Enchalada Sauce

0 views
Skip to first unread message

Evalan

unread,
May 26, 2001, 3:08:07 AM5/26/01
to
I was surprised to find that cans of enchilada sauce contained no tomato
sauce. Does anyone have a recipe for this sauce?


Dimitri

unread,
May 26, 2001, 10:53:03 AM5/26/01
to

"Evalan" <Cou...@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:rDIP6.33552$BN6.1...@newsread1.prod.itd.earthlink.net...

> I was surprised to find that cans of enchilada sauce contained no tomato
> sauce. Does anyone have a recipe for this sauce?


Red or Green ??

Dimitri


Karen O'Mara

unread,
May 26, 2001, 11:42:48 AM5/26/01
to
Dimitri wrote:

Since s/he prefaced with the surprise of no tomato sauce in the cans, I would
be willing to presume s/he meant red.


--
Karen O'
37:23:10 N
122:04:58 W


Dimitri

unread,
May 26, 2001, 8:23:18 PM5/26/01
to

"Evalan" <Cou...@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:rDIP6.33552$BN6.1...@newsread1.prod.itd.earthlink.net...
> I was surprised to find that cans of enchilada sauce contained no tomato
> sauce. Does anyone have a recipe for this sauce?

Ok here you go:

1. Go to the store and in the dried chile section usually n produce
purchase a bag of dried mild Anaheim chiles New Mexico chiles will also do
as long as they are marked mild.
2. Stem and seed the dried chiles and break them up into a large bowl.
3. Pour enough boiling water into the bowl to cover the chiles and set
aside.
4. Mince and onion and some garlic and sauté until tender, set aside.
5. When the water is cool to the touch taste it for bitterness - if it
is too bitter discard it if not then its OK to use in the next steps.
6 Place the reconstituted chiles into a blender with either the water or
some cold chicken stock and puree.
7. Reheat the onion/garlic mixture add a little oregano (Mexican of
course) the puree and several cups of chicken stock.
8. Simmer for several hours thickening with some masa harina or fresh
corn tortillas blended with some water or sauce.
9. Adjust the heat, salt and pepper as you like.

That's about all there is to it - on my side I like to add about 1/8 to 1/4
ounce of raw chocolate or a 1/2 teaspoon of commercial mole (in the jar)
half way through the simmering process

For green - just roast seed and peal the Anaheim chiles or others - puree
half and dice half simmer in chicken stock with onion and garlic.

Dimitri.


David Wright

unread,
May 26, 2001, 11:06:50 PM5/26/01
to

"Evalan" <Cou...@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:KhZP6.24265$9D5.2...@newsread2.prod.itd.earthlink.net...
> Thanks for this recipe. I checked several on the net before I read your
> reply and found they all began with tomato sauce, which I don't believe
> makes them authentic. A Mexican friend of mine said her mother used
chilies
> and soaked them, as you described, and did not use tomato sauce.

It's true that "enchiladas" does mean that the folded or rolled tortillas
have a chile sauce, but there are also such things as enfrijoladas (bean
sauce), enmoladas (mole) and ... would you believe ... ENTOMATADAS, made
with tomato sauce.

In the English speaking part of the world, we seem to refer to all of them
as enchiladas, but these different terms and types of sauces exist in
Mexico, at least in Oaxaca. Do a google search and you'll find references to
all of them. You'll also find them in Nancy Zaslavsky's book, A Cook's Tour
of Mexico, which you can read about on amazon.com.

Have fun with whatever sauce you like.

David


Karen O'Mara

unread,
May 26, 2001, 11:54:39 PM5/26/01
to
David Wright wrote:

> It's true that "enchiladas" does mean that the folded or rolled tortillas
> have a chile sauce, but there are also such things as enfrijoladas (bean
> sauce), enmoladas (mole) and ... would you believe ... ENTOMATADAS, made
> with tomato sauce.
>
> In the English speaking part of the world, we seem to refer to all of them
> as enchiladas, but these different terms and types of sauces exist in
> Mexico, at least in Oaxaca. Do a google search and you'll find references to
> all of them. You'll also find them in Nancy Zaslavsky's book, A Cook's Tour
> of Mexico, which you can read about on amazon.com.
>
> Have fun with whatever sauce you like.

Enmoladas.. I love that word!

I was taught once how to make entomatadas by someone in Sacramento and I
suppose it's not true and dear but it was terrific.

This nice lady told me to brown cumin, chilipowder, onion salt and pepper with
flour over the stove to get it brown. Add some chicken stock and drain some
cheap salsa juice, and add the liquid in there and simmer. Add tomato sauce and
simmer for a few minutes an you have some good sauce. Adjust for taste and
qty...

Use that pulp from the cheap salsa to fold inside the enchiladas... with
olives, meats, cheese, onions, etc.

David Wright

unread,
May 27, 2001, 2:47:07 PM5/27/01
to

"Karen O'Mara" <ka...@randomgraphics.com> wrote in message
news:3B107A66...@randomgraphics.com...

> Enmoladas.. I love that word!
>
> I was taught once how to make entomatadas by someone in Sacramento and I
> suppose it's not true and dear but it was terrific.
>
> This nice lady told me to brown cumin, chilipowder, onion salt and pepper
with
> flour over the stove to get it brown. Add some chicken stock and drain
some
> cheap salsa juice, and add the liquid in there and simmer. Add tomato
sauce and
> simmer for a few minutes an you have some good sauce. Adjust for taste and
> qty...
>
> Use that pulp from the cheap salsa to fold inside the enchiladas... with
> olives, meats, cheese, onions, etc.

> Karen O'


> 37:23:10 N
> 122:04:58 W

That sounds pretty tasty, Karen, and I laughed at the olive part. It's
something I've thought of as part of the definition of Cal-Mex ever since I
lived there in the late '60s. :-)

Something to try ... I didn't have any flour one time when I wanted to
thicken a sauce and so tried masa harina. I've been using it ever since,
even in non-Mexican dishes. It thickens just as well and adds a nice, subtle
corn flavor.

David


Karen O'Mara

unread,
May 27, 2001, 11:43:16 PM5/27/01
to
David Wright wrote:

> That sounds pretty tasty, Karen, and I laughed at the olive part. It's
> something I've thought of as part of the definition of Cal-Mex ever since I
> lived there in the late '60s. :-)

Wow.. didn't know that.

>
>
> Something to try ... I didn't have any flour one time when I wanted to
> thicken a sauce and so tried masa harina. I've been using it ever since,
> even in non-Mexican dishes. It thickens just as well and adds a nice, subtle
> corn flavor.

Good idea.... the masa harina. Will do!

When I get up to par, I want to make sauce from scratch.. like Dimitri's.

--

David Wright

unread,
May 28, 2001, 8:39:50 AM5/28/01
to

"Karen O'Mara" <ka...@randomgraphics.com> wrote in message
news:3B11C945...@randomgraphics.com...

> When I get up to par, I want to make sauce from scratch.. like Dimitri's.

That's basically the way I make it, too, and it's well worth it. Not as
difficult as it may look.

David

Stefan Keller

unread,
May 28, 2001, 10:23:01 AM5/28/01
to

Hi Dimitri,

the recipe sounds interesting. Do you have any experience with freezing that
stuff? Sounds like making a batch and freezing it in portions would be a
reasonable thing to do...

Stefan

Dimitri

unread,
May 28, 2001, 8:27:41 PM5/28/01
to

"Stefan Keller" <ske...@mailer.uni-marburg.de> wrote in message
news:9etn05$4nf$06$1...@news.t-online.com...

>
> Hi Dimitri,
>
> the recipe sounds interesting. Do you have any experience with freezing
that
> stuff? Sounds like making a batch and freezing it in portions would be a
> reasonable thing to do...
>
> Stefan

<recipe snipped>

I really don't freeze much I prefer to make it fresh. There is no reason you
can't freeze it. Plan the discard the container I suspect it (the
container) will discolor.

Dimitri


CDavis0526

unread,
May 29, 2001, 7:16:06 PM5/29/01
to
don't worry about this naw i'm just kidding to find out more info to make it go
to Meals .com

ted samsel

unread,
May 30, 2001, 5:07:06 AM5/30/01
to

What a faux pas. Discolored freezer containers. Martha Stewart would
have
your guts for garters.


--
TBSa...@infi.net
http://home.infi.net/~tbsamsel/
'Do the boogie woogie in the South American way'
Hank Snow (1914-1999)
THE RHUMBA BOOGIE

Annie

unread,
Jun 5, 2001, 2:59:06 AM6/5/01
to
I've made enchilada sauce Dimitri's way a few times. Generally, I do a
very lazy version that's easier for me. A Mexican friend in California
taught me this about 30 years ago. I'm not very good at precise
measurements, but here goes;
I put about 1/4 c. of oil in a saucepan or teflon frying pan and heat
it, then add enough flour to make a thick paste. I stir this constantly,
and let the paste cook a bit, removing it from the heat before the flour
actually browns. In the meantime, I put about 3-4 Tbs. of mild chili
powder in 1 c. of hot water. I let this sit while I brown the flour.
Sometimes, I add a bouillion cube to the hot water and chili powder.
Sometimes I don't. (Did I say I'm not very precise?<g>) I gradually
stir a cup of cold water into the flour paste, then mix in the cup of
hot water and chili powder, stirring to keep from having lumps. Then, I
cook this over med heat until the sauce thickens, stirring often. I stir
in a pinch of ground cumin and garlic powder. I think of it as "chili
gravy" and like to put it over rice and beans as well as using it as an
enchilada sauce.
BTW, I'm new to this group and want to introduce myself. I'm Annie. I
live in rural Oregon and love Mexican food. Until recent years, it was
impossible to find ingredients for Mexican cooking in my area. Now, the
ingredients are more easily accessible. I'm a retired nurse and hope to
make my first trip to Mexico this winter.
Annie

David Wright

unread,
Jun 5, 2001, 11:53:14 AM6/5/01
to

"Annie" <annie...@webtv.net> wrote in message
news:11936-3B...@storefull-145.iap.bryant.webtv.net...

Hey, Annie, nice to have you here. I also make a quick sauce similar to
yours sometimes. I use powdered chile from New Mexico (I have both red and
green), and masa harina instead of flour for the roux. Try that sometime if
you can get it. It adds another flavor to the sauce.

I know the frustration of finding ingredients in the Pacific Northwest. When
I was in Seattle in the early-mid '80s, I had the choice of paying inflated
prices at the Pike market or driving up to Sedro Wooley where there was a
good Mexican restaurant/grocery. Glad to hear you can easily get what you
need.

David


BlackBeard

unread,
Jun 5, 2001, 1:31:06 PM6/5/01
to
In article <Kf7T6.7967$bZ6.1...@newsread1.prod.itd.earthlink.net>,
"David Wright" <dtwr...@earthlink.net> wrote:

>"Annie" <annie...@webtv.net> wrote in message
>news:11936-3B...@storefull-145.iap.bryant.webtv.net...
>> I've made enchilada sauce Dimitri's way a few times. Generally, I do a
>> very lazy version that's easier for me. A Mexican friend in California
>> taught me this about 30 years ago. I'm not very good at precise
>> measurements, but here goes;
>>

>Hey, Annie, nice to have you here. I also make a quick sauce similar to
>yours sometimes. I use powdered chile from New Mexico (I have both red and
>green), and masa harina instead of flour for the roux. Try that sometime if
>you can get it. It adds another flavor to the sauce.

I'd like to add my quick recipe. Make a roux of lard and masa harina.
Add chili powder (santa cruz if you can get it ;), cumin, garlic and onion
pwdrs. Then add chicken stock (bullion will do) to the right
consistency. I know a lady that likes to add some of the juice from the
olive jar to the stock. YMMV.

>
>I know the frustration of finding ingredients in the Pacific Northwest. When
>I was in Seattle in the early-mid '80s, I had the choice of paying inflated
>prices at the Pike market or driving up to Sedro Wooley where there was a
>good Mexican restaurant/grocery. Glad to hear you can easily get what you
>need.
>
>David


Hehehe... I drove to Alaska back in the mid 70's. Couldn't find a
tortilla to save a life, anywhere...

BlackBeard
Submarines once, Submarines twice...

" To laugh often and much; To win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children; To earn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends; To appreciate beauty; To find the best in others;
To leave the world a better place, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch or a redeemed social condition;
To know even one life has breathed easier because you lived.
This is to have succeeded".

Lawrence Tracey

unread,
Jun 5, 2001, 10:11:26 PM6/5/01
to
do you know if that place in Sedro Wooley is still there? remember the
address? I am in Vancouver BC and there is 1 store here that sells Mexican
foodstuffs. It is not bad but not fantastic either. I always like to have a
choice even if they are 50 miles apart.

--
=============================================
Lawrence Tracey
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
"BlackBeard" <Black...@middle.of.nowhere> wrote in message
news:BlackBeard-05...@keck-mac.chinalake.navy.mil...

David Wright

unread,
Jun 6, 2001, 10:27:24 AM6/6/01
to

"Lawrence Tracey" <this_guys...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:ijgT6.374721$166.8...@news1.rdc1.bc.home.com...

> do you know if that place in Sedro Wooley is still there? remember the
> address? I am in Vancouver BC and there is 1 store here that sells Mexican
> foodstuffs. It is not bad but not fantastic either. I always like to have
a
> choice even if they are 50 miles apart.

> Lawrence Tracey
> Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

> > >I know the frustration of finding ingredients in the Pacific Northwest.


> When
> > >I was in Seattle in the early-mid '80s, I had the choice of paying
> inflated
> > >prices at the Pike market or driving up to Sedro Wooley where there was
a
> > >good Mexican restaurant/grocery. Glad to hear you can easily get what
you
> > >need.
> > >
> > >David

I just looked up Mexican restaurants in Sedro Woolley on yahoo.com. There's
a place called Casa del Sol on Hwy 20 (Cascade Highway). I was doing some
consulting work for the USPS when I found it, and the headquarters for North
Cascades NP is/was on that road so that's probably it. Going toward the
mountains it was on the right in "downtown" Sedro Woolley. The bad news is,
yahoo doesn't list it as a Mexican grocery, just a restaurant.

Good luck,
David


Lawrence Tracey

unread,
Jun 6, 2001, 12:24:17 PM6/6/01
to
Thanks David. I will take a drive down there this weekend at check it out.
Very least that can happen is I eat lunch there. I will report back if
anyone else is interested.

--
=============================================


Lawrence Tracey
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

"David Wright" <dtwr...@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:g5rT6.2000$9m.1...@newsread2.prod.itd.earthlink.net...

H. Paul Jacobson

unread,
Jun 6, 2001, 12:50:16 PM6/6/01
to
On Wed, 6 Jun 2001, David Wright wrote:
> "Lawrence Tracey" <this_guys...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:ijgT6.374721$166.8...@news1.rdc1.bc.home.com...
> > do you know if that place in Sedro Wooley is still there? remember the
> > address? I am in Vancouver BC and there is 1 store here that sells Mexican
> > foodstuffs. It is not bad but not fantastic either. I always like to have
> a
> > choice even if they are 50 miles apart.

The Hispanic population in the Puget Sound area has grown in the past
decade. A recent article in the local weekly paper note 5 latino
groceries in the south Snohomish county area. Most are small, especially
in comparison to the 'carnicerias' I knew in Chicago.

Burlington seems to have the largest hispanic concentration in the Skagit
valley area. I had a decent torta at a small restaurant there a couple of
years ago. I wouldn't be surprised if there was something of a Mexican
presence in the Bellingham/Ferndale area.

Paul


Lawrence Tracey

unread,
Jun 6, 2001, 3:54:52 PM6/6/01
to
Thanks Paul maybe I will extend my explorations. Any addresses or
recommendations gratefully received.


Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages