Emergency Oxygen!!

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Harold Jaynes

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Aug 6, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/6/96
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Come visit our web site to see the NEW powdered emergency oxygen system
called emOx.....it's lightweight, portable, non-flammable,
non-combustible, non-pressurized, non-corrosive and maintenance free.
.....recently made available in the US....

http://www.emox.com
OXYGEN IS LIVE.....DON'T PRESSURIZE IT!!

Harold Jaynes

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Aug 6, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/6/96
to misc.health.alternative, alt.med.equipment

Steven B. Harris

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Aug 8, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/8/96
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Shipped to you directly on ValueJet Airlines, no doubt. Allow for
some delays in transit.

Steve Harris, M.D.

Dan Willett

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Aug 10, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/10/96
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xdc...@quake.net (Mike Davis) wrote:

>Gee Steve, there are ways of chemically storing oxygen for retreival at a
>latter date, MgO2, CaO2. Maybe a dweeb for not being more specific and
>informative, the web page for it wouldn't even download.

BTW, I visited the Web site, and it loads just fine (it uses Frames,
so you need a fairly new version of Netscape to be able to see it) but
it is just an ad that doesn't contain any information.

Later...
Dan

Mike Davis

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Aug 11, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/11/96
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In article <4uldgp$5...@sjx-ixn2.ix.netcom.com>, sbha...@ix.netcom.com
(Steven B. Harris) wrote:
>
> "Due diligence"? From a twerp who talks about an oxygen system being
> "non-combustable"? That leaves the impression that the thing is not a
> fire-hazzard, which of course is incorrect. A case of a statement which
> is strictly true being used to lie by implication, like the label that
> says that coconut oil is cholesterol free. With advertising like this
> as your introduction, I wouldn't buy one of your devices even if the
> only alternative was a whiff of limburger.
>
> Steve Harris, M.D.

Gee Steve, there are ways of chemically storing oxygen for retreival at a
latter date, MgO2, CaO2. Maybe a dweeb for not being more specific and
informative, the web page for it wouldn't even download.

Regards,

--
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etc.; Discount Sources Listing, Herpes Alternatives Page
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Harold Jaynes

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Aug 11, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/11/96
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> Steve Harris, M.D.Very cute.....this is in NO way similiar to the oxygen generators which
exploded on ValuJet.....

The product has been featured on Beyond 2000 on the Discovery Channel...
the regulatory consultant that had this cleared for marketing by FDA is
the person that wrote just about all the code for FDA in regards to
oxygen devices.....most of us in our company are physicians..... due
diligence might be suggested before a glib remark...

Harold Jaynes
MedTrak International
410.381.6488 Voice
410.381.7670 Fax

Steven B. Harris

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Aug 11, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/11/96
to

Harold Jaynes

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Aug 12, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/12/96
to

Dan Willett wrote:

>
> xdc...@quake.net (Mike Davis) wrote:
>
> >Gee Steve, there are ways of chemically storing oxygen for retreival at a
> >latter date, MgO2, CaO2. Maybe a dweeb for not being more specific and
> >informative, the web page for it wouldn't even download.
>
> BTW, I visited the Web site, and it loads just fine (it uses Frames,
> so you need a fairly new version of Netscape to be able to see it) but
> it is just an ad that doesn't contain any information.
>
> Later...
> Dan

Sorry you didn't get to the page to retrieve more information.... you
have to click the small oxygen cylinder.....the site is being changed
today to remove the frames and banner to make it more net-friendly....

Harold Jaynes

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Aug 12, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/12/96
to

Steven B. Harris wrote:
>
> In <320DD5...@emox.com> Harold Jaynes <har...@emox.com> writes:
>
> >
> >VeSteven B. Harris wrote:
> >>
> >> In <320796...@emox.com> Harold Jaynes <har...@emox.com> writes:
> >> >
> >> >Come visit our web site to see the NEW powdered emergency oxygen
> >> system
> >> >called emOx.....it's lightweight, portable, non-flammable,
> >> >non-combustible, non-pressurized, non-corrosive and maintenance
> free.
> >> >.....recently made available in the US....
> >> >
> >> >http://www.emox.com
> >> >OXYGEN IS LIVE.....DON'T PRESSURIZE IT!!
> >>
> >> Shipped to you directly on ValueJet Airlines, no doubt. Allow for
> >> some delays in transit.
> >>
> >> Steve Harris, M.D.Very
> cute.....this is in NO way similiar to the oxygen generators which
> >exploded on ValuJet.....
> >
> >The product has been featured on Beyond 2000 on the Discovery
> Channel...
> >the regulatory consultant that had this cleared for marketing by FDA is
> >the person that wrote just about all the code for FDA in regards to
> >oxygen devices.....most of us in our company are physicians..... due
> >diligence might be suggested before a glib remark...
> >
> >Harold Jaynes
> >MedTrak International
> >410.381.6488 Voice
> >410.381.7670 Fax
> >
>
> "Due diligence"? From a twerp who talks about an oxygen system being
> "non-combustable"? That leaves the impression that the thing is not a
> fire-hazzard, which of course is incorrect. A case of a statement which
> is strictly true being used to lie by implication, like the label that
> says that coconut oil is cholesterol free. With advertising like this
> as your introduction, I wouldn't buy one of your devices even if the
> only alternative was a whiff of limburger.
>
> Steve Harris, M.D.


The active chemical ingredient in the emOx device is sodium
percarbonate. This substance is composed of 1 mole of sodium carbonate
(Na2CO3) and 2 moles of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Like its main
ingredient, hydrogen peroxide, and many other chemicals available for
general household use (e.g. bleach, hypochlorite), sodium percarbonate
is a strong oxidant. An oxidant is a substance that either adds oxygen
or removes hydrogen from another substance. This process is termed
oxidation. Oxidation should not be confused with combustion. Combustion
is used to describe the oxidation of organic materials whose end
products are CO2 and H2O. Not all oxidations can be classified as
combustions. For example, the rusting of iron is oxidation but not
combustion.

Distinction must be made between a combustible substance and one which
supports combustion. A substance which supplies the oxygen necessary for
combustion, supports combustion. Sodium percarbonate may be considered
to support combustion since it produces oxygen as it decomposes in the
presence of water. For this reason, sodium percarbonate should not be
stored in contact with combustible materials such as paper and wood.

The rate of oxidation of a substance varies with the substance's
chemical nature and environmental conditions. In lay terms, substances
which undergo rapid, almost instantaneous oxidation are referred to as
flammable. Inadvertent combustion of such substances can result in fire
or explosion, depending on the rate of oxidation. In a fire, oxidation
occurs slowly: in an explosion, there is a detonation in which oxidation
is nearly instantenous and the by-products and energy evolved are
dissipated rapidly. Again, the rusting of iron may be used as an example
of oxidation that cannot be classified as combustion, and therefore, by
definition cannot be either flammable or explosive.

Sodium percarbonate, in the presence of water, decomposes into sodium
carbonate, water and oxygen. Because gas is evolved, the rate of this
reaction is a function of temperature and pressure. The end product,
sodium carbonate, occurs in nature.

Our search on the chemical product (CAS Number 15630-89-4) shows it to
be non-explosive and environmentally safe. The OHS MSDS Summary Sheet
clearly states "No fire hazard. This material is an oxidizer." Since
sodium percarbonate is not combustible, by definition it cannot be
either flammable or explosive.

The catalyst, manganese dioxide, occurs in nature as pyrolusite. The
substance is readily soluble in water, is not caustic, is not an
oxidant, is not combustible, does not suport comsution, and is neither
flammable nor explosive.

I hope this explanation clears thing up on the technical end of the
product.....

Dan Willett

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Aug 12, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/12/96
to

Harold Jaynes <har...@emox.com> wrote:


>The active chemical ingredient in the emOx device is sodium
>percarbonate. This substance is composed of 1 mole of sodium carbonate
>(Na2CO3) and 2 moles of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Like its main

...


>I hope this explanation clears thing up on the technical end of the
>product.....

Much better. You should include this information on your Web page
(btw, I DID get to the sub page, and like I said previously, it did
NOT contain any information, it was just an ad.) The above is what I
call information.

Later...
Dan


Steven B. Harris

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Aug 13, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/13/96
to

In <320F1F...@emox.com> Harold Jaynes <har...@emox.com> writes:
>Our search on the chemical product (CAS Number 15630-89-4) shows it to
>be non-explosive and environmentally safe. The OHS MSDS Summary Sheet
>clearly states "No fire hazard. This material is an oxidizer." Since
>sodium percarbonate is not combustible, by definition it cannot be
>either flammable or explosive.

>I hope this explanation clears thing up on the technical end of the
>product.....


Total bullshit. You can't ship this stuff on an airplane, because it's
too dangerous to do so. And in practice there is very little difference
between the danger of a directly flammable substance, and one that
simply supports combustion vigorously. If you doubt, why don't you look
at the number in the red diamond of the chemical safety logo posted by
law on the outside of the building you use to make and store this stuff,
and see what number is written there. That number is the fire hazard
number. Yours will be as high as it is possible to go-- a 4.

Steve Harris, M.D.


Steven B. Harris

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Aug 13, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/13/96
to

In <xdcrlab-1108...@xdcrlab.com> xdc...@quake.net (Mike Davis)
writes:

>> Steve Harris, M.D.

>
>Gee Steve, there are ways of chemically storing oxygen for retreival at
>a latter date, MgO2, CaO2.

I know there are, and all dangerous as hell, too. Try ordering a pound
of your favorite metal superoxide from Sigma or Aldritch, and see how
they ship it to you.

Steve Harris, M.D.

Harold Jaynes

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Aug 13, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/13/96
to

Steven B. Harris wrote:
>
> In <320F1F...@emox.com> Harold Jaynes <har...@emox.com> writes:
> >Our search on the chemical product (CAS Number 15630-89-4) shows it to
> >be non-explosive and environmentally safe. The OHS MSDS Summary Sheet
> >clearly states "No fire hazard. This material is an oxidizer." Since
> >sodium percarbonate is not combustible, by definition it cannot be
> >either flammable or explosive.
>
> >I hope this explanation clears thing up on the technical end of the
> >product.....
>
> Total bullshit. You can't ship this stuff on an airplane, because it's
> too dangerous to do so. And in practice there is very little difference
> between the danger of a directly flammable substance, and one that
> simply supports combustion vigorously. If you doubt, why don't you look
> at the number in the red diamond of the chemical safety logo posted by
> law on the outside of the building you use to make and store this stuff,
> and see what number is written there. That number is the fire hazard
> number. Yours will be as high as it is possible to go-- a 4.
>
> Steve Harris, M.D.

As of today, August 13, 1996, according to the Hazardous Material
Section in FAA, packaged sodium percarbonate and manganese dioxide
conform to I.A.T.A. (International Air Transportation Association) and
I.C.A.O. (International Civil Aviation Organization) This was taken from
the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by
Air....

Harold Jaynes

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Aug 13, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/13/96
to

The unit is and has been transported on planes....is used by some
airlines....and so are the two chemicals.......

Harold Jaynes
MedTrak International


In <4up2q6$p...@sjx-ixn1.ix.netcom.com> sbha...@ix.netcom.com (Steven


B. Harris) writes:
>
>In <320F1F...@emox.com> Harold Jaynes <har...@emox.com> writes:

>>Our search on the chemical product (CAS Number 15630-89-4) shows it
to
>>be non-explosive and environmentally safe. The OHS MSDS Summary
Sheet
>>clearly states "No fire hazard. This material is an oxidizer." Since
>>sodium percarbonate is not combustible, by definition it cannot be
>>either flammable or explosive.
>

>>I hope this explanation clears thing up on the technical end of the
>>product.....
>
>

Jerry

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Aug 15, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/15/96
to

Harold Jaynes <har...@emox.com> wrote:

>Steven B. Harris wrote:
>>
>> In <320F1F...@emox.com> Harold Jaynes <har...@emox.com> writes:

>> >Our search on the chemical product (CAS Number 15630-89-4) shows it to
>> >be non-explosive and environmentally safe. The OHS MSDS Summary Sheet
>> >clearly states "No fire hazard. This material is an oxidizer." Since
>> >sodium percarbonate is not combustible, by definition it cannot be
>> >either flammable or explosive.
>>

>> >I hope this explanation clears thing up on the technical end of the
>> >product.....
>>

>> Total bullshit. You can't ship this stuff on an airplane, because it's
>> too dangerous to do so. And in practice there is very little difference
>> between the danger of a directly flammable substance, and one that
>> simply supports combustion vigorously. If you doubt, why don't you look
>> at the number in the red diamond of the chemical safety logo posted by
>> law on the outside of the building you use to make and store this stuff,
>> and see what number is written there. That number is the fire hazard
>> number. Yours will be as high as it is possible to go-- a 4.
>>
>> Steve Harris, M.D.

>As of today, August 13, 1996, according to the Hazardous Material

>Section in FAA, packaged sodium percarbonate and manganese dioxide
>conform to I.A.T.A. (International Air Transportation Association) and
>I.C.A.O. (International Civil Aviation Organization) This was taken from
>the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by
>Air....

>Harold Jaynes


>MedTrak International
>410.381.6488 Voice
>410.381.7670 Fax

Harold:

Don't you know this can't be true - after all the all knowing
Dr. Steven says it's bullshit and that means that by definition, you
are wrong. Don't you know that Dr's know more than anyone
else on ALL subjects - just ask one.

I think the doctor owes you an apology for the crude and
abusive language that he used about your postings. It's
obvious that you have more knowledge on this subject
than he does, yet his high and mighty attitude led him to criticize
you - to quote "Total bullshit ..". How about it Doc, got
enough guts to admit you were wrong and opened your
big mouth about a subject that you are not knowledgeable
about? Maybe that's true of some of your other postings also?
Just because you're an MD doesn't make you a superior
being. It also does not mean that you know more about all
things in the world than all other humans beings. You may
know something about medicine - although we're not sure
how much - but that doesn't make you an expert on all
phases of medicine nor does it make you an expert on all
other subjects.


ashish....@gmail.com

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Jul 26, 2015, 9:58:48 AM7/26/15
to
On Tuesday, August 6, 1996 at 12:30:00 PM UTC+5:30, Harold Jaynes wrote:
> Come visit our web site to see the NEW powdered emergency oxygen system
> called emOx.....it's lightweight, portable, non-flammable,
> non-combustible, non-pressurized, non-corrosive and maintenance free.
> .....recently made available in the US....
>
> http://www.emox.com
> OXYGEN IS LIVE.....DON'T PRESSURIZE IT!!

it's a good product. but what about heat, since it is an exothermic reaction, what is the amount of heat generated and rise in temperature of water

ashish....@gmail.com

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Jul 26, 2015, 10:01:13 AM7/26/15
to
Hello

Since it is an exothermic reaction, please help me in figuring out the amount of heat generated and rise in temperature of water when sodium percarbonate is dissolved in water
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