Baracho Beans

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Roy Dunn

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Aug 7, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/7/98
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Does anyone have a good recipe

Wayne Lundberg

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Aug 7, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/7/98
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Borracho means drunk in Spanish. There is a salsa borracha, a traditional
salsa for Sunday outings where barbacoa is the main topic - the kids
playing in the field, the adults sipping tequila and swapping stories,
talking politics and arguing about everything under the sun. Barbacoa is
lamb, steamed overnight, wrapped in maguey leaves, in a deep hole in which
a fire burned all day Saturday. The lamb is served along with steaming hot
tortillas, guacamole, salsa borracha, salsa verde, salsa casera -- and the
people drink tequila, sodas, Mexican beer and/or pulque.

Pulque is the key ingredient to salsa borracha. Which is nothing more than
finely ground dried chile pasilla or mulato or ancho, spiced up with garlic
and some chile de arbol and into which a generous portion of pulque is
added.

Pulque, is aguamiel allowed to ferment over 72 hours. Aguamiel is the juice
which accumulates in the heart of the maguey when the heart is cut out. It
is harvested daily by pulqueros who with a calf-skin, suck the aguamiel
into the skin without it touching their mouth - except for the required
taste, which leaves enough spit in the aguamiel to begin the fermentation
process.

So, if you want borracho beans, then you may want to cook some beans in
pulque. But I never heard of it nor do I claim any fame to this idea.

Along the border thousands of gringos go into Tijuana, Rosarito and
Ensenada to indulge in drinking since the legal age limit is less. Maybe
somebody decided to cook the beans in beer. Who knows?


Roy Dunn

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Aug 7, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/7/98
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I may have spelled the name wrong, but here in south texas , there are a
number of Mexican Restaraunts and even some fast food establishments, like
Taco Cabana that serve what are called borracho beans, instead of refried
beans if you so desire.
Wayne Lundberg wrote in message <01bdc242$90f13980$d16e400c@wayne>...

Roy Dunn

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Aug 7, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/7/98
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Melody Eriksen

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Aug 7, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/7/98
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I know what you are talking about. . . basically bean soup, no? I have
heard of borracho beans before. . . . .(I'm from South Texas, too.) They
also call them frijoles a la charra, I think.

Roy Dunn <ran...@intertex.net> wrote in article
<dDKy1.13078$k73.7...@news.giganews.com>...

Victor M. Martinez

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Aug 8, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/8/98
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Roy Dunn <ran...@intertex.net> wrote:
>I may have spelled the name wrong, but here in south texas , there are a
>number of Mexican Restaraunts and even some fast food establishments, like

I don't know about south Texas (never been there), but here in central
Texas the "mexican" restaurants don't serve real mexican food.
I've never heard of "borracho beans", maybe you mean "charro beans"?

>Taco Cabana that serve what are called borracho beans, instead of refried
>beans if you so desire.

Well, if you think what they serve at Taco Cabana is Mexican food, you
haven't been reading this newsgroup!

--
Victor M. Martinez, Jr. | The University of Texas at Austin
mar...@che.utexas.edu | Department of Chemical Engineering
http://www.che.utexas.edu/~martiv | Austin, TX 78712
If we knew what we were doing it would not be called research, would it?

dtwr...@texas.net

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Aug 8, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/8/98
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In article <6qhhfh$nj5$1...@geraldo.cc.utexas.edu>,

mar...@bullwinkle.che.utexas.edu (Victor M. Martinez) wrote:
> Roy Dunn <ran...@intertex.net> wrote:
> >I may have spelled the name wrong, but here in south texas , there are a
> >number of Mexican Restaraunts and even some fast food establishments, like
>
> I don't know about south Texas (never been there), but here in central
> Texas the "mexican" restaurants don't serve real mexican food.
> I've never heard of "borracho beans", maybe you mean "charro beans"?
>

Diana Kennedy has a recipe for "frijoles a la charra" from Nuevo Leon. Then
she adds that they become "frijoles borrachos" when a small bottle of beer is
added, Monterrey being a brewing center. Several restaurants here in central
Texas add a little beer to their beans and call them "borracho." Maybe not as
complicated a recipe as the charra beans plus beer, but the thought is there.

David

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wel...@my-dejanews.com

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Aug 9, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/9/98
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In article <6qhhfh$nj5$1...@geraldo.cc.utexas.edu>,
mar...@bullwinkle.che.utexas.edu (Victor M. Martinez) wrote:
> Roy Dunn <ran...@intertex.net> wrote:
> >I may have spelled the name wrong, but here in south texas , there are a
> >number of Mexican Restaraunts and even some fast food establishments, like
>
> I don't know about south Texas (never been there), but here in central
> Texas the "mexican" restaurants don't serve real mexican food.
> I've never heard of "borracho beans", maybe you mean "charro beans"?
>

Ok, then...what are charro beans?

Susan

Larry Medina

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Aug 9, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/9/98
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Well, Chevys says they're what us Portuguese folks call CRANBERRY BEANS,
prepared with cilantro, bacon, onions, garlic and tomatos.

The beans are soaked overnight (with a few tablespoons of baking soda
added to the water....this is how *we Portugees* kill the gas factor)
and then boiled, drained and rinsed. Dice and brown bacon and onion
until the onion is clear, then add minced garlic and stir until garlic
browns. Drain off bacon grease, well.....at least MOST of it... =).....
and then set this mixture aside. Chop cilantro and tomatos fine and add
to mixture. Put the beans back on the stove, add a couple of cups of
water and one cup of red wine, bring to a boil. Reduce hear to simmer,
add mixture and one tablespoon of brown sugar and simmer until beans are
soft.

This will result in a soupy mixture that is tough to top on a Sunday
morning....unless you've got intestinal fortitude to make a great pot of
Menudo!!

Larry #:)#


wel...@my-dejanews.com

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Aug 10, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/10/98
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In article <35CDD509...@ibm.net>,

YUM!!!

susan

Linda Gonzalez

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Aug 10, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/10/98
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On Mon, 10 Aug 1998 02:10:32 GMT, wel...@my-dejanews.com wrote:

>In article <35CDD509...@ibm.net>,
> Larry Medina <LJM...@ibm.net> wrote:
>> Well, Chevys says they're what us Portuguese folks call CRANBERRY BEANS,
>> prepared with cilantro, bacon, onions, garlic and tomatos.
>>
>> The beans are soaked overnight (with a few tablespoons of baking soda
>> added to the water....this is how *we Portugees* kill the gas factor)
>> and then boiled, drained and rinsed. Dice and brown bacon and onion
>> until the onion is clear, then add minced garlic and stir until garlic
>> browns. Drain off bacon grease, well.....at least MOST of it... =).....
>> and then set this mixture aside. Chop cilantro and tomatos fine and add
>> to mixture. Put the beans back on the stove, add a couple of cups of
>> water and one cup of red wine, bring to a boil. Reduce hear to simmer,
>> add mixture and one tablespoon of brown sugar and simmer until beans are
>> soft.
>>
>> This will result in a soupy mixture that is tough to top on a Sunday
>> morning....unless you've got intestinal fortitude to make a great pot of
>> Menudo!!
>>
>> Larry #:)#
>>
>
>YUM!!!
>
>susan
>>
>

You're right.. One can get pretty hungry just reading this group... :)

Linda

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