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Horace Wachope

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May 24, 2001, 1:49:59 AM5/24/01
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The boy turns 4 later this week and I've got to go present shopping.

Any suggestions?

Scooby, August, Sky?

Vicki Cleaver

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May 24, 2001, 2:02:43 AM5/24/01
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Whilst licking their paws in alt.ozdebate on 24 May 2001, Horace Wachope
<horryw...@hotmail.com> purred:

>
>The boy turns 4 later this week and I've got to go present shopping.
>
>Any suggestions?
>
>Scooby, August, Sky?

Will I do? :)

Seriously, try to get him something old fashioned. I have a friend with a
four year-old and she gets loads of "technology" toys - computer games and
stuff like that. For Christmas last year I bought her the Memory card game
- you know where you put the cards out and then try to match them up. She
*loves* it. Her father says it's the toy she plays with most and even has
another set of them at Grandma's! I think while it's important for kids to
be exposed to technology, they need some of the old fashioned games as well
- Headache, Snakes and Ladders, Mouse Trap (not even sure if you can buy
all of those now).

--
See ya!

Vicki Cleaver
vickiclea...@dingoblue.net.au
http://kittecat.cjb.net
Take out the litter to email me.

On alt.ozdebate, all posters are equal. Some are just more equal than
others.

Spooky Guy Next Door

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May 24, 2001, 2:17:10 AM5/24/01
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For I have glimpsed inside Matthew R. Goodyear's mind, and what did I
see but THIS...

> Buy him some Lego.. it will allow him to be creative and develop some
> kind of skill that i cant think of right now :-)

<sings> "It's not unusual da da da de dum..." </sings>

You're attempting, and failing miserably, to think of "motor skills".

--
Freedom is the freedom to say two plus two make four. If that is
guaranteed, all else follows.
- George Orwell, "Nineteen Eighty-Four"
http://smiley.vh.mewl.net/markweb/
http://www.smileydesigns.com/

Horace Wachope

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May 24, 2001, 2:14:49 AM5/24/01
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On 24 May 2001 06:02:43 GMT, vickiclea...@dingoblue.net.au
(Vicki Cleaver) wrote:

>Whilst licking their paws in alt.ozdebate on 24 May 2001, Horace Wachope
><horryw...@hotmail.com> purred:
>
>>
>>The boy turns 4 later this week and I've got to go present shopping.
>>
>>Any suggestions?
>>
>>Scooby, August, Sky?
>
>Will I do? :)
>
>Seriously, try to get him something old fashioned.

He wants a rocking horse.

But there's no way a son of mine will own a rocking horse.

> I have a friend with a
>four year-old and she gets loads of "technology" toys - computer games and
>stuff like that.

He also wants a laptop. See comments above re rocking horse.

> For Christmas last year I bought her the Memory card game
>- you know where you put the cards out and then try to match them up. She
>*loves* it.

Is this like flash cards? Where you turn one over, then turn another
one over and if they're the same, put them aside, otherwise turn them
both back again and repeat (with different cards - unless you have
absolutely no memory)?

> Her father says it's the toy she plays with most and even has
>another set of them at Grandma's! I think while it's important for kids to
>be exposed to technology, they need some of the old fashioned games as well

I was thinking of getting him a whole pile of smaller $10-$20 books
and toys, and one 'big' toy. I was going to get him a DVD player, but
I caught him putting slices of bread in the VCR (again) the other day
so I've changed my mind.

>- Headache, Snakes and Ladders, Mouse Trap (not even sure if you can buy
>all of those now).

Yeah, you can still get them. I saw them a few months ago.

Horace Wachope

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May 24, 2001, 2:15:41 AM5/24/01
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On Thu, 24 May 2001 16:00:31 +0930, Matthew R. Goodyear
<matthew...@dingoblue.net.au> wrote:

>No, dont buy him those three women!!

Are you aware that Sky is a man? Not much of one though :-)

>And dont buy Pokemon or Digimon or any other bloody Mons or you will
>never hear the ned of it :-)

There's a Pikachu floating around somewhere.

>Buy him some Lego.. it will allow him to be creative and develop some
>kind of skill that i cant think of right now :-)

Motor?

Jason

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May 24, 2001, 2:32:23 AM5/24/01
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You can't go past Lego.

Problem is, it's very expensive, and you need a fair bit of it to start
having real fun.

Jason

"Horace Wachope" <horryw...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:r08pgtc460ij0592a...@4ax.com...

Téa Smith

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May 24, 2001, 2:41:57 AM5/24/01
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Matthew R. Goodyear <matthew...@dingoblue.net.au> wrote

> Buy him some Lego.. it will allow him to be creative and develop some


> kind of skill that i cant think of right now :-)

If you get Lego, make sure you wear shoes 24/7. *grin*

--
Téa Smith
ICQ:21859695
www.teasmith.com


John Phillips

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May 24, 2001, 2:59:08 AM5/24/01
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On Thu, 24 May 2001 15:19:59 +0930, Horace Wachope
<horryw...@hotmail.com> wrote:

You'll scar him for life if he unwraps any of those on his birthday.


--

ICQ UIN: 107533462

Vicki Cleaver

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May 24, 2001, 3:01:51 AM5/24/01
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Yes, that's the one. It's good because it does teach them memory and also
identifying things (depending on the set you get and how advanced the
pictures are).

>> Her father says it's the toy she plays with most and even has
>>another set of them at Grandma's! I think while it's important for
>>kids to be exposed to technology, they need some of the old fashioned
>>games as well
>
>I was thinking of getting him a whole pile of smaller $10-$20 books
>and toys, and one 'big' toy. I was going to get him a DVD player, but
>I caught him putting slices of bread in the VCR (again) the other day
>so I've changed my mind.

Books are always a good idea. A child can never have too many books. The
memory game was only about $15 IIRC so it could be one of your smaller
gifts as well. Heehee about the video toast ...... you need a lockable
video cabinet :)

>>- Headache, Snakes and Ladders, Mouse Trap (not even sure if you can
>>buy all of those now).
>
>Yeah, you can still get them. I saw them a few months ago.

Headache is especially good fun - but trust me it's you that'll end up with
the headache! What about a games compendium with snakes and ladders,
checkers etc in it? It's fun for kids to learn these games and you sound
like the kind of father that would play them with him.

Let us know what you end up getting.

John Phillips

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May 24, 2001, 3:08:38 AM5/24/01
to
On Thu, 24 May 2001 17:15:18 +1000, August <augus...@hotmail.com>
wrote:

>I read it someplace, where Horace Wachope said...

>
>||
>|| The boy turns 4 later this week and I've got to go present shopping.
>||
>|| Any suggestions?
>||
>|| Scooby, August, Sky?
>||
>

>Why not get him all three? ;)

Do you come for the price of one?

--

ICQ UIN: 107533462

John Phillips

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May 24, 2001, 3:17:02 AM5/24/01
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On Thu, 24 May 2001 17:22:41 +1000, August <augus...@hotmail.com>
wrote:

>I read it someplace, where John Phillips said...

>I dont come cheap at all.

Then it was a poor suggestion of yours to Horry.

--

ICQ UIN: 107533462

Clancy

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May 24, 2001, 3:31:03 AM5/24/01
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"August" <augus...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:MPG.157753b87...@news.dingoblue.net.au...
> I read it someplace, where John Phillips said...
> I dont come cheap at all.


I could understand, why he would want you, but the other 2 are the stuff
nightmares are made of (sorry Chris)

--
Clancy
The biggest trouble
with having the gift of the gab
is wrapping it up

ScoobyGang

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May 24, 2001, 3:42:19 AM5/24/01
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"Matthew R. Goodyear"

> And dont buy Pokemon or Digimon or any other bloody Mons or you will
> never hear the ned of it :-)

I have not bought my son Pokemon etc because they are too expensive. He has
been told this is the reason, has accepted it and even though there is a
whole stand full of videos at the Bi-Lo we go to every week to grocery shop,
he NEVER asks for them. There is a thing called explaining to your child
and giving them the beneifit of the doubt in life to understand. It does
not help to simply shut them off or lock things out as they WILL come up
eventually.

Of course I am not saying this is what you meant by saying the above, just
putting my view out there.

> Buy him some Lego.. it will allow him to be creative and develop some
> kind of skill that i cant think of right now :-)

Lego is VERY expensive for a small quantity, and not suitable for a child so
young. Small pieces easily lost when let slip through little fingers,
easily choked on. Even if you have a child like mine who never put things
in his mouth all the time there is still the danger there will be a first
time. We do have the 'Shell' lego that was available last year, but it is
put away waiting for Dylan to reach the appropriate age for it. I think
recomended age is about 7-9 on most items of Lego except for the Duplo
range. Duplo is great, I love the stuff but there are much more economical
ways to buy blocks for your child.

ScoobyGang

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May 24, 2001, 3:45:47 AM5/24/01
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"Clancy"

> I could understand, why he would want you, but the other 2 are the stuff
> nightmares are made of (sorry Chris)

thanks for saying sorry to me too...

As for me, maybe Horry thinks I would be fun for a four year old boy, mine
has yet to complain.
Maybe he thinks I would make a good jumping castle for his kid, or a
motherly figure :)

ScoobyGang

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May 24, 2001, 3:43:44 AM5/24/01
to

"Horace Wachope"

> >And dont buy Pokemon or Digimon or any other bloody Mons or you will
> >never hear the ned of it :-)
>
> There's a Pikachu floating around somewhere.

LOL Darn it, belied myself in my last reply...

OK so Dylan does have ONE pokemon thing, a Pikachu snuggle friend pillow
that was only about $15 at toys r us...

Dion Mikkelsen

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May 24, 2001, 3:50:16 AM5/24/01
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On Thu, 24 May 2001 17:21:19 +1000, August <augus...@hotmail.com> wrote, after
pausing and ensuring that what they were going to write was not absolute
gobbledy-gook:

>Lego collectables, a set of mobilo (my son's favorite - not gimmicky and
>lasts for years), a two wheeler bike, a real, inexpensive camera (to use
>with you!), with a photograph album he can fill, a workbench (child size)

On this note, a cheap digital camera could be economical (eg a Polaroid or
whatever $100-$150).

>with tack hammer, nails, corks, lino etc to 'work' with, a real,
>inexpensive tool set with bits he can use on the workbench, a pet, a tenet
>and sleeping bag (another favorite here).

I reckon Lego Duplo.

Dion M.
http://dionsplace.terrashare.com/

"It takes a lot of brains to enjoy satire, humour and wit - but none to be offended by them."

Horace Wachope

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May 24, 2001, 3:47:39 AM5/24/01
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Morphun Blocks?

Horace Wachope

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May 24, 2001, 3:50:32 AM5/24/01
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On Thu, 24 May 2001 17:01:14 +0930, Matthew R. Goodyear
<matthew...@dingoblue.net.au> wrote:

>On Thu, 24 May 2001 15:44:49 +0930, Horace Wachope
><horryw...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>>I was thinking of getting him a whole pile of smaller $10-$20 books
>>and toys, and one 'big' toy. I was going to get him a DVD player, but
>>I caught him putting slices of bread in the VCR (again) the other day
>>so I've changed my mind.
>

>have you considered getting him a Playstation2? I'll only be to happy
>to give you a month of my time to help play...err...set it up :)

When he was a baby he continually dribbled into the Nintendo cartridge
slot until the machine no longer worked.

From that moment on he's been banned from games consoles.

Horace Wachope

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May 24, 2001, 3:54:30 AM5/24/01
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On Thu, 24 May 2001 07:50:16 GMT, dmikk...@start.com.au (Dion
Mikkelsen) wrote:

>On Thu, 24 May 2001 17:21:19 +1000, August <augus...@hotmail.com> wrote, after
>pausing and ensuring that what they were going to write was not absolute
>gobbledy-gook:
>
>>Lego collectables, a set of mobilo (my son's favorite - not gimmicky and
>>lasts for years), a two wheeler bike, a real, inexpensive camera (to use
>>with you!), with a photograph album he can fill, a workbench (child size)
>
>On this note, a cheap digital camera could be economical (eg a Polaroid or
>whatever $100-$150).
>
>>with tack hammer, nails, corks, lino etc to 'work' with, a real,
>>inexpensive tool set with bits he can use on the workbench, a pet, a tenet
>>and sleeping bag (another favorite here).
>
>I reckon Lego Duplo.

You can't build anything good with Duplo though (unless you have
several tonnes of it).

And because the blocks are so big, anything good you do make (ie.
cars, trucks, houses) turn out almost life-size.

ScoobyGang

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May 24, 2001, 4:04:19 AM5/24/01
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Horry has your son been introduced to the computer yet? I am sure we have
talked about this b4 but I forget the answer. Any one of the Sesame Street
line of educational software is a good thing in my opinion. Within two
weeks of having them (he had then 2 weeks prior to his 2nd birthday) Dylan
was able to turn on and off the computer properly (better than most adults),
set up his games, recognised his own name on the screen to click on to get
to his partition and not daddy's etc Also the obvious, it taught him alot
of basic which have stuck with him, colour, numbers, letters, opposites,
object names etc.

If that is not your cup of tea...
Try looking at K-Mart for books, they often have childrens soft cover books
for $3 each. We got a whole heap back in March (picked up the laybuy so
sale must have been around january) and they are great stories which have
been a real hit with him.

If he likes Thomas The Tank Engine (I am sure you said he does), then maybe
for the big present you could get him the giant train set. Actually on
second thoughts that might be best to look for around xmas time as they
often throw in free extras like another 'friend' which usually sell for
around $25-30 each seperately.
There are great Thomas lace up cards (good for those motor skills and hand
eye co-ordination) for around $10, also a number game which works as two
matching jigsaw cut pieces that will not fit with any other half but their
own. They count up to 20 and have the Thomas and friend characters, the
number cleary shown and the pictures are great to teach the child to not
just count in there head from one to 20 but to visually count things. That
was about $10-15 I think, both at K-Mart.

Does he like cars? Try a wooden garage and some hotwheels cars to go with.
Most good independant toy stores should sell the wooden garages for about
$20 give or take. Something you can often find on sale for a reasonable
price is a floor carpet with roads and a town on it for the child to run
cars on. These are great as they provide warmth under where the child plays
(if you dont have carpet already), a designated play area if you need on in
a main room like the lounge (teach the kid to play where the mat is and not
to drag the toys all over the rest of the room I mean), and a lasting good
wearing car playmat which are otherwise usually crappy plastic sheets these
days. We have a mat measuring about 7-8 by 5-5 1/2 feet that cost us $49-59
on sale at a carpet place that seems to be in just about every shopping
center here...Buggered if I can think of the name though...Sorry.

A playdough molding set is a good idea if you are prepared to set him up on
a lovely wet day inside and help him learn to use it (which I am sure you
would be :)), sticker books which teach time, shapes etc are also a good
indoor activity for winter days upon us. Oh and if you think he would like
to build wooden things he could then use you can get complete sets with all
the pieces of wood cut and predrilled ready to go, all the screws and tools
needed to put them together etc to make bird houses, toolboxes, treasure
boxes etc. These we found for around $20 each at Myer.

I hope this give you some ideas, with the explanaitions as to why *I* think
they are good and would work for you.
Good luck and happy hunting. I love giving presents to kids :)


ScoobyGang

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May 24, 2001, 4:08:26 AM5/24/01
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"Horace Wachope" >

>Duplo is great, I love the stuff but there are much more economical
> >ways to buy blocks for your child.

> Morphun Blocks?

Ummm were they the ones which can go in circles etc? Advertised on tv?
Still not quite 4 yr old range, we have two sets dad bought for Dylan last
year, one set is almost completely lost :( under beds and couches and places
that you hardly ever move or find things again.

We got several plastic brief cases of blocks, around 72 blocks in each case,
for $15 a case.
3 different sizes in four diff colours. They are great big, easy to use
blocks for little fingers and safe size to prevent choking hazard. (K-mart
again)


Clancy

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May 24, 2001, 4:37:05 AM5/24/01
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"ScoobyGang" <Scoob...@optushome.com.au> wrote in message
news:L_2P6.3629$25.1...@news1.eburwd1.vic.optushome.com.au...

>
> "Clancy"
> > I could understand, why he would want you, but the other 2 are the stuff
> > nightmares are made of (sorry Chris)
>
> thanks for saying sorry to me too...

Not in this lifetime

ScoobyGang

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May 24, 2001, 5:00:38 AM5/24/01
to

"Clancy"

> > thanks for saying sorry to me too...
>
> Not in this lifetime

Ph I so love a man who gets a wedgie so far up his arse he cant see the
light :)

Clancy

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May 24, 2001, 5:09:02 AM5/24/01
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"ScoobyGang" <Scoob...@optushome.com.au> wrote in message
news:W44P6.3666$25.1...@news1.eburwd1.vic.optushome.com.au...
You are confused....My name is not Weginald.

--
Clancy
Be different:
Conform

John Mares

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May 24, 2001, 5:47:10 AM5/24/01
to

"Horace Wachope" <horryw...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:r08pgtc460ij0592a...@4ax.com...
>
> The boy turns 4 later this week and I've got to go present shopping.
>
> Any suggestions?
>
> Scooby, August, Sky?

Lego?


--

John Mares
www.psdsoft.com
www.ozdebatecams.cjb.net

John Phillips

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May 24, 2001, 7:32:48 AM5/24/01
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At least then you could send him out to do the shopping in his Duplo
Volvo.


--

ICQ UIN: 107533462

John Phillips

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May 24, 2001, 7:33:41 AM5/24/01
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On Thu, 24 May 2001 17:54:48 +1000, August <augus...@hotmail.com>
wrote:

>And yours was so much better, John!

I didn't make one?!

--

ICQ UIN: 107533462

Dassa

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May 24, 2001, 8:06:02 AM5/24/01
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Personally I would recommend a safe set of crayons (non-toxic) and a large
sized plain paper notpad. Should be under $10.

Or go to the local supermarket and get a collection of large sized
cardboard boxes and spend an afternoon in the back yard building cubbies
with them.

Dassa.

Lea B

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May 24, 2001, 9:12:36 AM5/24/01
to

"Horace Wachope" <> wrote ...

>
> The boy turns 4 later this week and I've got to go present shopping.
>
> Any suggestions?


My friend's son recently got his first Barbie Doll ( he's 4yrs old ).
His dad was mortified, but apparently he was the only kid ( boys & girls )
at creche without one.
It's all he wanted.

I love Barbie.

Vicki Cleaver

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May 24, 2001, 9:14:45 AM5/24/01
to
Whilst licking their paws in alt.ozdebate on 24 May 2001, "Lea B" <lea-
b...@cybergal.com> purred:

>I love Barbie.

There is a new Barbie out in the USA that has a cat and a carrier, and the
inside of the carrier doubles as a litter tray that contains a scoop and
some poopy as well :) Sounds very cute but I thought those little pieces
might be too small for young children!

Horace Wachope

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May 24, 2001, 9:14:06 AM5/24/01
to
On Thu, 24 May 2001 23:12:36 +1000, "Lea B" <le...@cybergal.com>
wrote:

I'll add that to the list along with the rocking horse and the laptop
computer.

Lea B

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May 24, 2001, 9:18:38 AM5/24/01
to

"Matthew R. Goodyear" <> wrote ...

> Buy him some Lego.. it will allow him to be creative and develop some
> kind of skill that i cant think of right now :-)

Lego. I loooooove Lego !

I used to play with some kids down the street solely coz of their huge Lego
collection.
My sister had heaps of Fabuland too ( smaller than Duplo, bigger than
Lego ) - that was ace fun.


Lea B

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May 24, 2001, 9:20:42 AM5/24/01
to

"Spooky wrote ...
> Matthew ...

>
> > Buy him some Lego.. it will allow him to be creative and develop some
> > kind of skill that i cant think of right now :-)
>
> <sings> "It's not unusual da da da de dum..." </sings>
>
> You're attempting, and failing miserably, to think of "motor skills".


That wasn't very nice.

Lea B

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May 24, 2001, 9:25:37 AM5/24/01
to

"ScoobyGang" <> wrote ...

>
> maybe Horry thinks I would be fun for a four year old boy, mine
> has yet to complain.
> Maybe he thinks I would make a good jumping castle for his kid, or a
> motherly figure :)


Hmmm ... a marriage proposal ?

ScoobyGang

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May 24, 2001, 9:29:11 AM5/24/01
to

"Lea B"

> My friend's son recently got his first Barbie Doll ( he's 4yrs old ).
> His dad was mortified, but apparently he was the only kid ( boys & girls )
> at creche without one.
> It's all he wanted.

Dylan got the swimming Barbie around xmas time/new year and we later picked
up the Australian Olympic supporter Barbie too. Both were on laybuy but one
young son would not leave without the swimming one to play with in that
night's bath...

Hubby always said his son was not going to have a Barbie but i told him to
get real, that there was nothing wrong with boys or girls play acting with
dolls, be they baby or Barbie.

> I love Barbie.

I used to have heaps of them but who knows what my brother did with them
while mum and I were away from this house :( All my dolls and Golden
Library books prolly thrown away like yesterday's garbage not to mention
first edition enid blyton books etc out to the tip. My brother has NO idea
how rich we could be with all the stuff he got rid of.

Horace Wachope

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May 24, 2001, 9:28:44 AM5/24/01
to
On Thu, 24 May 2001 23:25:37 +1000, "Lea B" <le...@cybergal.com>
wrote:

>"ScoobyGang" <> wrote ...

Rayvyn Shadow-Black-Wachope

ScoobyGang

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May 24, 2001, 9:31:19 AM5/24/01
to

"Lea B"

> > maybe Horry thinks I would be fun for a four year old boy, mine
> > has yet to complain.
> > Maybe he thinks I would make a good jumping castle for his kid, or a
> > motherly figure :)

> Hmmm ... a marriage proposal ?

I said fun for the boy not for Horry.


@subdimension.com danielle

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May 24, 2001, 9:35:17 AM5/24/01
to


Horry doesn't know how to have fun, he is a mysoginistic old prick

What's the fastest way to a man's heart?
Through his chest with a sharp knife.

Dassa

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May 24, 2001, 7:16:51 PM5/24/01
to

Don't want to share?

Dassa

Hashcat

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May 25, 2001, 2:29:41 AM5/25/01
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"Spooky Guy Next Door" <galldy=use...@bigpond.com> wrote in message
news:MPG.1577526d3...@news.bigpond.com...
> For I have glimpsed inside Matthew R. Goodyear's mind, and what did I
> see but THIS...

>
> > Buy him some Lego.. it will allow him to be creative and develop some
> > kind of skill that i cant think of right now :-)
>
> <sings> "It's not unusual da da da de dum..." </sings>

To sing crappy songs in a newgroup?

>
> You're attempting, and failing miserably, to think of "motor skills".

I wouldn't say he failed *miserably*. Failing miserably is when you fail to
do something really important, like opening a parachute.


Spooky Guy Next Door

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May 25, 2001, 3:11:03 AM5/25/01
to
For I have glimpsed inside Lea B's mind, and what did I see but
THIS...

> "Spooky wrote ...

I know, and I can't justify it.

Well, not entirely true. There's a part of me that wants to cry out
childishly "he did it too!"

--
Freedom is the freedom to say two plus two make four. If that is
guaranteed, all else follows.
- George Orwell, "Nineteen Eighty-Four"
http://smiley.vh.mewl.net/markweb/
http://www.smileydesigns.com/

Horace Wachope

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May 25, 2001, 4:12:12 AM5/25/01
to
On 24 May 2001 07:01:51 GMT, vickiclea...@dingoblue.net.au
(Vicki Cleaver) wrote:

>Let us know what you end up getting.

1 x Monster Truck
1 x Teletubbies Puzzle
2 x Bananas in Pyjamas Puzzle
1 x Kid's Camera
1 x Winnie the Pooh Duplo
1 x Play Doh Set
1 x copy of The Tigger Movie
1 x Action Man Polar Ski
1 x Bob the Builder
3 x Autotech Car things
1 x Remote Control Boat
1 x Wallabies autographed Rugby Union Ball
1 x Thomas the Tank Engine Railway Set
2 x Bear in the Big Blue House books
Numerous books and card games

Dassa

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May 25, 2001, 4:54:24 AM5/25/01
to

Just curious, does everyone agree with giving young children this number of
gifts?

To me it appears to be promoting expectations that may not be maintained.

My opinion is shaped by my own upbringing of course. However, I see
potential dangers in such generous gift giving.

Dassa

Dassa

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May 25, 2001, 4:55:41 AM5/25/01
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On Fri, 25 May 2001 16:29:41 +1000, "Hashcat" <has...@crosswinds.net>
wrote:

That could result in achieving success with a splat if the intention was
not to open a parachute.

Dassa

ScoobyGang

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May 25, 2001, 5:08:56 AM5/25/01
to

"Horace Wachope"

> >Let us know what you end up getting.
> 1 x Monster Truck
> 1 x Teletubbies Puzzle
> 2 x Bananas in Pyjamas Puzzle
> 1 x Kid's Camera
> 1 x Winnie the Pooh Duplo
> 1 x Play Doh Set
> 1 x copy of The Tigger Movie
> 1 x Action Man Polar Ski
> 1 x Bob the Builder
> 3 x Autotech Car things
> 1 x Remote Control Boat
> 1 x Wallabies autographed Rugby Union Ball
> 1 x Thomas the Tank Engine Railway Set
> 2 x Bear in the Big Blue House books
> Numerous books and card games


Sound like a Christmas list not a birthday one :)

|Lucky kid, I hope he enjoys them all :)


Vicki Cleaver

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May 25, 2001, 6:48:01 AM5/25/01
to

Sounds like some great choices. I don't know a four year old boy who
wouldn't be thrilled to bits with that list!

Vicki Cleaver

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May 25, 2001, 6:51:13 AM5/25/01
to
Whilst licking their paws in alt.ozdebate on 25 May 2001, da...@dhs.org
(Dassa) purred:

>Just curious, does everyone agree with giving young children this number
>of gifts?
>
>To me it appears to be promoting expectations that may not be
>maintained.
>
>My opinion is shaped by my own upbringing of course. However, I see
>potential dangers in such generous gift giving.

This is a tough one. My family never had the money to give us much, but we
always got *something* for every birthday and Christmas and they didn't
mean any less because we got little. I think if you have the money and the
inclination though, it can't hurt. I'm not sure of Horry's philosophy on
this, but IMHO I think lots of pressies twice a year is better than a
couple every fortnight on pay day.

Dassa

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May 25, 2001, 7:17:14 AM5/25/01
to
On 25 May 2001 10:51:13 GMT, vickiclea...@dingoblue.net.au (Vicki
Cleaver) wrote:

>Whilst licking their paws in alt.ozdebate on 25 May 2001, da...@dhs.org
>(Dassa) purred:
>
>>Just curious, does everyone agree with giving young children this number
>>of gifts?
>>
>>To me it appears to be promoting expectations that may not be
>>maintained.
>>
>>My opinion is shaped by my own upbringing of course. However, I see
>>potential dangers in such generous gift giving.
>
>This is a tough one. My family never had the money to give us much, but we
>always got *something* for every birthday and Christmas and they didn't
>mean any less because we got little. I think if you have the money and the
>inclination though, it can't hurt. I'm not sure of Horry's philosophy on
>this, but IMHO I think lots of pressies twice a year is better than a
>couple every fortnight on pay day.

BTW...I cast no stones in direction on this issue. I grew up in a
situation where presents were few and far between. They were appreciated
when given. I was just wondering as I personally would consider any
present given from a single person over 2 to be excessive. However, I
realise this is from my own perspective and may not be shared. I was
curious what others thought.

Personally I would believe giving a lot of presents would minimise the
impact and appreciation. It may also lead to the expectation that large
numbers of presents are the norm and that when a situation arises where the
giving of large numbers of presents is not possible, trouble could arise.

Dassa

ScoobyGang

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May 25, 2001, 7:39:54 AM5/25/01
to
Dassa my brother and I got some little things(as in inexpensive and stocking
fillers but stuff you would not get every day), clothes (always pjammas that
were one size too small from mum's mother) and one large/expensive item. I
think it works well that way as it provides memories for me at least. I
clearly remember the times I got The Treehouse Family (much like Pooh Bear's
Treehouse but with people and a dog) I had been wanting so much, the year we
got our bikes (mum tied string to the xmas tree and had a card on it from
'santa' saying to follow said string for the present. String went forever,
around the backyard, across the road to the service station (mum had oked
this with the owners prior), down the side street a little and around the
front yard then back to the front verandah to the end where the bikes were.
We were never the wiser and it is a fantastic memory), getting these two
huge blow up cats for our first xmas in this house (2 yrs old) along with my
pop up toaster and teaset that year.
All in proportion I think. If you don't get toys libraly all year long,
these occassions are nice to have, they remain special and I know I learnt
from them, the importance of giving from the heart as well as the
pocketbook.


Lea B

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May 25, 2001, 8:03:37 AM5/25/01
to

"Dassa" <> wrote ...
> Horace wrote:

> >1 x Monster Truck
> >1 x Teletubbies Puzzle
> >2 x Bananas in Pyjamas Puzzle
> >1 x Kid's Camera
> >1 x Winnie the Pooh Duplo
> >1 x Play Doh Set
> >1 x copy of The Tigger Movie
> >1 x Action Man Polar Ski
> >1 x Bob the Builder
> >3 x Autotech Car things
> >1 x Remote Control Boat
> >1 x Wallabies autographed Rugby Union Ball
> >1 x Thomas the Tank Engine Railway Set
> >2 x Bear in the Big Blue House books
> >Numerous books and card games
>
> Just curious, does everyone agree with giving young children this number
of
> gifts?

no.

> To me it appears to be promoting expectations that may not be maintained.

correct.

> My opinion is shaped by my own upbringing of course. However, I see
> potential dangers in such generous gift giving.


I too am shaped by a rather frugal upbringing. Not always good either - we
sometimes befriended other kids for their toys/possessions. Nothing to be
proud of :(

I used to know a lady though who had the first grandchild in a large family.
The child received an obscene amount of gifts for Xmas/B'days etc. She
would choose a couple of gifts and put the others in a cupboard for a boring
rainy day etc. Her rellies simply would not *hear* of less/less extravagent
gifts, so it made it very hard for her to keep the child unspoilt.

Don't know how said child turned out - moved away/ lost contact long ago.


Phoenix

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May 25, 2001, 8:11:38 AM5/25/01