Top Ten Most Prolific Composers

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Premise Checker

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Aug 18, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/18/00
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TOP TEN MOST PROLIFIC COMPOSERS

ranked by hours of music composed, based on a survey
conducted by _Classical Music_. Source: Russell Ash,
_The Top Ten of Everything 2000_ (NY: DK [Dorling
Kindersley] Publishing, 1999), p. 163.

Haydn (1732-1809) 340 hours
Handel (1685-1759) 303
Mozart (1756-91) 202
Bach (1685-1750) 175
Schubert (1797-1828) 134

Beethoven (1770-1827) 120
Purcell (1659-95) 116
Verdi (1813-1901) 87
Dvorak (1841-1904) 79
Liszt (1811-86) 76
Tchaikovsky (1840-93) 76

I'm sure that Vivaldi wrote more that 76 hours of
concerti for 1, 2, 3, and 4 HeckelFones alone and
Telemann at least that much table music.

I wonder how many of Beethoven's 120 hours were
published with opus numbers.

A division of the hours into instrumental and vocal
would also be useful.

Frank Forman


John E. Prussing

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Aug 18, 2000, 9:27:36 PM8/18/00
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>Frank Forman

This seems to be an eminently silly survey. For starters, it (if it
is correct) does not measure "hours composed" but hours recorded.
It's known that a significant amount of Bach's compositions are lost,
and hence never recorded.

And I agree that Vivaldi's recordings would exceed Purcell's (whom I
like alot).

This seems highly suspect. In our digital age, lots of information
is out there, but that doesn't mean every analysis of it is correct.
--
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
John E. Prussing
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

John Harkness

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Aug 18, 2000, 9:29:02 PM8/18/00
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I think that if we use Celibidache's recordings, Bruckner turns out to
be the most prolific by time.

John Harkness

Grant

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Aug 18, 2000, 10:32:22 PM8/18/00
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Well, from the number of discs in the Leslie Howard cycle of Liszt's
piano music, I know that Liszt wrote more than 76 hrs worth of music.
The accuracy of this survey is very suspect IMO.

Grant

Josh Klein

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Aug 19, 2000, 12:55:02 AM8/19/00
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I suspect that -- in most repertoire -- decent and reasonable interpreters'
times to perform any given piece could easily vary by 10 to 15%.
This would be enough to switch the order of several of these composers,
if the estimates weren't made using a hypothetical consistant interpeetive
standard.

Not to mention, of course, the questions of (a) "lost" composititons,
(b) how to count variants, reworkings, fragments, etc. -- e.g., does
Beethoven's piano version of his violin concerto count as a separate
work; (c) do repeats without variations count as separate time.

And as a measure of how "much" composing any of these composers has
done, there's also the complication of measuring fully-orchestrated
works against solo works - or, for that matter, slow works with a few
long notes against fast works with lots and lots of notes.

> Frank Forman


--
Josh Klein
Amherst College

Matthew B. Tepper

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Aug 19, 2000, 1:25:55 AM8/19/00
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Dawk, where's Webern? And Ruggles? And Varèse? And Duparc?

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parachu...@my-deja.com

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Aug 19, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/19/00
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You didn't mention Jonathan Chapman Cook. He's one of the all-time
greatest.

In article <Pine.SOL.4.10.100081...@clark.net>,


Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

Peter T. Daniels

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Aug 19, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/19/00
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Matthew B. Tepper wrote:
>
> Dawk, where's Webern? And Ruggles? And Varèse? And Duparc?

Their prolificity just sends them way off the list!
--
Peter T. Daniels gram...@worldnet.att.net

Abram Plum

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Aug 19, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/19/00
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> In article <Pine.SOL.4.10.100081...@clark.net>,
> Premise Checker <che...@clark.net> wrote:
> > TOP TEN MOST PROLIFIC COMPOSERS
> >
> > ranked by hours of music composed, based on a survey
> > conducted by _Classical Music_. Source: Russell Ash,
> > _The Top Ten of Everything 2000_ (NY: DK [Dorling
> > Kindersley] Publishing, 1999), p. 163.
> >
> > Haydn (1732-1809) 340 hours
> > Handel (1685-1759) 303
> > Mozart (1756-91) 202
> > Bach (1685-1750) 175
> > Schubert (1797-1828) 134
> >
> > Beethoven (1770-1827) 120
> > Purcell (1659-95) 116
> > Verdi (1813-1901) 87
> > Dvorak (1841-1904) 79
> > Liszt (1811-86) 76
> > Tchaikovsky (1840-93) 76
> >

Has anyone added up the number of hours for Hovhaness? (And has anyone
listened to all of his works?)

Abram Plum

Tony W. Frye

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Aug 19, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/19/00
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Where's Wagner? He composed the most marathon-like operas I've ever had
to endure.


> Premise Checker wrote:
>
> TOP TEN MOST PROLIFIC COMPOSERS
>
> ranked by hours of music composed, based on a survey
> conducted by _Classical Music_. Source: Russell Ash,
> _The Top Ten of Everything 2000_ (NY: DK [Dorling
> Kindersley] Publishing, 1999), p. 163.
>
> Haydn (1732-1809) 340 hours
> Handel (1685-1759) 303
> Mozart (1756-91) 202
> Bach (1685-1750) 175
> Schubert (1797-1828) 134
>
> Beethoven (1770-1827) 120
> Purcell (1659-95) 116
> Verdi (1813-1901) 87
> Dvorak (1841-1904) 79
> Liszt (1811-86) 76
> Tchaikovsky (1840-93) 76
>

Matthew B. Tepper

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Aug 19, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/19/00
to
"Tony W. Frye" wrote:
>
> Where's Wagner? He composed the most marathon-like operas I've ever
> had to endure.

Yes, but even a baker's-dozen operas at (perhaps) an average four hours
each still total far short of the 76-hour low-water-mark. The symphony,
Faust-Ouverture, "Siegfried Idyll," Wesendonck-Lieder and other short
works don't even come close to making up the difference.

paul stanbrook

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Aug 20, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/20/00
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Premise Checker wrote in message ...

>TOP TEN MOST PROLIFIC COMPOSERS
>.. <snip>

>I'm sure that Vivaldi wrote more that 76 hours of
>concerti for 1, 2, 3, and 4 HeckelFones alone and
>Telemann at least that much table music.


I have always had great respect for Vivaldi, but to write concerti for an
instrument that was not to be invented until about 150 years after his death
seems quite remarkable.

Regards,
Paul

Ian Kemmish

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Aug 20, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/20/00
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In article <Pine.SOL.4.10.100081...@clark.net>,
che...@clark.net says...

>
>TOP TEN MOST PROLIFIC COMPOSERS
>
>ranked by hours of music composed, based on a survey
>conducted by _Classical Music_. Source: Russell Ash,
>_The Top Ten of Everything 2000_ (NY: DK [Dorling

At what tempi? With or without repeats? ;-)

Probably the first composer for whom we have a reasonably precise idea of the
duration of his works is Gerschwin, and I'd venture that for anyone active
before around 1850, the margin of error could be anything between 20% and
50%.....

[E.g. look at various descriptions of the surviving 17th and 18th Century
barrel-organ `recordings' of published works, and their sometimes startling
tempi.]


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Ian Kemmish 18 Durham Close, Biggleswade, Beds SG18 8HZ, UK
i...@five-d.com Tel: +44 1767 601 361
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Behind every successful organisation stands one person who knows the secret
of how to keep the managers away from anything truly important.


David Kirkpatrick

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Aug 21, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/21/00
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Premise Checker wrote:
>
> TOP TEN MOST PROLIFIC COMPOSERS
>
> ranked by hours of music composed, based on a survey
> conducted by _Classical Music_. Source: Russell Ash,
> _The Top Ten of Everything 2000_ (NY: DK [Dorling
> Kindersley] Publishing, 1999), p. 163.
>
> Haydn (1732-1809) 340 hours
> Handel (1685-1759) 303
> Mozart (1756-91) 202
> Bach (1685-1750) 175
> Schubert (1797-1828) 134
>
> Beethoven (1770-1827) 120
> Purcell (1659-95) 116
> Verdi (1813-1901) 87
> Dvorak (1841-1904) 79
> Liszt (1811-86) 76
> Tchaikovsky (1840-93) 76
>
> I'm sure that Vivaldi wrote more that 76 hours of
> concerti for 1, 2, 3, and 4 HeckelFones alone and
> Telemann at least that much table music.

Didn't Vivaldi claim to have written 75 or 100 operas? And I thought
Telemann was famous for having written more than Handel and Bach
combined. And what about more recent composers like Hovaness and
Brian? Obviously there must have been some cutoff in terms of
popularity or reputation when considering who was a candidate for the
list, but what reasonable cut-off would include Purcell but not Vivaldi
or Telemann?

Interesting that by the temporal duration measure, Satie's "Vexations"
alone makes him more prolific than several Weberns.

And what about John Cage's 1,283,102'46" for prepared piano? (OK, I made
that one up.)

Perhaps a "bar count" would be a better measure than total hours
(apologies to Hildegard von Bingen fans).

David

Dirk Siebert

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Aug 21, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/21/00
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> Interesting that by the temporal duration measure, Satie's "Vexations"
> alone makes him more prolific than several Weberns.
>
> And what about John Cage's 1,283,102'46" for prepared piano? (OK, I made
> that one up.)

These days starts in Halberstadt (Germany) the performance of a single
organ work from John Cage (as slow as possible) which will last about
639 years. It starts with a pause of nearly 1.5 years, so there is
enough time to build the organ meanwhile.



> Perhaps a "bar count" would be a better measure than total hours
> (apologies to Hildegard von Bingen fans).

even better: note and pause count, so Hildegard gets a chance.

Dirk

David Kirkpatrick

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Aug 21, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/21/00
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Dirk Siebert wrote:
>
> > Interesting that by the temporal duration measure, Satie's "Vexations"
> > alone makes him more prolific than several Weberns.
> >
> > And what about John Cage's 1,283,102'46" for prepared piano? (OK, I made
> > that one up.)
>
> These days starts in Halberstadt (Germany) the performance of a single
> organ work from John Cage (as slow as possible) which will last about
> 639 years. It starts with a pause of nearly 1.5 years, so there is
> enough time to build the organ meanwhile.

he he! I might have know that truth was stranger than fiction!

Imagine the disappointment of an internet user searching for "prolific,
long organ" and getting this thread!



> > Perhaps a "bar count" would be a better measure than total hours
> > (apologies to Hildegard von Bingen fans).
>
> even better: note and pause count, so Hildegard gets a chance.
>
> Dirk

So how many points does Penderecki's "Threnody to the Victim's of
Hiroshima" get?

David

Peter T. Daniels

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Aug 21, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/21/00
to

Brian doesn't count; most of his 32 symphonies are under 20 minutes.

David Kirkpatrick

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Aug 22, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/22/00
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I was thinking of his total output. From a perusal of the "official" HB
website,

http://www.musicweb.force9.co.uk/music/brian/

it appears that symphonies make up maybe 1/3 of his total output,
although one would probably have to include "lost" works to make Brian a
contender in the "notes in the outbachs" contest. Since I've never
heard a work by Havergal Brian, however, this is my last post regarding
him.

Some other thoughts regarding prolific composers:

1. I wonder how many hours of Handel music is recycled from earlier
Handel music.

2. I have no idea of the hour, bar or note tally for these composers,
but I'm curious whether Villa-Lobos, Saint-Saens, Milhaud and/or
Hindemith might be contenders in the Liszt-Tchaikovsky range.

David

I. Neill Reid

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Aug 22, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/22/00
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In article <Pine.SOL.4.10.100081...@clark.net>, Premise Checker <che...@clark.net> writes...

>TOP TEN MOST PROLIFIC COMPOSERS
>
>ranked by hours of music composed, based on a survey
>conducted by _Classical Music_. Source: Russell Ash,
>_The Top Ten of Everything 2000_ (NY: DK [Dorling
>Kindersley] Publishing, 1999), p. 163.

As you point out, perhaps a shade incomplete:

Palestrina, for example, wrote 93 masses, four books of Lamentations,
35 magnificats, 280+ motets in at least 8 books, 3 books of madrigals,
68 Offertories, 45 Hymns, and a wheen of other stuff
(see http://www.universitymusicedition.com/palestri.html)
I am certain that a continuous performance of that music would amount to
well over 76 hours.

Neill Reid - i...@morales.physics.upenn.edu

>
>Haydn (1732-1809) 340 hours
>Handel (1685-1759) 303
>Mozart (1756-91) 202
>Bach (1685-1750) 175
>Schubert (1797-1828) 134
>
>Beethoven (1770-1827) 120
>Purcell (1659-95) 116
>Verdi (1813-1901) 87
>Dvorak (1841-1904) 79
>Liszt (1811-86) 76
>Tchaikovsky (1840-93) 76
>
>I'm sure that Vivaldi wrote more that 76 hours of
>concerti for 1, 2, 3, and 4 HeckelFones alone and
>Telemann at least that much table music.
>

jbay...@hotmail.com

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Aug 22, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/22/00
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In article <39A2676B...@home.com>,
David Kirkpatrick <dak...@home.com> wrote:
<snip>

> it appears that symphonies make up maybe 1/3 of his total output,
> although one would probably have to include "lost" works to make Brian
a
> contender in the "notes in the outbachs" contest.

One would have to. If his symphonies are about a third of his
output (in units time), then all his compositions amount to
some 42 hours.

John

Matthew B. Tepper

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Aug 22, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/22/00
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Ian Lowery wrote:

>
> "paul stanbrook" <paul.st...@virgin.net> wrote:
>
> >Premise Checker wrote in message ...
>
> >>I'm sure that Vivaldi wrote more that 76 hours of
> >>concerti for 1, 2, 3, and 4 HeckelFones alone and
>
> >I have always had great respect for Vivaldi, but to write concerti for
> >an instrument that was not to be invented until about 150 years after
> >his death seems quite remarkable.
>
> The originals were written for the Muckinese battle horn.

Nyuk if you will, but I was just watching (and re-watching!) one of the
old New York Philharmonic "Young People's Concerts," written and
narrated by Leonard Bernstein, called "What is a Concerto?" (It's in a
humongous box of 10 VHS tapes, containing 25 programs among them dating
from 1958 to 1969 broadcasts, and normally costs $350+, but I picked up
a used copy in great condition for half that on eBay.)

Anyway, Lenny traces the "concerto" concept from the Baroque concerti
grossi to works with fewer and fewer instruments in the concertino, to
solo-and-orchestra works (offering what he called a "John Corigliano
festival," since Corigliano Sr. was concertmaster in those years), and
finally the last couple of movements of the Bartok Concerto for
Orchestra. For starters, however, he conducts (from the harpsichord!) a
movement from a Vivaldi Concerto for Diverse Instruments which was
originally hatched for some oddball combination, in which the concertino
included two mandolins, two theorbes (their parts played on harps),
three trombe marine (their parts played on trumpets!), something I can't
recall (its part played on a bass oboe), and a couple of flutes. Having
heard this, I am planning to buy the "Bernstein Century" CD which
contains the whole work, but I would also love to hear a HIP version on
something even slightly resembling period instruments. Any suggestions
of a CD issue?

Beth Diane Garfinkel

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Aug 23, 2000, 12:33:25 AM8/23/00
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In alt.music.j-s-bach I. Neill Reid <i...@deimos.caltech.edu> wrote:
> In article <Pine.SOL.4.10.100081...@clark.net>, Premise Checker <che...@clark.net> writes...
>>TOP TEN MOST PROLIFIC COMPOSERS

> Palestrina, for example, wrote 93 masses, four books of Lamentations,


> 35 magnificats, 280+ motets in at least 8 books, 3 books of madrigals,
> 68 Offertories, 45 Hymns, and a wheen of other stuff
> (see http://www.universitymusicedition.com/palestri.html)
> I am certain that a continuous performance of that music would amount to
> well over 76 hours.

Well, I don't understand why Telemann isn't in the list; he's in the
Guinness book of world records as the most prolific composer EVERl I don't
think all of his surviving works have made it into print yet, much less
onto recording, wo we can't know exactly how long his total output runs.

That said, I think Palestrina's contribution is perhaps more impressive.
I don't know about people growing up in a given style, but as a purveyor
of fine pastiche, I can tell you that renaissance counterpoint is much
more difficult to write than high baroque rocambole--and Telemann's music
actually has a lot more musical content than it's given credit for.

Beth

--
"Under the green wood tree/Who loves to lie with me/And tune his merry
note/Unto the sweet bird's throat/Come hither, come hither, come hither/
Here he shall see/No enemy/But winter and rough weather."
--William Shakespeare

Ian Lowery

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Aug 23, 2000, 1:37:39 AM8/23/00
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"paul stanbrook" <paul.st...@virgin.net> wrote:

>Premise Checker wrote in message ...

>>I'm sure that Vivaldi wrote more that 76 hours of
>>concerti for 1, 2, 3, and 4 HeckelFones alone and

>I have always had great respect for Vivaldi, but to write concerti for an
>instrument that was not to be invented until about 150 years after his death
>seems quite remarkable.

The originals were written for the Muckinese battle horn.

Ian Lowery

------------------------------------------------
To reply, remove "nospam" from my e-mail address.

Ian Lowery

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Aug 23, 2000, 1:45:49 AM8/23/00
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Beth Diane Garfinkel <bgar...@steel.ucs.indiana.edu> wrote:

>That said, I think Palestrina's contribution is perhaps more impressive.

One of Dudley Moore's favourites. He did his BMus thesis on Palestrina
counterpoint. (He confessed this at a one man show at Sydney Uni where
he did Colnel Bogey a la Berethoven, and a fantastic one man rendition
of Die Flaubergaust - a frenetic duet between baritone and soprano,
accompanied by the piano).

>Telemann's music actually has a lot more musical content than it's given credit for.

Absolutely, he wrote some fantastic stuff. I probably like his trio
sonatas most of all.

Norman M. Schwartz

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Aug 23, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/23/00
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Matthew B. Tepper <o...@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:39A36F7C...@earthlink.net...

> Having
> heard this, I am planning to buy the "Bernstein Century"
CD which
> contains the whole work, but I would also love to hear a
HIP version on
> something even slightly resembling period instruments.
Any suggestions
> of a CD issue?

RV 558, I believe:
IL Giardino Armonico/Teldec 4509-91182-2
English Concert/Pinnock Archiv 415 674-2 (o/p?)

Peter T. Daniels

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Aug 23, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/23/00
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A considerable number of Archiv albums (which you'd think would be
fairly standard repertory with recognized performers) are available as
Tower Imports at badly inflated prices, and that includes a number of
Pinnock's.

BTW I've been trying to find a recording of his that seems to be a WQXR
favorite -- it's been on twice in the last few months: Overture and
Suite from Il Pastor Fido (Handel). It's sort of an oboe-and-bassoon
concerto. It's not in the catalog, and I found another recording that
doesn't list an oboe soloist so it may not be the same work (it's called
"Suite No. 2," H.8b -- maybe the one Pinnock does is H.8a or H.8c, or
some such. Any ideas?

Norman M. Schwartz

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Aug 23, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/23/00
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Peter T. Daniels <gram...@worldnet.att.net> wrote in
message news:39A3BA...@worldnet.att.net...

> A considerable number of Archiv albums (which you'd think
would be
> fairly standard repertory with recognized performers) are
available as
> Tower Imports at badly inflated prices, and that includes
a number of
> Pinnock's.
>
> BTW I've been trying to find a recording of his that seems
to be a WQXR
> favorite -- it's been on twice in the last few months:
Overture and
> Suite from Il Pastor Fido (Handel). It's sort of an
oboe-and-bassoon
> concerto. It's not in the catalog, and I found another
recording that
> doesn't list an oboe soloist so it may not be the same
work (it's called
> "Suite No. 2," H.8b -- maybe the one Pinnock does is H.8a
or H.8c, or
> some such. Any ideas?

I think you are looking for Handel: Overtures, in
particular, HWV 8a, (with oboe, bassoon, double bass and
theorbo) Pinnock/English Concert, Archiv 419 219-2. (WQXR
has a play list at their web site, www.wqxr.com which is
excellent and up-to-date, giving both catalog nos. and
performing artists.) Additionally, having participated in a
Universal Classics Survey, you AND others here might be
interested in their plan to announce within the next 3
months, a program for the re-release of o/p material (upon
request ?) It seems they have not decided what to do about
the booklets.
My reward for participating was DG CD 457 607-2 Steinberg:
Symphony no. 1, etc. (said to be available only in Europe),
and a T-shirt (available everywhere).

Peter T. Daniels

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Aug 23, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/23/00
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Norman M. Schwartz wrote:

> > BTW I've been trying to find a recording of his that seems to be a WQXR
> > favorite -- it's been on twice in the last few months: Overture and
> > Suite from Il Pastor Fido (Handel). It's sort of an oboe-and-bassoon
> > concerto. It's not in the catalog, and I found another recording that
> > doesn't list an oboe soloist so it may not be the same work (it's called
> > "Suite No. 2," H.8b -- maybe the one Pinnock does is H.8a or H.8c, or
> > some such. Any ideas?
>
> I think you are looking for Handel: Overtures, in
> particular, HWV 8a, (with oboe, bassoon, double bass and
> theorbo) Pinnock/English Concert, Archiv 419 219-2. (WQXR
> has a play list at their web site, www.wqxr.com which is
> excellent and up-to-date, giving both catalog nos. and
> performing artists.)

The Overture and Suite goes on for quite a while -- like it might have
filled a whole side of an LP. (And I think I would have noticed a
theorbo! -- and the announcer gave the names of oboist and bassoonist
but not other soloists.) So maybe we're looking for an H.8c ...

> Additionally, having participated in a
> Universal Classics Survey, you AND others here might be
> interested in their plan to announce within the next 3
> months, a program for the re-release of o/p material (upon
> request ?) It seems they have not decided what to do about
> the booklets.

DG/Archiv has this plan? or WQXR? (Some of the DG Originals are Archiv
albums -- I recently noticed Ralph Kirkpatrick's English Suites.
Remember when Archiv records came with a giant filing card, with careful
classification scheme so you could keep your library in perfect order?)

> My reward for participating was DG CD 457 607-2 Steinberg:
> Symphony no. 1, etc. (said to be available only in Europe),
> and a T-shirt (available everywhere).

Hmm, a Steinberg symphony should have been recorded in Pittsburgh, and
they worked for Vanguard, I think ... my first Beethoven and Brahms
symphony sets were his really cheap -- and it turns out really good --
boxes.

Mark Slater

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Aug 23, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/23/00
to
re: IL Pastor Fido overtures and suite: I found keyboard arrangements of 1a and
1b in Novello series "Twenty Overtures in authentic keyboard arrangements". The
catalogue no. is: 100269 04


Mark Slater

Musica laetitiae comes medicina dolorum.
(Music is the companion of joy and the medicine of sorrow.)


Norman M. Schwartz

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Aug 23, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/23/00
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Peter T. Daniels <gram...@worldnet.att.net> wrote in
message news:39A3D1...@worldnet.att.net...

> The Overture and Suite goes on for quite a while -- like
it might have
> filled a whole side of an LP. (And I think I would have
noticed a
> theorbo! -- and the announcer gave the names of oboist and
bassoonist
> but not other soloists.) So maybe we're looking for an
H.8c ...

On the CD, Archiv 419 219-2, in my hands currently, HWV 8a
Il pastor fido, "Overture", 6 tracks; 4' 12, 3' 53", 2' 12"
2' 00, 8' 20" and 3' 24". If you know the day(s) it was
aired, you should be able to identify the CD you heard by
searching at www.wqxr.com

> > Additionally, having participated in a
> > Universal Classics Survey, you AND others here might be
> > interested in their plan to announce within the next 3
> > months, a program for the re-release of o/p material
(upon
> > request ?) It seems they have not decided what to do
about
> > the booklets.

> DG/Archiv has this plan? or WQXR? (Some of the DG
Originals are Archiv
> albums -- I recently noticed Ralph Kirkpatrick's English
Suites.
> Remember when Archiv records came with a giant filing
card, with careful
> classification scheme so you could keep your library in
perfect order?)

Presumably all Universal Classics' labels. I too have those
LPs with cards and they stayed in the jackets; these are
CDswith booklets, no cards!

> > My reward for participating was DG CD 457 607-2
Steinberg:
> > Symphony no. 1, etc. (said to be available only in
Europe),
> > and a T-shirt (available everywhere).
>
> Hmm, a Steinberg symphony should have been recorded in
Pittsburgh, and
> they worked for Vanguard, I think ... my first Beethoven
and Brahms
> symphony sets were his really cheap -- and it turns out
really good --
> boxes.

No, not the conductor William Steinberg, but the composer,
Maximilian Steinberg 1883-1946, and performed by Neemi Jarvi
and the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, recorded in the
Gothenburg Concert Hall 12/1996.


Matthew B. Tepper

unread,
Aug 23, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/23/00
to
"Norman M. Schwartz" wrote:
>
> RV 558, I believe:
> IL Giardino Armonico/Teldec 4509-91182-2
> English Concert/Pinnock Archiv 415 674-2 (o/p?)

Many thanks!

Peter T. Daniels

unread,
Aug 23, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/23/00
to
Norman M. Schwartz wrote:

> On the CD, Archiv 419 219-2, in my hands currently, HWV 8a
> Il pastor fido, "Overture", 6 tracks; 4' 12, 3' 53", 2' 12"
> 2' 00, 8' 20" and 3' 24". If you know the day(s) it was
> aired, you should be able to identify the CD you heard by
> searching at www.wqxr.com

I don't suppose they have categories like "recently" and "a few months
ago" ... The number will be very helpful: Classical Muze (that computer
thing that often doesn't work anyway) had nothing, and Tower's internal
system seems to require the album number (it doesn't care about
punctuation or label, it just needs the number!).

Norman M. Schwartz

unread,
Aug 23, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/23/00
to

Peter T. Daniels <gram...@worldnet.att.net> wrote in
message news:39A403...@worldnet.att.net...

> Norman M. Schwartz wrote:
>
> > On the CD, Archiv 419 219-2, in my hands currently, HWV
8a
> > Il pastor fido, "Overture", 6 tracks; 4' 12, 3' 53", 2'
12"
> > 2' 00, 8' 20" and 3' 24". If you know the day(s) it was
> > aired, you should be able to identify the CD you heard
by
> > searching at www.wqxr.com
>
> I don't suppose they have categories like "recently" and
"a few months
> ago" ...

No. A while back there was a search engine that permitted,
composer and artists search.

The number will be very helpful: Classical Muze (that
computer
> thing that often doesn't work anyway) had nothing, and
Tower's internal
> system seems to require the album number (it doesn't care
about
> punctuation or label, it just needs the number!).

You could try to get the information you would like by
calling the WQXR Music Information Line, 212-633-7640, M-Th
10:30AM-12:30PM, at which time you can speak with a real
living person.
Their recorded message states that they will respond to a
faxed request for information, 212-663-7730. I wouldn't
think "recently" or "a few months ago" is adequate if their
search is based on a date/hour basis.

Ludwig...@hotmail.com

unread,
Aug 23, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/23/00
to
"Norman M. Schwartz" wrote:
>
> Matthew B. Tepper <o...@earthlink.net> wrote in message
> news:39A36F7C...@earthlink.net...
>
> > Having
> > heard this, I am planning to buy the "Bernstein Century"
> CD which
> > contains the whole work, but I would also love to hear a
> HIP version on
> > something even slightly resembling period instruments.
> Any suggestions
> > of a CD issue?
>
> RV 558, I believe:
> IL Giardino Armonico/Teldec 4509-91182-2
> English Concert/Pinnock Archiv 415 674-2 (o/p?)

One more to add:

Academy of Ancient Music/Manze -- Harmonia
Mundi France -- HMU 907230

--
Mark K. Ehlert

Matthew B. Tepper

unread,
Aug 23, 2000, 9:21:22 PM8/23/00
to

Many thanks to all who helped with suggestions!

mamo...@my-deja.com

unread,
Aug 23, 2000, 11:32:29 PM8/23/00
to
That's nothing. I've written a piece called
"765 hours and 46 seconds," for cello, in which
the player explores the logic of simplicity
and randomness by repeating C1 and G2 continuously
and intermittently, for 765 hours, 46 seconds.

Jarl Sigurd

unread,
Aug 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/26/00
to

Premise Checker wrote in message ...
>TOP TEN MOST PROLIFIC COMPOSERS
>
>ranked by hours of music composed, based on a survey
>conducted by _Classical Music_. Source: Russell Ash,
>_The Top Ten of Everything 2000_ (NY: DK [Dorling
>Kindersley] Publishing, 1999), p. 163.
>
>Haydn (1732-1809) 340 hours
>Handel (1685-1759) 303
>Mozart (1756-91) 202
>Bach (1685-1750) 175
>Schubert (1797-1828) 134
>
>Beethoven (1770-1827) 120
>Purcell (1659-95) 116
>Verdi (1813-1901) 87
>Dvorak (1841-1904) 79
>Liszt (1811-86) 76
>Tchaikovsky (1840-93) 76

Isn't this a rather unfair way of evaluating a composer's
outout. After all a sonata and a symphony may have
the same duration of time when performed, but the
symphony takes much longer to write and the score
is much larger.

Jarl Sigurd

to listen to a symphony composed by Jarl Sigurd
visit: http://geocities.com/Paris/Lights/3333

Mario Martinoli

unread,
Aug 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/26/00
to

Beth Diane Garfinkel ha scritto nel messaggio
<8nvk6l$ufk$2...@flotsam.uits.indiana.edu>...

[...]

>Well, I don't understand why Telemann isn't in the list; he's in the
>Guinness book of world records as the most prolific composer EVERl

The point is: what is prolificity? IMHO, if this silly survey has a sense,
one must take into account the life duration of the composer or the number
of years when he was active. So Schubert wrote all of his output in about 13
years, while Haydn took about 50 years to write all of his music. Schubert
is therefore to be considered more prolific than Haydn or Mozart, who wrote
music for almost 30 years. Bruckner started to write his music well after
his 30s, Rossini stopped everything at about the same age, Leclair wrote
nearly everything in less than ten years, Pergolesi died 26, etc. etc.
Possibly, density in time is a better measure for composers' prolificity.
Anyway, I believe that no rankings are reasonably possible to be made in
this (totally useless) field.

Best

Mario

Bill Johnston

unread,
Aug 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/26/00
to
Jarl Sigurd wrote:
>
> Premise Checker wrote in message ...
> >TOP TEN MOST PROLIFIC COMPOSERS
> >
> >ranked by hours of music composed, based on a survey
> >conducted by _Classical Music_. Source: Russell Ash,
> >_The Top Ten of Everything 2000_ (NY: DK [Dorling
> >Kindersley] Publishing, 1999), p. 163.
> >
> >Haydn (1732-1809) 340 hours
> >Handel (1685-1759) 303
> >Mozart (1756-91) 202
> >Bach (1685-1750) 175
> >Schubert (1797-1828) 134
> >
> >Beethoven (1770-1827) 120
> >Purcell (1659-95) 116
> >Verdi (1813-1901) 87
> >Dvorak (1841-1904) 79
> >Liszt (1811-86) 76
> >Tchaikovsky (1840-93) 76
>

I dont get this list. It must only include what someone defines as
Major composers...wasnt Georg Telemann one of the all-time music makers?
There are also now-obscure composers like Karl Ditters von
Dittersdorf....Hey, where's Vivaldi? With his 50 operas and 400
concertos...that ought to be a couple hundred hours at the very least.

Matthew B. Tepper

unread,
Aug 26, 2000, 10:14:38 PM8/26/00
to
Jarl Sigurd wrote:
>
> Isn't this a rather unfair way of evaluating a composer's outout.
> After all a sonata and a symphony may have the same duration of
> time when performed, but the symphony takes much longer to write
> and the score is much larger.

Why on earth should it be fair?

kfarad

unread,
Aug 26, 2000, 11:33:08 PM8/26/00
to
In order to give an accurate picture of the Most Prolific composers.

BTW- shouldn't Telemann be somwhere on this list? I read somewhere that he
composed over 800 commissioned pieces...

-Beeri


Matthew B. Tepper <o...@earthlink.net> wrote in message

news:39A8798F...@earthlink.net...

Mike K. Saunders

unread,
Aug 27, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/27/00
to
kfarad wrote:
>
> In order to give an accurate picture of the Most Prolific composers.
>
> BTW- shouldn't Telemann be somwhere on this list? I read somewhere that he
> composed over 800 commissioned pieces...

See some of the other sub-threads. According to my Guiness Book of
Records (1993), Telemann is the most prolific composer.

--
Mike Saunders -- mi...@aster.fsnet.co.uk
Site: http://www.aster.fsnet.co.uk

Peter Billiet

unread,
Aug 27, 2000, 10:35:14 AM8/27/00
to
Im incredibly traditional in my approach to music but I always think that
music should try to communicate something and when I see a piece written
with a purpose like that I tend to question its validity as actual music.
But thats my opinion
<mamo...@my-deja.com> wrote in message news:8o250d$9hq$1...@nnrp1.deja.com...

Eugene Herron

unread,
Sep 11, 2000, 5:22:54 PM9/11/00
to
What about George Phillip Telemann? I heard something on the order of about
2,000 cantatas alone from him. Someone else also mentioned his Tablemusic
works. He lived a long time and worked hard.

Does anytone think that maybe whoever compiled this survey looked at
"popular" composers and then did a quick count of current recordings?

Gene


Premise Checker wrote in message ...
>TOP TEN MOST PROLIFIC COMPOSERS
>
>ranked by hours of music composed, based on a survey
>conducted by _Classical Music_. Source: Russell Ash,
>_The Top Ten of Everything 2000_ (NY: DK [Dorling
>Kindersley] Publishing, 1999), p. 163.
>
>Haydn (1732-1809) 340 hours
>Handel (1685-1759) 303
>Mozart (1756-91) 202
>Bach (1685-1750) 175
>Schubert (1797-1828) 134
>
>Beethoven (1770-1827) 120
>Purcell (1659-95) 116
>Verdi (1813-1901) 87
>Dvorak (1841-1904) 79
>Liszt (1811-86) 76
>Tchaikovsky (1840-93) 76
>

>I'm sure that Vivaldi wrote more that 76 hours of
>concerti for 1, 2, 3, and 4 HeckelFones alone and

Robert Ehrlich

unread,
Sep 11, 2000, 8:15:57 PM9/11/00
to
yes but Bach had the most children.

Sybrand Bakker

unread,
Sep 11, 2000, 6:31:30 PM9/11/00
to
Telemann supposedly wrote 4000 works.

Regards,

Sybrand Bakker

"Eugene Herron" <ghe...@bellatlantic.net> wrote in message
news:O2cv5.4890$_F3.1...@typhoon1.ba-dsg.net...

David Kirkpatrick

unread,
Sep 12, 2000, 7:32:21 AM9/12/00
to
Sybrand Bakker wrote:
>
> Telemann supposedly wrote 4000 works.

Therefore, since he didn't make the list, they must have averaged 1
minute duration each. Perhaps he wrote some commercial jingles. ;-)

David

Sybrand Bakker

unread,
Sep 12, 2000, 12:30:14 PM9/12/00
to
This remark definitely shows your unfamiliarity with Telemann. You would
have wished you wrote only 5 minutes of his music.
Evidently, however compiled the list was unfamiliar with Telemann too.

Regards,

Sybrand Bakker

"David Kirkpatrick" <dak...@home.com> wrote in message
news:39BE136E...@home.com...

David Kirkpatrick

unread,
Sep 12, 2000, 7:40:31 PM9/12/00
to
Well, I'm no expert on Telemann and my personal Telemann collection is
rather small, but I certainly was aware of his enormous productivity. I
was being ironic in assuming that the Top 10 list was complete and using
it to calculate the average Telemann opus based on it.

In an earlier post, I pointed out that Vivaldi and Telemann were both
overlooked.

David

Gene Herron

unread,
Sep 21, 2000, 3:00:00 AM9/21/00
to
>>
>> Telemann supposedly wrote 4000 works.
>
>Therefore, since he didn't make the list, they must have averaged 1
>minute duration each. Perhaps he wrote some commercial jingles. ;-)


I know you're kidding, Dave. Telemann wrote some damned good music. His
oboe and recorder works were very fine indeed. I have never heard any of his
cantatas, but I'm sure I'll get to them.

I think it's notable to mention that Telemann also wrote an epitaph to Bach.
One of the lines struck me when I first read it.... quoting roughly...

"...whose cognomen is "Great" and whose works with both delight and envy we
contemplate".

....with envy....

Shoot, I'm jealous of Bach too. It isn't everyone who has a golden touch
and who can reach people so well, so often.


What amazes me is that most of the contemporaries of Bach and Telemann would
probably have judged Telemann the better composer. Well is it not said
that a Prophet is without honor in his own nation...

and perhaps... his own time?


Gene Herron

Peter T. Daniels

unread,
Sep 21, 2000, 3:00:00 AM9/21/00
to
Gene Herron wrote:

> I think it's notable to mention that Telemann also wrote an epitaph to Bach.
> One of the lines struck me when I first read it.... quoting roughly...
>
> "...whose cognomen is "Great" and whose works with both delight and envy we
> contemplate".
>
> ....with envy....
>
> Shoot, I'm jealous of Bach too. It isn't everyone who has a golden touch
> and who can reach people so well, so often.
>
> What amazes me is that most of the contemporaries of Bach and Telemann would
> probably have judged Telemann the better composer. Well is it not said
> that a Prophet is without honor in his own nation...
>
> and perhaps... his own time?

They were friends (good friends, it appears; the P. in C.P.E. Bach
represents his godfather G.P.T.'s name); T. was four years older; JSB
adapted at least one concerto by T. for keyboard solo -- did T. ever do
that honor to B.?

Ludwig...@hotmail.com

unread,
Sep 21, 2000, 3:00:00 AM9/21/00
to
"Peter T. Daniels" wrote:

> They were friends (good friends, it appears; the P. in C.P.E. Bach
> represents his godfather G.P.T.'s name); T. was four years older; JSB
> adapted at least one concerto by T. for keyboard solo -- did T. ever do
> that honor to B.?

Wasn't Telemann C.P.E. Bach's godfather?

--
Mark K. Ehlert

Peter Billiet

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Sep 21, 2000, 9:04:04 PM9/21/00
to

"Peter T. Daniels" <gram...@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
news:39CA02...@worldnet.att.net...

> Gene Herron wrote:
>
> > I think it's notable to mention that Telemann also wrote an epitaph to
Bach.
> > One of the lines struck me when I first read it.... quoting roughly...
> >
> > "...whose cognomen is "Great" and whose works with both delight and envy
we
> > contemplate".
> >
> > ....with envy....
> >
> > Shoot, I'm jealous of Bach too. It isn't everyone who has a golden
touch
> > and who can reach people so well, so often.
> >
> > What amazes me is that most of the contemporaries of Bach and Telemann
would
> > probably have judged Telemann the better composer. Well is it not said
> > that a Prophet is without honor in his own nation...
> >
> > and perhaps... his own time?

Well Bach had to wait till Mendelssohn revived his music and its been pretty
popular since then,


Matthew B. Tepper

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Sep 21, 2000, 8:56:36 PM9/21/00
to
Ludwig...@hotmail.com wrote in <39CA81EB...@hotmail.com>:

And didn't Telemann take a matrimonial bullet, as it were, for JS?

Peter T. Daniels

unread,
Sep 21, 2000, 9:01:36 PM9/21/00
to
Ludwig...@hotmail.com wrote:
>
> "Peter T. Daniels" wrote:
>
> > They were friends (good friends, it appears; the P. in C.P.E. Bach
> > represents his godfather G.P.T.'s name); T. was four years older; JSB
> > adapted at least one concerto by T. for keyboard solo -- did T. ever do
> > that honor to B.?
>
> Wasn't Telemann C.P.E. Bach's godfather?

That's what I said ...

Peter T. Daniels

unread,
Sep 21, 2000, 9:06:06 PM9/21/00
to
Peter Billiet wrote:

> Well Bach had to wait till Mendelssohn revived his music and its been pretty
> popular since then,

That relates to the vocal music in particular (and specifically the
Matthew Passion, of course -- the cantata 80 "Ein feste Burg" had been
published decades before -- Felix's grandmother gave him the autograph
score of the SMP, and he decided a few years later to perform it); JSB's
keyboard music was always appreciated by his contemporaries and after
his death.

Ludwig...@hotmail.com

unread,
Sep 22, 2000, 3:00:00 AM9/22/00
to
"Peter T. Daniels" wrote:
>
> Ludwig...@hotmail.com wrote:
> >
> > "Peter T. Daniels" wrote:
> >
> > > They were friends (good friends, it appears; the P. in C.P.E. Bach
> > > represents his godfather G.P.T.'s name); T. was four years older; JSB
> > > adapted at least one concerto by T. for keyboard solo -- did T. ever do
> > > that honor to B.?
> >
> > Wasn't Telemann C.P.E. Bach's godfather?
>
> That's what I said ...

D'OH!!!

--
Mark K. Ehlert

manife...@gmail.com

unread,
Nov 13, 2014, 5:06:23 PM11/13/14
to
What about Telemann?


On Friday, August 18, 2000 2:00:00 AM UTC-5, Premise Checker wrote:
> TOP TEN MOST PROLIFIC COMPOSERS
>
> ranked by hours of music composed, based on a survey
> conducted by _Classical Music_. Source: Russell Ash,
> _The Top Ten of Everything 2000_ (NY: DK [Dorling
> Kindersley] Publishing, 1999), p. 163.
>
> Haydn (1732-1809) 340 hours
> Handel (1685-1759) 303
> Mozart (1756-91) 202
> Bach (1685-1750) 175
> Schubert (1797-1828) 134
>
> Beethoven (1770-1827) 120
> Purcell (1659-95) 116
> Verdi (1813-1901) 87
> Dvorak (1841-1904) 79
> Liszt (1811-86) 76
> Tchaikovsky (1840-93) 76
>
> I'm sure that Vivaldi wrote more that 76 hours of
> concerti for 1, 2, 3, and 4 HeckelFones alone and
> Telemann at least that much table music.
>
> I wonder how many of Beethoven's 120 hours were
> published with opus numbers.
>
> A division of the hours into instrumental and vocal
> would also be useful.
>
> Frank Forman

Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)

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Nov 13, 2014, 5:18:37 PM11/13/14
to
In article <77435c51-29c3-4027...@googlegroups.com>,
manife...@gmail.com writes:

>What about Telemann?

Indeed. Bach wrote about 1000 pieces; Telemann about 6000, most of
which have been lost. Bach wrote 4 ouvertures or orchestral suites;
Telemann about 1000, most of which have been lost.

Telemann is seriously underrated in terms of quality.

>> I'm sure that Vivaldi wrote more that 76 hours of
>> concerti for 1, 2, 3, and 4 HeckelFones alone and
>> Telemann at least that much table music.

Bach wrote 2 violin concertos (maybe a couple more which have been
lost), Vivaldi about 150, and about 400 concertos altogether.

nedcro...@gmail.com

unread,
Jul 12, 2015, 8:24:17 AM7/12/15
to
Re: most prolific composers, what about Alan Hovhaness? 500 works, including 67+ symphonies. And, everything he wrote was long. Then, there's Shostakovich.

Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)

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Jul 12, 2015, 12:09:27 PM7/12/15
to
In article <2ab14927-dc6c-4b59...@googlegroups.com>,
Telemann: about 6000 pieces.

juvi...@gmail.com

unread,
May 30, 2016, 11:35:10 PM5/30/16
to
While they are all masters in their own terms, when it comes to Western classical, people outside the Indian diaspora rarely know about the world's most prolific film composer ILAIYARAAJA. He has composed more than 1000 films and 5000 songs. As you know, Indian films have a minimum duration of 2 hours. Considering 1 hour of silence in each film, his background scores still make 1000+ hours of music.


On Friday, August 18, 2000 at 5:00:00 PM UTC+10, Premise Checker wrote:
> TOP TEN MOST PROLIFIC COMPOSERS
>
> ranked by hours of music composed, based on a survey
> conducted by _Classical Music_. Source: Russell Ash,
> _The Top Ten of Everything 2000_ (NY: DK [Dorling
> Kindersley] Publishing, 1999), p. 163.
>
> Haydn (1732-1809) 340 hours
> Handel (1685-1759) 303
> Mozart (1756-91) 202
> Bach (1685-1750) 175
>