What is "milk leg"

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Eddie Berry

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Feb 8, 1996, 3:00:00 AM2/8/96
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In this Elite Group, Glenn Merkord <gmer...@zycor.lgc.com> dared to
post such wisdom:

>|My gggrandmother died of "milk leg". Does anyone know what that is?
>|
>|Glenn Merkord

Glenn, the medical dictionary says "milk leg. A swelling and
inflammation of the leg caused by phlebitis of the femoral vein and
sometimes associated with childbirth."

-- Eddie Berry Email to: ebe...@ix.netcom.com

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Leonard W. Riley III

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Feb 8, 1996, 3:00:00 AM2/8/96
to Glenn Merkord
Glenn Merkord wrote:
>
> My gggrandmother died of "milk leg". Does anyone know what that is?
>
> Glenn Merkord
> gmer...@zycor.lgc.com
> Austin, Texas
Glenn,
Webster's New International Dictionary, Second Edition, defines
Milk Leg as "a painful general swelling of the leg, usually in women at
the time of childbirth, caused by an inflammation and clotting in the
veins, and characterized by a white appearance due to an accumulation of
serium in the subcutaneous tissue; phlegmasia alba dolens."
--
Leonard W. Riley III
117 Acorn Dr. Roseburg, OR. 97470-9401

Dr. Andrew McCaddon

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Feb 8, 1996, 3:00:00 AM2/8/96
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In article <4fcuk2$8...@ixnews4.ix.netcom.com>, Thelma Carlson
<tcar...@popd.ix.netcom.com> writes

>Glenn Merkord <gmer...@zycor.lgc.com> wrote:
>>My gggrandmother died of "milk leg". Does anyone know what that is?
>
>
>Milk leg was a term used for a complication of childbirth.
>It probably got the name because it occurred about the time
>a woman"s milk came in. I have heard the term, but do not
>know what it would be called now.
>
>
>
>
Probably known as "phlegmasia alba dolens", though this itself is an old
term I believe. I have never seen it, but remember reading about it. It
is due to obstruction to the lymphatic drainage of the lower limb,
occuring shortly after childbirth, probably following an infection of
the womb? I think the other reason that it may have been known as milk
leg maybe that fluid that exudes from such a swollen leg is lymphatic
fluid? Also, the skin itself would be white or milky coloured? Perhaps
an obstetrician out there could provide more info? Also, try one of the
medical science newsgroups, ie sci.med
Hope this helps,
Best wishes
Andrew
--
Dr. Andrew McCaddon, Tel 0044-01978-840034 "The Internet-
Gardden Road Surgery, Fax 0044-01978-845782 One small step for me....
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North Wales. LL14 2EN. 'phone bill!" :-)

Sharon King

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Feb 9, 1996, 3:00:00 AM2/9/96
to tcar...@popd.ix.netcom.com
To the best of my awareness "milk leg" or "milk leg fever" is
another name for undelent fever, a problem that was relatively
common before the pasteurization of milk. Unpasturized milk was
the carrier of the bacteria that caused the affliction. My
grandfather had it (and nearly died) in the late 1940's. I
recall my folks buying a pasturizer that sat on the kitchen
counter just after Grandpa's illness and being terribly concerned
than no one drank milk before it was processed. One of the
fringe benefits of living on a farm and having fresh milk
available!


Sharon King

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Feb 9, 1996, 3:00:00 AM2/9/96
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Laikie

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Feb 10, 1996, 3:00:00 AM2/10/96
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What used to be called milk leg is a form of postpartum phlebitis. I
checked my list of old outmoded medical terms, and my own memory as well.
Why? Because I had this complication of pregnancy/delivery in 1967 and
again in 1970. Developed thromophlebitis in both legs the last week
before delivery and was flat on my back for ten days afterward. Fine
health, now and makes a great story to tell!!


Catherine Di Pietro

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Feb 10, 1996, 3:00:00 AM2/10/96
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Greetings,

Milk leg is thrombosis in femoral artery usually after childbirth;
death from a pulmonary embolism or pelvic infection (usual cause).
Ref: _Family Diseases - Are You At Risk?_ Myra Vanderpool Gromley
(c) 1989 Genealogical Publishing Co., Balt. MD.

Hope this helps -
Cathy

John W Stephens

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Feb 14, 1996, 3:00:00 AM2/14/96
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Hi Glenn
Milk Leg is the name which used to be given to a weakness of a woman's
legs after having giving birth to a number of children and nursing them
over a long period of time.... "Osteoporosis"?????
John


On 5 Feb 1996, Glenn Merkord wrote:

> My gggrandmother died of "milk leg". Does anyone know what that is?
>

Kim Ivey

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Feb 15, 1996, 3:00:00 AM2/15/96
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In Article<4fecgi$ith@vixc>, <sk...@vixa.voyager.net> write:
> Path: news.companet.net!jolt.pagesat.net!pagesat.net!news.uoregon.edu!news.u.washington.edu!news.alt.net!news1.alt.net!news.oz.net!news.sprintlink.net!news.zeitgeist.net!sf.net!news1.zap.net!news1.i1.net!news.exodus.net!uunet!in2.uu.net!tank.news.pipex.net!pipex!usenet.eel.ufl.edu!gatech!nntp.ne
trex.net!news.voyager.net!news
> From: Sharon King <sk...@vixa.voyager.net>
> Newsgroups: alt.genealogy
> Subject: Re: What is "milk leg"
> Date: 9 Feb 1996 02:45:38 GMT
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Milk leg is known today as phlebitis, a inflamation of the blood vessels in
the leg. The reason it was called milk leg is because the legs turned white,
like the color of milk. Milk leg and milk fever are two entirely different
diseases.

Kim Ivey <ki...@companet.net>


fsim...@emi.net

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Feb 16, 1996, 3:00:00 AM2/16/96
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Isn't "Milk Leg" now referred to as Phlebitis?

Terry


Laikie

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Feb 17, 1996, 3:00:00 AM2/17/96
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Yes, milk leg is inflammation of the leg veins (phlebitis) following
delivery; in my case it also preceded delivery by a few days in 1967 and
in 1970, due to sluggish circulation. It was a serious condition that
landed me in the hospital even then. Imagine what havoc it caused in the
19th century. Some of you may also remember when Pres. Nixon had
phlebitis. Presumably in his case it was NOT a complication of pregnancy.

Sandy Lassen

Patricia Schade

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Feb 18, 1996, 3:00:00 AM2/18/96
to js...@gladstone.uoregon.edu
Milk leg was called that because it occured about the time a woman's
milk came in...a little after the birth of her child. It was
phlebitis...a blood clot that made the leg swell up...undisolved it
could be fatal..it is not osteoporosis!

John W Stephens

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Feb 19, 1996, 3:00:00 AM2/19/96
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Hi Everybody,
I guess you are correct. My recollection of Milk Leg was incorrect. As
I remember it however, the women who had just given birth in the 1920's,
when I was a boy, thought it was connected with nursing.
They were all very much aware of it and justifiably afraid.
Sorry to have misinformed you.
John

Stuart Nixon

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Feb 19, 1996, 3:00:00 AM2/19/96
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A good source for questions of this kind is a newly published book, A TO
ZAX--Third Edition--A Comprehensive Dictionary for Genealogists &
Historians by Evans. One place this book is available is Hearthstone
Bookshop, Alexandria, VA, 703-960-0086. This book defines milk leg as a
thrombosis of the femoral (thigh) vein. Milk leg was a circulatory
problem caused by women remaining in bed too long after childbirth.

Arnold & Jennifer Pomerance

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Feb 21, 1996, 3:00:00 AM2/21/96
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> problem caused by women remaining in bed too long after childbirth.My 1884 medical book describes all the symptoms and the treatment used
way back then. Beef tea and gruel, anyone? Add to that rubber or
flannel bandages from toes to thigh, alternate hot and cold sponging and
the admonition to stay in bed!

Jennifer

EGUL IZ

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Feb 26, 1996, 3:00:00 AM2/26/96
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Milk leg refers to phlebitis (legs) afflicting a postpartem woman,
probably because she was breast feeding, but not relating to brst,
feeding. Probably related to too much bedrest and lack of activity
postpartem.

sami...@gmail.com

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May 13, 2020, 9:40:42 AM5/13/20
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My father was diagnosed with Milk Leg in S. Dakota after working in wheat fields in 1921. My Uncle was sent from NY to
claim the body. Alas, by the time he got there,my father had recovered.

Doug Chadduck

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May 13, 2020, 12:25:17 PM5/13/20
to
On 5/13/2020 6:40 AM, sami...@gmail.com wrote:
> My father was diagnosed with Milk Leg in S. Dakota after working in wheat fields in 1921. My Uncle was sent from NY to
> claim the body. Alas, by the time he got there,my father had recovered.
>
google "milk leg" and it pops right up

Doug Chadduck

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May 13, 2020, 12:32:46 PM5/13/20
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On 5/13/2020 6:40 AM, sami...@gmail.com wrote:
> My father was diagnosed with Milk Leg in S. Dakota after working in wheat fields in 1921. My Uncle was sent from NY to
> claim the body. Alas, by the time he got there,my father had recovered.
>
Also, I wonder if he was in Canistota S.D. There was supposedly (old
family story) a lot of some would say quack/snake oil doctors working
out of there back in the day. Couldn't find any verification of that so
don't know how valid that was. My dad went there for a couple weeks Dec.
'48. Was just curious because neither my brother or I have any idea why
he went there. Now days it has a major chiropractic center.
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