What method do you prefer for scheduling a batch file to run silently [sans a command window displaying]?

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Arlen Holder

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Apr 16, 2020, 1:48:49 PM4/16/20
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What specific method do you prefer for running a batch file silently
[sans a command window displaying]?

The question isn't whether it can be done, but which of the many methods do
you find most useful when you need to schedule a command to run silently.

The number & variation of potential freeware solutions are vast, e.g.,
o <https://serverfault.com/questions/9038/run-a-bat-file-in-a-scheduled-task-without-a-window>
o <https://www.raymond.cc/blog/hidden-start-runs-batch-files-silently-without-flickering-console/>
o <https://www.winhelponline.com/blog/run-bat-files-invisibly-without-displaying-command-prompt/>
etc.

Note the surprisingly many freeware solutions suggested in those threads.

I'm sure most of those freeware solutions will work, so this thread is
simply a quick question asking those of you who _already_ many times
implemented scheduling of batch commands to run silently...
.... *which method do you most prefer?* ....

There is only one user & I've already scheduled the batch command.
o But it pops up a window which I want to not be visible all the time.
Start > Run > taskschd.msc >
Create Basic Task >
Name = tzrandom
Description = Schedule random Windows system timzone changes
Trigger: (o)When I log on
Action: Start a program > C:\app\os\pgm\bat\tzrandom.bat

In summary, this question asks experienced users who have already many
times scheduled a freeware batch command to run silently in Windows...
*Q: Which silent mode batch scheduling method do you most prefer?*
--
For reference, this is the randomizer I wish to run silently.
@echo off
rem tzrandom.bat randomly sets the Windows system timezone
rem by Herbert Kleebauer, 20200415, alt.msdos.batch
setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion

:loop
set /a n=137*%random%/32768*3+1
for /f "tokens=*" %%i in ('tzutil /l^|more +%n%') do set a=%%i& goto :l1
:l1
echo.
echo.
echo setting time zone to: %a%
tzutil.exe /s "%a%"

:: wait 6-24h
set /a n=20864+(%random%*2)
set /a h=%n%/3600
set /a m=(n-(%h%*3600))/60
echo waiting %h% hours, %m% minutes
timeout %n%
goto :loop

exit 0

Libor Striz

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Apr 17, 2020, 12:11:13 AM4/17/20
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Arlen Holder <arlen...@anyexample.com> Wrote in message:r
> What specific method do you prefer for running a batch file silently [sans a command window displaying]?The question isn't whether it can be done, but which of the many methods do you find most useful when you need to schedule a command to run silently.The number & variation of potential freeware solutions are vast, ....

I personally do not see reason to use extra utilities
for what can be easily done by scripts
so I go via VBS way, when I need it.

--
Poutnik ( the Wanderer )

JJ

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Apr 17, 2020, 2:41:27 PM4/17/20
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Use the "Run whether user is logged on or not" option. That'll run the
program in the service desktop instead of the current user's desktop.

Kenny McCormack

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Apr 17, 2020, 5:40:03 PM4/17/20
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In article <14rcfvxs79lh7$.1cjudg2nawj2g$.d...@40tude.net>,
JJ <jj4p...@vfemail.net> wrote:
...
>> In summary, this question asks experienced users who have already many
>> times scheduled a freeware batch command to run silently in Windows...
>> *Q: Which silent mode batch scheduling method do you most prefer?*
>
>Use the "Run whether user is logged on or not" option. That'll run the
>program in the service desktop instead of the current user's desktop.

Could you explain further why you like that method so much and why it is
your own, personal favorite?

--
I've been watching cat videos on YouTube. More content and closer to
the truth than anything on Fox.

Arlen Holder

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Apr 17, 2020, 6:04:50 PM4/17/20
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In response to what JJ <jj4p...@vfemail.net> wrote :

> Use the "Run whether user is logged on or not" option. That'll run the
> program in the service desktop instead of the current user's desktop.

Hi JJ,

Thanks for risking a suggestion how best to schedule hidden batch commands.
<https://i.postimg.cc/8z6NC7BC/tz05.jpg>

Making that one change necessitated, I think, a few concurrent changes of:
(o)Run whether user is logged on or not
[x]Do not store password.
The task will only have access to local computer resources.
[x]Hidden
Configure for: [Windows 10]
[_]Stop the task if it runs longer than: [3 days]

I am in the process of testing this suggestion out with those changes.
<https://i.postimg.cc/8z6NC7BC/tz05.jpg>

Thank you for your purposefully helpful suggestions.
--
Usenet is where purposefully helpful adults publicly help each other.

Libor Striz

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Apr 17, 2020, 9:50:16 PM4/17/20
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gaz...@shell.xmission.com (Kenny McCormack) Wrote in message:

>> Use the "Run whether user is logged on or not" option. That'll run the>program in the service desktop instead of the current user's desktop.

> Could you explain further why you like that method so much and why it isyour own, personal favorite?

Not speaking for the author,
but it is an elegant method,
if what you want is regular scheduled running.

If you need running on demand,
like invoking an action by an application,
the VBS method in my other post
is the way to go.

Arlen Holder

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Apr 18, 2020, 1:00:16 AM4/18/20
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In response to what Libor Striz
<poutnik4R...@gmailCAPITALS.com.INVALID> wrote :

> Not speaking for the author,
> but it is an elegant method,
> if what you want is regular scheduled running.
>
> If you need running on demand,
> like invoking an action by an application,
> the VBS method in my other post
> is the way to go.

Hi Poutnik,

The goal is to help me, and everyone, who wants a silent script running.
As always, we want the most elegant solution possible, native if possible.

Bear in mind I have _never_ before run a script silently using the task
manager, so take anything I say in this thread with a huge grain of sul.

Generally, I just run scripts openly, on demand.

But having the tzrandom.bat script in my face 24/7 is obnoxious, so when I
googled for how to hide it, I found so many solutions that I asked which
one to focus upon of people who might know offhand which they prefer.

JJ kindly suggested the native task scheduler, which fits with my MO of
using native stuff as much as possible (freeware otherwise).

To your point, focusing on the native task scheduler, I do note it has an
option to allow manual invocation to run it on demand, which you can see as
the first item on the left side "Settings" tab in the previous screenshot:
<https://i.postimg.cc/8z6NC7BC/tz05.jpg>

It seems that option allows _both_ automatic & on-demand invocation,
doesn't it?
[x]Allow task to be run on demand

See also at the bottom of that same screenshot:
If the task is already running then the following rule applies:
[Do not start a new instance]
Where other options on my Windows 10 Pro system are:
[Run a new instance in parallel]
[Queue a new instance]
[Stop the existing instance]

This is another test you can try if you like:
Start > Run > taskschd.msc > Create Basic Task...
Name: cmda
Description: Open an unmistakably red command window as administrator
Trigger: (o)When I log on
Action: (o)Start a program
Program/script: C:\app\os\pgm\bat\cmda.bat
Finish: [x]Open the Properties dialog for this task when I click Finish

At this point, you have a ton of potentially useful settings:
o General tab
o Triggers tab
o Actions tab
o Conditions tab
o Settings tab
o History tab (disabled)

The elegant cmda.bat script is included in the sig to facilitate testing.
o Efficient Windows Admin command prompt of any color in any desired location
<https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.msdos.batch/PFke17AzS78/NSLlZJebCwAJ>
--
@ECHO OFF
rem cmda.bat opens a new shell to "Run As Administrator"
rem based on a script by foxidrive found on alt.msdos.batch 7/7/2018

SETLOCAL ENABLEEXTENSIONS

IF NOT "%~1"=="" goto :START

SET LogFile=%TEMP%\cmda.vbs"
Echo Set UAC = CreateObject("Shell.Application") >"%LogFile%"
Echo UAC.ShellExecute "%~f0", "%cd%", "", "runas", 1 >>"%LogFile%"
Start "" /MIN "%LogFile%"
goto :EOF

:START
Cmd /k "CD /D "%*" & Echo Administrator: & color 4F"
:EOF


Libor Striz

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Apr 18, 2020, 2:04:30 AM4/18/20
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Arlen Holder <arlen...@anyexample.com> Wrote in message:

> To your point, focusing on the native task scheduler, I do note it has anoption to allow manual invocation to run it on demand, which you can see asthe first item on the left side "Settings" tab in the previous screenshot: <https://i.postimg.cc/8z6NC7BC/tz05.jpg>

> It seems that option allows _both_ automatic & on-demand invocation,doesn't it?
> [x]Allow task to be run on demand


Well, for scheduling by time or event, task scheduler is the way to go.
But it seems to me rather a weird way
going to task scheduler to manually launch a task invisibly :-)

I mean various UI utilities or front end programs
often have in their configuration optional command line actions
that can be disturbing, if they open console windows.

For this is good the script I have posted in the other post.

Libor Striz

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Apr 18, 2020, 2:11:40 AM4/18/20
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Libor Striz <poutnik4R...@gmailCAPITALS.com.INVALID> Wrote
in message:

> For this is good the script I have posted in the other post.

instead of visible " <batch> [ <parameters> ]"
running invisible
"cscript invis.vbs <batch> [ <parameters> ]"

JJ

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Apr 18, 2020, 7:10:17 AM4/18/20
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On Fri, 17 Apr 2020 21:40:02 -0000 (UTC), Kenny McCormack wrote:
>
> Could you explain further why you like that method so much and why it is
> your own, personal favorite?

Actually, it's not my personal preference. Mainly due to the requirements of
using Task Scheduler, because it requires administrator privileges.

My personal preference is to use VBScript to run the program as hidden. It
basically uses the desktop ShellExecute function. It's advantage is that no
administrator privilege is required to use it for launching a program as
hidden. It's disadvantages is that it's not as easy to use as using Task
Scheduler, and it will require programming knowledge if the script is not
yet available at hand. So, it's not ideal for inexperienced users.

Using the previously mentioned Task Scheduler method on the other hand,
makes the GUI of the program not enumerable by most window managers because
those windows managers only work on the current user's desktop. Basically,
the hidden GUI is super hidden. But this method must not be used if at later
time, the (hidden) GUI needs to be accessed for e.g. program
reconfiguration.

Kenny McCormack

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Apr 18, 2020, 9:01:22 AM4/18/20
to
In article <d8hvu0ouajyn$.1c5f7hpnypnpw$.d...@40tude.net>,
JJ <jj4p...@vfemail.net> wrote:
>On Fri, 17 Apr 2020 21:40:02 -0000 (UTC), Kenny McCormack wrote:
>>
>> Could you explain further why you like that method so much and why it is
>> your own, personal favorite?
>
>Actually, it's not my personal preference. Mainly due to the requirements of
>using Task Scheduler, because it requires administrator privileges.

The question as posted was specifically about personal preference, so hence
my question.

>My personal preference is to use VBScript to run the program as hidden. It

OK. That makes sense.

--
The randomly chosen signature file that would have appeared here is more than 4
lines long. As such, it violates one or more Usenet RFCs. In order to remain
in compliance with said RFCs, the actual sig can be found at the following URL:
http://user.xmission.com/~gazelle/Sigs/BestCLCPostEver

Herbert Kleebauer

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Apr 18, 2020, 10:29:45 AM4/18/20
to
On 18.04.2020 07:00, Arlen Holder wrote:

> The goal is to help me, and everyone, who wants a silent script running.
> As always, we want the most elegant solution possible, native if possible.
Why not let the script hide itself?

@echo off
setlocal enabledelayedexpansion
certutil -f -decode %~f0 showwin.exe>nul
showwin.exe 0

:loop
set /a n=137*%random%/32768*3+1
for /f "tokens=*" %%i in ('tzutil /l^|more +%n%') do set a=%%i& goto :l1
:l1
echo.
echo.
echo setting time zone to: %a%
tzutil.exe /s "%a%"

:: wait 6-24h
set /a n=20864+(%random%*2)
set /a h=%n%/3600
set /a m=(n-(%h%*3600))/60
echo waiting %h% hours, %m% minutes
timeout %n%
goto :loop

-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----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-----END CERTIFICATE-----





Herbert Kleebauer

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Apr 18, 2020, 10:34:09 AM4/18/20
to
On 18.04.2020 16:29, Herbert Kleebauer wrote:

> Why not let the script hide itself?

Usage of showwin.exe:

@echo off
:: minimize/maximize/hide the command window (requires W2k or better).
::
:: Usage: showwin.exe number
::
:: 0 SW_HIDE
:: Hides the window and activates another window.
::
:: 1 SW_SHOWNORMAL
:: Activates and displays a window. If the window is minimized or maximized,
:: the system restores it to its original size and position. An application
:: should specify this flag when displaying the window for the first time.
::
:: 2 SW_SHOWMINIMIZED
:: Activates the window and displays it as a minimized window.
::
:: 3 SW_MAXIMIZE
:: Maximizes the specified window.
::
:: 3 SW_SHOWMAXIMIZED
:: Activates the window and displays it as a maximized window.
::
:: 4 SW_SHOWNOACTIVATE
:: Displays a window in its most recent size and position. This value is
:: similar to SW_SHOWNORMAL, except the window is not actived.
::
:: 5 SW_SHOW
:: Activates the window and displays it in its current size and position.
::
:: 6 SW_MINIMIZE
:: Minimizes the specified window and activates the next top-level window
:: in the Z order.
::
:: 7 SW_SHOWMINNOACTIVE
:: Displays the window as a minimized window. This value is similar to
:: SW_SHOWMINIMIZED, except the window is not activated.
::
:: 8 SW_SHOWNA
:: Displays the window in its current size and position. This value is
:: similar to SW_SHOW, except the window is not activated.
::
:: 9 SW_RESTORE
:: Activates and displays the window. If the window is minimized or maximized,
:: the system restores it to its original size and position. An application
:: should specify this flag when restoring a minimized window.
::
:: 10 SW_SHOWDEFAULT
:: Sets the show state based on the SW_ value specified in the STARTUPINFO
:: structure passed to the CreateProcess function by the program that
:: started the application.
::
:: 11 SW_FORCEMINIMIZE
:: Windows 2000/XP: Minimizes a window, even if the thread that owns the
:: window is not responding. This flag should only be used when minimizing
:: windows from a different thread.


certutil -f -decode %~f0 showwin.exe>nul

cls
dir
:: wait 4 seconds
ping -n 4 localhost >nul
:: hide window
showwin.exe 0
dir /b
:: wait 4 seconds
ping -n 4 localhost >nul
:: show window
showwin.exe 5
:: wait 4 seconds
ping -n 4 localhost >nul
del showwin.exe
goto :eof

-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----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-----END CERTIFICATE-----




The source code:


winmain::
jsr.l (GetCommandLine)
; skip program name
eor.l r1,r1 ; not within "" flag
dec.l r0
_20: inc.l r0
cmp.b #0,(r0)
beq.b _10
cmp.b #'"',(r0)
bne.b _30
not.l r1
_30: or.l r1,r1
bne.b _20
cmp.b #' ',(r0)
bne.b _20
inc.l r0

_10: eor.l r5,r5
move.l #5,r4 ; default: SW_SHOW
_50: movu.bl (r0),r1
inc.l r0
or.b r1,r1
beq.b _40
sub.b #'0',r1
bcs.b _50
cmp.b #9,r1
bhi.b _50
mulsq.l #10,r5,r5
add.l r1,r5
eor.l r4,r4
br.b _50
_40: or.l r4,r4
beq.b _60
move.l r4,r5

_60: jsr.l (GetConsoleWindow)

move.l r5,-(sp)
move.l r0,-(sp)
jsr.l (ShowWindow)

moveq.l #0,-(sp)
jsr.l (ExitProcess) ; exit program




Arlen Holder

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Apr 19, 2020, 9:47:19 AM4/19/20
to
In response to what Herbert Kleebauer <kl...@unibwm.de> wrote :

> Why not let the script hide itself?

Hi Herbert Kleebauer,

Thank you for being purposefully helpful where I'll always strive to add
value to your input so that others can further improve for everyone else.

I saved your script to tzrandom.bat & ran it twice with the result
that the first time output an error that showwin.exe wasn't found
while the second time seems to have worked while remaining hidden.
<https://i.postimg.cc/P5rxcQ4C/tz06.jpg>
Name: showwin.exe
Size: 1024 bytes (1 KiB)
SHA256: 721F80911F063B0503656E225BCA6505D1145EF6D26F9C5AA02CC6DE4DF22C65

I'm not sure if having a script of the same name already scheduled
(and running) from the Windows task schedule (taskschd.msc) affected things
so I belatedly disabled that task (which was created prior to hide the
tzrandom.bat command window) & rebooted and ran the tzramdom.bat again.

It seems, perhaps, perchance, to have created 3 processes maybe?
1. Console Windows Host
2. timeout - pauses command processing
3. Windows Command Processor
<https://i.postimg.cc/s27fBfHb/tz07.jpg>

Did it?
--


Herbert Kleebauer

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Apr 19, 2020, 11:40:19 AM4/19/20
to
On 19.04.2020 15:47, Arlen Holder wrote:

Sorry, but I don't provide ready-to-use solutions, I only show
how things could be done. It's up to you, to modify it in a way,
so it fits your needs.

> I saved your script to tzrandom.bat & ran it twice with the result
> that the first time output an error that showwin.exe wasn't found
> while the second time seems to have worked while remaining hidden.

You need write access to the current directory. If you are not
sure, which is the current directory when the batch is executed,
it is always a good idea, to create temporary files in the %temp%
directory. Or create showwin.exe only once and store it in a
directory which is in your %path%.


> I'm not sure if having a script of the same name already scheduled
> (and running) from the Windows task schedule (taskschd.msc) affected things
> so I belatedly disabled that task (which was created prior to hide the
> tzrandom.bat command window) & rebooted and ran the tzramdom.bat again.

I also wouldn't use "showin.exe 0", but "showwin.exe 6". This way you
can display the window by a simple mouse click into the task bar. Or
at least use a token file and add something like

if exist fg.txt showwin.exe 1

If you create this file, the window is displayed again after the wait time.
I also wouldn't use "timeout" but "choice" because then you can exit the
batch with a simple key press.


> It seems, perhaps, perchance, to have created 3 processes maybe?
> 1. Console Windows Host
> 2. timeout - pauses command processing
> 3. Windows Command Processor
> <https://i.postimg.cc/s27fBfHb/tz07.jpg>

That has nothing to do with showwin.exe. Create a batch file with a single line:

timeout 300

Then the same processes should be created. After 5 minutes, when the batch
has terminated, the processes should be gone. Maybe it is also a good idea
to use the "title" command in the batch file.





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