Wave "Dehumidifier" -- Has anyone here tried it?

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Ivan

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May 26, 2010, 8:30:49 PM5/26/10
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I live in an area with a high water table, and my basement gets quite
humid; it recently flooded when the sump pump failed. The basement
area is about 1300 to 1500 sq ft, and is divided into rooms, though
only two of those rooms (one of which is a store room that also houses
the sump) have doors. There is also a small room housing the gas
furnace and hot-water heater. I used to have a small, inadequate
dehumidifier (built into the partition between the main room and sump
room) that ran all the time and did little good. One satisified owner
in a similar locale has recommended the Wave Home Solutions
ventilation unit, which should certainly use less power than a large
dehumidifier, but I'd like other opinions. Anyone here have experience
with it? Any suggestions on what to look for in a regular dehumidifier?

ransley

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May 27, 2010, 7:10:33 AM5/27/10
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All the Wave does is vent the basement, just put a fan in a basement
window and there is your expensive "wave". It wont do much, ive tried
my own homemade setup and it didnt help me. My Energy Star humidifier
uses about 4-5$ a month on a 600 sq ft basement and keeps my humididty
low, if its below around 68 in the basement when you plan on using it
get a low temp model, consumer reports has reviews online.

Hell Toupee

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May 27, 2010, 2:04:44 PM5/27/10
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On 5/26/2010 7:30 PM, Ivan wrote:
> I live in an area with a high water table, and my basement gets quite
> humid; it recently flooded when the sump pump failed. The basement
> area is about 1300 to 1500 sq ft, and is divided into rooms, though
> only two of those rooms (one of which is a store room that also houses
> the sump) have doors. There is also a small room housing the gas
> furnace and hot-water heater. I used to have a small, inadequate
> dehumidifier (built into the partition between the main room and sump
> room) that ran all the time and did little good.

I have a damp basement split into three rooms. I used to run two
dehumidifiers down there, then learned that setting up a fan on a
timer in one of the rooms allowed me to get just as good results with
only one dehumidifier. I have the fan run three times a day for two
hours each time. It uses a lot less electricity than a second
dehumidifier, and moves the air well enough that one dehumidifier can
work efficiently. It'd be a cheap thing for you to try out and see if
it works for you. Note: I use a box fan set on the floor, because the
dampest air is down by the floor, and I figure anything smaller than a
box fan wouldn't cut the mustard.


One satisified owner
> in a similar locale has recommended the Wave Home Solutions
> ventilation unit, which should certainly use less power than a large
> dehumidifier, but I'd like other opinions. Anyone here have experience
> with it? Any suggestions on what to look for in a regular dehumidifier?


I looked into the Humidex, which is essentially the same thing under a
different brand. It was expensive, so I ginned up a homemade version
using six-inch ductwork running up the wall from the floor and venting
out a basement window. I placed a six-inch fan on the floor right into
the duct, so it would draw the damp floor air up and out the window. I
turned off my usual dehumidifier/fan combo and gave this setup a
three-day test, allowing it to run constantly. I quit after three
days, because the increase in humidity in the basement was _very_
noticeable.

A couple things to note - a basement dehumidifier gets a big boost
when central a/c is running - but I'm in a climate where I run central
air only occasionally, so my basement dehumidifier usually doesn't get
that assist and does fine anyway. I did not have the central air on
when my DIY device was running, and frankly, just exhausting the
basement air (which is all it does) wasn't sufficient to keep down the
humidity. This concept probably works a lot better when central a/c is
running, because the central a/c ends up doing the dehumidifying. So
if you run a/c most of the summer, it might work out better for you. I
expect the commercial version probably works a bit more efficiently
than my DIY version, but given the results of my DIY version, I ended
up disconnecting it and going back to my usual dehumidifier/fan combo.

Frankly, I was disappointed. I'd hoped I'd be able to get away from
running the dehumidifier altogether. Nope.

David Combs

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Jun 24, 2010, 9:01:43 PM6/24/10
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In article <87eebb0e-920f-45b4...@40g2000vbr.googlegroups.com>,

What's different about a "low temp" model? (Never heard the term
until saw your post)

David

Jim

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Jul 24, 2010, 10:04:14 PM7/24/10
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In June I had a Wave system installed in my ranch home for $1500. I am not
handy so I didn't dare try to build the system detailed in this forum.

In installer thought our basement door was too nice to cut in a vent so we
just leave it open. The late June and July weather was like august. High
heat and humidity. The central air ran continuously.

My concern was the cost of electricity for this system and using the air
conditioned air. Well, I just received my electric bill and it was about
the same as last August where the AC was always on.

AND, my basement is dry and there is no mildew smell. Up until now I used
a dehumidifier but it never dried out the basement and there was always a
damp like smell. Also it cost about $35-45 a month to run.

So, the bottom line is that the Wave works. I know it was costly, but it
works much better than a dehumidifier and uses much, much less
electricity.



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Message sent through http://www.BetterHomePortal.com

Jim

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Aug 23, 2010, 4:53:27 PM8/23/10
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>>
>In June I had a Wave system installed in my ranch home for $1500. I am
not
>handy so I didn't dare try to build the system detailed in this forum.
>
>In installer thought our basement door was too nice to cut in a vent so
we
>just leave it open. The late June and July weather was like august.
High
>heat and humidity. The central air ran continuously.
>
>My concern was the cost of electricity for this system and using the air
>conditioned air. Well, I just received my electric bill and it was about
>the same as last August where the AC was always on.
>
>AND, my basement is dry and there is no mildew smell. Up until now I
used
>a dehumidifier but it never dried out the basement and there was always a
>damp like smell. Also it cost about $35-45 a month to run.
>
>So, the bottom line is that the Wave works. I know it was costly, but it
>works much better than a dehumidifier and uses much, much less
>electricity.


My Wave System continues to do the job but I wanted to add something.

When it was first installed I noticed that it constantly cycled with the
fan turing on and off every few seconds.

I c contacted a service rep who was very helpful and assured me the unit
was operating properly and was getting itself adjusted.

A week or so ago he called me back and explained that because they had
received many calls similar to mine, they looked into the matter and
developed some better software to control the unit. He told me they were
sending me a new control panel unit, at no cost. I believe the man's name
is Ron and he was very friendly and helpful. He was wonderful to deal
with.

The next day I received the unit. All I had to do was remove four screws,
unplug the circuit board and install the new one. A five minute task. I
then returned the old one in a Fedex mailer they provided.

The unit no longer goes through the constant cycling. It gets the
atmosphere to me desired setting (55%) and maintains it. When it drops
below my setting, it runs at a very low speed.

Now that is what I call great customer service. I just wanted to share
this info because it is nice dealing with a company like this.

briant...@gmail.com

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Aug 30, 2014, 12:27:53 PM8/30/14
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Lookup ... basement systems inc. And find your local dealer for a true permanent solution.

Oren

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Aug 30, 2014, 5:37:51 PM8/30/14
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On Sat, 30 Aug 2014 09:27:53 -0700 (PDT), briant...@gmail.com
wrote:

>Lookup ... basement systems inc. And find your local dealer for a true permanent solution.

I don't have a basement.

Stormin Mormon

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Aug 31, 2014, 7:57:10 AM8/31/14
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I've got some table salt, and tap water. Maybe
I can make a permanent solution?

Wave:
http://fc08.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2012/350/9/0/penguin_wave_by_emi_kittie-d5o8tkb.gif

--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
www.lds.org
.

michele....@kentwoodps.org

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Oct 10, 2014, 9:48:20 PM10/10/14
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\
`

nowave

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Jul 3, 2016, 9:44:05 PM7/3/16
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replying to Jim, nowave wrote:
I have had the Wave now for 4 years. It has not done what it was intended to
do. Dry out the basement. I was told that the unit needs to be installed in
the furthest corner of the basement (2500 sqft) and the draw will large enough
to pull the humidity for the entire area. I also asked if it mattered that the
basement was finished and they said no sweat. My basement has been as wet as
ever along with mildew. It was essentially junk. I am now looking for a true
dehumidifier system, even if I have to pay more money per month to run the
system. What am I saving? More dollars for a problem never solved? I believe I
was mislead by sales on the capacity the unit could handle, along with the
knowledge of a finished basement. Stay away from this product! Do more
research for a dehumidifier vs. Wave. Trust me.

--
posted from
http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/wave-dehumidifier-has-anyone-here-tried-it-444013-.htm


Aprilnluv

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Sep 24, 2016, 4:44:05 PM9/24/16
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replying to nowave, Aprilnluv wrote:
> basement systems inc
What wave company did you use if you don't mind me asking. I'd like to stay
away from them if at all possible. Thanks.

--
for full context, visit http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/wave-dehumidifier-has-anyone-here-tried-it-444013-.htm


Aprilnluv

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Sep 24, 2016, 4:44:05 PM9/24/16
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replying to Jim, Aprilnluv wrote:
> basement systems inc
Hi Jim, what type of wave system or company did you use for the wave
installation? I would like to look into this further and maybe even consider
giving the route you took a try... Thanks..

trader_4

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Sep 26, 2016, 11:50:41 AM9/26/16
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On Sunday, July 3, 2016 at 9:44:05 PM UTC-4, nowave wrote:
> replying to Jim, nowave wrote:
> I have had the Wave now for 4 years. It has not done what it was intended to
> do. Dry out the basement. I was told that the unit needs to be installed in
> the furthest corner of the basement (2500 sqft) and the draw will large enough
> to pull the humidity for the entire area. I also asked if it mattered that the
> basement was finished and they said no sweat. My basement has been as wet as
> ever along with mildew. It was essentially junk. I am now looking for a true
> dehumidifier system, even if I have to pay more money per month to run the
> system. What am I saving? More dollars for a problem never solved? I believe I
> was mislead by sales on the capacity the unit could handle, along with the
> knowledge of a finished basement. Stay away from this product! Do more
> research for a dehumidifier vs. Wave. Trust me.
>

IMO, the big problem with Wave is that they only tell you part of the
equation. They tell you that it works by drawing fresh air into the
basement, while exhausting the air that's there. And that it costs
a lot less to run than a dehumidifier. That last part apparently is
based on how much it costs to run the Wave fan. What they ignore is
the rest of the story. As it blows air out of the basement, the make
up air is brought in from upstairs, from the conditioned house air.
So, in summer, you're pulling AC cooled air into the basement, then
pumping it outside. The makeup air for upstairs comes from outside.
So, you're paying to cool that air with your AC unit, it just doesn't
show up in the electricity number for the Wave unit.

In principle, it seems like is should work. Essentially, AFAIK, it's
just an exhaust fan on a humidistat. I could make up similar from
off the shelf parts for not much money. IDK what they charge for a
Wave, they won't tell you on the website, which IMO, is never a good
thing. The real question is how efficient is it versus a dehumidifier
and how much it costs versus one.

Wink Knudge

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Aug 31, 2017, 12:14:10 PM8/31/17
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replying to trader_4, Wink Knudge wrote:
That seems to be the concept, just an exhaust fan with a humidity sensor
controlling when it turns on. If the humidity is above a threshold, it
switches the fan on, otherwise, it's not needed and turns off.
If you don't have an AC in the house, it'd actually end up pulling outside air
into the house, and if it's humid outside, makes things worse in regard to
humidity. The radon and pollutants would be helped, but if humidity is the
main purpose, the dehumidification has to be done either by the separate AC
system, or if it's dryer outside to get a benefit.

--
for full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/wave-dehumidifier-has-anyone-here-tried-it-444013-.htm


trader_4

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Aug 31, 2017, 12:23:33 PM8/31/17
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On Thursday, August 31, 2017 at 12:14:10 PM UTC-4, Wink Knudge wrote:
> replying to trader_4, Wink Knudge wrote:
> That seems to be the concept, just an exhaust fan with a humidity sensor
> controlling when it turns on. If the humidity is above a threshold, it
> switches the fan on, otherwise, it's not needed and turns off.
> If you don't have an AC in the house, it'd actually end up pulling outside air
> into the house, and if it's humid outside, makes things worse in regard to
> humidity.

And if you have AC upstairs, it's pulling outside air into the house
through cracks, window seals, door seals, etc, cooling it, sucking
it into the basement, then pumping it outside. I've never seen the
Wave folks talk about the energy loss, extra AC involved there,
only how little it costs to run their unit with the little fan.
Maybe we're missing something, but I haven't seen anyone explain
what it is.






The radon and pollutants would be helped, but if humidity is the
> main purpose, the dehumidification has to be done either by the separate AC
> system, or if it's dryer outside to get a benefit.

+1

One benefit for sure is you're getting fresh air into the basement,
so I don't doubt it will make it smell better, reduce typical
basement odor, etc.


mako...@yahoo.com

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Aug 31, 2017, 4:36:24 PM8/31/17
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> One benefit for sure is you're getting fresh air into the basement,
> so I don't doubt it will make it smell better, reduce typical
> basement odor, etc.

i find that simply opening the basement windows ONLY on those days that the sky is blue and the outside humidity is low and running a circulating fan 24/7 works pretty well.

I do run a standard dehumidifier if there is a long spell of humid days.

m



jill

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Oct 21, 2017, 5:44:05 PM10/21/17
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replying to Ivan, jill wrote:
it does not work and then no resonse after the installation . No answered
emails or return follow up . a scam and I fell for it and did not trust my
intuition . They say to set it on 30 percent. after three days nothing but a
basement still at 70percent humidity which I bought a meter at the hardware
store . No response back from DALE.

jill

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Oct 21, 2017, 5:44:07 PM10/21/17
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replying to nowave, jill wrote:
yes mine was useless and no return call or email to my disappointment . scam
company

trader_4

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Oct 21, 2017, 6:26:16 PM10/21/17
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On Saturday, October 21, 2017 at 5:44:05 PM UTC-4, jill wrote:
> replying to Ivan, jill wrote:
> it does not work and then no resonse after the installation . No answered
> emails or return follow up . a scam and I fell for it and did not trust my
> intuition . They say to set it on 30 percent. after three days nothing but a
> basement still at 70percent humidity which I bought a meter at the hardware
> store . No response back from DALE.
>
>

Is it only drawing air from upstairs in the house? What's the temp and
humidity there? It won't be lower humidity than that and if it's say
78F temp upstairs and 60F in the basement, then the humidity in the
basement will be higher than that upstairs as the air cools. The system
relies on pulling conditioned air from upstairs into the basement while
pushing basement air outside. It also depends on how it's installed.
I would think that if you had the exhaust on one end of the basement,
the air coming from upstairs at the opposite end, it would work well.
If you have the exhaust at one end and the air from upstairs coming
down close by, it will just be sucking air from upstairs and pushing it
outside, not doing much to change the humidity in the rest of the basement.

camden...@gmail.com

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Oct 18, 2018, 8:42:18 PM10/18/18
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Drew, the sales guy, promises the moon and fails to deliver. Sounds like half snake, half used car salesman. When sending email correspondence he only answers some question and seems to have problems communicating.

After the sell, you'll get no response until you open a card dispute. Then, they demand pictures proving their ideal install. They will make you jump through fiery hopes to return the item and then will charge you a restocking fee.

This device, just so you are aware, is a very large PC style fan in a large empty box. Weighs ~1 pound. All it will do is provide so ventilation. You can buy a much more powerful squirrel cage fan for 10% of the cost. They claim it will take multiples SEAONS for humidity to go down lol. Does nothing but push air (A very small amount).

Told this con artist my outside humidity is higher than inside, but still promised it would work. When trying to do a return you get routed to another company - because they are only white labeling the use of this product. I use this word sparingly, but it's a brilliant scam. You've been warned.

trader_4

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Oct 18, 2018, 9:16:40 PM10/18/18
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It will work with outside humidity higher. It pulls air OUT of the basement,
with return air coming from upstairs, inside the conditioned airspace.
Say it's 85F outside, high humidity. So, you have the AC running in the
house. This thing blows basement air outside, with the replacement air
coming into the basement from the conditioned air upstairs, that is low
humidity. That upstairs air in turn is made up by outside air entering
through cracks around doors, windows, etc. So, you're pulling high humidity,
hot air into the upstairs with the house AC cooling it and removing the
humidity. They tell you it costs little to operate the fan, but ignore
the AC energy upstairs that has an increased load due to constantly pulling
in outside hot, humid air. AFAIK, that's how it works. So, I can see how
it works, but it also sounds like the true cost shows up in the AC electric
usage, which will be higher. There is no free lunch.

I came to your conclusion from looking at it years ago. Like you say,
it's just a fan with a humidistat control. You could put that together
for what, $75 in parts?

John

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Feb 5, 2019, 3:24:09 PM2/5/19
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The WAVE product is ok, just way over-priced. The Breeze (sold on Amazon, Ebay, and Breeze website) does the same thing, is made with quality parts in USA, and costs a small fraction of the price of the WAVE unit (entry unit sells for $349). Also, it is backed by a five-year warranty. Breeze also sells a more powerful unit (the DL) with two fans, for large basements. Check it out!

Davej

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Feb 6, 2019, 12:17:04 PM2/6/19
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On Thursday, June 24, 2010 at 8:01:43 PM UTC-5, David Combs wrote:
> In article <87eebb0e-920f-45b4...@40g2000vbr.googlegroups.com>,
> ransley wrote:
> >
> >All the Wave does is vent the basement, just put a fan in a basement
> >window and there is your expensive "wave". It wont do much, ive tried
> >my own homemade setup and it didnt help me. My Energy Star humidifier
> >uses about 4-5$ a month on a 600 sq ft basement and keeps my humididty
> >low, if its below around 68 in the basement when you plan on using it
> >get a low temp model, consumer reports has reviews online.
>
> What's different about a "low temp" model? (Never heard the term
> until saw your post)
>

A dehumidifier works by blowing air across a cold coil (like air
flowing through a window air-conditioner). It also has a hot coil
where it dumps the heat. When air flow across the cold coil the
moisture in the air condenses on the coil and then drips into a
collection pan. The problem is that in a cool location like a
damp basement this cold coil can ice up. A "low temp" dehumidifier
runs in "reverse" every so often so that the cold coil heats up. This
will melt any ice that may have accumulated on the coil.

shm9800

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Nov 24, 2021, 6:31:41 PM11/24/21
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I know this thread is from two years ago. Maybe someone is still out there. I moved into a house that had this in the basement. I also had prefinished hard wood floors installed in top floor the first month I moved in - December in NJ. The house has been super humid over summer and we we did find a hole in a duct and just had it fixed. The new floors are chipping and cracking and just a mess. 25k down the drain. Could the wave be to blame? The inspector that was hired for the floors said it’s because of humidity.

--
For full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/wave-dehumidifier-has-anyone-here-tried-it-444013-.htm

Robert

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Nov 24, 2021, 9:01:50 PM11/24/21
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Did you measure the humidity in both areas? It may not be working as you expected it to, so if it's because it's not doing anything it could be to blame for that, but it can't make it any more humid.

Robert

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Nov 24, 2021, 9:01:50 PM11/24/21
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A smart system that has capability to measure outside humidity as well as inside humidity is the way to go, it should only operate when the conditions outside are sufficiently low in humidity. Otherwise it's going to be unproductive, pulling more humid air in.

--
For full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/wave-dehumidifier-has-anyone-here-tried-it-444013-.htm

trader_4

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Nov 25, 2021, 8:56:26 AM11/25/21
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AFAIK, this device just ejects basement air outside and relies on most of the makeup air
coming from inside the house, not from outside. They rely on that air, which typically is
air conditioned air in most homes during the most humid months, to reduce the basement
humidity. They tout a very low cost to run the Wave fan, but ignore the fact that hot, humid
make up air is entering the conditioned air space above, which increases that energy bill.
In short, it's a fan with a humidistat that they sell for $$$$.

The idea of a similar system that only operates when humidity outside is low would work,
if a return air path is available in the basement, so it pulls from that. However it would
have limited use, because it would not work when you need it most.




Robert

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Nov 25, 2021, 10:01:49 PM11/25/21
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That's why I hardly ever use my whole house fan, when it's cooler outside and I want to get rid of the hot air in the house, it always seems to be very high humidity outside, and I'd rather have the heat than humidity in the house.
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