Box Set seen on sale in UK today

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John Fowles

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Jul 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/14/99
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Any British fan who hasn't yet acquired the masterpiece (shame on you), and
in particular anyone near Basingstoke, Hants, (Old Hampshire, Diane), may
like to know that there is a Box Set on the shelf at that town's Virgin
store for what is I reckon the quite reasonable price (for a US import) of
£49.99.That is in real money, and roughly equal to $75 (or $112 of the
Canadian variety) and includes all taxes such as VAT, John Prescott's
motorway bus lane tax, Kosovo entertainment fund,
IRA arms subsidy etc.It also compares with top-line CD prices here of $16.49
for one CD. Phew no wonder the Internet CD sales are booming.

John Fowles

P.S. I said "real" money as some humurous foreigner in Rik's chat room last
night dared to query if Pounds Sterling is real money - well at least our
currency has a living person's image on all newly-minted/printed items, even
though the forthcoming 50 pence coin will have Diana P-o-W on the obverse.

P.P.S. Obverse in this case has nothing to do with back side.

John Fowles

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Jul 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/14/99
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John Fowles <jo...@rungheating.freeserve.co.uk> wrote...

> .It also compares with top-line CD prices here of $16.49
> for one CD. >
Correction - getting confused in my old age - £16.49

dj17

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Jul 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/14/99
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Glad you were paying attention last night John and
remembered the "query" of #s vs $s. Always a joy to see
you post. Hopefully your find will enable another
Lighthead to enjoy what we share every Tuesday and Friday
night in Rik's room. As long as they don't try to cut in
on you and our mutual friend (you know who you are) as you
two share your evening's dance.

Regards, Diane (in NEW Hampshire)

**** Posted from RemarQ - http://www.remarq.com - Discussions Start Here (tm) ****

Hershey102

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Jul 15, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/15/99
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>Correction - getting confused in my old age - £16.49

Not nearly as confused and befuddled as I . . . just how do you make that pound
sign?

Duff :-)

Susan

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Jul 15, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/15/99
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In article <7miqnc$4s3$1...@news4.svr.pol.co.uk>, jo...@rungheating.freeserve.co.uk
says...
John--We're getting such a world education in Rik's chat, mostly thanks to
you! No foreigners there, tho', just friends, eh? But I see you've been
holding back on your chat pals--you never told us you had Virgin stores over
there! (Keeping secrets like that from us "foreigners" certainly won't help to
strengthen those Pounds Sterling.) But I digress.

What I really want to say is that in awe and respect of your special abilities,
I am nominating you as the official "Massey Currency-Master and Chief
Metrician", pending of course, a second and whatever other parliamentary
procedures may be deemed necessary.

Sir John, will you rise to the occasion?

Respectfully,
Susan

P.S. Since many of us hope to meet at Massey, a few trips to Rik's very
friendly Tues and Fri (9PM EST) chats (www.europa.com/~random7/chat.htm) are
highly recommended as an aid in combatting those social diseases such as
shyness, anxiety, even zenophobia!

Oh, BTW, I would imagine that John could also provide time zone conversions
PRN.

dj17

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Jul 15, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/15/99
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Susan wrote to John, I am nominating you as the official
"Massey Currency-Master and Chief Metrician" pending of
course, a second.....

I second.

(However, I must say that Gman deserves to be Asst Chief
Metrician.)

Snap!!

Diane

Susan

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Jul 15, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/15/99
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In article <7mki1s$sac$1...@birch.prod.itd.earthlink.net>, gord...@hotmail.com
says...
>

>P.S. Since many of us hope to meet at Massey, a few trips to Rik's very
>friendly Tues and Fri (9PM EST) chats (www.europa.com/~random7/chat.htm) are
>highly recommended as an aid in combatting those social diseases such as
>shyness, anxiety, even zenophobia!

After checking the post, thought I'd correct my own typo for the obsessive
among us (you know who you are!): "xenophobia". I beg your indulgences.

Susan

Susan

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Jul 15, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/15/99
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In article <9320411...@www.remarq.com>, anon...@web.remarq.com says...

>
>Susan wrote to John, I am nominating you as the official
>"Massey Currency-Master and Chief Metrician" pending of
>course, a second.....
>
>I second.
>
>(However, I must say that Gman deserves to be Asst Chief
>Metrician.)
>
>Snap!!
>
>Diane

Hmmm! I see your point and apologize for any slight to Gman, however, Gman may
not make Massey. Perhaps if Gman can overcome any problems associated with
crossing the border we will need to split the title and take it to a vote!
Comments, Gman, John, Diane, anyone?

Susan

and...@postoffice.swbell.net

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Jul 15, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/15/99
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What about "Xena-phobia?" Does that count?
E.D.

John Fowles

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Jul 16, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/16/99
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Hershey102 <hersh...@aol.com> wrote in message
news:19990714213039...@ng-fz1.aol.com...

See below, but patient readers may like a bit of background to start with:-

Firstly, apologies - I should have headed my original posting "Private
message for British eyes only"
then ex-colonials wouldn't have been troubled by a strange crossed L. This
is from Latin "libra", an ancient Roman unit of weight corresponding to 1
pound, or in Old English "pund", an obsolete unit of weight. "libra" was
then shortened to "lb" (for younger British readers 1 lb = 16 ounces =
0.453592 kilograms, unless it's being used to weigh precious metals or
gemstones when it is then called a troy pound = 12 ounces = 0.373242 kg and
also 1 troy ounce = 20 pennyweights where 1 pennyweight = 24 grains, of what
I've no idea.The ancient Albions, as inflation reduced the value of their
penny weights, needed a collective noun for a pile of pennies, and as you
may have noticed if you're still with me 240 pennyweights weigh 1 pound.
20-odd years ago the imminent availability of small miraculous £500 portable
electronic calculators made more cents if the Pound was decimilised, so our
current penny weights are 2.4 old penny weights, and to differentiate them
they are now shown
as "p" compared to the previous "d" (itself from Latin "denarius", a Roman
coin worth 10 asses).
This is verbally abbreviated by the hoi polloi from "pence" to "pee",
presumably because their vulgar minds associate a penny with the old
entrance charge to a loo (toilet, washroom, little boy's room, little girl's
room or pisshouse).The ounce itself is so-named from old French "unce" or
Latin "uncia" meaning a twelfth. "Troy" is from Troyes in France where this
whole silly system apparently originated. Then the French under Napoleon
buggered the whole lot up by insisting that all their conquested domains
change to the metric system and drive on the wrong side of the road. They
had friends in the recently rebel tea-drinking colonies somewhere to the
West who, while in some United State of disarray, decided to cock a snoot
(nose) to their old mad King and, in sympathy with France, started to tell
their horses to drive on the right also (note that even today the majority
of right-thinking drivers throughout the rest of the world sit in the right
seat of their cars and drive down the natural, left, side of the road).
Later on the Irish thought they'd follow suit, but made the mistake of
getting all buses and lorries (trucks) to change to the right one weekend,
with cars and push-bikes the next. The resulting carnage led to that
experiment being quickly abandoned, but not before many of those who
protested at this insult to the British mainland had moved north and set up
a breakaway area called Ulster (United Left Side Throughout the Empire
Region). The Southern Irish never forgave the protest(ant)ers hence the
current sorry mess there. The Irish pound (money) is called a "punt", which
is almost where we came in, and why they still rock the boat as it were.
None of this would have happenned if it hadn't been for the fact that fully
50% of all Irish, French and Americans are of below average intelligence,
whereas a good 50% of all native Brits are blessed with above average
intellectual powers.

Amazing what you can find in a dictionary isn't it?

Anyway, back to Duff's question: :-)
1. Move to the UK, buy a UK issue computer, and you get a nice REAL £ sign
on the keyboard
( where you have a # above the 3)
OR:
2.1 Open up Character Map ( Windows 95/98, Accessories, System Tools)
2.2 Open a True Type fonts, most feature the £ sign
2.3 Highlight it and Select, then press Copy - the £ symbol should then be
in the Clipboard
2.4 Edit, Paste into your document, hey presto (I hope!) the £ sign should
be there in all its glory
and in the font you are using .
2.5 That way you don't make a hash of it.

Finally, I hope I haven't offended anyone.

Best wishes, John Fowles, author of the above but not "The French
Lieutenant's Woman" unfortunately


Sbloo50139

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Jul 16, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/16/99
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>The ounce itself is so-named from old French "unce"

>a good 50% of all native Brits are blessed with above average
>intellectual powers.

Would that then make the other 50% "dunce"s? Like, say, someone who actually
looked up the history of british currency? (Grin)

John you have way too much time on your hands. (hehe)

Sue

John Fowles

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Jul 16, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/16/99
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http://www.audiostreet.infront.co.uk/ has Songbook for £38.99 - about same
as I paid including UPS Express carriage from Soundstone, Florida

hw

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Jul 16, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/16/99
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To those who may have taken exception. Proper grammur/spellin does
not an obsessive make :).

Magnus Paterson

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Jul 16, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/16/99
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John Fowles wrote:

[lots of wonderful £ stuff snipped]

I now have partly-chewed salad all over my keyboard from trying
to eat a sandwich while simultaneously laughing out loud at John's
contribution to trans-Atlantic relations and understanding. :)

John, was your name either Sellar or Yeatman in a former life?

Cheers,
Magnus

Telekidd

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Jul 16, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/16/99
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>Best wishes, John Fowles, author of the above but not "The French
>Lieutenant's Woman" unfortunately

Thank you for the excellent and informative post Mr. Fowles (actually Alt-156
works for me, I think...£...ah yes!). Incidentally, I enjoyed "The Collector"
and "Daniel Martin" very much--would you autograph them for me? ;)
Derek

mollie2

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Jul 16, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/16/99
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John--We're getting such a world education in Rik's chat,
mostly thanks to you!

I have tried unsuccessfully for a couple weeks to get into
Rik's chat. I miss the AOL chat on Friday nights...last time
I checked in there, everyone was at Rik's.

My computer is old and slow...like me, I guess.

Hershey102

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Jul 16, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/16/99
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John,
Thank you for the hilarious explanation. I now count myself computer
literate as well as versed in the history of precious metals, Irish-Protestant
relations, mass transportation, French and Latin, the American Revolution (I'm
afraid to ask what the Brits call it . . .), and the demographics of
intelligence. Tea anyone?

Duff

John Fowles

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Jul 16, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/16/99
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Thanks to all who responded to my tongue-in-cheek (foot-in-mouth ?)
discourse.
I'm rather surprised nobody has (yet) been offended, as I thought I may have
disturbed your cosy self-satisfied smug view of the perfection of life
Stateside. I heard a softly-spoken respectful chap called Jeremy Clarkson
(Brits all know who he is) on BBC Radio 2 this week describe Americans as
"people who get upset if they haven't got hot and cold running cable TV and
the MacDonald's are more than 300 yards apart", or words to that effect.
(300 yards = 1.363636363636 recurring furlongs as an approximate metric
conversion)

A collective response to various comments you've made:-

Magnus:
I see you're an astronomer, I'm Pisces myself, any clue where I should be on
November 13th?
Would a visit to Toronto Eclipse everything else this year? (in joke for UK
readers)
I do know that my present life started in the Yeatman Hospital in Sherborne,
since you ask.
Who he anyway? (Yeatman)
Derek:
Yes I know all about ASCII and ANSI codes, but thought the average (above
50% even) punter would forget Alt-156 = £ (yes it does work)
Duff:
The American Revolution should have been called ... off.
Sue Bloo:
Yes. See you in Denver hopefully.
Diane:
Thanks for seconding me. I'll think about it.
Mollie2:
Do try again tonite sorry tonight for Rik's slanging room - reminder to
others (Brian Walters, are you listening?) it's at
www.europa.com/~random7/chat.htm
and, last but not least,
Susan:
What American Virgin stores? You got some too? The man's a megalomaniac,
Richard Branson I mean, he of the beard, sweaters, sinking balloons, trains,
planes, condoms, cola, finance, UK ISP (Virgin.net), radio station, truly
virgin on the ridiculous. Have a look at the Virgin web site, a mess of
references to US and UK services, $ and £, www.virgin.com

Gonna get a bit of shut-eye now before entering the chat room later in
trepidition. See you all there?

John Fowles

PS For nit pickers I checked the spelling of megawhatsit and trepidiascope

an...@pa.ausom.net.au

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Jul 17, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/17/99
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In article <7mlvel$bq6$1...@news7.svr.pol.co.uk>,

"John Fowles" <jo...@rungheating.freeserve.co.uk> wrote:
> Hershey102 <hersh...@aol.com> wrote in message
> news:19990714213039...@ng-fz1.aol.com...
> > >Correction - getting confused in my old age - £16.49
> > Not nearly as confused and befuddled as I . . . just how do you make that
> pound sign?
> > Duff :-)
>
> See below, but patient readers may like a bit of background to start with:-
>
> Firstly, apologies - I should have headed my original posting "Private
> message for British eyes only"
> then ex-colonials wouldn't have been troubled by a strange crossed L. This

>


> Anyway, back to Duff's question: :-)
> 1. Move to the UK, buy a UK issue computer, and you get a nice REAL £ sign
> on the keyboard
> ( where you have a # above the 3)
> OR:
> 2.1 Open up Character Map ( Windows 95/98, Accessories, System Tools)
> 2.2 Open a True Type fonts, most feature the £ sign
> 2.3 Highlight it and Select, then press Copy - the £ symbol should then be
> in the Clipboard
> 2.4 Edit, Paste into your document, hey presto (I hope!) the £ sign should
> be there in all its glory
> and in the font you are using .
> 2.5 That way you don't make a hash of it.
>
> Finally, I hope I haven't offended anyone.
>

> Best wishes, John Fowles, author of the above but not "The French
> Lieutenant's Woman" unfortunately
>
>

John I am impresed not only with your knowledge of English Coin and
weight histories, but with the fact that you didn't mention or try and
explain cricket now that would really have them confused

Warm Regards Peter T

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Share what you know. Learn what you don't.

John Fowles

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Jul 17, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/17/99
to
> John I am impresed not only with your knowledge of English Coin and
> weight histories, but with the fact that you didn't mention or try and
> explain cricket now that would really have them confused
>
> Warm Regards Peter T
You wouldn't have expected me to take that challenge lying down now would you Peter?
Especially from an inhabitant of some God-forsaken corner of the planet that the Queen's
been trying to off-load for years? (actually my best mate is the great-great-great..............
grand-daughter of a minor convict name of Matthew James Etherington, a "First-fleeter" sent
to Sydney in 1788. She lives here in Sherborne and was converted to a GL fan by me in 1970)
So here goes - and no, I'm not the author of this and no doubt you've seen it before but it
may be of interest to "Rounders"-lovers such as Rik:
 
CRICKET
There are two sides: one out in the field and one in.
Each man that's in the side that's in goes out and when he's out he goes in
and the next man goes in until he's out.
When they are all out, the side that's been in goes out and tries to get those
coming in out.
Sometimes you get men still in and not out.
When both sides have been in and out, including anyone not out, both sides
start going in and out again as they did the first time out.
In some cases the side that's just been in comes out and instead of coming in
goes straight out again, This is known as "following on".
After all these innings and outings have been sorted out - or when the sun goes
in - the stumps are pulled out, everybody comes in and it's
THE END OF THE GAME.
 
So what's so confusing about that?

Telekidd

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Jul 17, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/17/99
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>So what's so confusing about that?

My goodness! Finally, cricket in a way even I can understand it! Thanks,
John--let's play!

(I sorta like the fact that they will often have a break for drinks. My kind
of sport...) :)
Derek


John Fowles

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Jul 17, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/17/99
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RE: CRICKET:
 
Correction: having spoken to the lady I mentioned I got ticked off - her Great.........grandfather
was actually named Matthew James Everingham, who arrived in Oz on the "Scarborough" in
Jan 1788 .Her son Sam in turn sailed on the first and last legs of the Re-enactment voyage
in 1987-1988, arriving in Sydney Harbour on board the Saren Larsen on Australia Day 1988.
She'd welcome any contact from any fellow family members BTW.
 
I believe he was sent to Australia because the occupants of the previous destination of British
convicts, the colonies who created the USA, had realised that they were producing quite enough
home-grown convicts of their own thank you very much and rebelled at attempts to send even
more. Earlier a British hero called Sir Walter Raleigh - pronounced Raw-lee - had been introduced
to tobacco which he brought back to England when he retired to - would you believe - Sherborne
where he built a new castle in 1594 and where I now live (in a house, not in the Castle, dummo).
There is an even older 12th century castle, now mostly a pile of rubble.
See a picture of both castles at:  http://www.dorset-cc.gov.uk/sherbne.htm .
I am a member of the recently-formed Rotary Club of Sherborne Castles..There are incidently
several sites around here where legend has it that Sir Walter got a bucket of water thrown over him as
he sat smoking and seemed to be on fire.
So ends today's history lesson boys and girls - if you want me to stop someone please say so
as my finger tips are getting raw.
 
John Fowles
 
P.S. I forgot to thank Derek for his plug for two of my namesake's books, but he omitted what IMHO
is the greatest 20th Century novel - John Fowles' "The Magus".  Highly recommended.
(so ends today's English Literature lesson)

Telekidd

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Jul 18, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/18/99
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>P.S. I forgot to thank&nbsp;Derek for =
>his plug for=20
>two of my namesake's books, but he omitted what IMHO </DIV>
><DIV>is the greatest 20th Century novel -
>John Fowles'=20
>"The Magus".&nbsp; Highly recommended.

Oops! I can't believe I forgot that one!
Derek <<chastened... :)


an...@pa.ausom.net.au

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Jul 19, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/19/99
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In article <19990717132704...@ng-fy1.aol.com>,

tele...@aol.com (Telekidd) wrote:
> >So what's so confusing about that?
>
> My goodness! Finally, cricket in a way even I can understand it! Thanks,
> John--let's play!
>
> (I sorta like the fact that they will often have a break for drinks. My kind
> of sport...) :)
> Derek
>
>

Derek you haven't heard the best part. You can acutally get to bowl a
maiden over!!!!! :-)

Warm Regards Peter T.

Telekidd

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Jul 20, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/20/99
to
>Derek you haven't heard the best part. You can acutally get to bowl a
>maiden over!!!!! :-)
>

Wow! At last! At last! Where do I sign up? :)
Derek

John Fowles

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Jul 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/22/99
to
Re: CRICKET:
> >Derek you haven't heard the best part. You can actually get to bowl a
> >maiden over!!!!! :-)
> >Peter

>
> Wow! At last! At last! Where do I sign up? :)
> Derek

__
Right here on the dotted line ( but avoid the Crease)
.................................................!!!

But if you do want to play keep in mind that when fielding in cricket you
may be
put at silly mid on or short leg, and when bowling avoid "no balls" and if
you get
lucky you may even get your leg over (the wicket).
You'll also need a box set to protect your vitals.

John

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