"Clearing" your palate

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Eric White

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May 11, 2002, 12:24:35 PM5/11/02
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Greetings -

In another forum a contributor mentioned that one could effectively
"clear" ones palate by taking a small bite of celery between tastes.
Interesting concept I had not heard of, which got me to thinking -
what methods do you find work?

Personally, I prefer not to clear my palate at all between flights of
the same type of wine. Then between fights or if switching from one
type of wine to another, simply a bit of water.

How about the rest of you? Any comments on the celery suggestion?

Eric White
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RobertsonChai

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May 11, 2002, 3:58:57 PM5/11/02
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Eric writes,

>
>How about the rest of you? Any comments on the celery suggestion?

I also use water between wines in a flight. When tasting reds, I'll also have
some bread handy (as long as it's not sweet or salty).

Celery sounds like an excellent palate-cleanser. I've often wondered also
about "baby" carrots, which are so widely available these days: would they also
work? They certainly are convenient.

---Bob

Winebase

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May 11, 2002, 6:01:02 PM5/11/02
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If you are tasting a fairly long flight of wines, then a quick swig of water is
all you really need every now and again. Anything else just detracts from the
experience - I mean we are spitting, aren't we?

Mark Lipton

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May 11, 2002, 1:55:29 PM5/11/02
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Winebase wrote:

If we *are'nt* spitting, trying to clear the palate is pointless anyway... FWIW,
when tasting flights of wine, I just spit and use bread only when making a
transition between types of wine (especially from heavier to lighter).

Mark Lipton


Joseph B. Rosenberg

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May 11, 2002, 7:43:55 PM5/11/02
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I use the Reedle "Tedium" series glasses for my palate cleansing, using only
organic water, free range, as my liquid after visiting my dentiste-palate
adjuster, Sidney, da tongue tickler, Fishbein, who scrubs my tongue, with
unguents and laser beams and the inside of my mouth with cod fish oil.

Joe "Beppe" Rosenberg
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cwd...@webtv.net

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May 11, 2002, 8:42:47 PM5/11/02
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Plain French style bread or the very bland water biscuits work for me.
If I have been eating something strong, a bit of water helps also. If I
have been eating something full of strong spices and hot pepper, only
time will help. I am thinking more of mature wines with a meal rather
than massive tastings of young wines where spitting is necessary.

dysprosium

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May 11, 2002, 11:42:17 PM5/11/02
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Well, it's no secret that bread and cheese are excellent palette cleansers.
A good nose cleanser is freshly ground coffee...when you're at a big tasting
event, bring a little bag along, and have a sniff, so you can enjoy the
bouquet and aroma of more wines.
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Michael Pronay

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May 12, 2002, 3:14:05 AM5/12/02
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cwd...@webtv.net wrote:

> If I have been eating something full of strong spices and hot
> pepper, only time will help.

The same holds true when having tasted sweet wines.

M.

Anders Tørneskog

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May 12, 2002, 7:36:42 AM5/12/02
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"Michael Pronay" <pro...@gmx.at> skrev i melding
news:abl4ns$j1cji$5...@ID-67468.news.dfncis.de...

> The same holds true when having tasted sweet wines.
>
Indeed. Bitburger beer and then black coffee and a Trester helps, however..
:-) Anders


Leland Myrick

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May 13, 2002, 9:51:40 AM5/13/02
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dysprosium wrote:

>Well, it's no secret that bread and cheese are excellent palette cleansers.
>A good nose cleanser is freshly ground coffee...when you're at a big tasting
>event, bring a little bag along, and have a sniff, so you can enjoy the
>bouquet and aroma of more wines.

I find that cheese can affect the taste of wine, so I tend to stay away from that. Usually just water.

Leland
WineReader.com
http://www.winereader.com

Mike Tommasi

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May 13, 2002, 9:57:24 AM5/13/02
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On Sun, 12 May 2002 03:42:17 GMT, "dysprosium" <dyspr...@shaw.ca>
wrote:

>Well, it's no secret that bread and cheese are excellent palette cleansers.
>A good nose cleanser is freshly ground coffee...when you're at a big tasting
>event, bring a little bag along, and have a sniff, so you can enjoy the
>bouquet and aroma of more wines.

Right, I will try it next time by bringing a well seasoned banon or an
epoisses. With coffee as a chaser.

Seriously, cheese as a cleanser?

Mike

Josh Passell

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May 13, 2002, 10:19:33 AM5/13/02
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In article <3chvdu4imdkuhqmq7...@4ax.com>, Mike Tommasi
<mi...@tommasi.org> wrote:


> Seriously, cheese as a cleanser?

So true, Mike. The mold in the cheese tends to mix with the mold on the
shower curtain to create a truly ignoble rot all around the tub. And bread
is useless for scrubbing, unless it's very stale, and even then only
briefly.

Josh

Mark Lipton

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May 13, 2002, 6:51:10 AM5/13/02
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Josh Passell wrote:

LMAO!

Mark Lipton

Dale Williams

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May 13, 2002, 2:50:42 PM5/13/02
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It seems to be de rigueur for tastings to have cheeses out, but I generally
avoid trying them. Far from clearing, they affect my palate. Mostly I just have
water and a little bread as I move to a different type of wine. Obviously time
helps too- if I'm at a store tasting, I shop (or window shop) between tables.
If I'm at a large-scale tasting (one of those charity fundraisers or a big
touring exhibition), I'll carry a book or magazine and periodically just stop
and take a break to prevent palate fatigue. If I'm going to a tasting in an
unfamiliar setting, I'll stick bottled water in my pocket to ensure I can
occasionally clear my palate.
Dale

Dale Williams
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rochepot

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May 15, 2002, 1:49:57 AM5/15/02
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you are right Leland, water is the best but prefer using mineral sparkling
water.

Yannick TREFFOT
www.relais-du-chateau.com
Burgundy


lotusart

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May 15, 2002, 4:32:49 PM5/15/02
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Its common to taste with cheese and fruit but both can influence someone
with a very acute sense of smell. I have been distracted by outside odors
when tasting wine thinking I was picking up some very pleasant vanilla
smells ( when there was a unburnt incense nearby) . The pyrazines in celery
could easily throwoff the scent of many wines. Apples the standard for
munching on between sips may have smells which are often applied as
positives in wine descriptions. Cheese,the fat ( coats the tongue and
reduces sensitivity) and protein ( binds with tannins) ( the adage sell
with cheese and buy with apples) can interfere taste as well as contribute
olfactory (cheesy odor) . Water would be the logical choice , carbonated
would add somatasensetion as well as having a detergent effect removing the
natural protein covering our tongues; this makes for "sharper" tastes. Of
course all this is theoretical. lotusart
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