Landlord forgot to pay the Wifi Bill

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BYANYOTHER NAME

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Feb 7, 2020, 12:26:33 AM2/7/20
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So internet was down. But interestingly I could STILL connect and browser
although much slower using TOR or any encrypted VPN. Why is that?

BYANYOTHER NAME

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Feb 10, 2020, 3:33:31 AM2/10/20
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Johann Beretta <ber...@nun-ya-bizness.com> wrote in
news:r1jnar$fn8$1...@dont-email.me:
> Obviously the internet was not down. It's not like your computer was
> browsing by fucking telepathy. Your wifi may have been down, but then
> it becomes obvious you were connection another way. Cellular?
> Hardline? Ad-Hoc connection via another computer that did have a
> connection? Hotspot?
>
> You cannot use the internet if the "Internet is down". That's like
> claiming you can use electricity when the electricity is out. If your
> house has power when the power is out, then you're getting it another
> way; generator, solar, batteries, something.. It doesn't spring into
> existence out of the ether.
>
>
Sorry but you're wrong. This has happened before. It has to do with
access to the router/ISP's DNS server. When the connection is encrypted
the ISP has no control over your DNS lookups, cannot block them, slow
them, etc. Honestly you don't know what your talking about.

BYANYOTHER NAME

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Feb 12, 2020, 5:19:09 AM2/12/20
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Sqwertz <sqwe...@gmail.invalid> wrote in
news:k3ihugbc...@sqwertz.com:
> Wow. Just... Wow.
>
> -sw
>
GZOWEY, ONLY GZOWEY, anything else intelligent u have to say?

Johann Beretta

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Apr 29, 2020, 1:39:53 AM4/29/20
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On 2/10/20 5:00 AM, Sqwertz wrote:
> On Mon, 10 Feb 2020 08:33:29 +0000 (UTC), BYANYOTHER NAME wrote:

>>>
>> Sorry but you're wrong. This has happened before. It has to do with
>> access to the router/ISP's DNS server. When the connection is encrypted
>> the ISP has no control over your DNS lookups, cannot block them, slow
>> them, etc. Honestly you don't know what your talking about.
>
> Wow. Just... Wow.
>
> -sw
>

I am not wrong. I own a freakin' ISP. Do you not understand what you
are saying? If the internet is "down", you cannot get on it. Down
could mean any number of things... Your hardline to your ISP was cut,
someone drove over your node (cable internet), etc etc.

I can assure you, when the internet is down, the signals to the VPN are
not floating along magically. If you can browse the internet then it's
not DOWN!

BYANYOTHER NAME

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Apr 29, 2020, 7:19:20 PM4/29/20
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Johann Beretta <ber...@nun-ya-bizness.com> wrote in news:r8b3v8$qgg$1
@dont-email.me:
You're just playing with semantics. By "down" I meant that no data
transfers are occurring because the DNS server at the ISP is blocking or
dropping them. Yeah I can connect, but you cannot do anything unless you
encrypt everything so the ISP cannot get it's hands on your DNS lookups.

Sorry I offended your sense of word definitions!

Johann Beretta

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May 1, 2020, 1:52:25 PM5/1/20
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On 4/29/20 4:19 PM, BYANYOTHER NAME wrote:

>>
>
> You're just playing with semantics. By "down" I meant that no data
> transfers are occurring because the DNS server at the ISP is blocking or
> dropping them. Yeah I can connect, but you cannot do anything unless you
> encrypt everything so the ISP cannot get it's hands on your DNS lookups.
>
> Sorry I offended your sense of word definitions!
>

If you "encrypt your data" for DNS look-ups, then DATA TRANSFERS ARE
OCCURRING.

Initial exchanges of keys, for secure communications, OCCUR IN THE
CLEAR. The whole protocol operates in the clear. That's how it was designed.

You can't encrypt your data BEFORE you exchange temporary keys with the
remote computer/server/device.

Otherwise, it would be like writing the combo to a safe on a
sticky-note, putting the sticky note in the safe, closing and locking
it, and then mailing it to a friend.

How is he gonna open it?

Furthermore, when I turn off the internet for a customer (non-payment,
planned cancellation, etc) all the encrypted bullshit in the world isn't
going to sneak by the system because we shut off ALL data transfers to
the customer's IP address. Nothing in, nothing out. Even encrypted data
still has bits in the clear. DESTination IP address data must be visible
(internet has to know where to send that encrypted data) and there are a
handful of other bits (header sizes, payload sizes, ACK packets, NACK
packets, etc) that all must traverse in the clear. Even if you could
come up with a system that could obfuscate all of that, you MUST have
the IP address data in the clear. You cannot get around that. That's
what is blocked when you are shut-off BY ANYONE.



Johann Beretta

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May 1, 2020, 1:53:49 PM5/1/20
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On 4/30/20 10:00 AM, Sqwertz wrote:
ling at ME. I'm not the asshole here.
>
> And there you are arguing with him again in the Trump thread <yawn>.
> Take it somewhere else.
>
> -sw
>

I'll take it where I please.

BYANYOTHER NAME

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May 2, 2020, 5:28:47 AM5/2/20
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Johann Beretta <ber...@nun-ya-bizness.com> wrote in
news:r8hnkn$5iq$1...@dont-email.me:

> On 4/29/20 4:19 PM, BYANYOTHER NAME wrote:
>
> >>
> >
> > You're just playing with semantics. By "down" I meant that no data
> > transfers are occurring because the DNS server at the ISP is
> > blocking or dropping them. Yeah I can connect, but you cannot do
> > anything unless you encrypt everything so the ISP cannot get it's
> > hands on your DNS lookups.
> >
> > Sorry I offended your sense of word definitions!
> >
>
> If you "encrypt your data" for DNS look-ups, then DATA TRANSFERS ARE
> OCCURRING.
>
> Initial exchanges of keys, for secure communications, OCCUR IN THE
> CLEAR. The whole protocol operates in the clear. That's how it was
> designed.

My understanding of tor is that the DNS lookups are handled by tor
exclusively. The connection to the tor server might be in the clear but
the dns lookups are not. That is why I can surf using tor and when I do not
use it my dns lookups are blocked or thrown away because they go to the ISP
dns server, not tor. The content of my tor data transfers is encrypted by
the browser before it leaves my computer. The original post asked why this
was happening. THe most likely correct reply is that the ISP is blocking
access to DNS lookups at ITS servers. That is why I can still get web pages
using TOR and not otherwise. Correct me if I am wrong, I'm all ears.
The problem is a fucked up ISP that blocks or drops dns lookups to its
servers, hence the browser cannot find the web page you requested.
I was not talking about the connection to the initial tor hop. I was
talking about who does the dns lookup for that connection. It it's tor then
i get the page. If it's the isp I don't. Down can mean many things-isp dns
server is DOWN OR more likely incompetently managed. I guess you just like
to show your SUPERIOR knowledge about everything rather than trying to help
with the question.

Johann Beretta

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May 3, 2020, 12:50:57 AM5/3/20
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Superior knowledge? Yes.. I have over 25 years of low-level experience
with the internet. I have an ARIN #. I've been doing this for a long
time.

A DNS server or a web server or an FTP server are single nodes on the
internet. Not being able to reach them, specifically, may or may not
have anything to do with the internet as a whole.

Now, as far as your ISP's DNS server... I'm having a hard time wrapping
my head around your claim that the Landlord forgot to pay his bill. Are
you under the impression that the ISP blocks access to DNS as their
method of shutting down an account for non-payment? While this is....
certainly technically possible, it would be absolutely ineffective. One
can configure their computer to use any DNS server that permits inbound
connections. 1.1.1.1, 1.0.0.1, 8.8.8.8, and 4.4.4.4 are four examples of
DNS servers that permit anyone to connect, by design.

Those DNS servers (at least the first two) even offer DNS over HTTPS to
get around any ISP blockages.

Tor probably does have an internal DNS list, as you suggest, otherwise
it would not be able to resolve .onion addresses.

Is it possible that you are not able to browse the web outside of Tor
because your computer's DNS settings are incorrect or absent?

If you did, in fact, have misconfigured or incorrect DNS settings on
your PC you would have a hard (impossible) time getting anything to work
if you're typing "www.anything" whereas if you fired up Tor you'd be
using its internal, hard-coded, DNS servers.

Can you reach the internet from the command line? Using ping, for example.

I really don't think the ISP is cutting off access by disabling your DNS
lookups. It's simply ineffective for anyone with a modicum of internet
experience and would be detected almost immediately by anyone who
notices that "ping" works.

@EliteBook-8470p:~$ ping 1.1.1.1
PING 1.1.1.1 (1.1.1.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 1.1.1.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=55 time=51.3 ms
64 bytes from 1.1.1.1: icmp_seq=2 ttl=55 time=24.3 ms
64 bytes from 1.1.1.1: icmp_seq=3 ttl=55 time=188 ms
^C
--- 1.1.1.1 ping statistics ---
3 packets transmitted, 3 received, 0% packet loss, time 2002ms


@EliteBook-8470p:~$ nslookup www.tor.com
Server: 127.0.0.53
Address: 127.0.0.53#53

Non-authoritative answer:
www.tor.com canonical name = www.tor.com.cdn.cloudflare.net.
Name: www.tor.com.cdn.cloudflare.net
Address: 104.20.16.112
Name: www.tor.com.cdn.cloudflare.net
Address: 104.20.15.112


In the above example, nslookup used my internal DNS settings to decide
which server to query for www.tor.com. If my settings were wrong, I'd
have gotten an error message.

However, you can tell nslookup to use an external DNS server

@EliteBook-8470p:~$ nslookup
> server 1.1.1.1
Default server: 1.1.1.1
Address: 1.1.1.1#53
> www.tor.com
Server: 1.1.1.1
Address: 1.1.1.1#53

Non-authoritative answer:
www.tor.com canonical name = www.tor.com.cdn.cloudflare.net.
Name: www.tor.com.cdn.cloudflare.net
Address: 104.20.16.112
Name: www.tor.com.cdn.cloudflare.net
Address: 104.20.15.112

If one works and the other does not, then investigate your computer's
DNS settings. If those settings are correct for your ISPs DNS server IP
addresses, then yeah... Either the DNS server is down due to a fault or
you have the world's dumbest ISP :)

In the meantime, you can simply put 1.1.1.1 and 8.8.8.8 into your
computer's DNS settings and see if you can browse again.




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