the Selective
Service College Qualification Test (SSCQT). Any student ranking in the
lower levels of their class was eligible for the draft. Despite the
nationwide outburst of student protest, over 750,000 students took the
test in 1966, in hopes of retaining their student deferments.

As the war continued and antiwar sentiment became more widespread, the
means of evading, avoiding, and resisting the draft were becoming more
sophisticated.

The most popular way of beating the draft was flunking the
pre-induction physical.

Once a young man became eligible for the draft (on his eighteenth
birthday), he was required to have an examination to determine his
physical, mental, and moral fitness for military service. If he
passed, he would receive a Selective Service Classification of I-A and
become immediately capable of induction. If he failed, he would be
classified as IV-F, permanently exempting him from all military
service or I-Y, making him available only in time of declared war or
national emergency,

While it is reasonable to infer that the majority of IV-F exemptions
were granted for legitimate reasons, cases in which individuals
contrived to fail their physicals were legion. Some men punctured
their arms with pens to create the appearance of "tracks" made by
heroine users. Other aggravated old sports injuries or artificially
raised their blood pressure using caffeine or other drugs, or binged
for weeks prior to their physical exam on nothing but candy bars
(high blood sugar/diabetes). Other young men starved themselves down
to skeletal proportions (severely underweight), only to be granted a
temporary deferment, and "come back again for another physical in 3
months" – this required them to remain in a chronic state of under-
(and mal-)nourishment.

There were those who blatantly opposed the war and publicly defied the
draft. They expressed their distaste for the war by burning their
draft cards, civil protest and disobedience. Once you burned your
draft card you were a criminal. And if you didn't show when your
number was called up, it meant prison time and a dishonorable
discharge.

For a man, a dishonorable discharge defines the rest of your life.
Without an honorable discharge from military service on a resume or
job application, your chances at having a career were zero.

-You lived on the fringe in America, "underground" - off-the-books
jobs, out of touch with family and friends (so that the authorities
can't track you), or,

- You went to Canada with the understanding that you might never be
able to return to the U.S., live amongst family and friends again,
have a real career in life, etc.

These were the choices for the middle class.

If you were on the other end of the economic spectrum (poor,
uneducated, with no influential friends or relatives in high and
exalted echelons of power, hadn't ever been more than 20 miles from
your birthplace) and did not want to go to Vietnam? You got an
express ticket to the front lines, as an Army foot soldier.

This website lists just about everybody's (in politics and government)
military service -
http://www.awolbush.com/whoserved.html

Everything you could ever want to know about the Vietnam war -
http://demonet.tripod.com/vietnam-links.htm

Rich

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Feb 4, 2004, 7:35:57 PM2/4/04
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according to the military he was a recipient of an Honorable Discharge with
flight certification as a pilot......that wouldn't happen with an AWOL on
your record.

rich


"Jane Sandringham" <sandr...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:f9bc1937.04020...@posting.google.com...


> George W. Bush was the son of privilege who did not want to go to
> Vietnam.
>
> I can not fault him for not wanting to go to Vietnam. Few did. What
> I fault him for not having the courage to admit his military service
> was a fancy set-up dodge for very few privileged. A loophole. Made
> possible for the well-connected, by the powerful few.
>
> If you were poor or middle class, and did not want to go to Vietnam,
> your life became more complicated as your options carried with them
> more life-defining consequences. It is of this group that we find the
> real heroes and people of courage and character. It is from this
> group that we should be electing our leaders and heads of State. (No,

> not from those who went and fought as they were told - those are "say


> 'yes' to authority" robots who blindly adhere to the status quo,
> incapable of thinking outside of the box.)
>
> Vietnam was yet another war that conservatives wanted to wage using
> everybody else's children but their own. It was around the draft
> system and the war in Vietnam in the 1960s that this nation found
> another reason to divide.
>
> Amongst the options for avoiding going to Vietnam:
>
> -You enlisted before your draft number came up because if you did get

> drafted you had a chance to cut yourself a better deal - after


> volunteering, passing pre-induction physicals you could choose which
> branch of the military to serve (Air Force, Navy) over Army or Marine
> Corps. Your chances of going to Vietnam were more certain if you were
> in the Army or the Marine Corps. The longer the war went on, the less
> viable this option was.
>
> Myra MacPherson, author of "Long Time Passing:Vietnam and the Haunted
> Generation, cited in a 1970 report showing that 234 sons of senators
> and congressmen came of age after the U.S. got involved in Vietnam:
> "Only twenty-eight of that 234 were in Vietnam. Of that group, only

> nineteen 'saw combat' - circumstances undescribed. Only one, Maryland


> Congressman Clarence Long's son, was wounded. That was the closest
> any of the 535 members of Congress came to personal grief."
>
> Barry Goldwater, Jr., did "alternative service" in the House of
> Representatives.
>
> Six senators' sons flunked physicals.
>
> Among the twenty-eight sons of the U.S. Congress who actually served
> in Vietnam was Al Gore, Jr., who "felt an obligation to go to the war

> he detested so that his father's position would not be compromised" -


> Tennessee Senator Al Gore, Sr., had openly bucked his conservative
> Tennessee constituency and opposed the war. His son served six months
> as an Army journalist at Bien Hoa in Vietnam.
>

> There are those conservatives who mock Gore's service in Vietnam -

> months" - this required them to remain in a chronic state of under-

Bîllary

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Feb 4, 2004, 7:41:22 PM2/4/04
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W. was a jet fighter pilot. What did YOU fly, Hillary's broom???

gr...@internet.charitydays.co.uk

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Feb 4, 2004, 8:29:18 PM2/4/04
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>
>according to the military he was a recipient of an Honorable Discharge with
>flight certification as a pilot......that wouldn't happen with an AWOL on
>your record.
>
>rich
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Bush was never charged with being AWOL, therefore, AWOL would not be on his record.

But it is still possible that he made himself disappear from his official place of duty.

The ancient art of disappearing is well known to people in the military.
It requires some skill [or friends in high places] to do it without getting caught.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Gene Douglas

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Feb 4, 2004, 10:11:42 PM2/4/04
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The government paid over a million dollars to train George. After his
training was over, he didn't volunteer to do anything with it. He reports
in his biography that he flew the plane for a few years. Actually, it was
22 months, less than two years. Then he disappeared, and never flew it
again.

"Bîllary" <bil...@vastrightwingconspiracy.gov> wrote in message
news:SigUb.4907$EH5....@nwrddc01.gnilink.net...

Gene Douglas

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Feb 4, 2004, 10:11:41 PM2/4/04
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That's silliness. I was honorably discharged from the National Guard, and I
had an AWOL on my record. AWOL is a relatively minor matter, if it's for
only a day. Bush's was for a year.

"Rich" <data...@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:NdgUb.4896$EH5...@nwrddc01.gnilink.net...

Gene Douglas

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Feb 4, 2004, 10:11:42 PM2/4/04
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Actually, he wasn't recorded as AWOL, because the Texas people thought he
was in Alabama, and he never showed up in Alabama.

After about a year had passed, somebody noticed and got word to him that the
doo-doo was going to hit the ventilator. He reported to his Texas unit
(known as a champaign unit, due to its handling of Texas elite) and did desk
duty a couple of days a week for several months. After putting in about 30
days (he had missed over 50) he was discharged eight months before his legal
obligation was complete.

<gr...@internet.charitydays.co.uk> wrote in message
news:9v5320dhtqoh2etss...@4ax.com...

Lowly Worm

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Feb 4, 2004, 10:52:30 PM2/4/04
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"Gene Douglas" <gene...@prodigy.net> wrote in message
news:OviUb.32132$m_7....@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com...

> Actually, he wasn't recorded as AWOL, because the Texas people thought he
> was in Alabama, and he never showed up in Alabama.
>
> After about a year had passed, somebody noticed and got word to him that
the
> doo-doo was going to hit the ventilator. He reported to his Texas unit
> (known as a champaign unit, due to its handling of Texas elite) and did
desk
> duty a couple of days a week for several months. After putting in about
30
> days (he had missed over 50) he was discharged eight months before his
legal
> obligation was complete.

Well, there you go. Clearly it was all about "honor and dignity". Just like
Bush said.


Ian S.

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Feb 4, 2004, 11:07:26 PM2/4/04
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a lying sack of santorum. Look it up.


Ian S.

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Feb 4, 2004, 11:16:31 PM2/4/04
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"Gene Douglas" <gene...@prodigy.net> wrote in message
news:NviUb.32131$m_7....@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com...

> That's silliness. I was honorably discharged from the National Guard, and
I
> had an AWOL on my record. AWOL is a relatively minor matter, if it's for
> only a day. Bush's was for a year.

and during a war. If the average Joe had pulled that sort of stunt at the
time, he'd have been Saigon-bound in no time. It's clear that Bush got
special treatment all the way through because of who he was.


LawsonE

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Feb 5, 2004, 12:07:44 AM2/5/04
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"Ian S." <iws51...@cox.net> wrote in message
news:_qjUb.2356$Yj.4@lakeread02...

You can get AWOL on your record if your car breaks down while enroute to
your base. Its a matter of degree and reasons and all that.


Gene

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Feb 5, 2004, 1:09:03 AM2/5/04
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sandr...@hotmail.com (Jane Sandringham) wrote in
news:f9bc1937.04020...@posting.google.com:

> George W. Bush was the son of privilege who did not want to go to
> Vietnam.
>
> I can not fault him for not wanting to go to Vietnam. Few did. What
> I fault him for not having the courage to admit his military service
> was a fancy set-up dodge for very few privileged. A loophole. Made
> possible for the well-connected, by the powerful few.
>
> If you were poor or middle class, and did not want to go to Vietnam,
> your life became more complicated as your options carried with them
> more life-defining consequences. It is of this group that we find the
> real heroes and people of courage and character. It is from this
> group that we should be electing our leaders and heads of State. (No,
> not from those who went and fought as they were told – those are "say
> ‘yes' to authority" robots who blindly adhere to the status quo,
> incapable of thinking outside of the box.)

Well since the majority of folks who actually held strong views on the
war that were more pro communism than anti war your assessment is dead
wrong. Communism was a dismal failure as we have seen. The vast majority
of the folks who went to Canada or dodged the draft were followers not
leaders. They were more interested in smoking pot and screwing the next
flowerchild while listening to Santana. As someone who saw bothsides, I'd
say the kids that made a choice were brave souls. Whether the choice was
anti war or to volunteer for service. The rest were just kids doing what
feels good - which is what all kids do.

Something to think about was that science has recently found that the
centers of the human brain responsible for making reasoned choices don't
finish developing until as late as the 20th year. Holding 16-20 year old
kids responsible for the choices they make is stupid. The Adults at the
time were responsible for starting the war and prosecuting the war. The
democrats and republicans voted for the war and the draft and the
subsequent widening of the war. Save your anger for them - they are the
only that deserve it.


>
> Vietnam was yet another war that conservatives wanted to wage using
> everybody else's children but their own.

President Johnson took a small conflict were American were advisors to a
full fledged war. Johnson was a Democrat. McManara was the guy who lied
about the Gulf of Tonkin attack which never took place. Please, if your
going to be a liberal please get your facts straight. Otherwise you may
as well join the ranks of those fools called republicans. The best thing
about liberalism is that it is on the side of right and truth. So be
right and tell the truth.


The following is very good - much better.

You left out that the wealthy that could afford a 'family doctor' often
got defered for made-up conditions that these doctors supplied.

Also, marrage and babies were a deferment for a while - I had friends
that got married just to avoid the draft.

Lastly, when I was drafted several boys showed up wearing dresses, high
heels and makeup. Some were drafted some not. A psychologist made the
choice.

This is funny, the majority of folks I knew that went to canada went
because that's where the 'party' was moving to.

There was no police force with the resources to track down draft evaders
they freely came and went as they wanted. I went to Canada when I was in
college in 1969 - Calgary. Great party, I think they called it the
stampede. Only the paranoid idiots worried about some kind of draft
evader police. Only high profile folks like Ali got arrested. WHen the
flight to Canada was at it's peak Vietnam was winding down. 1967-1968 was
the peak of the war after 1970 the ground forces were not involved in
much fighting just Army helicopters and the Air Force. The South
Vietnamese did the fighting on the ground after 1970-1971 time frame.

Gene

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Feb 5, 2004, 1:14:09 AM2/5/04
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"Rich" <data...@verizon.net> wrote in
news:NdgUb.4896$EH5...@nwrddc01.gnilink.net:

> according to the military he was a recipient of an Honorable Discharge
> with flight certification as a pilot......that wouldn't happen with an
> AWOL on your record.
>
> rich
>

Just like OJ is not a murderer. The wealthy have a different world with
different rules. If you don't believe this then your fooling yourself.

The guy responsible for charging Bush was a friend of the family. Appointed
to his positions throughout his carreer by father Bush and now son Bush.
Funny how he wound up as the head of the air national guard. Get real

"Any man who works for a living and votes republican is a fool."

The Pretzel

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Feb 5, 2004, 2:11:20 AM2/5/04
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"Bîllary" <bil...@vastrightwingconspiracy.gov> wrote in message
news:SigUb.4907$EH5....@nwrddc01.gnilink.net...
> W. was a jet fighter pilot. What did YOU fly, Hillary's broom???
>
> "Jane Sandringham" <sandr...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:f9bc1937.04020...@posting.google.com...
> >
>
It's not about US Billary. You're Ad Hominem fallacies not withstanding.
C'mon Billary, let's both ask our commander 'n' thief.
_____________________________
C'mon Mr. pResident.
Let us in on all the facts. We want to know... Let's be up front about this.
Let's see 'em. C'mon Georgie....
_____________________________
service member's personnel records (including "201" files) by contacting:

National Personnel Records Center
Attn: Air Force Reference Branch
9700 Page Blvd
St Louis MO 63132


The Bandit

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Feb 5, 2004, 4:17:39 AM2/5/04
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sandr...@hotmail.com (Jane Sandringham) wrote in message news:<f9bc1937.04020...@posting.google.com>...


I think radical web-loggers starting to affect your objective
reasoning.

> George W. Bush was the son of privilege who did not want to go to
> Vietnam.

He should had went to canada then, lot safer then learning to fly a
delta wing fighter plane. Probablly wasn't smart to had volunteered
for the "Palace Alert" program which sent qualified F-102 pilots to
Asia and Vietnam for six-month tours.

> I can not fault him for not wanting to go to Vietnam. Few did. What
> I fault him for not having the courage to admit his military service
> was a fancy set-up dodge for very few privileged. A loophole. Made
> possible for the well-connected, by the powerful few.

A loophole?? LOL He is from Texas, there was an opening for fighter
training and he took it. Hardly a loophole. Where most pilots start.

The Pretzel

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Feb 5, 2004, 4:47:45 AM2/5/04
to

"The Bandit" <no-r...@idexer.com> wrote in message
news:929f2ef0.04020...@posting.google.com...

Calls to the White House seeking comment on if and when the president's full
military records will be released were not returned.

Calls to the White House seeking comment on if and when the president's full
military records will be released were not returned.

Calls to the White House seeking comment on if and when the president's full
military records will be released were not returned.

Calls to the White House seeking comment on if and when the president's full
military records will be released were not returned.

Calls to the White House seeking comment on if and when the president's full
military records will be released were not returned.

Calls to the White House seeking comment on if and when the president's full
military records will be released were not returned.


Bîllary

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Feb 5, 2004, 7:40:32 AM2/5/04
to
So what you just said is that if the liberals continue to lie about this
issue, not only do condemn President Bush but millions of veterans as well!!
How precious!!!!!! Thanks for top posting as I do. It makes it much easier
to "reply"


"Gene Douglas" <gene...@prodigy.net> wrote in message
news:NviUb.32131$m_7....@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com...

Wm James

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Feb 5, 2004, 7:50:13 AM2/5/04
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On 4 Feb 2004 16:28:51 -0800, sandr...@hotmail.com (Jane
Sandringham) wrote:

>George W. Bush was the son of privilege who did not want to go to
>Vietnam.

Most likely.

>I can not fault him for not wanting to go to Vietnam. Few did. What
>I fault him for not having the courage to admit his military service
>was a fancy set-up dodge for very few privileged. A loophole. Made
>possible for the well-connected, by the powerful few.

Nonsense. Many poor kids joined the guard too.

>If you were poor or middle class, and did not want to go to Vietnam,
>your life became more complicated as your options carried with them
>more life-defining consequences. It is of this group that we find the
>real heroes and people of courage and character. It is from this
>group that we should be electing our leaders and heads of State. (No,
>not from those who went and fought as they were told – those are "say
>‘yes' to authority" robots who blindly adhere to the status quo,
>incapable of thinking outside of the box.)

BS. Money was irrelevant. A lot of poor and rich kids look the same
paths. There were a lot of poor kids in the guard who never got
called up, and a lot of rich kids who didn't join the guard and risked
the draft, some of whom found themselved in Viet Nam.

>Vietnam was yet another war that conservatives wanted to wage using
>everybody else's children but their own. It was around the draft
>system and the war in Vietnam in the 1960s that this nation found
>another reason to divide.

Conservatiives? JFK and LBJ were conservatives? Well, we see how
extreme to the left you are. When Kennedy took office there were just
a handful of advisers there. Keneddy sent the first US toops. JBJ
escalated it into the fool blown war run by politicians from DC while
people were getting killed for nothing. Nixon was the one who pulled
out.

>Amongst the options for avoiding going to Vietnam:
>
>-You enlisted before your draft number came up because if you did get
>drafted you had a chance to cut yourself a better deal – after
>volunteering, passing pre-induction physicals you could choose which
>branch of the military to serve (Air Force, Navy) over Army or Marine
>Corps. Your chances of going to Vietnam were more certain if you were
>in the Army or the Marine Corps. The longer the war went on, the less
>viable this option was.
>
>Myra MacPherson, author of "Long Time Passing:Vietnam and the Haunted
>Generation, cited in a 1970 report showing that 234 sons of senators
>and congressmen came of age after the U.S. got involved in Vietnam:
>"Only twenty-eight of that 234 were in Vietnam. Of that group, only
>nineteen ‘saw combat' – circumstances undescribed. Only one, Maryland
>Congressman Clarence Long's son, was wounded. That was the closest
>any of the 535 members of Congress came to personal grief."
>
>Barry Goldwater, Jr., did "alternative service" in the House of
>Representatives.
>
>Six senators' sons flunked physicals.

I'm surprised that's not a lot higher.

>Among the twenty-eight sons of the U.S. Congress who actually served
>in Vietnam was Al Gore, Jr., who "felt an obligation to go to the war
>he detested so that his father's position would not be compromised" –

ROTFLMAO! Yeah, he invented the appachie too, huh?

>Tennessee Senator Al Gore, Sr., had openly bucked his conservative
>Tennessee constituency and opposed the war. His son served six months
>as an Army journalist at Bien Hoa in Vietnam.

With a body guard, and lied about being in compat before scamming his
way out of the military by getting into divinity school where he
flunked out.

>There are those conservatives who mock Gore's service in Vietnam –
>that unless your orders are to directly kill enemy combatants you were
>a dodger, an evader. Read this, and then ask yourself "Is the soldier
>who has Gore's job now in Iraq and Afghanistan an war evader"?
>http://www.evote.com/index.asp?Page=/news_section/2000-07/07052000Gore2.asp

If he lies his way out, yes.

>-You went to college. (The exemption and deferment system stated
>whether or not someone was eligible for service and the priority in
>which they would be used. It also granted deferments for a variety of
>reasons ranging from student status, to a needed civilian occupation
>in the United States, to being a minister, to not being qualified at
>all.)
>
>College students were eligible for II-S deferments until they
>fulfilled their degree requirements or reached their twenty-fourth
>birthday, whichever came first.

Yep. That was the rules. The logic wasn't entirely bad. Perhaps the
street thugs running the inner city streets could use some militay
discipline and training since they dropped out of school and don't
work. Of course, the problem is that the military isn't a reform
school or a jail and doesn't need people like that either.

>Initially, it was up to local boards to decide annually whether a
>student was making satisfactory progress toward a degree. Generally,
>boards granted a deferment to anyone who could prove that he was
>enrolled full time in an accredited college or university. However, in
>early 1966, the Selective Service System initiated the Selective
>Service College Qualification Test (SSCQT). Any student ranking in the
>lower levels of their class was eligible for the draft. Despite the
>nationwide outburst of student protest, over 750,000 students took the
>test in 1966, in hopes of retaining their student deferments.
>
>As the war continued and antiwar sentiment became more widespread, the
>means of evading, avoiding, and resisting the draft were becoming more
>sophisticated.

Like the protester at Oxford did?

William R. James


None

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Feb 5, 2004, 9:02:54 AM2/5/04
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. . .a daddy's boy?


Ian S.

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Feb 5, 2004, 11:41:03 AM2/5/04
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"The Bandit" <no-r...@idexer.com> wrote in message
news:929f2ef0.04020...@posting.google.com...
>
> A loophole?? LOL He is from Texas, there was an opening for fighter
> training and he took it.

His daddy's influence FORCED the "opening" that allowed him to cut in at the
front of the line. And that line wasn't like the one at a movie theater: the
poor guy Bush forced out likely ended up in Nam and possibly even dead or
maimed.


T.Carr

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Feb 5, 2004, 11:50:36 AM2/5/04
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"The Pretzel" <rold...@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:<5joUb.7695$ow4....@twister.socal.rr.com>...

> "The Bandit" <no-r...@idexer.com> wrote in message
> news:929f2ef0.04020...@posting.google.com...
> > sandr...@hotmail.com (Jane Sandringham) wrote in message
> news:<f9bc1937.04020...@posting.google.com>...
> >
> >
> > I think radical web-loggers starting to affect your objective
> > reasoning.
> >
> > > George W. Bush was the son of privilege who did not want to go to
> > > Vietnam.
> >
> > He should had went to canada then, lot safer then learning to fly a
> > delta wing fighter plane. Probablly wasn't smart to had volunteered
> > for the "Palace Alert" program which sent qualified F-102 pilots to
> > Asia and Vietnam for six-month tours.
> >
> > > I can not fault him for not wanting to go to Vietnam. Few did. What
> > > I fault him for not having the courage to admit his military service
> > > was a fancy set-up dodge for very few privileged. A loophole. Made
> > > possible for the well-connected, by the powerful few.
> >
> > A loophole?? LOL He is from Texas, there was an opening for fighter
> > training and he took it. Hardly a loophole. Where most pilots start.
>

The Pretzel" <rold...@hotmail.com

> Calls to the White House seeking comment on if and when the president's full
> military records will be released were not returned.
>
> Calls to the White House seeking comment on if and when the president's full
> military records will be released were not returned.
>
> Calls to the White House seeking comment on if and when the president's full
> military records will be released were not returned.
>
> Calls to the White House seeking comment on if and when the president's full
> military records will be released were not returned.
>
> Calls to the White House seeking comment on if and when the president's full
> military records will be released were not returned.
>
> Calls to the White House seeking comment on if and when the president's full
> military records will be released were not returned.


Give the parrot a cracker..maybe he will quit posting the same old BS

T.Carr

Gene Douglas

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Feb 5, 2004, 9:10:48 PM2/5/04
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"Ian S." <iws51...@cox.net> wrote in message
news:_qjUb.2356$Yj.4@lakeread02...
During that same period, I missed a single meeting, and was reduced in rank.
Oh-- but my dad wasn't a congressman.

Ian S.

unread,
Feb 5, 2004, 9:16:03 PM2/5/04
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"Gene Douglas" <gene...@prodigy.net> wrote in message
news:IICUb.4031$fE6...@newssvr31.news.prodigy.com...

Just imagine what would have happened had you missed a full year and refused
to take a physical!!!


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