AL PASTOR

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GUZ

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Jan 4, 1999, 3:00:00 AM1/4/99
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>> Tacos al pastor are very diferent from Yucatan to DF or Monterrey. They don't taste the same
>> because of the ingredients, they vary from place to place. "Tacos al Pastor" are very related
>> to "Tacos de Trompo" but they are not "exactly" the same. In Yucatan they are very spiced and
>> are made of pork.

>> In DF (sometimes) steaks are laid one upon another in an assorted manner (one of beef... one
>> of pork)all the way to form a big mass of marinated meat (achiote or axiote is one of the
>> ingredients. In Yucatan they use axiote too... in fact... they are the masters of the axiote,
>> and the "adobo" used to marinate this meat is very similar at the one used in "cochinita
>> pibil"). A metallic bar goes through all this meat (named "trompo") and placed vertically in
a
>> kinda' vertical grill. The "Trompo" spins slowly on its axis (the metallic bar). 2 halfs of
>> onion are placed, one on the top one at the bottom. Most of the "taqueros" use to place a
>> pineapple on the very top.

>> The taco is made of a small corn tortilla warmed right below the droping meat. You can use
>> some lemon and drink "tepache".
>>
>> WARNING
>> After eat tacos keep away from your girlfriend (the onion... you know).
>>
>> In this part of the states ther's a lot of guys claming to have the recipe... the good one...
>> but they don't. If you are interested in the original one in the DF style jut let me know,
>> I'll keep you in the book and I will send you the recipe as soon as my secret spies gather
>> information for me from "la ciudad del taco y la garnacha". I have good agents there and some
>> whistlers too. Are you interested en "salsa taquera"? ... I bet you are.

>> guz
.......................................

>If "Tacos de Trompo" are defined by the cooking method you describe, I am surprised that Big Al
>is not able to find them, but then maybe he is stuck in Minneapolis or some such place.

........................................

I was talking about "Al Pastor". "De Trompo" can be processed on a grill or a spin. I don't know
the exact
difference between them and "Al Carbon" (maybe difference lays on the "adobo"... but I don't
know for sure. My agent told me that they are the same but I don't think so... that will be part
of another investigation.

........................................

>I have
>seen these vertical spits everywhere even north of the border (although some people might argue
>that El Paso is not really north of the border). I read someplace that this method of cooking
in
>Mexico is less than 100 years old and was adapted from the Lebanese that immigrated relatively
>recently. But to many these are Tacos al Carbón.

........................................

Good point, I don't know about veracity of this information but it's very posible...
if Tacos al Pastor (the ones I've eaten in DF) are related to the ones of Yucatan... then you
can
bet that they come from Libanese origin (In Yucatan there are a lot people with Libanese
ancestors and
that enriched even more the Mexican cuisine).

........................................

>By all means, keep me on your list. I am always interested in new recipes as well the
variations
>of preparation and ingrediants of old ones.

>Thanks,
>Clayton

.........................................
.........................................

I got it!
Well... I must say I got a partial succes in this operation 'cause my special agent CG-2
is out of shape and couldn't remember measures but ingredients and process are right. He is
in DF and eats a lot... *A LOT* of tacos (even more than me -I know... "I").

TACOS AL PASTOR

Ingredients:
-Carne de cerdo (in some places pork and beef are mixed).
-2 whole lemons (key lemons with seeds and every thing)(tin skeen... you know)
-Chile Guajillo
-Cebolla
-Ajo
-Azucar
-Sal
-Manteca
-Vinagre

Process:
Se tuesta y se muele el chile guajillo con cebolla, ajo, azucar,sal y los limones.


SALSA TAQUERA

-Jitomate
-Chile de Arbol
-Ajo
-Cebolla
-Lemon (very important)
-Sal

Process:
-Se hirve el jitomate y el chile de arbol con semilla.
-Todo se mule con ajo, cebolla, limon y sal.
-freir un poco.

Something is missin' here... I made a test in "salsa taquera" and I'm not fully
satified, not at all... maybe we have to add cilantro and ... something... we need
another research to get the top.
(Sorry... my agent is really good when sober).


Alexander Lee

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Jan 8, 1999, 3:00:00 AM1/8/99
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Well, being that Al Pastor is my favorite filling for burritos, howeber, I
haven't made it much myself, instead I usually walk to the nearby taco stand,
but I think what I would put in it is:

Pork (but not from porkchops)
Chile spices similar to Cajun spice.
Lemon.
Cilantro.
White onion
Tomato
Maybe a pinch of salt.

I would grill it, heavily marinating it with the lemon, chile, cilantro and
salt, etc. And put the grilled mixture in a taco (or burrito) with more
cilantro, lettuce, onions, sour cream, maybe refried beans, and FRESH salsa.

Marc Frucht

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Jan 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM1/24/99
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Pardon my ignorance, but what are corn muchrooms?
I ran upstairs to look at a can of them thinking they might be
Al Pastor, but they weren't. And for that matter, what is Al Pastor?
I'm always looking for something else to put in burritos.
blackbeans, chedder cheese, cilantro, onions and garlic gets boring after
a while.
marco

VernonH

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Feb 3, 1999, 3:00:00 AM2/3/99
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In article <78grta$s...@newsops.execpc.com>, Marc Frucht <koko...@execpc.com>
writes:

>
>Pardon my ignorance, but what are corn muchrooms?
>I ran upstairs to look at a can of them thinking they might be
>Al Pastor, but they weren't. And for that matter, what is Al Pastor?
>I'm always looking for something else to put in burritos.
>blackbeans, chedder cheese, cilantro, onions and garlic gets boring after
>a while.
>marco
>
>

Marc,

This is a fungus that grows on corn similar to what we called "smut" back on
the farm in Ohio. It's aztec (nahuatl) name is cuitlacoche or huitlacoche. I
almost hesitate to translate but "cuitlatl" = "caca" and "cochtli" = "asleep".
Don't let that stop you from trying it.
It is almost considered a delicacy and I have even seen it referred to in
French cooking and it is served in some upscale restaurants in Texas. Hongos or
champiņones are the standard translation of "mushrooms" but for the corn
mushrooms the term "huitlacoche" is generally used in Mexico and Texas. I did
not know that it was available in a can and I never knew it was being canned
and sold stateside as corn mushrooms.

AL PASTOR means shepherd style. "Cabrito al pastor" is a very popular and
traditional dish in Northeast Mexico and Southern Texas where I have lived for
past 47 years. Cabrito is a kid goat, still a suckling. The butchered cabrito
is impaled on a metal rod and placed over hot coals. Generally these are only
available in restaurants that specialize in cabrito but are beginning to be
available at some fairly fancy restaurants.

ĄYa se me hizo agua la boca!

Vern


Vernon C. Hammond,O.D.
McAllen, TX 78501

GUZ

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Feb 7, 1999, 3:00:00 AM2/7/99
to

>
>This is a fungus that grows on corn similar to what we called "smut" back on
>the farm in Ohio. It's aztec (nahuatl) name is cuitlacoche or huitlacoche. I
>almost hesitate to translate but "cuitlatl" = "caca" and "cochtli" = "asleep".
>Don't let that stop you from trying it.
>It is almost considered a delicacy and I have even seen it referred to in
Generally these are only
>available in restaurants that specialize in cabrito but are beginning to be
>available at some fairly fancy restaurants.
>
>ĄYa se me hizo agua la boca!
>
>Vern
>
>
>Vernon C. Hammond,O.D.
>McAllen, TX 78501

..................

Good for you Vernon, I see you are well informed.
I would like just to add that definitively the word is "Huitlacoche" and when it appears on the
corn (In south Texas) the news refers to it as a "catastrophe".
Huitlacoche is has more nutrients in this form than as corn. I know the cans, but conservatives
spoil the party. Whatever, one of them is so much better than the other... but I don't remember
names... sorry.

Colette Abascal

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Feb 11, 1999, 3:00:00 AM2/11/99
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Don't remind me of Huitlacoche! I love the stuff, spent my whole last
pregnancy craving it, without being able to ever get the real mouthwatering
stuff! And my husband really misses the Tacos al Pastor and also the Tacos
Arabes from Puebla. Don't talk to me about food, I'll go crazy until I can
get back on a plane to Mexico lindo y querido!!!!
A mi tambien se me hizo agua la boca!
Colette

GUZ wrote in message <79l96d$h...@dfw-ixnews4.ix.netcom.com>...

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