Eric Clapton Chord Question

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Todd Powell

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Jul 27, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/27/96
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I have a brief question for all guitar players out there who have seen
Eric Clapton play live. There seems to be one chord shape he uses the
most in all of his songs. It is a bar chord, where he uses his pinky
and ring finger and keeps his middle finger out for all to see. It
doens't look like he uses the middle finger at all. Anyone who has seen
Clapton should recognize the chord I am talking about. If anyone knows
what type chord he is using, could you please e-mail me and provide
some info on playing the chord and the chords produced.

Thanks

Daniel Meijer

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Jul 28, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/28/96
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Todd Powell (po...@ix.netcom.com) wrote:

: I have a brief question for all guitar players out there who have seen

It's just your standard barre chord, with the root on the 5th string.
Clapton uses 1st finger to barre, keeps his middle finger straight, and uses
his 3rd/4th fingers to fret the rest of the chord.

Simple!

Dan

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| ^ ^ |
(| * * |)
---------oOOo---(__)---oOOo--------
Daniel Meijer - Sydney, Australia.
dme...@zeta.org.au
p303...@hardy.ocs.mq.edu.au
http://www.zeta.org.au/~dmeijer/dan
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Jon Canfield

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Jul 29, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/29/96
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In article <4tdurl$i...@sjx-ixn4.ix.netcom.com>, po...@ix.netcom.co says...

>
>
>I have a brief question for all guitar players out there who have seen
>Eric Clapton play live. There seems to be one chord shape he uses the
>most in all of his songs. It is a bar chord, where he uses his pinky
>and ring finger and keeps his middle finger out for all to see. It
>doens't look like he uses the middle finger at all. Anyone who has seen
>Clapton should recognize the chord I am talking about. If anyone knows
>what type chord he is using, could you please e-mail me and provide
>some info on playing the chord and the chords produced.
>
>Thanks
I think you're talking about a B (or C or D ...)

E A D G B e
| | | | | |
2 2 2 2 2 2
| | | | | |
| | 4 4 4 |


Jon

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The opinions expressed in this message are my own personal views
and do not reflect the official views of Microsoft Corporation.


Fry Guy

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Jul 29, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/29/96
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In article <4tik5n$p...@news.microsoft.com>, jon...@microsoft.com (Jon
Canfield) wrote:

What do you mean he's talking about a B? It's an A barre cord.

Pat L. Durante

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Jul 30, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/30/96
to Todd Powell

Todd Powell wrote:
>
> I have a brief question for all guitar players out there who have seen
> Eric Clapton play live. There seems to be one chord shape he uses the
> most in all of his songs. It is a bar chord, where he uses his pinky
> and ring finger and keeps his middle finger out for all to see. It
> doens't look like he uses the middle finger at all. Anyone who has seen
> Clapton should recognize the chord I am talking about. If anyone knows
> what type chord he is using, could you please e-mail me and provide
> some info on playing the chord and the chords produced.
>
> Thanks

Hmmm...Tough to say based on the information you give above, but
I'd be willing to bet that the chord shape you are describing is
a common voicing of a minor bar chord.

For example here is the shape of an Am bar chord (String are
from the Low E (6th string) to the High E (1st String) left to right):

EADGBE

****** (Bar 1st Finger to cover all strings at the 5th fret)
||||||
|**||| (Use your ring finger on the 5th string and your pinky on the
|||||| 4th string.)

Note that this is a "movable chord voicing" which means that you simple
change the root note (The one on the 6th string) to a different position
on the neck and you still have a minor chord...so moving that shape up
one fret would give you an A#m chord...two frets...Bm chord.

If you have web-access here are a couple of valuable guitar chord
resources that you can check out:

http://www.pacificsw.com/guitar/chord.html
http://www.guitar.net/cotw/thisweek/
http://www.guitar.net/cotw/archives.html

Hope that helps!

Cheers,
Pat

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^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-

Pat L. Durante pldu...@tasc.com
Staff MTS http://users.aol.com/durante
TASC Inc., Reading MA 01867

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Doug deWerd

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Jul 30, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/30/96
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> I think you're talking about a B (or C or D ...)
>
> E A D G B e
> | | | | | |
> 2 2 2 2 2 2
> | | | | | |
> | | 4 4 4 |
>
>
> Jon
>
> --
> The opinions expressed in this message are my own personal views
> and do not reflect the official views of Microsoft Corporation.

>>What do you mean he's talking about a B? It's an A barre cord.

Got to disagree.. the chord listed above is in fact a B, but it uses the
A barre chord SHAPE.

Doug


James Robins

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Jul 31, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/31/96
to

Todd Powell wrote:
>
> I have a brief question for all guitar players out there who have seen
> Eric Clapton play live. There seems to be one chord shape he uses the
> most in all of his songs. It is a bar chord, where he uses his pinky
> and ring finger and keeps his middle finger out for all to see. It
> doens't look like he uses the middle finger at all. Anyone who has seen
> Clapton should recognize the chord I am talking about. If anyone knows
> what type chord he is using, could you please e-mail me and provide
> some info on playing the chord and the chords produced.
>
> Thanks

OK, no problemo. EC is playing a barre chord...like your basic A, but
it can be moved up and down the neck...kinda like the barre E.

If your index finger is 1, middle finger 2, ring finger 3 and pinky 4,
it looks like this:

| | | | | |
1 1 1 1 1 1
| | | | | |
| | 3 3 3 |
| | | | | |

The pinky (4) is stacked on top of the ring finger (3) to make sure that
all 3 strings involved get pressed down firmly. If you play this chord
on the 7th fret (the index finger on the 7th, that is), you've got an E.
Slide the whole thing down 2 frets and it's a D. Put those two together
and you've got a song like "Cocaine." I've also seen his stack the ring
finger on top of the pinky...making the 3's shown above to be 4's.

As for the appearance that he's flipping a bird at the world, well, it's
time to venture into the world of culture. OK, in the US, the middle
finger is...well..an obvious statement. In British culture, it's
meaningless. Now then, what do the British use as "the finger"? Since
you asked, they use our "peace sign" (the 2-finger "V"), but with the
hand turned around, so that their palm faces them instead of facing
outward. Since Clapton is very British, the "U.S.-style" finger is no
big deal, just as the reverse peace sign is no big deal to us. By the way,
our peace sign (the palm forward V with 2 fingers, means "victory" in
England).

Now, as for Spock's "Live Long and Prosper" 4-finger split V sign....I
don't know, but if he stuck a metal slide bar in there and had a nice
guitar, he could do a great Vulcanized Allman Brothers slide routine.

Ain't galatic culture great?

Jim n Tejas

GTRXMAN

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Aug 2, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/2/96
to

As described before, it's a root 5 barre chord.


Ed

P.S.

In a previous posting, this was referred to as an A chord. There's no way
this could be an A as there are no A's in this fingering. It's a B chord.

Thomas Connell

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Nov 27, 2021, 2:36:14 AM11/27/21
to
Actually , it can be said that one is Bm chord , but adding chromatic minor technique. It is originally played in A key by Eric Clapton. In A family key. Chose B is a called Dim Key.
According to music theory , keyframe goes like this theoretical building except on some Jazz and blues songs. The family keys frame is like that below :

Major Minor Minor Major Major Minor Dim
C Dm Em F G Am Bdim

D Em Gbm Abm Bb C#m Cdim

A Bm C#m D E F#m Gdim

By looking that family chords chart , If you play it in A key , it support to be called Hbm instead of calling Bb if someone is so serious about musical teams usage.
Bb is not included in Key A chords frame building. Maybe Eric Clapton is one of the greatest guitarists of all time , he might want to show off his musical terms usage.
After playing (Hbm) Bm chord , chord E comes. The note that Hbm is played is on the descent note like "Cos I know" . He just want to use Lower octave. So that he used one and half note higher but
sounded like lower octave. That's why he writes Hbm in "Tears in Heaven".
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