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Marlon Brando - The Best Actor That Ever Lived?

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The Kentucky Wizard

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Jul 2, 2004, 1:21:59 PM7/2/04
to
I've seen and heard several folks remark today that in essence Marlon
Brando was the best actor that ever lived. When compared to every
actor/actress that has ever lived, whether on-topic or off-topic, was
Marlon Brando indeed the best actor that ever lived?

--
© The Wiz ®
«¤»¥«¤»¥«¤»

Jason Quilliam

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Jul 2, 2004, 1:23:15 PM7/2/04
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"The Kentucky Wizard" <Kentuck...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:XQgFc.13287$%_6.8740@attbi_s01...

Personal opinion? Yeah - he's definitely up there based on what I've seen.
But I'm by no means an expert.

Jason


Christine

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Jul 2, 2004, 1:32:21 PM7/2/04
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"The Kentucky Wizard" <Kentuck...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:XQgFc.13287$%_6.8740@attbi_s01...

Dear Mr. Wizard,

I've heard it said that Lawrence Olivier was the greatest actor that ever
lived. Didn't he once say something terribly funny about Marlon Brando and
"Method Acting"?

Chris in Pearland, TX


Volfie

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Jul 2, 2004, 1:30:03 PM7/2/04
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"Jason Quilliam" <jqui...@rogers.com> wrote in message
news:7SgFc.361$rEj1...@news04.bloor.is.net.cable.rogers.com...

I'd say he was up there but Kate Hepburn is up there, too.

Giselle (or do you literally mean "actor" as in "male only"?)


J.D. Baldwin

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Jul 2, 2004, 1:38:11 PM7/2/04
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In the previous article, The Kentucky Wizard

I don't know who the best actor who ever lived was, but I am pretty
sure it wasn't Marlon Brando.
--
_+_ From the catapult of |If anyone disagrees with any statement I make, I
_|70|___:)=}- J.D. Baldwin |am quite prepared not only to retract it, but also
\ / bal...@panix.com|to deny under oath that I ever made it. -T. Lehrer
***~~~~-----------------------------------------------------------------------

J.D. Baldwin

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Jul 2, 2004, 1:40:41 PM7/2/04
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In the previous article, Christine <rmark...@nospamhouston.rr.com>
wrote:

> I've heard it said that Lawrence Olivier was the greatest actor that
> ever lived.

Probably you heard Lawrence Olivier say it.

> Didn't he once say something terribly funny about Marlon Brando and
> "Method Acting"?

You may be thinking of Dustin Hoffman.

Christine

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Jul 2, 2004, 1:46:32 PM7/2/04
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"J.D. Baldwin" <INVALID...@example.com.invalid> wrote in message
news:cc46mp$iek$1...@reader2.panix.com...

>
> In the previous article, Christine <rmark...@nospamhouston.rr.com>
> wrote:
> > I've heard it said that Lawrence Olivier was the greatest actor that
> > ever lived.
>
> Probably you heard Lawrence Olivier say it.
>
> > Didn't he once say something terribly funny about Marlon Brando and
> > "Method Acting"?
>
> You may be thinking of Dustin Hoffman.

Could be... I'll try and "google out" the exact quote.

Chris in Pearland

Hyfler/Rosner

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Jul 2, 2004, 1:49:03 PM7/2/04
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"J.D. Baldwin" <INVALID...@example.com.invalid> wrote
in message news:cc46i3$id1$1...@reader2.panix.com...

>
> In the previous article, The Kentucky Wizard
> <Kentuck...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> > I've seen and heard several folks remark today that in
essence
> > Marlon Brando was the best actor that ever lived. When
compared to
> > every actor/actress that has ever lived, whether
on-topic or
> > off-topic, was Marlon Brando indeed the best actor that
ever lived?
>
> I don't know who the best actor who ever lived was, but I
am pretty
> sure it wasn't Marlon Brando.


I'm with you. I liked him. He was distinctive. But the
best?


Christine

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Jul 2, 2004, 1:50:27 PM7/2/04
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"Christine" <rmark...@nospamhouston.rr.com> wrote in message
news:YbhFc.4557$T72....@fe2.texas.rr.com...

>
> "J.D. Baldwin" <INVALID...@example.com.invalid> wrote in message
> news:cc46mp$iek$1...@reader2.panix.com...
> >
> > In the previous article, Christine <rmark...@nospamhouston.rr.com>
> > wrote:
> > > I've heard it said that Lawrence Olivier was the greatest actor that
> > > ever lived.
> >
> > Probably you heard Lawrence Olivier say it.
> >
> > > Didn't he once say something terribly funny about Marlon Brando and
> > > "Method Acting"?
> >
> > You may be thinking of Dustin Hoffman.
>
> Could be... I'll try and "google out" the exact quote.
>
> Chris in Pearland
>

Here it is and you're right it was Dustin Hoffman:

Or, as Lawrence Olivier once remarked to another fantastic method actor,
Dustin Hoffman, "Why not try acting, dear boy?"

Hal Horn

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Jul 2, 2004, 2:11:51 PM7/2/04
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No.

HCH
"The Kentucky Wizard" <Kentuck...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:XQgFc.13287$%_6.8740@attbi_s01...

James Neibaur

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Jul 2, 2004, 2:08:25 PM7/2/04
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in article XQgFc.13287$%_6.8740@attbi_s01, The Kentucky Wizard at
Kentuck...@hotmail.com wrote on 7/2/04 12:21 PM:

> When compared to every
> actor/actress that has ever lived, whether on-topic or off-topic, was
> Marlon Brando indeed the best actor that ever lived?

It is impossible to state that any one person is the best actor, but Brando
was among the most significant. I have seen all of his films at least
once, and he redefined screen acting with a style that continues to inspire
performers today.

JN

R H Draney

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Jul 2, 2004, 2:00:52 PM7/2/04
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J.D. Baldwin filted:

>
>
>In the previous article, The Kentucky Wizard
><Kentuck...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>> I've seen and heard several folks remark today that in essence
>> Marlon Brando was the best actor that ever lived. When compared to
>> every actor/actress that has ever lived, whether on-topic or
>> off-topic, was Marlon Brando indeed the best actor that ever lived?
>
>I don't know who the best actor who ever lived was, but I am pretty
>sure it wasn't Marlon Brando.

You're right....

It was James Cagney....

Better singer too....r

Laurie D. T. Mann

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Jul 2, 2004, 2:31:42 PM7/2/04
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Nope, but he was exceptionally good in a number of movies - The
Godfather, The Wild Bunch, Streetcar Named Desire. He was a wildly
erratic actor and person, who had a wildly erratic life.

Laurie D. T. Mann
Dead People Server
http://www.dpsinfo.com/dps

Bermuda999

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Jul 2, 2004, 2:51:25 PM7/2/04
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"Laurie D. T. Mann" spamc...@dpsinfo.com

> > The Kentucky Wizard wrote:
>> I've seen and heard several folks remark today that in essence Marlon
>> Brando was the best actor that ever lived. When compared to every
>> actor/actress that has ever lived, whether on-topic or off-topic, was
>> Marlon Brando indeed the best actor that ever lived?
>
>Nope, but he was exceptionally good in a number of movies - The
>Godfather, The Wild Bunch,

You of course mean "The Wild One"

King Daevid MacKenzie

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Jul 2, 2004, 3:26:33 PM7/2/04
to
Christine sez:

> Here it is and you're right it was Dustin Hoffman:
>
> Or, as Lawrence Olivier once remarked to another fantastic method actor,
> Dustin Hoffman, "Why not try acting, dear boy?"

...after seeing THE BOYS FROM BRAZIL again the other day, I'm sure
Gregory Peck could have legitimately asked the same of Olivier ;-) ...

--
King Daevid MacKenzie, La Crosse, Wisconsin, USA
How Radio is done. No brag, just fact.
http://ultimajock.blogspot.com
"Fear and God do not inhabit the same space." DICK GREGORY

King Daevid MacKenzie

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Jul 2, 2004, 3:29:11 PM7/2/04
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R H Draney quotes J.D. Baldwin 'n sez:

>>I don't know who the best actor who ever lived was, but I am pretty
>>sure it wasn't Marlon Brando.
>
>
> You're right....
>
> It was James Cagney....

...naah. My pick would have been one of the guys Cagney once played, Lon
Chaney...

James Neibaur

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Jul 2, 2004, 3:33:27 PM7/2/04
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in article cc47s...@drn.newsguy.com, R H Draney at dado...@spamcop.net
wrote on 7/2/04 1:00 PM:

> It was James Cagney....

He would be my favorite, indeed.

JN

Lenona321

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Jul 2, 2004, 3:31:31 PM7/2/04
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>
>Or, as Lawrence Olivier once remarked to another fantastic method actor,
>Dustin Hoffman, "Why not try acting, dear boy?"

The way I heard it, Hoffman was supposed to look exhausted in "Marathon Man,"
so he either stayed up all night or ran around the block many times. Olivier
said: "My dear boy, you really ought to learn to act. Then you wouldn't have to
put yourself through this."

And when Hoffman acted with the younger John Malkovich and kept trying to give
him unsolicited advice, Malkovich said in his soft, mocking voice: "Mr.
Hoffman, I don't need acting tips from someone who lost an Oscar to John
Wayne."

Lenona.

James Neibaur

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Jul 2, 2004, 3:35:18 PM7/2/04
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in article -LqdnUXSjbm...@adelphia.com, Laurie D. T. Mann at
spamc...@dpsinfo.com wrote on 7/2/04 1:31 PM:

> Nope, but he was exceptionally good in a number of movies - The
> Godfather, The Wild Bunch, Streetcar Named Desire. He was a wildly
> erratic actor and person, who had a wildly erratic life.

He wasn't in The Wild Bunch, you are likely thinking of The Wild One. I do
that sort of thing all the time.

JN

Loki

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Jul 2, 2004, 3:41:39 PM7/2/04
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Depends on who you ask. Obviously it is difficult to compare him to
Edwin Booth, for example, or any number of actors of who little or no
film work exists.

However, limiting the choices to actors who's better work was captured
on film, I would say he was. Other people may choose Olivier, Tracy,
DeNiro, or Guiness but any list that does not have him within the top
5 is not worth the time it takes to read.


Loki

Loki

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Jul 2, 2004, 3:42:56 PM7/2/04
to

Never heard that one, but it is a beauty. Thank you for the smile on
this sad day.


Loki

Christine

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Jul 2, 2004, 3:44:02 PM7/2/04
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"Lenona321" <leno...@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20040702153131...@mb-m02.aol.com...

> >
> >Or, as Lawrence Olivier once remarked to another fantastic method actor,
> >Dustin Hoffman, "Why not try acting, dear boy?"
>
> The way I heard it, Hoffman was supposed to look exhausted in "Marathon
Man,"
> so he either stayed up all night or ran around the block many times.
Olivier
> said: "My dear boy, you really ought to learn to act. Then you wouldn't
have to
> put yourself through this."

That's more the way I remember it when Sir Lawrence said that. I "googled"
Olivier's quotes and that's what I found. Yours sounds more accurate.

Chris in Pearland, TX

James Neibaur

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Jul 2, 2004, 3:56:18 PM7/2/04
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in article 10ebdsd...@corp.supernews.com, King Daevid MacKenzie at
thevoic...@charter.net wrote on 7/2/04 2:29 PM:

>> It was James Cagney....
>
> ...naah. My pick would have been one of the guys Cagney once played, Lon
> Chaney...

Lon Chaney was outstanding. More people should look beyond Hunchback and
Phantom and see such classics as The Penalty and He Who Gets Slapped.

JN

King Daevid MacKenzie

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Jul 2, 2004, 3:56:49 PM7/2/04
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Lenona321 sez:

> And when Hoffman acted with the younger John Malkovich and kept trying to give
> him unsolicited advice, Malkovich said in his soft, mocking voice: "Mr.
> Hoffman, I don't need acting tips from someone who lost an Oscar to John
> Wayne."

...although I don't consider TRUE GRIT to be an Oscar-caliber Wayne
performance (that would have been THE LONG VOYAGE HOME almost three
decades earlier), John Wayne was by no means the kind of performer
Malkovich's insult suggests...

Mpoconnor7

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Jul 2, 2004, 5:39:34 PM7/2/04
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I always felt Brando was overrated. He had about a half dozen really good film
roles, but it seemed for most of his career he simply showed up for a big
paycheck and chewed scenery. Most of his best roles were in the 50's, and I
think his movies with Coppola were his only really good roles after that I
would not rate him among the best actors of his era, but I would certainly rate
him as one of the most influential actors of his era.

Michael O'Connor - Modern Renaissance Man

"The likelihood of one individual being correct increases in a direct
proportion to the intensity with which others try to prove him wrong"
James Mason from the movie "Heaven Can Wait".

Loki

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Jul 2, 2004, 5:48:07 PM7/2/04
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On 02 Jul 2004 21:39:34 GMT, mpoco...@aol.comnojunk (Mpoconnor7)
wrote:

>I always felt Brando was overrated. He had about a half dozen really good film
>roles, but it seemed for most of his career he simply showed up for a big
>paycheck and chewed scenery. Most of his best roles were in the 50's, and I
>think his movies with Coppola were his only really good roles after that I
>would not rate him among the best actors of his era, but I would certainly rate
>him as one of the most influential actors of his era.
>
>Michael O'Connor - Modern Renaissance Man

Have you seen Last Tango? Streetcar? Waterfront? He was brilliant and
I cannot think of any actor before or since who showed such depth in
so many varied roles.


Loki

R H Draney

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Jul 2, 2004, 5:24:01 PM7/2/04
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Lenona321 filted:

>
>And when Hoffman acted with the younger John Malkovich and kept trying to give
>him unsolicited advice, Malkovich said in his soft, mocking voice: "Mr.
>Hoffman, I don't need acting tips from someone who lost an Oscar to John
>Wayne."

I can just hear him saying it too...in fact, I'm having trouble imagining John
Malkovich so much as ordering a bologna sandwich without sounding like he thinks
the person he's talking to is an earthworm to him....r

Mack Twamley

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Jul 2, 2004, 5:55:53 PM7/2/04
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"The Kentucky Wizard" <Kentuck...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:XQgFc.13287$%_6.8740@attbi_s01...

> I've seen and heard several folks remark today that in essence Marlon
> Brando was the best actor that ever lived. When compared to every
> actor/actress that has ever lived, whether on-topic or off-topic, was
> Marlon Brando indeed the best actor that ever lived?
>
> --
> © The Wiz ®
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
If you've sat through "Reflections in a Golden Eye", "The Countess From Hong
Kong" and most of "Sayonara" (there is a touching scene in Sayonara that I'm
fond of) I think you'll not think that much of Brando's acting. He was
stunning in a few pictures, but was much less so in many others. On
balance, I'd sooner watch Jimmy Stewart, Spencer Tracy or Gary Cooper ....or
even Johnny Depp (with whom Brando made Don Juan de Marco....two for the
price of one!)


James Neibaur

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Jul 2, 2004, 6:32:48 PM7/2/04
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in article 10ebmfe...@corp.supernews.com, Mack Twamley at
mack...@dslextreme.com wrote on 7/2/04 4:55 PM:

> On
> balance, I'd sooner watch Jimmy Stewart, Spencer Tracy or Gary Cooper

or James Cagney, Humphrey Bogart, Edward G. Robinson....

But this does not negate Brando's tremendous influence and impact, based on
only a handful of films (Streetcar, Wild One, Waterfront, Godfather). Those
are not his only good movies, of course, but they are usually the ones
singled out.

JN

Loki

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Jul 2, 2004, 6:33:31 PM7/2/04
to
On Fri, 2 Jul 2004 14:55:53 -0700, " Mack Twamley"
<mack...@dslextreme.com> wrote:

>
>"The Kentucky Wizard" <Kentuck...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>news:XQgFc.13287$%_6.8740@attbi_s01...
>> I've seen and heard several folks remark today that in essence Marlon
>> Brando was the best actor that ever lived. When compared to every
>> actor/actress that has ever lived, whether on-topic or off-topic, was
>> Marlon Brando indeed the best actor that ever lived?
>>
>> --
>> © The Wiz ®
>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>If you've sat through "Reflections in a Golden Eye", "The Countess From Hong
>Kong" and most of "Sayonara" (there is a touching scene in Sayonara that I'm
>fond of) I think you'll not think that much of Brando's acting.

He was inconsistent, no doubt. In fact, he is down right awful in some
of his works. However, it is for his best that he is being judged.
Just as one does not evaluate Babe Ruth based on how many times he
struck out, or Ali based on the Spinx fight, Brando deserves to be
evaluated by his best work.


Loki

Mpoconnor7

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Jul 2, 2004, 6:57:31 PM7/2/04
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>>I always felt Brando was overrated. He had about a half dozen really good
>film
>>roles, but it seemed for most of his career he simply showed up for a big
>>paycheck and chewed scenery. Most of his best roles were in the 50's, and I
>>think his movies with Coppola were his only really good roles after that I
>>would not rate him among the best actors of his era, but I would certainly
>rate
>>him as one of the most influential actors of his era.
>>
>>Michael O'Connor - Modern Renaissance Man
>
>Have you seen Last Tango? Streetcar? Waterfront? He was brilliant and
>I cannot think of any actor before or since who showed such depth in
>so many varied roles.
>
>

Yes, Yes and Yes. I really liked the first two, and would put those amongst
his best work. Last Tango was IMO unwatchable; I tried to sit thru it three
times and failed.

He had a number of great roles in the 50's, but the rest of his career was a
disappointment other than the Coppola films, and I guess I have to include The
Freshman also since he was in essence playing the Don once again. I still
stand by my belief that he had a half dozen or so great roles (mostly in the
50's), and the rest of his career was less than stellar. After his Godfather
role, he had IMO more or less became a parody of his earlier self and was for
the most part just going thru the motions and making tons of money for as
little screen time as possible. IMDB lists just over forty screen roles, and
I'll say a quarter of those at best were great roles and the rest was lead
roles in lesser films or cameos in good films.

I'll reiterate that I don't think he was the greatest actor who ever lived
(although he was at times brilliant), but was arguably the most influential
actor who ever lived.

Michael O'Connor - Modern Renaissance Man

"The likelihood of one individual being correct increases in a direct

Brigid Nelson

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Jul 2, 2004, 6:58:31 PM7/2/04
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R H Draney wrote:

I hear what you're saying, but I think it's a symptom of extreme
shyness. For obvious reasons, the actions of people who lack social
skills are often misunderstood.

brigid

Brigid Nelson

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Jul 2, 2004, 7:00:42 PM7/2/04
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Mack Twamley wrote:

Oh you di'en just insinuate that Johnny Depp is anything less than a
*fine* actor.

brigid

Michael Rhodes

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Jul 2, 2004, 8:17:58 PM7/2/04
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bermu...@aol.com (Bermuda999) wrote in message news:<20040702145125...@mb-m28.aol.com>...

> "Laurie D. T. Mann" spamc...@dpsinfo.com
>
> > > The Kentucky Wizard wrote:
> >> I've seen and heard several folks remark today that in essence Marlon
> >> Brando was the best actor that ever lived. When compared to every
> >> actor/actress that has ever lived, whether on-topic or off-topic, was
> >> Marlon Brando indeed the best actor that ever lived?

Actor, or Film Star? There's a difference I think. He certainly wasn't
much good in the classical roles. I caught the Channel 4 news tonight
in Britain and he was the top story - rare I think. Sinatra was
probably the last actor to top the news in Britain (excluding Ronald
Reagan of course).

In "On the Waterfront" Brando forged a new style of acting. Lord
Attenborough said that when he saw the movie for the first time he sat
in his car afterwards quite speechless for 20 minutes.

R H Draney

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Jul 2, 2004, 9:07:46 PM7/2/04
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Mpoconnor7 filted:

>
>After his Godfather
>role, he had IMO more or less became a parody of his earlier self and was for
>the most part just going thru the motions and making tons of money for as
>little screen time as possible.

*More or less* a parody of his earlier self?...

You missed "The Freshman", I take it?...r

Jax

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Jul 2, 2004, 10:03:17 PM7/2/04
to
I saw something rather funny and kinda sad today on the Headline News
channel.
A rather young female reporter was talking about Brando and during the bit
she said the Brando had invented the Method System.
Ha!
Too bad reporters don't have to do actual research into the stories they
do.I mean, how hard would it have been to do just a Google search for a bio
on Brando?

BsT

"R H Draney" <dado...@spamcop.net> wrote in message
news:cc50t...@drn.newsguy.com...

The Kentucky Wizard

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Jul 3, 2004, 12:50:05 AM7/3/04
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Michael Rhodes wrote:
> bermu...@aol.com (Bermuda999) wrote in message
news:<20040702145125...@mb-m28.aol.com>...
>> "Laurie D. T. Mann" spamc...@dpsinfo.com
>>
>>>> The Kentucky Wizard wrote:
>>>> I've seen and heard several folks remark today that in essence
Marlon
>>>> Brando was the best actor that ever lived. When compared to every
>>>> actor/actress that has ever lived, whether on-topic or off-topic,
was
>>>> Marlon Brando indeed the best actor that ever lived?
>
> Actor, or Film Star? There's a difference I think. He certainly wasn't
> much good in the classical roles. I caught the Channel 4 news tonight
> in Britain and he was the top story - rare I think. Sinatra was
> probably the last actor to top the news in Britain (excluding Ronald
> Reagan of course).
>
> In "On the Waterfront" Brando forged a new style of acting. Lord
> Attenborough said that when he saw the movie for the first time he sat
> in his car afterwards quite speechless for 20 minutes.
>
>

Hmmm, you have an interesting point, Michael, which I had not
considered. I know that his approach to acting where at times somewhat
on the eccentric side. I heard someone remark today on cable that Brando
refused to memorize his lines, and relied heavily on cue cards, as noted
when he portrayed Superman's father, Jor-El, in the first 'Superman'
movie, when he actually read his lines that were written on the infant
Superman's (Kal-El) diaper.

His screen presence most likely supercedes his overall acting, for he
definitely entranced movie viewers everywhere. In 2000, Brando was
ranked #12 in Entertainment Weekly's "Top 100 Entertainers of All Time",
so he was definitely a powerful force that intimidated even the most
veteran of actors/actresses.

So, to answer your question from my point of view, I'd say that Brandon
was a good actor, while at the same time he was a great film star.
Whether he was the best or not, appears to be up to the individual,
based on the many different responses to this thread.


--
© The Wiz ®
«¤»¥«¤»¥«¤»

Mack Twamley

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Jul 3, 2004, 2:12:47 AM7/3/04
to

"Brigid Nelson" <irja...@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:0MudnclaRb8...@comcast.com...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
He IS a fine actor...he just doesn't have the age or the body of work that
the other three actors mentioned before him have.


Mack Twamley

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Jul 3, 2004, 2:16:26 AM7/3/04
to

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Oh, another turkey I had blissfully forgotten..."The Missouri Breaks" with
Marlon in a Mother Hubbard. Really!

Sadly, I heard on KNX (CBS in LA) today that Brando had been living on
Social Security, Actors' Fund Pension, some residuals, and nothing
else....and that his 'compound' on Mulholland Drive was 'shabbily'
furnished. Apparently a large part of his fortune melted away when he had
to pay for Christian's defense in the murder case.
Truly sad.


Bob Feigel

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Jul 3, 2004, 3:19:48 AM7/3/04
to
On Fri, 2 Jul 2004 17:38:11 +0000 (UTC),
INVALID...@example.com.invalid (J.D. Baldwin) wrote:

>
>In the previous article, The Kentucky Wizard


><Kentuck...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>> I've seen and heard several folks remark today that in essence
>> Marlon Brando was the best actor that ever lived. When compared to
>> every actor/actress that has ever lived, whether on-topic or
>> off-topic, was Marlon Brando indeed the best actor that ever lived?
>

>I don't know who the best actor who ever lived was, but I am pretty
>sure it wasn't Marlon Brando.

The Best Actor Who Ever Lived? Those kind of questions sorta frost my
ass. Who the hell can possibly answer that kind of question any way
but subjectively?

What I *do* know is that I think Brando could be an excellent actor
within his range. His performances in SCND and OTWF were, IMO, the
best anyone could have done with those roles at that time. I've seen
clips tonight that reminded me of how good he was, but also how
limited his range was. I guess the main thing for me is that, despite
his dynamic and sometimes mesmerising presence, I was always aware
that it was Marlon Brando I was seeing in the role. I couldn't say the
same about Sir John Gielgud or Sir Alec Guinness for example. b


"Until death, it is all life." - Cervantes
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Wax-up and drop-in of Surfing's Golden Years: <http://www.surfwriter.net>

Terrymelin

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Jul 3, 2004, 8:40:30 AM7/3/04
to
I would not even include Brando on the list. The very thought is laughable.

Terry Ellsworth

Terrymelin

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Jul 3, 2004, 8:41:19 AM7/3/04
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>...after seeing THE BOYS FROM BRAZIL again the other day, I'm sure
>Gregory Peck could have legitimately asked the same of Olivier ;-) ...

That would be funny since Peck easily gives one of the worst performances in
the history of film in that movie.

Terry Ellsworth

Terrymelin

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Jul 3, 2004, 8:42:15 AM7/3/04
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>.although I don't consider TRUE GRIT to be an Oscar-caliber Wayne
>performance (that would have been THE LONG VOYAGE HOME almost three
>decades earlier), John Wayne was by no means the kind of performer
>Malkovich's insult suggests...

He certainly was a more natural actor than Malkovich who is so obvious that he
bores me with each and every utterance.

Terry Ellsworth

James Neibaur

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Jul 3, 2004, 8:41:59 AM7/3/04
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in article 20040703084215...@mb-m20.aol.com, Terrymelin at
terry...@aol.com wrote on 7/3/04 7:42 AM:

> He certainly was a more natural actor than Malkovich who is so obvious that he
> bores me with each and every utterance.

The idea that Malkovich could make a condescending remark to a superior
actor (Hoffman) about a legendary screen presence (Wayne) is pretty amazing.

Sort of like Britney Spears making a condescending remark to Ray Charles
about Billie Holiday.

JN

Loki

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Jul 3, 2004, 9:10:10 AM7/3/04
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On Sat, 03 Jul 2004 12:41:59 GMT, James Neibaur <jnei...@wi.rr.com>
wrote:

>in article 20040703084215...@mb-m20.aol.com, Terrymelin at
>terry...@aol.com wrote on 7/3/04 7:42 AM:
>
>> He certainly was a more natural actor than Malkovich who is so obvious that he
>> bores me with each and every utterance.
>
>The idea that Malkovich could make a condescending remark to a superior
>actor (Hoffman) about a legendary screen presence (Wayne) is pretty amazing.

It is valid. I do not know if you have ever seen Malkovich on stage,
but it is a truly electrifying experience. I saw him in Salesman on
Broadway with Hoffman, and Malkovich commanded more attention just by
silently smoking a cigarette than Hoffman did with all of his scene
chewing.

Unfortunately his film work has not been that impressive, but people
who saw them both say that off all of the stage actors to come along
over the last 60 years or so, Malkovich comes the closest in terms of
presence and force to recapturing what Brando had.


Loki

James Neibaur

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Jul 3, 2004, 9:50:55 AM7/3/04
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in article dpbde0h8e5lciinmv...@4ax.com, Loki at
cubby...@aol.com wrote on 7/3/04 8:10 AM:

> It is valid. I do not know if you have ever seen Malkovich on stage,
> but it is a truly electrifying experience. I saw him in Salesman on
> Broadway with Hoffman, and Malkovich commanded more attention just by
> silently smoking a cigarette than Hoffman did with all of his scene
> chewing.

I saw him years and years ago in Chicago in a very good play called Say
Goodnight Gracie, in which Gary Sinise also appeared. But this may not be
fair because it was so long ago, and I was -- at that time-- unaware of
either of them. I don't think my memory of this production (as much as I
enjoyed it ) would be very accurate in assessing his performance.

> Unfortunately his film work has not been that impressive, but people
> who saw them both say that off all of the stage actors to come along
> over the last 60 years or so, Malkovich comes the closest in terms of
> presence and force to recapturing what Brando had.

I will have to take your word for it. I never saw Brando on stage. I have
seen all of Malkovich's films and don't think he has done anything close to
what Brando did.

JN

Terrymelin

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Jul 3, 2004, 9:56:21 AM7/3/04
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>I will have to take your word for it. I never saw Brando on stage. I have
>seen all of Malkovich's films and don't think he has done anything close to
>what Brando did.
>
>JN

He hasn't done anything close to what Kevin Spacey has done.

Terry Ellsworth

Terrymelin

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Jul 3, 2004, 9:55:42 AM7/3/04
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>The idea that Malkovich could make a condescending remark to a superior
>actor (Hoffman) about a legendary screen presence (Wayne) is pretty amazing.
>
>Sort of like Britney Spears making a condescending remark to Ray Charles
>about Billie Holiday.
>
>JN
>

Wonderful analogy, Jim.

Terry Ellsworth

Hyfler/Rosner

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Jul 3, 2004, 10:07:09 AM7/3/04
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"Terrymelin" <terry...@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20040703095621...@mb-m25.aol.com...


So the point here is this. There are lots and lots of
wonderful actors around and to decide that one has to be the
best (Me, I'm voting for Bruno Ganz) is a ridiculous
endeavour. Start a top ten or a hundred if you must.


Terrymelin

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Jul 3, 2004, 11:37:09 AM7/3/04
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>So the point here is this. There are lots and lots of
>wonderful actors around and to decide that one has to be the
>best (Me, I'm voting for Bruno Ganz) is a ridiculous
>endeavour.

Agreed.

Regnirps

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Jul 3, 2004, 2:31:14 PM7/3/04