Going down under ...

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Nils Gustaf Lindgren

oläst,
2 aug. 2006 08:55:532006-08-02
till
Hello,
Old hands in the NG will no doubt be amazed to find that the Dynamic Duo
(self + Xina) are leaving the old haunts of Europe for a Land Down Under, to
wit, Australia, sometimes also called Oz (and many other things). Yes, we
will depart for two weeks, on business mostly - conference voyage, this, and
very little time for idleness. One day (and two nughts), to be precise. We
will be stationed in Sydney, so that would appear to cut down possible wine
explorations to ... Hunter Valley? Am I correct? I have also heard that
outings, by coach, to various wine producers, is available. Are they
worthwhile? Did the gent who made similar enquiries (Salil) beginning of
June complete that voyage and what were his experiences?
I know that Google-san is my friend but, unfortunately, he is very prolix
in his advice - I did Hunter Valley wine tourism and got 534 000 hits!!

Cheers

Nils Gustaf


Ed Rasimus

oläst,
2 aug. 2006 09:40:592006-08-02
till

All the way from Europe to Oz for "one day (and two nights)"?? I
couldn't recover from the jet lag in less than 36 hours, even when I
was thirty years younger. Seems hardly worth the effort. Couldn't you
finagle a four or five day intermission once you've traveled all that
way? Once I'd done the half-a-world jaunt, it would be difficult to
keep me from getting to Barossa and McLaren Vale!


Ed Rasimus
Fighter Pilot (USAF-Ret)
"When Thunder Rolled"
www.thunderchief.org
www.thundertales.blogspot.com

Nils Gustaf Lindgren

oläst,
2 aug. 2006 09:47:582006-08-02
till

"Ed Rasimus" <rasimus...@verizon.net> skrev i meddelandet
news:uma1d2h9lvb5a6i0l...@4ax.com...

> On Wed, 02 Aug 2006 12:55:53 GMT, "Nils Gustaf Lindgren"
> <gar...@drchips.se> wrote:

> All the way from Europe to Oz for "one day (and two nights)"?? I

As I said, we are there for conferences (two of them), so we will stay for a
good two weeks in Sydney. The extent of our idleness is from afternoon Fri
Sept 8 to evening Sun Sept 10.

> Couldn't you
> finagle a four or five day intermission once you've traveled all that
> way?

No. Besides, I would be extremely frustrated by all the beautiful wines I
would be unable to bring home, due to weight limitations. To the point where
I have seriously thought of not visiting any wine region at all, and rather
indulhe in a day of vigorous hiking.

Cheers

Nils Gustaf


Mark Lipton

oläst,
2 aug. 2006 09:55:452006-08-02
till
Ed Rasimus wrote:

> All the way from Europe to Oz for "one day (and two nights)"?? I
> couldn't recover from the jet lag in less than 36 hours, even when I
> was thirty years younger. Seems hardly worth the effort. Couldn't you
> finagle a four or five day intermission once you've traveled all that
> way? Once I'd done the half-a-world jaunt, it would be difficult to
> keep me from getting to Barossa and McLaren Vale!

Aw, c'mon, Ed! Fighter pilots getting jet lag? What next? Motion
sickness? :p

Seriously, I find that I get *less* jet lag going trans-Pacific than I
do going trans-Atlantic. I've flown across the Pacific 3 times now,
each time with no appreciable jet lag. (I get enough sleep on the plane
to help offset the ca. 12 hour time change and arrive in the evening so
that I soon go to sleep for the night). The toughest trip for me is the
overnight flight from the US to Europe, where we arrive in the a.m. and
have to stay awake for 12-14 hours to get our sleep rescheduled. The
last time I tried that I had to drive from Paris to Lyon, not the thing
to do when sleep-deprived.

Mark Lipton

Nils Gustaf Lindgren

oläst,
2 aug. 2006 10:27:332006-08-02
till

"Mark Lipton" <not...@eudrup.ude> skrev i meddelandet
news:09WdnSlUXup8M03Z...@insightbb.com...

THis is exactly the experience of my more-travelled friends - east-to-west
is OK, while west-to-east is a serious bummer.
This would be a reason to always do the round trip - going in a westerly
direction, of course.

Cheers

Nils Gustaf


Ed Rasimus

oläst,
2 aug. 2006 10:54:172006-08-02
till
On Wed, 02 Aug 2006 13:47:58 GMT, "Nils Gustaf Lindgren"
<gar...@drchips.se> wrote:

>
>"Ed Rasimus" <rasimus...@verizon.net> skrev i meddelandet
>news:uma1d2h9lvb5a6i0l...@4ax.com...
>> On Wed, 02 Aug 2006 12:55:53 GMT, "Nils Gustaf Lindgren"
>> <gar...@drchips.se> wrote:
>
>> All the way from Europe to Oz for "one day (and two nights)"?? I
>
>As I said, we are there for conferences (two of them), so we will stay for a
>good two weeks in Sydney. The extent of our idleness is from afternoon Fri
>Sept 8 to evening Sun Sept 10.

It sounds as though you are entirely too dedicated! All work and no
play makes Nils a hungry and thirsty tourist!


>
>> Couldn't you
>> finagle a four or five day intermission once you've traveled all that
>> way?
>
>No. Besides, I would be extremely frustrated by all the beautiful wines I
>would be unable to bring home, due to weight limitations. To the point where
>I have seriously thought of not visiting any wine region at all, and rather
>indulhe in a day of vigorous hiking.

I've never indulged in ascetism myself. In fact, one weekend away from
the war during my experiences in Southeast Asia I took a squadron mate
to Bangkok--after two days he remarked that I was the "greatest
hedonist he had ever known." I try not to let my fans down to this
day.

Ed Rasimus

oläst,
2 aug. 2006 10:58:422006-08-02
till
On Wed, 02 Aug 2006 09:55:45 -0400, Mark Lipton <not...@eudrup.ude>
wrote:

>Ed Rasimus wrote:
>
>> All the way from Europe to Oz for "one day (and two nights)"?? I
>> couldn't recover from the jet lag in less than 36 hours, even when I
>> was thirty years younger. Seems hardly worth the effort. Couldn't you
>> finagle a four or five day intermission once you've traveled all that
>> way? Once I'd done the half-a-world jaunt, it would be difficult to
>> keep me from getting to Barossa and McLaren Vale!
>
>Aw, c'mon, Ed! Fighter pilots getting jet lag? What next? Motion
>sickness? :p

No, never had a motion sickness problem. But I am seriously
acrophobic. High bridges absolutely petrify me. My wife laughed at me
for several days after I aborted my trip to the top of the Eifel Tower
when I had to transit from one elevator to another at the second
level. The wide-eyed panic as I edged across the open ironwork gave
her great cause for amusement.

>
>Seriously, I find that I get *less* jet lag going trans-Pacific than I
>do going trans-Atlantic. I've flown across the Pacific 3 times now,
>each time with no appreciable jet lag. (I get enough sleep on the plane
>to help offset the ca. 12 hour time change and arrive in the evening so
>that I soon go to sleep for the night). The toughest trip for me is the
>overnight flight from the US to Europe, where we arrive in the a.m. and
>have to stay awake for 12-14 hours to get our sleep rescheduled. The
>last time I tried that I had to drive from Paris to Lyon, not the thing
>to do when sleep-deprived.

Either ocean, either direction, I would be wiped out. The Atlantic
trip actually was always more taxing. The longer Pacific crossing
usually just meant going to bed upon arrival and waking up at the next
morning light. Strangely enough, with 23 years in the business, I
never did an ocean crossing in my own jet. Didn't avoid the
experience, simply was never in a unit that did it.

Salil

oläst,
2 aug. 2006 11:25:342006-08-02
till
Nils Gustaf Lindgren wrote:
> worthwhile? Did the gent who made similar enquiries (Salil) beginning of
> June complete that voyage and what were his experiences?

Yes, Salil did complete that voyage and had a quite phenomenal
experience.

Firstly, you'll most probably need to travel there by coach. The
Hunter's about 2 hours away from Sydney, and unless you know the route
there, the area and can drive there and back, it's the easiest way to
go about it. There are a lot of pretty good tour operators around - I
went there on one day with Boutique Wine Tours (88 AUD for the weekday,
no lunch) and as the name implies, they tend to focus on slightly
smaller wineries.
The service is quite good - the buses are excellent (small, 14 seater
Mercedes buses with a very good driver/guide), and a day trip with them
included two wineries pre-lunch, then lunch (either with them at extra
cost, or on your own - and there are a couple of restaurants/bistros in
the Hunter Valley Gardens area where they stop), time to wander around
and do more tasting (Hunter Cellars is a good destination to just taste
and buy a few wines from various wineries in the area - alternatively,
there's a cheese factory and a chocolate shop in the vicinity), and
then another winery after lunch. And of course picking/dropping off at
the hotel in the city.
They are quite flexible though in the itinerary - I was keen on going
to McWilliams' Mount Pleasant and had specified that when making my
booking, so the bus driver was able to accomodate me in the schedule
and drove me there separately for my pre-booked tour/tasting there.

I went on another day with a friend who drove, so we managed to see
some of the other wineries that the wine tour didn't cover. Among those
we visited;

- Audrey Wilkinson (with the Boutique Wines group) - nice cellar door,
very friendly staff with a great tasting experience - wines were very
good overall; a couple of reds stood out and the dessert wines
(Semillon, Muscat, Liqueur Verdelho) were wonderful. Good chance you
might go there if you do go with the Boutique Wine tours company.

- Mount Pleasant - not that great in terms of service/the tour, but the
Semillon was *very* good. They're open from 9-5 IIRC for tastings, but
you need to be there specifically at 10 am if you want to do the winery
tour.

- Tempus Two - went with a friend here, and this was amazing. It's got
a pretty bad rep in terms of service/etc from a lot of
websites/reviewers, but we went on a Tuesday morning and it was empty.
Great one to one service, impromptu tour and fantastic wines. Worth
going out of your way to see this place, and take your time - some of
the wines are excellent (and they've got an incredible range - even
'Traminer, Pinot Gris and Zinfandel)

- Brokenwood - heard many good things about the wines here, so went on
a separate trip here. Bit of a let down, as a number of their wines
weren't available for tasting (particularly the Graveyard Vineyard
wines, which are very well known), and there wasn't much there in terms
of hospitality/service.

- Peterson's Champagne House (with the Boutique wines group) - group
tastings with the company were very well organised, with some really
nice sparkling wines. Quite a different experience in the Valley - if
you're keen on sparkling wines, definitely worth checking out (and they
also had a pretty good fortified Muscat).

Definitely would suggest going to Tempus Two if you can manage it -
either speak to your tour group if you are going with one (and ensure
you get a fair bit of time there - we took almost 2 hrs), and would
give a thumbs up to Boutique Wine tours if you are considering it.

BTW, if you've got any further queries on my Hunter trip, just drop me
an email (use salilbenegal at gmail dot com) and I'll be glad to help
out.

Cheers,

Salil

Nils Gustaf Lindgren

oläst,
2 aug. 2006 12:01:542006-08-02
till

"Ed Rasimus" <rasimus...@verizon.net> skrev i meddelandet
news:kue1d293hbv893gqs...@4ax.com...

> On Wed, 02 Aug 2006 13:47:58 GMT, "Nils Gustaf Lindgren"
> <gar...@drchips.se> wrote:
>
>>
>>"Ed Rasimus" <rasimus...@verizon.net> skrev i meddelandet
>>news:uma1d2h9lvb5a6i0l...@4ax.com...
>>> On Wed, 02 Aug 2006 12:55:53 GMT, "Nils Gustaf Lindgren"
>>> <gar...@drchips.se> wrote:

> It sounds as though you are entirely too dedicated! All work and no
> play makes Nils a hungry and thirsty tourist!

;)


>
> I've never indulged in ascetism myself.

I never did consider hiking as ascetism. Been doing it since I was this high
[holding out hand, indicating 6'3"].

Cheers

Nils Gustaf


Brian Boutel

oläst,
2 aug. 2006 18:40:122006-08-02
till

The overnight trans-atlantic flight from the E coast isn't called the
redeye for nothing. It's not long enough to get a reasonable amount of
sleep. The longer W Coast to Europe flight is much easier.

I have convinced myself that jet-lag is avoidable with the right
attitude and a couple of sleeping pills. I go to Europe every 2-3 years
on average, often stopping in the US (usually E coast, as my son lived
in NYC for 8 years). I count 20 Pacific crossings, 14 Atlantic, and 5
via the far east, with another coming up next week (via Sydney and
Bangkok). Flying E or W doesn't make much difference, as long as you get
some sleep on the plane, and go to bed at a reasonable time on the first
night in the new timezone.

--brian


--
Wellington, New Zealand

"What's life? Life's easy. A quirk of matter. Nature's way of keeping
meat fresh."

Matt S

oläst,
3 aug. 2006 00:13:022006-08-03
till

My old NYC based corporate travelling buddy always claimed that too.
His trips down under were always the full circle. Personally, I
always found adjusting/preparing the day before into the time I was
travelling to, and a good kip on the plane meant jet lag was marginal.

Hunter Valley is a couple of hours west out of Sydney Nils, and yes,
the only reasonable region worth visiting given your time restraints.
I am sure you know the HV is the home of Australia's sensational
ageworthy Semillons, and if that is your penchant, do not miss Tyrells
(Belfords and Vat 1's), or the McWilliams MTPleasant's Sem's (esp.
the Lovedale and Elizabeth's)and don't leave without tasting the
O'Shea Shiraz!! If Brokenwood is on the schedule, try the Graveyard
Shiraz, and their Sem's are also quite delicious.

Of interest may be Len Evans' own vineyard, (he is a well known wine
writer in Oz) and the Evan's Family winery in the Lower Hunter
specialises in something rare in Oz...Gamay.

If Chardonnay is your go, Lakes Folly (Saturdays only I believe),
Margan Family (shiraz too is excellent!), and Scarborough release
their Chards at 5 years old,

The historic Lindemans winery is worth a call, and is open 7 days. As
their portfolio is very large, I am sure a full complemnt of varietals
will greet you.

Saddlers Creek is a personal favourite,and known in certain years to
release block specific wines. Eqqus Shiraz is as Aussie as they come.
Wyndham Estate is at the northern edge of the Lower Hunter, although
a little isolated it has a huge range of wines, and often are selling
off back vintages and odd lots at the cellar door.

All the above wineries are in the Lower HV, and the more exciting of
the 2 GI's. Upper Hunter is predominantly the monolithic Roemount's
territory, and travel between vineyards a little longer.

Hope you enjoy your brief stay.

hooroo...


>

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