key broke off in Taylor deadbolt

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Saperstein

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Nov 25, 2021, 9:41:30 AM11/25/21
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I have a "Jimmy resistant" Taylor deadbolt lock that I have been using
for years on one of my doors. It has sometimes been tough to open and
close and I used graphite last year which helped and I just hadn't
gotten around to redoing it this year. When I used the key to open it
last night however, I noticed that the key had partially broken over the
portion beyond the lock. The tare was quite bad, about halfway across
the key width and I thought I would try and solder the sections. It
seemed to solder, but when I tried to use it again, the key handle broke
off leaving the remainder in the lock. I have two questions:

1) Is it possible to extract the broken section from the lock and, if
so, how?

2) Is it possible to get a replacement key somewhere? I doubt anything
could be made from this broken one now.

Thank you.

Bob F

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Nov 25, 2021, 10:45:03 AM11/25/21
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Probably -
Disassemble the lock assembly and remove the key cylinder assembly.
Tap it against something to get the key out - or
Take it to a locksmith.

Ed Pawlowski

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Nov 25, 2021, 10:47:20 AM11/25/21
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If you can get the part out a locksmith can probably cut a new key.
Some locks/key have serial numbers and the manufacturer can sell you one.

Can you disassemble the lock from inside? If you take that section to a
locksmith he may have something for extraction. OTOH, at that point may
be best to buy new.

Dean Hoffman

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Nov 25, 2021, 10:53:04 AM11/25/21
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I don't know the answers. Consumer Reports has these rated. I picked the ones
under $100.
Yale Premier YH82. Rating 83. $100
Kwikset 980 Rating 80. $30
Baldwin Prestige. Rating 80. $40
Falcon D241 Rating 75 $55
Falcon D100 Series D141. Rating 69. $75
The top one resists drilling better than the rest. It doesn't resist picking as well as the next
two. The second and third ones resist picking really well.

Four locks got the top rating of 96.
Medico Maxim. 11TR503-19. $230
Medico Maxim. 11*603 $190
Abloy ProTech 2. ME153. $350
Mul-T-Lock MT5+Hercular. $180

gfre...@aol.com

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Nov 25, 2021, 11:43:02 AM11/25/21
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On Thu, 25 Nov 2021 09:41:23 -0500, Saperstein <no...@nowhere.com>
wrote:
If you pull the lock cylinder out you can usually push the broken key
out from the back with a paper clip. At that point it might be easier
to buy a new cylinder than to get a key made from the broken part but
you could try.
Then fix the bind in the assembly before you break another one. I bet
it is in the bolt, not the cylinder. It probably doesn't line up with
the hole in the strike. That may actually be the other (spring) latch
not holding it in position.

bud--

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Nov 25, 2021, 11:55:13 PM11/25/21
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On 11/25/2021 10:40 AM, gfre...@aol.com wrote:
> On Thu, 25 Nov 2021 09:41:23 -0500, Saperstein <no...@nowhere.com>
> wrote:
>
>> I have a "Jimmy resistant" Taylor deadbolt lock that I have been using
>> for years on one of my doors. It has sometimes been tough to open and
>> close and I used graphite last year which helped and I just hadn't
>> gotten around to redoing it this year. When I used the key to open it
>> last night however, I noticed that the key had partially broken over the
>> portion beyond the lock. The tare was quite bad, about halfway across
>> the key width and I thought I would try and solder the sections. It
>> seemed to solder, but when I tried to use it again, the key handle broke
>> off leaving the remainder in the lock. I have two questions:
>>
>> 1) Is it possible to extract the broken section from the lock and, if
>> so, how?
>>
>> 2) Is it possible to get a replacement key somewhere? I doubt anything
>> could be made from this broken one now.
>>
>> Thank you.
>
> If you pull the lock cylinder out you can usually push the broken key
> out from the back with a paper clip. At that point it might be easier
> to buy a new cylinder than to get a key made from the broken part but
> you could try.

Replacing the cylinder may be cheapest and easiest.

Pushing from the back with a paper clip may (or may not) have a problem
with pins blocking the broken key from being pushed out. Pins in front
of the broken key can be lifted, another paper clip, at the same time as
pushing.

There are broken key extractors. I suggest taking the cylinder to a
locksmith.
<https://www.wikihow.com/Remove-a-Broken-Key>

A locksmith can likely make a new key from the pieces.

I would not expect solder to be reliable to repair a tear.

I have used graphite. But in a good usenet locksmith group, now
inactive, a common recommendation was Tri-Flow. Not sure I would mix
graphite and Tri-Flow.

> Then fix the bind in the assembly before you break another one. I bet
> it is in the bolt, not the cylinder. It probably doesn't line up with
> the hole in the strike. That may actually be the other (spring) latch
> not holding it in position.
>
Another possibility is key/pin wear. Wiggling the key up and down may
make a key work (for a while).

Rod Speed

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Nov 26, 2021, 12:06:25 AM11/26/21
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bud-- <nu...@void.com> wrote

> I have used graphite. But in a good usenet locksmith group, now inactive,
> a common recommendation was Tri-Flow.

Why did they claim that it was better than graphite ?

You basically need something that doesn’t end up with dirt in the cylinder.


Peeler

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Nov 26, 2021, 3:29:12 AM11/26/21
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On Fri, 26 Nov 2021 16:06:13 +1100, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Speed, the auto-contradicting senile sociopath, blabbered, again:

<FLUSH the abnormal trolling senile cretin's latest trollshit unread>

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skin of folk who really should know better.
Since when did arguing with a troll ever achieve anything (beyond giving
the troll pleasure)?
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Wade Garrett

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Nov 26, 2021, 7:56:15 AM11/26/21
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I saw an Instagram/Youtube video that showed extracting a broken-off key
from a lock using a common fingernail clipper. First remove the
clipper's lever handle and pivot pin and then close the jaws of the
clipper on the tiny bit of the key still sticking out then pull.

--
Can someone update me on what's offensive today? It's so hard to keep up.

Bob F

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Nov 26, 2021, 12:26:23 PM11/26/21
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On 11/25/2021 6:41 AM, Saperstein wrote:
I can never understand why anyone would not have a backup key. When I
get a new lock or lock re-keyed, I always stash one of the origional
keys in my safe as a master for future key duplication. Even using a
used key to for making a new one gets you an already worn new key. Using
your only key till it won't work the lock anymore is a serious mistake.

rbowman

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Nov 26, 2021, 12:32:04 PM11/26/21
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I've got a selection of those pointy torture devices dentists use. They
come in handy for fishing things out of tight spaces. The ranch store
usually has a jar of assorted types for a buck apiece.

Peeler

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Nov 26, 2021, 12:49:20 PM11/26/21
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On Fri, 26 Nov 2021 10:31:59 -0700, lowbrowwoman, the endlessly driveling,
troll-feeding, senile idiot, blabbered again:


> I've got a selection of those pointy torture devices dentists use. They
> come in handy for fishing things out of tight spaces. The ranch store
> usually has a jar of assorted types for a buck apiece.

COOOOOOL! <BG>

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but they are useful in marshaling [sic] my thoughts."
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micky

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Nov 26, 2021, 4:21:11 PM11/26/21
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In alt.home.repair, on Thu, 25 Nov 2021 22:53:31 -0600, bud--
If you want a project, you might be able to make an extractor tool like
thos in the url from a broken hacksaw blade. Especially if you can't
find them for sale, and cheaper too. I used to make lock picks that
way, and they worked fairly well (but broke much sooner than real ones
made from springier steel would have, but in your case, it only has to
work once.)

Like those in the url would be harder because you have to get under the
hook that is made, though you wouldn't have to go nearly as deep as the
ones in the picture. You're not catching a fish so even a millimeter
might well be enough to make a point that would catch on one of the
teeth. It's not like the tooth is soft -- the hook will not go into it.

I only had a grinder when I would make mine but I'd use an angle grinder
to make the indentation.

I started collecting springier steel, like the strap that held a picture
tube in place, but never got around to making lockpicks from what I had.


>A locksmith can likely make a new key from the pieces.
>
>I would not expect solder to be reliable to repair a tear.

Me neither. Not even for 5 seconds to extract something.
>
>I have used graphite. But in a good usenet locksmith group, now
>inactive, a common recommendation was Tri-Flow. Not sure I would mix
>graphite and Tri-Flow.

Never heard of Tri-flow. I hope I remember the word if I ever need it.

micky

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Nov 26, 2021, 4:30:04 PM11/26/21
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In alt.home.repair, on Fri, 26 Nov 2021 07:56:06 -0500, Wade Garrett
Very good.

As an aside, they make clippers with curved and straight jaws, I guess
for curved and straight toes.

I got one that was cheap but seemed reallly high quality. Beautiful
finish. I think it was made for some other market, like party favours
for rich people, and then sold on Amazon later. It was curved twice,
back to front and top to bottom. Never saw that before. Like for a
woman's small fingers.

Too bad, they're sold out, probably because they were some sort of
special order in the first place.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07ZQ3HWG7

TimR

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Nov 26, 2021, 6:16:35 PM11/26/21
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On Friday, November 26, 2021 at 4:21:11 PM UTC-5, micky wrote:
> >I have used graphite. But in a good usenet locksmith group, now
> >inactive, a common recommendation was Tri-Flow. Not sure I would mix
> >graphite and Tri-Flow.
> Never heard of Tri-flow. I hope I remember the word if I ever need it.

Graphite and humidity sometimes makes concrete. I've been using the Tri-flow or similar silicone lube since that discussion. Some people
swear by graphite though so i dunno.

My kids got a piece of wood stuck in a lock once trying to pick it. Once i got it out of the door it wasn't hard to disassemble. Actually it was a bit too easy and I ended up spilling the pins. Use care if you go that route. If you get the pieces of key out, a locksmith can measure the bitting and cut a new key, he doesn't have to use that pantograph thingie.

But I think it would be cheaper to throw it away and buy new.

Bob F

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Nov 26, 2021, 6:28:53 PM11/26/21
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The best free source of spring steel for picks is to watch by the curb
when you walk the dog for broken off street sweeper "brushes". Usually,
about 8" long and 1/8" - 1/4" wide.

bud--

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Nov 26, 2021, 11:35:48 PM11/26/21
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In my notes from the newsgroup no one really says why it works better.

About all I see is it contains teflon (which is highly recommended) and
is low viscosity to go and carry teflon deep into a lock.

Also can find locksmith recommendations on the internet with not much
more information than above.

Manufacturer says:
"a superior, light viscosity lube that allows for deep penetration into
hard to reach moving parts. The aerosol spray action allows you to have
a focused spray for even application. High-grade petroleum oils provide
optimum lubrication under extreme temperatures (-60 to 475̊F) and
humidity. Formulated solvents soften and remove dirt and contaminants,
while special additives displace moisture and prevent rust and
corrosion. Formulated with P.T.F.E."

Rod Speed

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Nov 26, 2021, 11:49:25 PM11/26/21
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bud-- <nu...@void.com> wrote
> Rod Speed wrote
>> bud-- <nu...@void.com> wrote

>>> I have used graphite. But in a good usenet locksmith group, now
>>> inactive, a common recommendation was Tri-Flow.
>>
>> Why did they claim that it was better than graphite ?
>>
>> You basically need something that doesn’t end up with dirt in the
>> cylinder.
>>
>>
> In my notes from the newsgroup no one really says why it works better.
>
> About all I see is it contains teflon (which is highly recommended) and is
> low viscosity to go and carry teflon deep into a lock.
>
> Also can find locksmith recommendations on the internet with not much more
> information than above.
>
> Manufacturer says:
> "a superior, light viscosity lube that allows for deep penetration into
> hard to reach moving parts. The aerosol spray action allows you to have a
> focused spray for even application. High-grade petroleum oils provide
> optimum lubrication under extreme temperatures (-60 to 475̊F) and
> humidity. Formulated solvents soften and remove dirt and contaminants,

I guess that bit is better than graphite can do.

> while special additives displace moisture and prevent rust and corrosion.

But will attract dust and dirt. Graphite doesn’t.

> Formulated with P.T.F.E."

I have used only graphite and it has worked fine every time.

Peeler

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Nov 27, 2021, 5:14:05 AM11/27/21
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On Sat, 27 Nov 2021 15:49:13 +1100, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Speed, the auto-contradicting senile sociopath, blabbered, again:

<FLUSH the abnormal trolling senile cretin's latest trollshit unread>

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micky

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Nov 28, 2021, 5:32:57 AM11/28/21
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In alt.home.repair, on Fri, 26 Nov 2021 15:28:44 -0800, Bob F
Good suggestion. Although no dog, no street sweeper. And no more locks
to pick, at least for me.

The last time I picked one, and the only time I picked one that wasn't
my own lock, it was the faculty club in college. I went in the back
door and down the steps to the commisary, the pantry, opened the lock
with a pick, and took, that is, stole a can of something. Like many
people of that age, I rationalized I wasn't doing it for the food but to
prove I could do it. And that was true, but I could have just locked
the lock back up without taking even one can.

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