Toilet chain rusts and breaks

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Terry Chambers

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Aug 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/26/00
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Hello:

I purchased a house a few months ago and one of the toilets has a
flushing mechanism with a chain connected to the flushing handle. The
chain keeps breaking every 6 - 8 weeks (like it rusts through). I
haven't really seen anything that I can use instead of the chain. I
need it to be something which can fit through the small hole and also
have a 'stopper' at one end so the chain doesn't pull through.

Is this a 'modern' type of flushing assembly? Is there something else I
can use instead of the chain?

Thanks!
Terry


Daniel Hicks

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Aug 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/26/00
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The chain should be either brass or plastic. Shouldn't corrode through,
even in fairly nasty water for tens of years. Go to a hardware store
and get the proper chain. A decent hardware store will have the chain
and all the necessary fittings.

Brian Marks CWS-I

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Aug 26, 2000, 9:35:00 PM8/26/00
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>I purchased a house a few months ago and one of the toilets has a
>flushing mechanism with a chain connected to the flushing handle. The
>chain keeps breaking every 6 - 8 weeks (like it rusts through). I
>haven't really seen anything that I can use instead of the chain. I
>need it to be something which can fit through the small hole and also
>have a 'stopper' at one end so the chain doesn't pull through.
>
>Is this a 'modern' type of flushing assembly? Is there something else I
>can use instead of the chain?
>
>Thanks!
>Terry
>
>
>
>

Terry, That sounds like a VERY unusual problem. I'm sure you could use
something other than a chain but the question I have is what's in your water
that makes it do that? If it rusts the toilet chains that quickly, then what is
it doing to your plumbing system? I would suggest that you have your water
tested for corrosivity.
It's possible that you have an acid problem that needs attention.
p.s.....Do you have blueish green staining on the sinks and tubs?
http://worldwidewater.bigstep.com
http://www.dreamwater.net/biz/watertalk1/

Terry Chambers

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Aug 27, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/27/00
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In article <20000826213500...@ng-cp1.aol.com>,
wwws...@aol.com says...

> >I purchased a house a few months ago and one of the toilets has a
> >flushing mechanism with a chain connected to the flushing handle. The
> >chain keeps breaking every 6 - 8 weeks (like it rusts through). I
> >haven't really seen anything that I can use instead of the chain. I
> >need it to be something which can fit through the small hole and also
> >have a 'stopper' at one end so the chain doesn't pull through.
> >
> >Is this a 'modern' type of flushing assembly? Is there something else I
> >can use instead of the chain?

> Terry, That sounds like a VERY unusual problem. I'm sure you could use


> something other than a chain but the question I have is what's in your water
> that makes it do that? If it rusts the toilet chains that quickly, then what is
> it doing to your plumbing system? I would suggest that you have your water
> tested for corrosivity.
> It's possible that you have an acid problem that needs attention.
> p.s.....Do you have blueish green staining on the sinks and tubs?

No ... nothing stains the sinks or tubs. The toilet does get 'hard
water' stains every 2-3 weeks, slightly more than other toilets in the
house, but this is the one that is used most.

Who would I call to test the water?

Thanks
Terry

Terry Chambers

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Aug 27, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/27/00
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In article <39A81D8D...@ieee.org>, danh...@ieee.org says...
> Terry Chambers wrote:
> >
> > Hello:

> >
> > I purchased a house a few months ago and one of the toilets has a
> > flushing mechanism with a chain connected to the flushing handle. The
> > chain keeps breaking every 6 - 8 weeks (like it rusts through). I
> > haven't really seen anything that I can use instead of the chain. I
> > need it to be something which can fit through the small hole and also
> > have a 'stopper' at one end so the chain doesn't pull through.
> >
> > Is this a 'modern' type of flushing assembly? Is there something else I
> > can use instead of the chain?
>
> The chain should be either brass or plastic. Shouldn't corrode through,
> even in fairly nasty water for tens of years. Go to a hardware store
> and get the proper chain. A decent hardware store will have the chain
> and all the necessary fittings.

Thanks. I'll see what I can find at a different store.


Terry Chambers

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Aug 27, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/27/00
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In article <soVp5.1833$k57.1...@news.flash.net>,
realad...@mail.com says...

> Terry Chambers <terry.c...@nospam.com> wrote:
> >Hello:
> >
> >I purchased a house a few months ago and one of the toilets has a
> >flushing mechanism with a chain connected to the flushing handle. The
> >chain keeps breaking every 6 - 8 weeks (like it rusts through). I
> >haven't really seen anything that I can use instead of the chain. I
> >need it to be something which can fit through the small hole and also
> >have a 'stopper' at one end so the chain doesn't pull through.
> >
> >Is this a 'modern' type of flushing assembly? Is there something else I
> >can use instead of the chain?
>
> Buy a replacement flapper that uses a rubber strap instead of a chain.

Okay, if the other suggestions don't work, that's the next step.

Thanks
Terry

Andy Anderson

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Aug 27, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/27/00
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Fluidmaster makes a replacement flapper with a plastic chain that floats


Default User

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Aug 31, 2000, 3:58:49 PM8/31/00
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Sounds like possibly a galvanic reaction with some of the other
metals in the toilet tank.

What to use. My first thought was nylon tie straps. Might take a
lot of creativity.

Some of the new toilet flappers (Chase Pitkin Hardware has them
around here) are soft rubber.


Terry Chambers wrote in message ...

>> >I purchased a house a few months ago and one of the toilets
has a
>> >flushing mechanism with a chain connected to the flushing
handle. The
>> >chain keeps breaking every 6 - 8 weeks (like it rusts
through). I
>> >haven't really seen anything that I can use instead of the
chain. I
>> >need it to be something which can fit through the small hole
and also
>> >have a 'stopper' at one end so the chain doesn't pull
through.
>> >
>> >Is this a 'modern' type of flushing assembly? Is there
something else I
>> >can use instead of the chain?
>

>> Terry, That sounds like a VERY unusual problem. I'm sure you
could use
>> something other than a chain but the question I have is what's
in your water
>> that makes it do that? If it rusts the toilet chains that
quickly, then what is
>> it doing to your plumbing system? I would suggest that you
have your water
>> tested for corrosivity.
>> It's possible that you have an acid problem that needs
attention.
>> p.s.....Do you have blueish green staining on the sinks and
tubs?
>

Brian Marks CWS-I

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Sep 1, 2000, 9:05:31 AM9/1/00
to
>No ... nothing stains the sinks or tubs. The toilet does get 'hard
>water' stains every 2-3 weeks, slightly more than other toilets in the
>house, but this is the one that is used most.
>
>Who would I call to test the water?
>
>Thanks
>Terry
>
>
>
>
>
>

Any water treatment company can test your water, or you could have an
independent lab test it for you. You can also buy home test kits for the basic
tests like hardness, iron, PH, dissolved solids, etc. and do it youself. The
home test kits on our site seem to be very popular lately. It seems that when
people have their water tested by a few different companies, they get
conflicting results either from lack of knowlege or honesty on the part of the
tester.
http://worldwidewater.bigstep.com
http://www.dreamwater.net/biz/watertalk1/

Jesse

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Sep 10, 2000, 5:34:23 AM9/10/00
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Do you use any kind of chlorine based tank cleaners?
I'm talking about the kind that sit in a dispenser or the tablet that you
drop into the tank.
They suppose to help keep that tank and toilet clean.
I ask because that is what has happened to me. It also caused the rubber
stopper in my toilet talk to wear prematurely.

Good Luck.

Jesse

Default User <def...@user.net> wrote in message
news:8ome9g$ecg$3...@node17.cwnet.frontiernet.net...

nunaya

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Sep 12, 2000, 4:54:48 PM9/12/00
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I had a toilet chain which did this in my old house. I finally bought
several brass snap swivels meant for use in salt water fishing and daisy
chained them into an appropriate length to use as the toilet chain. Never
had to replace this chain again. This lasted at least 10 years. Prior to
this I'd need new chain every few months.
Worked for me,
Eileen

Daniel Hicks

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Sep 13, 2000, 3:00:00 AM9/13/00
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Once again, if you simply buy decent quality BRASS toilet chain you
shouldn't have any problem with rust. If you use steel chain then it
will rust apart in fairly short order. I find it hard to believe that
even the cheap home centers would sell steel chain for toilets. Where
did you get the crummy stuff?

Sondra Z

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Jan 12, 2022, 12:35:53 PM (8 days ago) Jan 12
to
On Wednesday, September 13, 2000 at 2:00:00 AM UTC-5, Daniel Hicks wrote:
> Once again, if you simply buy decent quality BRASS toilet chain you
> shouldn't have any problem with rust. If you use steel chain then it
> will rust apart in fairly short order. I find it hard to believe that
> even the cheap home centers would sell steel chain for toilets. Where
> did you get the crummy stuff?
> nunaya wrote:
> >
I have the same problem. I have been in my home 33 years and only over the past 5-7 years have I had this problem. I have bought solid brass chain it corrodes through. I then bought galvanized wire and rigged it up to work and they still corrode about every 6-8 weeks.
I am really frustrated. Someone suggested rubber and my mind is in overdrive trying to figure how to do that. I just ordered new parts for this time. This is the replacement for mine if anyone
has any ideas on use of any material but metal or brass. https://www.amazon.com/EZ-FLO-40079-Touch-Flush-Chrome/dp/B00LEMS3NO/ref=asc_df_B00LEMS3NO/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=193994427542&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=9118888414156017777&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1026632&hvtargid=pla-307989044319&psc=1
Thanks so much.

"\"Re...@home.com

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Jan 12, 2022, 1:06:36 PM (8 days ago) Jan 12
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How  about a couple loops of fishing line, tied to the lever and flapper ??

In 40 years and 8 toilets in 5 homes, I've never had a chain rust. Other
problems, yes but not chains. And aren't some water supplies
particularly corrosive ?

Bob F

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Jan 12, 2022, 2:35:57 PM (7 days ago) Jan 12
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Mine have all been stainless steel, for years.

micky

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Jan 12, 2022, 3:45:00 PM (7 days ago) Jan 12
to
In alt.home.repair, on Wed, 12 Jan 2022 13:06:25 -0500,
You took the words out of my mouth. Or weedwacker string, or nylon
twine, etc. I normally think of metal as better than plastic or
anything invented in the last 150 years, but synthetics have advantages
too.

When I was in highschool I put some gasoline in a little plastic dish
that food had come in at the store (because my mother wouldn't let me
use actual dishes. She thought I'd ruin them.) And the dish melted,
into a blob. For a long time I acted liek gasoline would do this to
any plastic, but of course that's not true. They even make cas cans out
of plastic. The same thing is true of string. Maybe some will be
botherred by the OP's water, but I'm sure some won't.

>In 40 years and 8 toilets in 5 homes, I've never had a chain rust. Other

Me neither. Although in NYC for 12 years I had a flushometer.

>problems, yes but not chains. And aren't some water supplies
>particularly corrosive ?

Must be.

TimR

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Jan 12, 2022, 4:58:56 PM (7 days ago) Jan 12
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I've had exactly the same problem. I've tried various types of chain, wire, cable ties, none survive. If the link isn't very limp the plug won't slide down and the toilet keeps flushing.

What's in there now is paracord with the inner strands pulled out. so far working fine. .

Boris

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Jan 12, 2022, 7:54:47 PM (7 days ago) Jan 12
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Sondra Z <1cinder...@gmail.com> wrote in
news:e858d528-fb9d-4126...@googlegroups.com:
This appears to be an 11 year old post, but in case you still can't flush
your toilet (:>), my solution for chains, even stainless steel chains, that
have corroded, is to use a small nylon tie.

TimR

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Jan 13, 2022, 9:38:21 AM (7 days ago) Jan 13
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On Wednesday, January 12, 2022 at 7:54:47 PM UTC-5, Boris wrote:
> This appears to be an 11 year old post, but in case you still can't flush
> your toilet (:>), my solution for chains, even stainless steel chains, that
> have corroded, is to use a small nylon tie.

Nope. Tried it, didn't work.

Actually my plumber put it in first, when it broke I replaced it twice that way, finally realized it wasn't going to work.
Tried three different type chains, all corroded.
Now the paracord is in there, so far so good.

This is one of the old style toilets where the stopper moves vertically, with the shaft going through a small loop, rather than pivoting, so the requirements on the handle are slightly different. The connection needs to be quite limp or the stopper will hang up and the toilet keeps running. (one of the basic rules of engineering design that my professor hammered into us was NEVER put a side load on a sliding joint)
Hopefully you notice and jiggle it until it slides down, but can't trust the family to notice.

Frank

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Jan 13, 2022, 11:59:37 AM (7 days ago) Jan 13
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Have not had this problem although my well water is somewhat corrosive.
I have some old Kevlar cords that would probably work.

Ed Pawlowski

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Jan 13, 2022, 12:42:00 PM (7 days ago) Jan 13
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One thing not addressed is the water quality. If it is corroding bras
and SS in short time, perhaps it should be treated both for health
reasons and corroding infrastructure.

Bob F

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Jan 13, 2022, 1:02:49 PM (7 days ago) Jan 13
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Indeed. What is it doing to brass fixtures and valves, metal pipes,
brass fittings in plastic pipes ......?

Frank

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Jan 13, 2022, 1:05:33 PM (7 days ago) Jan 13
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I had tested mine with a kit from Lowes when we got a new well. It
looked at all contaminants and there was no problem except pH is a
little low and water hard plus 1 ppm iron when it should be less than a
half ppm. Brought it down with an iron filter. Only problem I had with
toilets in the last 20 years was corroded tank bolts on oldest toilet.

Many states will test water for just a few dollars and a lot of people
like plumbers will do it for free. Of course the plumber will want to
sell you a treatment system.

gfre...@aol.com

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Jan 13, 2022, 8:20:09 PM (6 days ago) Jan 13
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If the pH is below ~7.1 it will eat your plumbing. A lot of folks want
it more like 7.4 - 7.5. A few drops of the phenol solution from a
swimming pool kit in a shot glass of water will tell the tale. You
want it orange, not yellow (acid) or pink (alkaline).
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