Re: Can anyone do this?

86 views
Skip to first unread message

Big Bad Bob

unread,
Apr 20, 2017, 11:50:43 AM4/20/17
to
On 03/06/17 18:09, Mark4Posting so wittily quipped:
> In May 2016 I got a DUI in Cobb County, Georgia, which is a county in
> Atlanta, Georgia.

not much of a hack there. In fact, it's just a request for someone else
to risk jail time to help YOU out of a self-inflicted legal problem.

FYI you're supposed to include an obligatory hack in every post. like this:

ObHack: using aspirin as a cheaper alternative to pink liquid - seems
that the salycilates in aspirin have almost the same effect as the pink
liquid in a lot of cases. not always, but it CAN be just as effective.
that's assuming that aspirin + stomach doesn't cause you to upchuck, in
which case the pink liquid is definitely needed...

(strangely trying to remove the x-posts seems to have prevented the post
from working correctly - I'll have another go at it)


--
your story is so touching, but it sounds just like a lie
"Straighten up and fly right"

Eli the Bearded

unread,
Apr 20, 2017, 4:05:12 PM4/20/17
to
In alt.hackers, Big Bad Bob <BigBadBob-at...@testing.local> wrote:
> On 03/06/17 18:09, Mark4Posting so wittily quipped:
>> In May 2016 I got a DUI in Cobb County, Georgia, which is a county in
>> Atlanta, Georgia.
> not much of a hack there. In fact, it's just a request for someone else
> to risk jail time to help YOU out of a self-inflicted legal problem.

That post never made it to my server. I suspect self-moderation enforcement
problem.

ObHack: I've got some legacy systems that are largely unchanged code
from ~ 12 years ago[*]. Today they are running on Ubuntu 12.04 systems, but
support is running out on those, so I was looking to put it on Ubuntu
16.04. Well, the code for these was written in PHP. Turns out the PHP code
still has a few left-over PHP-4isms, which have been deprecated out of
existence in PHP 7, the version used in 16.04.

But it also turns out that every PHP file has a require() statement
to load the same config file. So I've been filling that config file out
with fixes. Like a new implementation of ereg() using preg_match().

[*] Once it was a complete website, but everything except one particular
set of pages has long been migrated to newer systems. So, there
has been many layers of hiding/disabling/turning into redirects
for many parts of it. I'm not counting that as "changes". The
complicated mess of source is there, even if the code has been
largely bypassed by virtue of the links being killed.

Elijah
------
for a long time this last bit has been "will be replaced" "real soon now"

Big Bad Bob

unread,
Aug 18, 2017, 2:09:57 PM8/18/17
to
On 04/20/17 13:05, Eli the Bearded wrote:
> In alt.hackers, Big Bad Bob <BigBadBob-at...@testing.local> wrote:
>> On 03/06/17 18:09, Mark4Posting so wittily quipped:
>>> In May 2016 I got a DUI in Cobb County, Georgia, which is a county in
>>> Atlanta, Georgia.
>> not much of a hack there. In fact, it's just a request for someone else
>> to risk jail time to help YOU out of a self-inflicted legal problem.
>
> That post never made it to my server. I suspect self-moderation enforcement
> problem.

really? hmmm... well at least the NG is getting some activity.

> But it also turns out that every PHP file has a require() statement
> to load the same config file. So I've been filling that config file out
> with fixes. Like a new implementation of ereg() using preg_match().

that's actually pretty convenient. on occasion I've done similar things
when porting windows-based code to non-windows systems, writing a
compatibility function(s) and put it into a header file, use #define
macros to keep the code as intact as possible, etc..

maintaining old code is a hack in and of itself, sometimes. 'bleeding
edge' updates are highly overrated.

ObHack - using 'patch' concrete to build ramps, etc. for use inside a
desert turtle's living space, which has playground sand and river rocks
and other stuff in it. OK haven't actually done it YET, but I bought
the materials... but the turtle kinda needs a ramp to get in/out of the
pool of water. [right now it's possible for him by climbing on rocks,
which he does]

AnotherAndroidHack - Android development lacks a proper "message box"
function. It's painful to make things like that happen the way it does
"pretty much everywhere else" from GTK to winders. The best compromise
solution wasn't originally my idea, as I got the idea reading other
people's solutions. But I think I nailed how to use it properly.

In short, create a static utility function (member of a common class,
maybe 'MainActivity') where you pass in a message as a String. The
function will use 'builder' to create the dialog box, but also create a
'handler' that throws an exception when you message it. You have the
dialog box's button 'onClick' send a message to the handler when the
user clicks on a button (and indicate which button, maybe as a static
public variable for the class). THEN, after you create/display the
dialog box, you call 'Looper.loop()' within a try/catch block, expecting
the "exception" (I know, exception-based stuff is LAME, but this is the
only way to do it, apparently).

THEN, when the user presses/taps a button in the dialog box, it sends a
message to the handler, which throws an exception, and busts out of
'Looper.loop()', with the static public variable optionally containing
information about the button that was pressed/tapped.

Simple, clean, works.

This is MUCH better than having to process this sort of thing
asynchronously, having to break things up into chunks just to satisfy
Google's somewhat limited vision of how things need to be. And, for
other 'async things' (like bluetooth, web server queries, network
activity in general) where you can NOT use the main UI thread, you can
use similar techniques. One caveat: It doesn't work if 'Looper.loop()'
will cause things to screw up, so you have to limit (slightly) where you
do this. But your average 'onClick' handler for buttons and menus and
stuff does it just fine.

And while you wait, the rest of the UI behaves as it ought to, nice and
clean without stuttering nor stalling.

Eli the Bearded

unread,
Oct 4, 2017, 3:27:03 PM10/4/17
to
In alt.hackers, Big Bad Bob <BigBadBob-at...@testing.local> wrote:
> ObHack - using 'patch' concrete to build ramps, etc. for use inside a
> desert turtle's living space, which has playground sand and river rocks
> and other stuff in it. OK haven't actually done it YET, but I bought
> the materials... but the turtle kinda needs a ramp to get in/out of the
> pool of water. [right now it's possible for him by climbing on rocks,
> which he does]

How did that work out? I've seen various grades of small batch concrete
used for art projects, things that might otherwise be done with plaster
of Paris. I've been considering tryting some projects, but haven't yet.

ObHack: New job, new office, new projects. But the best "hack" isn't
about the work at all. I'm in a small shared office in an old building
with windows that open. These are double hung sash, with counterweights,
a very typical early to mid 20th C window design. But for some reason,
the sash weight is too heavy. Unlock the window and it will slide,
slowly, all the way open.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sash_window

I know how to repair these sorts of windows, I've replaced broken sash
ropes in my own house, but it's a fair amount of work, and not something
I'm going to undertake in a rented office. So I found a way to wedge
something between the sliding window and the frame. Day one used wadded
paper, which was not easily wedged in or all that effective. Days two to
now use a plastic knife, the type given out with take out food. The
knife has a top re-enforcement that gives it a slight T shape. This is
perfect for a slim door-stop type action, and the handle makes it easy
to install and remove.

Next issue is always remembering to close it. There is no screen on the
window, and I've seen pigeons land on the outside sill to eye me. I have
no doubt they'd enter and explore if given the opportunity.

Elijah
------
sixth floor, 108 steps up when not using the (slow) elevator

Steven M. O'Neill

unread,
Oct 4, 2017, 4:03:12 PM10/4/17
to
Eli the Bearded <*@eli.users.panix.com> wrote:
>I know how to repair these sorts of windows, I've replaced broken sash
>ropes in my own house, but it's a fair amount of work, and not something
>I'm going to undertake in a rented office. So I found a way to wedge
>something between the sliding window and the frame. Day one used wadded
>paper, which was not easily wedged in or all that effective. Days two to
>now use a plastic knife, the type given out with take out food. The
>knife has a top re-enforcement that gives it a slight T shape. This is
>perfect for a slim door-stop type action, and the handle makes it easy
>to install and remove.

Nice, but I've always thought of you as more of a Unix hacker
than a windows hacker.

--
Steven O'Neill ste...@panix.com
Brooklyn, NY http://www.panix.com/~steveo

Eli the Bearded

unread,
Oct 6, 2017, 4:25:26 PM10/6/17
to
In alt.hackers, Steven M. O'Neill <ste...@panix.com> wrote:
> Eli the Bearded <*@eli.users.panix.com> wrote:
>> I know how to repair these sorts of windows, I've replaced broken sash
>> ropes in my own house, but it's a fair amount of work, and not something
>> I'm going to undertake in a rented office.
> Nice, but I've always thought of you as more of a Unix hacker
> than a windows hacker.

Well, not an MS Windows hacker. :^)

But where's your ObHack?

ObHack: Getting a freebie (swag) touch screen stylus and leaving it by
the kitchen sink. This allows control of a tablet or computer sitting
next to the sink without putting your wet fingers too near it. Ideal for
watching video while dish washing.

Elijah
------
might need to pause or rewind a bit when the water is too loud

Steven M. O'Neill

unread,
Oct 6, 2017, 4:45:09 PM10/6/17
to
Eli the Bearded <*@eli.users.panix.com> wrote:
>In alt.hackers, Steven M. O'Neill <ste...@panix.com> wrote:
>> Eli the Bearded <*@eli.users.panix.com> wrote:
>>> I know how to repair these sorts of windows, I've replaced broken sash
>>> ropes in my own house, but it's a fair amount of work, and not something
>>> I'm going to undertake in a rented office.
>> Nice, but I've always thought of you as more of a Unix hacker
>> than a windows hacker.
>
>Well, not an MS Windows hacker. :^)
>
>But where's your ObHack?

If one posts here without an ObHack is that like hacking the ng?

Big Bad Bob

unread,
Oct 15, 2017, 3:15:30 PM10/15/17
to
On 10/06/17 13:45, Steven M. O'Neill wrote:
> Eli the Bearded <*@eli.users.panix.com> wrote:
>> In alt.hackers, Steven M. O'Neill <ste...@panix.com> wrote:
>>> Eli the Bearded <*@eli.users.panix.com> wrote:
>>>> I know how to repair these sorts of windows, I've replaced broken sash
>>>> ropes in my own house, but it's a fair amount of work, and not something
>>>> I'm going to undertake in a rented office.
>>> Nice, but I've always thought of you as more of a Unix hacker
>>> than a windows hacker.
>>
>> Well, not an MS Windows hacker. :^)
>>
>> But where's your ObHack?
>
> If one posts here without an ObHack is that like hacking the ng?
>

not really, it's just that the original FAQ (see slightly earlier post)
basically says that you're supposed to post a hack with every comment.
That way we get more hacks. It doesn't have to be really inventive,
just everyday "I made a hack to solve this problem" stuff. You probably
do this all of the time, if you're a _real_ hacker. [and if you're
looking in this NG, you probably are].

hacks can involve computers, or the old-school bailing wire stuff.

work-related ObHack: a data collecting device that's potted in
fiberglass+epoxy (waterproof) had failed. To discover the cause of the
failure, I drilled holes in it to get to the solder pads (things like
the low-level programming interface pads, power supply pads, test
points, etc.). It has a fiberglass outer material, but the inside is
epoxy resin and relatively clear. So by comparing a 'bare board' to the
potted device, I could pretty much guess within a couple of millimeters
where the holes should be drilled, then get out Mr. Dremel and
drill/grind away until I can see pad under plastic. At that point, a
bit more care, then use solder-iron heat to melt the final bit of
plastic, and attach wires to appropriate points. It doesn't "fix" the
thing since it's not waterproof any more, but it DOES let me measure
things to find out why it broke.

Eli the Bearded

unread,
Oct 18, 2017, 6:38:27 PM10/18/17
to
In alt.hackers, Eli the Bearded <*@eli.users.panix.com> wrote:
> In alt.hackers, Big Bad Bob <BigBadBob-at...@testing.local> wrote:
>> ObHack - using 'patch' concrete to build ramps, etc. for use inside a
>> desert turtle's living space, which has playground sand and river rocks
...
> How did that work out? I've seen various grades of small batch concrete
> used for art projects, things that might otherwise be done with plaster
> of Paris. I've been considering tryting some projects, but haven't yet.

I've now purchased some patch concrete and some PoP. Hopefully find time
to get started this weekend.

ObHack:
I created a very small CGI script with a very short URL for quickly and
easily identifing my public IP address. 17 character "full" URL, but it
can be run from a typical Unix command line in 15 characters:

http://qaz.wtf/ip
123456789ABCDEF01
curl qaz.wtf/ip

On a QWERTY keyboard, QAZ is easy to type, and most people probably can
type WTF pretty easily.

Elijah
------
the command Amazon suggests for their AWS instances is so much longer

Eli the Bearded

unread,
Oct 28, 2017, 11:39:10 PM10/28/17
to
In alt.hackers, Eli the Bearded <*@eli.users.panix.com> wrote:
> I've now purchased some patch concrete and some PoP. Hopefully find time
> to get started this weekend.

I've started with the plaster of paris. Besides some fun toy things, I
made an extra stubby screwdriver out of a spare philips head bit and a
lug nut[1]. I put the screwdriver to use today, in a position that needed a
pretty small stubby if I wanted to take some screws out without moving
the stove.[2] It worked just fine.

https://i.imgur.com/sbuTCjw.jpg

Probably about 3cm tip to tip. I'm going to call making that tool my
hack. I'll probably look into making a socket based one for replacable
bits next.[3]

The lugnut has a reasonable amount of hold for turning screws that are
not very tight, and can be combined with a wrench for turning things
that are very tight, as seen in the photo.

[1] I have a collection of metal objects I've found on the road,
including quite a few lug nuts. The nice rusty-looking things I put
in the garden, but the lug nuts were too shiny for that. I have been
keeping them trying to think of a use, and was considering just
ballast weight.

[2] I ended up moving the stove anyway, but not as far as I would have
needed to remove the screw in the photo. I ran some bx from the
outlet behind the stove to next to the sink, so that I can plug an
in-counter dishwasher in. The previous dishwasher was a portable,
and I'm having to reconfigure a lot of the kitchen.[4]

[3] Next as in "next time I'm making a stubby". I've already made a
second batch of fun things. Silicone (or imitation silicone, it
feels like it, but it was much cheaper than I'd expect silicone to
be) ice cube molds work great with PoP. The objects pop out very
easily.

[4] Replacing the sink will be for tomorrow. The current sink is too
large, and cuts into the space that the dishwasher will need. I'm
scaling down from a 36" wide sink, on a 30" cabinet, to a 20"
wide one. When I installed the original sink, I cut a notch in the
side of the cabinet to let the sink spill out. Now the dishwasher
will go there, flush with the side of the cabinet.

Elijah
------
installed all of the kitchen cabinets himself about twelve years ago
Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages