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Replaced Ice Maker How Long For It To Produce Ice?

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Cha...@gmail.com

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Jun 20, 2006, 10:07:37 AM6/20/06
to
My old ice maker (Whirlpool) stopped making ice. Prior to it not
making ice it had started to make an intermittent creaking noise but
made good ice. After a few months of creaking it then stopped getting
water. I tested the module and found there was no voltage to the water
valve during the 7.5 seconds during the cycle that it is supposed to
send water to the ice maker. Last night I replaced the ice maker (the
whole unit inside the freezer compartment) with a new one I picked up
from Lowes (only $50...quite a deal compared to some online sites like
repairclinic.com that wanted over $100)...the model was ECKMF94. It
was an easy swap out of just three screws and plugging in the wiring
assembly.

Question is this: how long should it be before the new unit delivers
water to the ice maker?

After 13 hours (checked before I went to work) the ice maker still had
no water. Is the 24 hour period mentioned in the installation manual
for it start producing ice that hits the ice bucket or when it should
first state getting water to make ice?

Steve B

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Jun 20, 2006, 11:00:32 AM6/20/06
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<Cha...@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1150812457.5...@r2g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...

Usually a month


Bob

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Jun 20, 2006, 11:20:19 AM6/20/06
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Aaaahhhh, did you turn the water back on?

tra...@optonline.net

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Jun 20, 2006, 11:28:56 AM6/20/06
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There should be water going into the tray immediately and if the
freezer is at normal temp, you should have ice in an hour or two.

jerry...@hotmail.com

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Jun 20, 2006, 12:27:47 PM6/20/06
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Cha...@gmail.com wrote:

> After 13 hours (checked before I went to work) the ice maker still had
> no water. Is the 24 hour period mentioned in the installation manual
> for it start producing ice that hits the ice bucket or when it should
> first state getting water to make ice?

Did you lower the arm to the icemaking position?

Jerry

Edwin Pawlowski

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Jun 20, 2006, 1:10:20 PM6/20/06
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<tra...@optonline.net> wrote in message
news:1150817336.0...@b68g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

> There should be water going into the tray immediately and if the
> freezer is at normal temp, you should have ice in an hour or two.
>

You would think that, but now always true. I replaced mine and it did not
work. I was PO'd and it was getting late. I went to bed and the next
morning I found that the ice fairly delivered a bunch. No idea why, but it
took about 12 hours for it to start functioning.


Chazzum

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Jun 20, 2006, 1:16:34 PM6/20/06
to

jerry...@hotmail.com wrote:

>
> Did you lower the arm to the icemaking position?
>
> Jerry

Yes, of course.

To the guy that asked if I turned the water on: yes it is on.

Chazzum

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Jun 20, 2006, 1:19:49 PM6/20/06
to

Edwin;

Thanks for the info. I'm hoping to find ice when I get home. If not,
next step will be to replace the water valve (one came with the kit)
and water line. I'm trying to avoid fiddling with the water line
though.

Chazzum

hal...@aol.com

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Jun 20, 2006, 3:04:24 PM6/20/06
to
water vallve was probably bad

Chazzum

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Jun 20, 2006, 5:23:20 PM6/20/06
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hal...@aol.com wrote:
> water vallve was probably bad

I appreciate the advice but if the water valve was bad shouldn't I
still get a voltage reading to it on the module's test holes N and V
during the fill cycle? It's now been 24 hours with no ice so I ran the
new unit through a cycle and it is also not reading any voltage on N
and V during the fill cycle. I think you may be correct about the
water valve since the new module isn't getting water but don't
understand why I'm not getting a voltage reading during the fill cycle.

TIA

Jeff Wisnia

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Jun 20, 2006, 6:35:14 PM6/20/06
to


I sure hope that the original solenoid valve didn't fail in a shorted
coil mode and take out some component like a triac in both the old and
the new icemakers.

I don't know that much about present day icemakers, 'cause the one in
our old GE fridge uses mechanical contacts on the motor drive to switch
and time the voltage to the valve. I've had to clean up those contacts
once or twice already when they got grotty and wouldn't conduct when
they should.

I'm just suspecting that since everything else in appliances has gone
electronic, maybe your icemaker is made that way too.

Can you disconnect the valve's coil leads and make a measurement of it's
resistance, comparing that to the unused new valve's coil? That might
tell you something.

Jeff

--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
"Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength."

PipeDown

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Jun 20, 2006, 7:15:10 PM6/20/06
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"Edwin Pawlowski" <e...@snet.net> wrote in message
news:0_Vlg.5544$d9.74@trndny04...

Some ice makers do double duty as the timer for the defrost cycle and run on
a long schedual instead of on demand. Usually there is a hole to advance
the clock if it is this style and if you turn the knob inside you can cycle
through the paces. In any case it may have filled already and you are just
waiting for it to eject the ice. have you looked in the tray. If not maybe
you need to replace the solenoid as well.


PipeDown

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Jun 20, 2006, 7:24:20 PM6/20/06
to

"Chazzum" <Cha...@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1150838600....@p79g2000cwp.googlegroups.com...

If a load (the solenoid) is a dead short, you will read no voltage across it
even if the source (module) is still outputting a signal.

Unplug the solenoid. measure the voltage on the wire from the module during
the fill cycle. If it is 0V all the time, the new module is defective or
improperly installed. If you get voltage when you expect it diring the fill
cycle, then the module is probably OK

Measure the resistance of the solenoid. If it is open or shorted then it is
bad. Not sure what you should get but 100 to 2000 ohms is reasonable.

Connect a light bulb to in place of the solenoid, it should go on during the
fill cycle.

The solenoid may just be plugged with crud or it may be electrically failed.
Electrically speaking see advice above. Mechanically speaking, it would
appear to be electrically functional but still no water gets through. You
should be able to hear the solenoid click when it opens.

Anyway, it is a cheaper part than the module and probably easier to replace
than to debug it or repair it (clean out any crud). Just get a new one,
should be a 15min job if the tubing cooperates.


hal...@aol.com

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Jun 20, 2006, 10:14:03 PM6/20/06
to
I had flakey ice maker operation it finally quit.

I cheated a little connected solenoid valve to ole power cord, and
plugged it in looked for water in tray, it does not take long to fill.


turn valve off to solenoid valve, unscrew supply line, have someone
hold it in bucket while valve is turned on as test, this test assures
water is available

Chazzum

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Jun 20, 2006, 10:24:15 PM6/20/06
to
I really appreciate the well thought out and explained responses.

I took PipeDown's advice and ran the resistance and voltage tests.

The resistance on the exising water inlet valve (aka, solenoid) was
around 380 ohms. The new one that came with the ice maker kit (model #
ECKMF94) was around 220 ohms. I also cycled the ice maker and tested
the voltage at the solenoid to see if it was getting any volts and it
wasn't (or at least my voltmeter didn't read any...I was jury rigging
the test probes and contact may not have been all that good). I then
decided that since I had a new water inlet valve I might as well
install it and see what happened. I also wanted to check if the water
line was flowing properly. I had resisted this step as I'd have to
undo the compression nut and didn't want the hassle of it not working
after I reconnected. Anyways, the water flow thru the supply line was
good so that ruled that out as the culprit. I then proceeded to
connect the new inlet valve, and hooked up the water supply line.
Luckily, the compression nut was plastic, somewhat flexible and not
overtightened when I hooked the line up 11 years ago so I had no
problems with leaks after I reconnected it to the new inlet valve (I
will keep a close eye on it for a few days to make sure it isn't
leaking just in case).

Fingers crossed I plugged the fridge in and immediately noticed the ice
maker was cycling. As it got to the water valve part of the cycle it
didn't work and I felt defeated and frustrated...I was about to call it
a night when I heard the water valve click on and water, precious
water, filled the ice maker. I noticed the inlet valve cycled at about
1 PM on the dial and not around 10 - 11 AM as indicated here:
http://www.american-appliance.com/service_pages/Ice_Maker/modualimdiag.htm

Once again, thanks everyone for the helpful posts. My advice, for $50
(even less...around $40 on ebay), if your Whirlpool ice maker bites the
dust, replace the entire works (inlet valve and ice maker unit) as
testing didn't seem to reveal the real problem here.

hal...@aol.com

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Jun 21, 2006, 6:56:02 AM6/21/06
to
Glad it all worked out! Your experience was like mine solenoid valve
bit the dust.

I am a office machine service tech for a living, this discussion made
me realize that although I use meters and other test equiptement I
prefer to swap parts when possible since its more reliable........

DaRa

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Mar 29, 2016, 9:44:07 AM3/29/16
to
replying to Chazzum, DaRa wrote:
You tested water valve to be bad. Why change out ice maker when valve is
culprit?

--
posted from
http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/replaced-ice-maker-how-long-for-it-to-produce-ice-121186-.htm
using HomeOwnersHub's Web, Mobile and Social Media Interface to
alt.home.repair and other home improvement groups

DerbyDad03

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Mar 29, 2016, 10:20:43 AM3/29/16
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On Tuesday, March 29, 2016 at 9:44:07 AM UTC-4, DaRa wrote:
> replying to Chazzum, DaRa wrote:
> You tested water valve to be bad. Why change out ice maker when valve is
> culprit?
>

A ten year old thread, but still a valid question. :-)

Come on, Chazzum, fess up!

Oren

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Mar 29, 2016, 5:44:04 PM3/29/16
to
Recon air in the water supply line was purged?

JimmyB

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May 21, 2016, 2:44:05 PM5/21/16
to
replying to Chazzum, JimmyB wrote:
The unit needs to get to 15deg before it will add water for ice, this could
take 24-26 hrs

Oren

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May 21, 2016, 3:44:01 PM5/21/16
to
On Sat, 21 May 2016 18:44:01 +0000, JimmyB
<caedfaa9ed1216d60e...@example.com> wrote:

>The unit needs to get to 15deg before it will add water for ice, this could
>take 24-26 hrs

Golly. Ice will not produce until the mold is cold enough. Then the
heater do jigger tosses it into the bucket.

I love America.

trader_4

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May 21, 2016, 8:08:45 PM5/21/16
to
IDK how long it will take to get to 15F, but unless the freezer is loaded
full of warm stuff, I doubt it will take 24 hours. Also, I have doubts
about the 15F before it *adds* water for ice. Makes no sense to me.
I thought the process was mold gets filled with water, once a sensor
detects that the mold has dropped well below freezing (maybe that's the 15F)
indicating the cubes are hard, it turns on a heater, loosens them up,
pushes them out, then the mold refills.

DerbyDad03

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May 21, 2016, 8:47:38 PM5/21/16
to
Stolen without permission from:

http://products.geappliances.com/appliance/gea-support-search-content?contentId=17402

"New Icemaker Not Producing Ice:

If the refrigerator icemaker has just been installed, there are a few things that must happen before it can produce ice:

- The refrigerator and icemaker must be at proper temperature.
- If just installed, the icemaker itself could take 24 hours to get
cold enough to produce ice.
- The icemaker must reach 15 degrees F before a cycle will begin."

Oren

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May 22, 2016, 4:53:29 PM5/22/16
to
I cheated. Added water to the mold that got cold faster.

IDK why the OP needs a low temp to fill the mold. Supply line or chute
frozen? Hairdryer :)

trader_4

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May 23, 2016, 8:24:45 AM5/23/16
to
I didn't think it needed the low temp to fill either. I thought it needed
the low temp to form the ice and eject. I thought the temp switch just
halted the process short of heating and ejecting, But Derby posted what GE
says and at least for their's it requires 15F to fill. Why they do it that
way, IDK. It would seem to only complicate things, because first it has
to stop and wait for 15F, then it has to fill and then stop again and wait
for 15F (indicating ice has formed) and then proceed.

Mustang61

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Jul 31, 2016, 11:14:04 PM7/31/16
to
replying to Chazzum, Mustang61 wrote:
no it does not tell you anything

--
for full context, visit http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/replaced-ice-maker-how-long-for-it-to-produce-ice-121186-.htm


DerbyDad03

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Aug 1, 2016, 7:07:27 AM8/1/16
to
On Sunday, July 31, 2016 at 11:14:04 PM UTC-4, Mustang61 wrote:
> replying to Chazzum, Mustang61 wrote:
> no it does not tell you anything
>


...and the 2006 date on the post obviously didn't tell you anything.

Shana

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Dec 19, 2020, 1:35:08 AM12/19/20
to
Hi, I just had a new ice maker installed yesterday. Not getting water. Today I had plumber and he showed me the valve was bad. He replaced it with a new one. That was half hour ago so I’m waiting for that lovely kerplunk sound. 267.00 later. I must reeeaaaaly hate ice cube trays.

--
For full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/replaced-ice-maker-how-long-for-it-to-produce-ice-121186-.htm

micky

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Dec 19, 2020, 8:30:41 AM12/19/20
to
In alt.home.repair, on Sat, 19 Dec 2020 06:35:02 +0000, Shana
<9b59cd3597933e9a...@example.com> wrote:

>Hi, I just had a new ice maker installed yesterday. Not getting water. Today I had plumber and he showed me the valve was bad. He replaced it with a new one. That was half hour ago so I’m waiting for that lovely kerplunk sound. 267.00 later. I must reeeaaaaly hate ice cube trays.

What does 267.00 later mean?

Ice takes several hours to make.

Ed Pawlowski

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Dec 19, 2020, 10:27:32 AM12/19/20
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$267.00 What she spent to fix it.

gfre...@aol.com

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Dec 19, 2020, 4:34:36 PM12/19/20
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$40 part, $227 labor.

micky

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Dec 19, 2020, 8:54:53 PM12/19/20
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In alt.home.repair, on Sat, 19 Dec 2020 10:27:22 -0500, Ed Pawlowski
Oh, yeah, of course.

She must really hate ice cube trays.

I never met an ice cube tray I could really get close to.

trader_4

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Dec 20, 2020, 8:30:59 AM12/20/20
to
It could take hours for the first ice following a repair like that, because the freezer needs to
first get down close to normal temperature. If it usually makes ice in an hour after
the ice maker activates, could take many hours for the first batch following the repair.
So give it some time and don't get worried.


gfre...@aol.com

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Dec 20, 2020, 11:36:47 AM12/20/20
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Why is that? The freezer door does not have to be open to replace the
valve. It is in the back of the fridge. Most of the thermal mass is in
the stuff you put in the freezer anyway. If that thawed out you have
bigger problems. When I am screwing with an icemaker, I yank it out
and that only takes a minute or so. (loosen 3 screws and unplug a
cable on a Whirlpool, amana,kenmore etc). I always have a hot spare
ready to go and I fix the old one on the bench or just chuck it,. They
only cost about $40.
I am nursing 4 of them along (2 at my house, 2 at my FILs) so I have
some experience on them.

trader_4

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Dec 20, 2020, 1:48:37 PM12/20/20
to
On Sunday, December 20, 2020 at 11:36:47 AM UTC-5, gfre...@aol.com wrote:
> On Sun, 20 Dec 2020 05:30:53 -0800 (PST), trader_4
> <tra...@optonline.net> wrote:
>
> >On Saturday, December 19, 2020 at 1:35:08 AM UTC-5, Shana wrote:
> >> Hi, I just had a new ice maker installed yesterday. Not getting water. Today I had plumber and he showed me the valve was bad. He replaced it with a new one. That was half hour ago so I’m waiting for that lovely kerplunk sound. 267.00 later. I must reeeaaaaly hate ice cube trays.
> >>
> >> --
> >> For full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/replaced-ice-maker-how-long-for-it-to-produce-ice-121186-.htm
> >
> >It could take hours for the first ice following a repair like that, because the freezer needs to
> >first get down close to normal temperature. If it usually makes ice in an hour after
> >the ice maker activates, could take many hours for the first batch following the repair.
> >So give it some time and don't get worried.
> >
> Why is that? The freezer door does not have to be open to replace the
> valve.

Title of thread:

"Replaced Ice Maker How Long For It To Produce Ice?"





It is in the back of the fridge. Most of the thermal mass is in
> the stuff you put in the freezer anyway. If that thawed out you have
> bigger problems. When I am screwing with an icemaker, I yank it out
> and that only takes a minute or so.

Since it's AHR and DIY I figure many people aren't going to be able to change an ice
maker in minute. If they can do it fast, then I agree, ice making can resume faster
than if it's open for an hour. I was just pointing out that if it takes longer than usual
for the first batch, this is a factor and not to get worried prematurely.








gfre...@aol.com

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Dec 20, 2020, 7:43:49 PM12/20/20
to
On Sun, 20 Dec 2020 10:48:31 -0800 (PST), trader_4
<tra...@optonline.net> wrote:

>On Sunday, December 20, 2020 at 11:36:47 AM UTC-5, gfre...@aol.com wrote:
>> On Sun, 20 Dec 2020 05:30:53 -0800 (PST), trader_4
>> <tra...@optonline.net> wrote:
>>
>> >On Saturday, December 19, 2020 at 1:35:08 AM UTC-5, Shana wrote:
>> >> Hi, I just had a new ice maker installed yesterday. Not getting water. Today I had plumber and he showed me the valve was bad. He replaced it with a new one. That was half hour ago so I’m waiting for that lovely kerplunk sound. 267.00 later. I must reeeaaaaly hate ice cube trays.
>> >>
>> >> --
>> >> For full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/replaced-ice-maker-how-long-for-it-to-produce-ice-121186-.htm
>> >
>> >It could take hours for the first ice following a repair like that, because the freezer needs to
>> >first get down close to normal temperature. If it usually makes ice in an hour after
>> >the ice maker activates, could take many hours for the first batch following the repair.
>> >So give it some time and don't get worried.
>> >
>> Why is that? The freezer door does not have to be open to replace the
>> valve.
>
>Title of thread:
>
>"Replaced Ice Maker How Long For It To Produce Ice?"
>
I guess you missed the "yesterday" part.

It had been a half hour after the valve was replaced.

>It is in the back of the fridge. Most of the thermal mass is in
>> the stuff you put in the freezer anyway. If that thawed out you have
>> bigger problems. When I am screwing with an icemaker, I yank it out
>> and that only takes a minute or so.
>
>Since it's AHR and DIY I figure many people aren't going to be able to change an ice
>maker in minute. If they can do it fast, then I agree, ice making can resume faster
>than if it's open for an hour. I was just pointing out that if it takes longer than usual
>for the first batch, this is a factor and not to get worried prematurely.
>

She said "had it replaced". Since she paid all that money, I was
assuming a pro did the work.
The only thing that really needs to cool down is the tray and that
gets heated up in every batch.
The best way to see if it is working is to stick your finger in there
and see if it is full of water.
>
>
>
>

Snag

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Dec 20, 2020, 9:26:17 PM12/20/20
to
Sounds about right , and that's why I do all my own repairs . Only
thing I won't (usually) work on is an automatic transmission .
To the OP (if he/she's still around) throw the first 3 or 4 trays of
ice out . Likely to have crud in it .
--
Snag

Bob F

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Dec 21, 2020, 12:29:38 AM12/21/20
to
+1

Jim Joyce

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Dec 21, 2020, 10:33:14 AM12/21/20
to
On Sun, 20 Dec 2020 20:26:09 -0600, Snag <snag...@msn.com> wrote:

>On 12/19/2020 3:34 PM, gfre...@aol.com wrote:
>> On Sat, 19 Dec 2020 10:27:22 -0500, Ed Pawlowski <e...@snet.xxx> wrote:
>>
>>> On 12/19/2020 8:30 AM, micky wrote:
>>>> In alt.home.repair, on Sat, 19 Dec 2020 06:35:02 +0000, Shana
>>>> <9b59cd3597933e9a...@example.com> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Hi, I just had a new ice maker installed yesterday. Not getting water. Today I had plumber and he showed me the valve was bad. He replaced it with a new one. That was half hour ago so I’m waiting for that lovely kerplunk sound. 267.00 later. I must reeeaaaaly hate ice cube trays.
>>>>
>>>> What does 267.00 later mean?
>>>>
>>>> Ice takes several hours to make.
>>>>
>>>
>>> $267.00 What she spent to fix it.
>>
>> $40 part, $227 labor.
>>
>
> Sounds about right , and that's why I do all my own repairs . Only
>thing I won't (usually) work on is an automatic transmission .

The guys on Garage Squad make it look easy and take a lot of the mystery
out of it. Get a rebuild kit consisting of new seals and gaskets, then
crack the transmission open. Inspect the clutch pack, replacing any discs
that are worn or burnt, clean the crud out of the oil passages, and
reassemble using the new seals and gaskets. Through the magic of
television, it only seems to take a couple of hours, max.

> To the OP (if he/she's still around) throw the first 3 or 4 trays of
>ice out . Likely to have crud in it .

Still good for chilling beer. Not so good for dropping into a drink.

gfre...@aol.com

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Dec 21, 2020, 1:16:06 PM12/21/20
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On Mon, 21 Dec 2020 09:33:07 -0600, Jim Joyce <no...@none.invalid>
wrote:
If you wash out the tray on the new icemaker, there is nothing wrong
with the ice that comes out.

James

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Feb 18, 2021, 2:15:08 PM2/18/21
to
Thanks asshole

Ed Pawlowski

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Feb 18, 2021, 3:08:29 PM2/18/21
to
On 2/18/2021 2:15 PM, James wrote:
> Thanks asshole
>

You are missing a comma after thanks. It should be:
Thanks, asshole

Now we know it is you when properly signed.
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