I Can't turn off my ceiling fan

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syt...@yahoo.com

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Jul 23, 2004, 8:25:10 AM7/23/04
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I have a Hunter-Douglas (Home Depot) ceiling fan in my office.

It has one of those chain "puller" switches to adjust the speed and to
turn it on or off. As I was turning on the fan, the chain pulled out
and now I can't turn the fan off. HELP!!!!!!!!!

Any advice will be appreciated.

Thanks,

Sy

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Charlie Bress

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Jul 23, 2004, 8:58:51 AM7/23/04
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<syt...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:230720040825599713%syt...@yahoo.com...

No controlling wall switch? Start flipping off circuit breakers until you
find the right one.


Curmudgeon

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Jul 23, 2004, 9:18:27 AM7/23/04
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Replacement switches are available at any Home Depot.

<syt...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:230720040825599713%syt...@yahoo.com...
>
>

dr-...@wi.rr.xx.com

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Jul 23, 2004, 11:06:48 AM7/23/04
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better yet... get a remote control set for it. Ingrid

"Curmudgeon" <bit...@nospam.com> wrote:

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Gary

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Jul 23, 2004, 6:41:37 PM7/23/04
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It's been my experience that mechanical things just work better if you
periodically kick the living sh*t out of them. In this case, it may
not be practical to kick the offending machine, unless you have a very
high kick, or a very low ceiling. My advice would be to jump up and
hang onto the damned thing until you and it come crashing to the
floor. From there, you can easily get a foot, hand, or sledge hammer
on it to reduce it to a multitude of minute pieces, which can then
easily be scooped up and placed in the dustbin. Then go out to Wally
World and get yourself a $9.99 portable, oscillating fan that will
faithfully run longer than your grandchildren will be on this earth.
Another chapter in the "Life Sucks When Things Don't Work" book,
huh!!!
:)
Gary

HVAC fella

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Jul 23, 2004, 7:21:20 PM7/23/04
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Unplug it if is plugged in / shut off its breaker if its alone on the
circuit/ or...just leave it running till you can obtain another switch ;
afterall...it is middle of summer.

_____________________________________________

Have you hugged your A/C Tech today ?

_____________________________________________

HVAC fella

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Jul 23, 2004, 7:22:51 PM7/23/04
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'In this case, it may not be practical to kick the offending machine,
unless you have a very high kick, '

ME: Take a crash course in Karate or Tai-kwon-do ?!

Jim Carlock

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Jul 23, 2004, 8:40:29 PM7/23/04
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:-) Put your mouth up to it and do the Ahghghghghgh sound into it.
You'll get a nice tremolo effect. Reminds me of when I was a kid
and made that sound while someone pounded on my back.

--
Jim Carlock
http://www.microcosmotalk.com/
Post replies to the newsgroup.

Dr.Ha£0nfire$

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Jul 24, 2004, 8:25:23 AM7/24/04
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HVAC fella wrote:
>> 'In this case, it may not be practical to kick the offending machine,
>> unless you have a very high kick, '
>>
>> ME: Take a crash course in Karate or Tai-kwon-do ?!

Great idea; then kick the fuck out of a particular pervert troll from
Illinois.

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Douglas E.

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Jul 23, 2004, 10:29:11 PM7/23/04
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Sounds like you haven't grown up.

"Jim Carlock" <anon...@127.0.0.1> wrote in message
news:1eiMc.289$kU5....@twister.tampabay.rr.com...

GFRfan

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Jul 24, 2004, 2:38:21 PM7/24/04
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>>
>>
>><sytech.at.oohay.moc> wrote:
>>
>>I have a Hunter-Douglas (Home Depot) ceiling fan in my office.
>>
>>It has one of those chain "puller" switches to adjust the speed and to
>>turn it on or off. As I was turning on the fan, the chain pulled out
>>and now I can't turn the fan off. HELP!!!!!!!!!
>>
>>Any advice will be appreciated.
>>
>>Thanks,
>>
>>Sy


> "Jim Carlock" <anon...@127.0.0.1> wrote in message
> news:1eiMc.289$kU5....@twister.tampabay.rr.com...
>
>>:-) Put your mouth up to it and do the Ahghghghghgh sound into it.
>>You'll get a nice tremolo effect. Reminds me of when I was a kid
>>and made that sound while someone pounded on my back.
>>
>>--
>>Jim Carlock
>>http://www.microcosmotalk.com/
>>Post replies to the newsgroup.

Douglas E. wrote:
> Sounds like you haven't grown up.
>

Who wants to grow up???

Pen

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Jul 24, 2004, 11:49:46 PM7/24/04
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I prefer pedestal fans too. A ceiling fan feels like a giant lawn mower. :)

jeepgu...@yahoo.com (Gary) wrote in message news:<ff8337fd.04072...@posting.google.com>...

Lee

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Jul 26, 2004, 12:43:56 AM7/26/04
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LOL.. thanks for the laugh, Gary.. I needed that! server been driving
me crazy kicking me off line, not connecting properly or timely, for
two weeks now.. at a time when i needed to down load some important
(to me) software! and get important info from out of state
relatives!. like you say, another chapter!
lee h

TURTLE

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Jul 28, 2004, 11:01:29 AM7/28/04
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"HVAC fella" <HVAC...@webtv.net> wrote in message
news:28258-41...@storefull-3231.bay.webtv.net...

> Unplug it if is plugged in / shut off its breaker if its alone on the
> circuit/ or...just leave it running till you can obtain another switch ;
> afterall...it is middle of summer.
>

This is Turtle.

You make a good case for selective breeding as the Germans thought up back in
about 1935. I think your a product of one of these experiments went Arye.

TURTLE


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TimR

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Jul 29, 2004, 9:11:22 AM7/29/04
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GFRfan <gran...@lives.com> wrote in message news:<x0yMc.21707$eM2.1485@attbi_s51>...

> >>
> >>
> >><sytech.at.oohay.moc> wrote:
> >>
> >>I have a Hunter-Douglas (Home Depot) ceiling fan in my office.
> >>
> >>It has one of those chain "puller" switches to adjust the speed and to
> >>turn it on or off. As I was turning on the fan, the chain pulled out
> >>and now I can't turn the fan off. HELP!!!!!!!!!
> >>
> >>Any advice will be appreciated.
> >>
> >>Thanks,
> >>
> >>Sy
>

When you go to Home Depot and buy the replacement fan switch, you're
going to notice it has several wires.

They are different colors.

I do not know what colors they are because I am color blind. The
result is that my ceiling fan does not go High, then Medium, then Low
like most. It goes High, Low, Medium. If you know what the chances
are of that combination, you are way too good at math.

PS it is good to turn the power off before changing the switch.
Especially if you have kids. When they hear cuss words they repeat
them to Mommy. Don't ask me how I know this.

<smiley>

syt...@yahoo.com

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Jul 29, 2004, 2:58:01 PM7/29/04
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[[ This message was both posted and mailed: see
the "To," "Cc," and "Newsgroups" headers for details. ]]


I've made some progress!!!. I was able to attach those other 2 wires
to the switch and now I have high, medium, low but no "off". When I
"hold" the chain after "low" I can hear the motor stop, but as soon as
I let it go it starts to run again.

Any advice?


In article <87af0be7.04072...@posting.google.com>, TimR
<timot...@aol.com> wrote:

--

syt...@yahoo.com

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Jul 29, 2004, 2:59:30 PM7/29/04
to
[[ This message was both posted and mailed: see
the "To," "Cc," and "Newsgroups" headers for details. ]]

In article


I've made some progress!!!. I was able to attach those other 2 wires
to the switch and now I have high, medium, low but no "off". When I
"hold" the chain after "low" I can hear the motor stop, but as soon as
I let it go it starts to run again.

Any advice?


--

Salty Thumb

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Jul 29, 2004, 3:34:36 PM7/29/04
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timot...@aol.com (TimR) wrote in
news:87af0be7.04072...@posting.google.com:

> GFRfan <gran...@lives.com> wrote in message
> news:<x0yMc.21707$eM2.1485@attbi_s51>...
>> >>
>> >>
>> >><sytech.at.oohay.moc> wrote:
>> >>
>> >>I have a Hunter-Douglas (Home Depot) ceiling fan in my office.
>> >>
>> >>It has one of those chain "puller" switches to adjust the speed and
>> >>to turn it on or off. As I was turning on the fan, the chain
>> >>pulled out and now I can't turn the fan off. HELP!!!!!!!!!
>> >>
>> >>Any advice will be appreciated.
>> >>
>> >>Thanks,
>> >>
>> >>Sy
>>
>
> When you go to Home Depot and buy the replacement fan switch, you're
> going to notice it has several wires.
>
> They are different colors.
>
> I do not know what colors they are because I am color blind. The
> result is that my ceiling fan does not go High, then Medium, then Low
> like most. It goes High, Low, Medium. If you know what the chances
> are of that combination, you are way too good at math.

I seriously doubt that the color of the wiring has anything to do with fan
speed. The pull chain on a ceiling fan connects to a part called a
rheostat which handy people should be able to replace. You can also get a
wall switch or a remote control device that has its own rheostat and leave
the one on the fan on 'high' (provided the one on the fan isn't busted
completely). Now if you get a wall switch or remote control device, the
wires will have different colors, white, green or bare copper and probably
two more of black, red or blue. By code, the white is always the grounded
wire and the green or bare always is the grounding wire. The other two are
hot and connect to the fan or light.



> PS it is good to turn the power off before changing the switch.
> Especially if you have kids. When they hear cuss words they repeat
> them to Mommy. Don't ask me how I know this.

> <smiley>

no kidding turn off the frickin power at the service entrance before you
fool around with electricity. Kids learning to cuss will be the least of
your worries.

[rec.gardens]

Laidup@Home

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Jul 29, 2004, 3:27:43 PM7/29/04
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syt...@yahoo.com wrote:
> I've made some progress!!!. I was able to attach those other 2 wires
> to the switch and now I have high, medium, low but no "off". When I
> "hold" the chain after "low" I can hear the motor stop, but as soon as
> I let it go it starts to run again.
>
> Any advice?

Ya. Go take a flying fanny fuck at the moon.

TimR

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Jul 30, 2004, 3:07:03 AM7/30/04
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Salty Thumb <sa...@notsogreenthumb.fake> wrote in message news:<gjcOc.20441$PK5....@nwrddc02.gnilink.net>...

No, this is not correct, fan motors with pull chains don't work on a
rheostat, or anything similar. Fan switches are multiple position,
and one wire at a time is hot. I intended some humor with this reply,
but I actually did make that mistake once. When you get a fan apart
you'll see lots of wires - mine had four suspended lights plus of
course four or so fan wires, it takes care to get them all poked back
in.

>
> > PS it is good to turn the power off before changing the switch.
> > Especially if you have kids. When they hear cuss words they repeat
> > them to Mommy. Don't ask me how I know this.
>
> > <smiley>
>
> no kidding turn off the frickin power at the service entrance before you
> fool around with electricity. Kids learning to cuss will be the least of
> your worries.
>
> [rec.gardens]

That mistake I've never made. Don't just turn it off, get a meter and
do live/dead/live, and prove it is off. You should not touch a home
electrical repair, ever, even the simplest, without a meter. Turning
it off isn't good enough. You never know how bad the do-it-yourselfer
before you screwed it up, sometimes there's power in surprising
places. I got shocked once from a computer chassis, because some
moron wired the outlet backwards, and the LAN cable was hot instead of
grounded.

Salty Thumb

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Jul 30, 2004, 9:35:54 AM7/30/04
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timot...@aol.com (TimR) wrote in
news:87af0be7.0407...@posting.google.com:

Sorry, but that sounds ridiculous. I'm not an expert, but I have installed
5 ceiling fans in my life (and installed a couple of them more than once).
These were all modern fans, model year 2000 or higher. None of them had
any wires other than I mentioned. If your fan switch does indeed have
multiple wires, then where do they connect? You have one supply wire for
the fan. Connecting your multiple wires to the one supply wire (or the fan
motor) is tantamount to having one connection. If you have any splitting,
it would be much more economical (and idiot proof for the installer) to
have the splitting internal to the control device. I don't suppose the
fan you are talking about is a Hunter Original fan?



> That mistake I've never made. Don't just turn it off, get a meter and
> do live/dead/live, and prove it is off. You should not touch a home
> electrical repair, ever, even the simplest, without a meter. Turning
> it off isn't good enough. You never know how bad the do-it-yourselfer
> before you screwed it up, sometimes there's power in surprising

Good advice, although most of the cheap meters I have seen are only rated
for max 10 amps whereas household wiring can carry 15 or 20 amps. You
don't need to know how much electricity is flowing, just whether it is on
or off, which you can test with a relatively cheap light probe. But when
it comes to your life, it pays to be anal.

> places. I got shocked once from a computer chassis, because some
> moron wired the outlet backwards, and the LAN cable was hot instead of
> grounded.

And how exactly do you do that? I've also assembled my share of computers
and what you've typed makes no sense.

Michael Lyons

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Jul 30, 2004, 11:01:33 AM7/30/04
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"Salty Thumb" <sa...@notsogreenthumb.fake> wrote in message
news:_8sOc.21519$PK5....@nwrddc02.gnilink.net...
The previous poster was not talking about installing a fan, but replacing
the speed switch. Yes there is only one wire to supply power from the house
to the fan. But in many fans, there is a speed switch that has one wire that
bring electricity in and three that go out. They go to three different
windings (coils) in the fan motor itself.

>
> > That mistake I've never made. Don't just turn it off, get a meter and
> > do live/dead/live, and prove it is off. You should not touch a home
> > electrical repair, ever, even the simplest, without a meter. Turning
> > it off isn't good enough. You never know how bad the do-it-yourselfer
> > before you screwed it up, sometimes there's power in surprising
>
> Good advice, although most of the cheap meters I have seen are only rated
> for max 10 amps whereas household wiring can carry 15 or 20 amps. You
> don't need to know how much electricity is flowing, just whether it is on
> or off, which you can test with a relatively cheap light probe. But when
> it comes to your life, it pays to be anal.
>
If you are checking VOLTAGE, the number of AMPS running through your meter
is close to zero. Yes, I have blown the fuse in my meter once, but it was
because I got frustrated and accidently went to check a live circuit with
the meter set on resistance (OHMS). It stupidity, not price of the meter,
that was at fault.

> > places. I got shocked once from a computer chassis, because some
> > moron wired the outlet backwards, and the LAN cable was hot instead of
> > grounded.
>
> And how exactly do you do that? I've also assembled my share of computers
> and what you've typed makes no sense.

It makes perfect sense. He is talking about the house receptacle the
computer was plugged into. AC current works by one side doing a push/pull
cycle of electrons while the other side is grounded. As long a electricty is
flowing first one way and then the other at the proper rate, it usually
doesnt matter which side is the live one. I knew (not well) a guy who wired
in some lights for some illegal plants he was growing ih the basement. He
bypassed the electric company's meter (and in the process the breaker panel)
to save money. He later went to change a burnt out bulb while standing on a
damp cement floor in bare feet. If he hadn't switched the wires, he would be
alive today. He had the screw threads of the bulb socket live instead of the
little dot in the middle.


Salty Thumb

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Jul 30, 2004, 11:45:56 AM7/30/04
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"Michael Lyons" <lyo...@earthlink.net> wrote in
news:hptOc.2496$Jp6...@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net:

> The previous poster was not talking about installing a fan, but
> replacing the speed switch. Yes there is only one wire to supply power
> from the house to the fan. But in many fans, there is a speed switch
> that has one wire that bring electricity in and three that go out.
> They go to three different windings (coils) in the fan motor itself.

okay, in that case, it make sense. So between the supply and three output
wires to the fan motor, is the device called a rheostat or not? And if not
what is it called?

> If you are checking VOLTAGE, the number of AMPS running through your
> meter is close to zero. Yes, I have blown the fuse in my meter once,
> but it was because I got frustrated and accidently went to check a
> live circuit with the meter set on resistance (OHMS). It stupidity,
> not price of the meter, that was at fault.

Yet another reason to keep things simple.

>> > places. I got shocked once from a computer chassis, because some
>> > moron wired the outlet backwards, and the LAN cable was hot instead
>> > of grounded.
>>
>> And how exactly do you do that? I've also assembled my share of
>> computers and what you've typed makes no sense.
>
> It makes perfect sense. He is talking about the house receptacle the

okay that makes a little more sense. I was thinking he was refering to an
outlet on the computer and the times I considered rewiring an ATX plug for
a non-standard MB. I still don't see how having a live LAN cable can give
you shock unless it was coax instead of twisted pair.

Salty Thumb

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Jul 30, 2004, 12:13:52 PM7/30/04
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Salty Thumb <sa...@notsogreenthumb.fake> wrote in
news:U2uOc.118$QA5...@nwrddc01.gnilink.net:

> "Michael Lyons" <lyo...@earthlink.net> wrote in
> news:hptOc.2496$Jp6...@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net:
>
>> The previous poster was not talking about installing a fan, but
>> replacing the speed switch. Yes there is only one wire to supply
>> power from the house to the fan. But in many fans, there is a speed
>> switch that has one wire that bring electricity in and three that go
>> out. They go to three different windings (coils) in the fan motor
>> itself.
>
> okay, in that case, it make sense. So between the supply and three
> output wires to the fan motor, is the device called a rheostat or not?
> And if not what is it called?


never mind. if you have one of those that connects to different windings
on the motor, I suppose that's just a switch. duh.

TimR

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Aug 1, 2004, 5:39:00 AM8/1/04
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Salty Thumb <sa...@notsogreenthumb.fake> wrote in message news:<U2uOc.118$QA5...@nwrddc01.gnilink.net>...

<snip>

> >> And how exactly do you do that? I've also assembled my share of
> >> computers and what you've typed makes no sense.
> >
> > It makes perfect sense. He is talking about the house receptacle the
>
> okay that makes a little more sense. I was thinking he was refering to an
> outlet on the computer and the times I considered rewiring an ATX plug for
> a non-standard MB. I still don't see how having a live LAN cable can give
> you shock unless it was coax instead of twisted pair.


Yes, I didn't explain that well.

The outlet in the wall was wired so that the normal hot was neutral
and vice versa. The circuit was run in thinwall electrical conduit
with no separate ground wire (the EMT was serving as ground) IIRC.
(It's been a while.)

The metal chassis of the computer should have been at ground. But it
was hot. The computer ran fine, all it cares about is 110 VAC.

The LAN cable was twin-ax, two connectors covered by a coaxial shield,
with nice big metal end connectors. So the shield and connector at
this PC was hot. The next PC on the network was at proper ground, so
its shield and connector were at ground. The two LAN cables were
hooked together in the middle with a double female barrel connector,
so when I connected them I had a hot metal connector in my left hand
and a grounded one in my right hand, and got that old familiar tingle.

Had they been power wires I would have tested with a meter first, but
who ever thinks of a network line carrying power?

Stormin Mormon

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Aug 4, 2004, 7:35:21 PM8/4/04
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Use bungee cords to secure fan blades to ceiling. Use large eye screws.

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<Laidup@Home> wrote in message news:Z6qdnaXFocP...@comcast.com...

Steve-o

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Jul 30, 2021, 3:01:14 PM7/30/21
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This proves Darwin's Theory again.

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TimR

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Oct 6, 2021, 11:14:56 AM10/6/21
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On Friday, July 30, 2021 at 3:01:14 PM UTC-4, Steve-o wrote:
> This proves Darwin's Theory again.

You're replying to a 17 year old thread. But i will too, because there has been a new development.

In 2004 I posted this:
> When you go to Home Depot and buy the replacement fan switch, you're
> going to notice it has several wires.
>
> They are different colors.
>
> I do not know what colors they are because I am color blind. The
> result is that my ceiling fan does not go High, then Medium, then Low
> like most. It goes High, Low, Medium. If you know what the chances
> are of that combination, you are way too good at math.

But this year one of my children, now an adult, moved into a new bedroom, and asked me how to get the ceiling fan to the right speed. I pulled the chain, and informed her that ceiling fans are always setup High, Medium, Low.

She reminded me that the one in our old house did not work that way. Ouch!
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