Ruth's Chris style steaks?

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Roger Herzler

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Jun 23, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/23/00
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Any thoughts or secrets on the Ruth's Chris style of steak cooking. The
wife and I ate there recently and loved it. I realize that the beef makes a
lot of the difference but I wanted some tips on marinades to use, cooking
style, etc. Any websites on the topic? Suggestions for steak marinades in
general?

Thanks for any help! Please forward replies to me at rherzler @ cts.com as
well as the newsgroup.

Clear skies,
Roger
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
T h e H e r z l e r s
"Imagine if we were all on the same sheet of music...
What a symphony it would be." <><
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Young

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Jun 23, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/23/00
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Roger Herzler wrote:
>
> Any thoughts or secrets on the Ruth's Chris style of steak cooking. The
> wife and I ate there recently and loved it. I realize that the beef makes a
> lot of the difference but I wanted some tips on marinades to use, cooking
> style, etc. Any websites on the topic? Suggestions for steak marinades in
> general?
>
> Thanks for any help! Please forward replies to me at rherzler @ cts.com as
> well as the newsgroup.
>
> Clear skies,
> Roger

I am in charge of their secret, but you must be able to say
Ruth's Chris with a mouthful of cracker crumbs without spitting any
out before I will divulge it. Either that or be able to remove
Excalibar from the stone. Then, maybe.

(laugh) nancy

Cuchulain Libby

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Jun 23, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/23/00
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"Young" <qwe...@mail.monmouth.com> wrote in message
news:395412...@mail.monmouth.com...

nancy,if the hoi-poloi @ rfc saw you here girl....

Ruth's Chris...
Take prime primal cuts (2% of ALL beef) age it 21 days - you can't age
retail cuts - and cook it @1800 deg F in a custom quartz-element broiler.
Serve with butter...


-Cuchulain

Cuchulain Libby

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Jun 23, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/23/00
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"Young" <qwe...@mail.monmouth.com> wrote in message
>
> Isn't hoi-poloi that dish people eat in Hawaii?
>
> nancy

Yea but if one were to suggest PARBOILING first here...well, I wouldn't be
responsible.

-C

aem

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Jun 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/24/00
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Roger Herzler wrote:
>
> Any thoughts or secrets on the Ruth's Chris style of steak cooking. The
> wife and I ate there recently and loved it. I realize that the beef makes a
> lot of the difference but I wanted some tips on marinades to use, cooking
> style, etc. Any websites on the topic? Suggestions for steak marinades in
> general?
>
We've also had good luck there, and I think it is almost entirely due
to the quality of the meat. They get true prime grade beef and dry
age it themselves. I don't believe they marinate it, and have never
heard of any special grilling techniques. It's just that if you start
with a truly superior piece of meat and don't do anything stupid, you
will get a truly good result. Sounds simple, but it automatically
rules out 99 percent of other restaurants, doesn't it?

At home, we're a big fan of a wide variety of marinades -- except for
plain grilled steak. On the rare occasions when we treat ourselves to
a porterhouse we will shop for the best quality we can find. If it's
an "ordinary" piece of steak, we might go so far as to paint it with a
thin coating of soy sauce for a half hour or so while it's coming to
room temperature. Nothing more.

Young

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Jun 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/24/00
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Cuchulain Libby wrote:
>
> "Young" <qwe...@mail.monmouth.com> wrote in message

> > I am in charge of their secret, but you must be able to say


> > Ruth's Chris with a mouthful of cracker crumbs without spitting any
> > out before I will divulge it. Either that or be able to remove
> > Excalibar from the stone. Then, maybe.
> >
> > (laugh) nancy
>
> nancy,if the hoi-poloi @ rfc saw you here girl....

> -Cuchulain

Young

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Jun 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/24/00
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Cuchulain Libby wrote:
>
> "Young" <qwe...@mail.monmouth.com> wrote in message
> >
> > Isn't hoi-poloi that dish people eat in Hawaii?
> >
> > nancy
>
> Yea but if one were to suggest PARBOILING first here...well, I wouldn't be
> responsible.
>
> -C

Please excuse me, alt.food.barbecue ... Ranger's got a problem with
me ... I don't care about that, but I didn't realize I cross-posted
when I replied.

Back to your smoking. (smile)

nancy

wvriter

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Jun 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/24/00
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I did hear that one difference between home cooked steaks and commercially
cooked steaks is the 1500-1700 F temp that the restaurant grill can reach.
"Roger Herzler" <skygaze...@cts.com> wrote in message
news:8j10pd$1jb4$1...@thoth.cts.com...

> Any thoughts or secrets on the Ruth's Chris style of steak cooking. The
> wife and I ate there recently and loved it. I realize that the beef makes
a
> lot of the difference but I wanted some tips on marinades to use, cooking
> style, etc. Any websites on the topic? Suggestions for steak marinades
in
> general?
>
> Thanks for any help! Please forward replies to me at rherzler @ cts.com
as
> well as the newsgroup.
>
> Clear skies,
> Roger

Phreddy

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Jun 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/24/00
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On Fri, 23 Jun 2000 23:31:16 -0500, "Cuchulain Libby"
<cuch...@texomagas.com> wrote:

>Ruth's Chris...
>Take prime primal cuts (2% of ALL beef) age it 21 days - you can't age
>retail cuts - and cook it @1800 deg F in a custom quartz-element broiler.
>Serve with butter...
>
>
>-Cuchulain

You can age your own beef, I've done it many times. Buy a whole
ribeye with the fat on it. Wrap it in 100% cotton towels, they sell
them at Walmart in 10 packs. Put it in the bottom rack of your
refrigerator and maintain a temp of 34-40 degrees. The first few days
you have to change the towels every day as it aborbs the blood from
the meat, then check it every other day. 15-20 days, depending on the
size of the ribeye, the fat will dry out and the meat will start to
break down so it melts in your mouth when you cook it. Expect to lose
about 30-40% of original weight, that's why aged beef is so expensive.
If you ask around rec.food.cooking there's probably somebody who has
the whole breakdown of the process, scientific-like.

rhgans

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Jun 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/24/00
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Eaten there twice. First time had a good steak. Second time the meal was vile. I
just don't think it's worth the money. I've had steaks just as good at cheaper
prices and with more consistancy.
Rich Gans

Roger Herzler wrote:

> Any thoughts or secrets on the Ruth's Chris style of steak cooking. The
> wife and I ate there recently and loved it. I realize that the beef makes a
> lot of the difference but I wanted some tips on marinades to use, cooking
> style, etc. Any websites on the topic? Suggestions for steak marinades in
> general?
>
> Thanks for any help! Please forward replies to me at rherzler @ cts.com as
> well as the newsgroup.
>
> Clear skies,
> Roger
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> T h e H e r z l e r s
> "Imagine if we were all on the same sheet of music...
> What a symphony it would be." <><
> mailto:rher...@cts.com
> the @stro pages: http://theastropages.com ~ astronomy for the amateur
> astronomylinks.com: http://astronomylinks.com
> diegotek web solutions: http://diegotek.com

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rhgans

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Jun 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/24/00
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My fault - I didn't look at the headers and also accidently cross posted this here.
Rich Gans

Scoobado

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Jun 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/24/00
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<<You can age your own beef, I've done it many times.>>

I've been reading this NG for some time now, and you always have comments and
suggestions that reflect your Q'ing expertise. My wife and I thank you, as
well as all of our friends who enjoy coming over to eat! I'm not the most
knowledgeable at responding to a NG, so I hope you don't mind the e-mail.

Do you have some suggestions regarding what types of meat to age? I would
guess mainly the cuts traditionally used for steaks. What about brisket? Any
advantage to aging it? Or ribs? I'm also assuming that beef is the only
choice for aging, but I'll take your advice on any other meats.

Thanks again,
Dave Orris
scoo...@aol.com
orris...@albertsons.com

Alan L. Isaacson

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Jun 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/24/00
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wvriter wrote:
>
> I did hear that one difference between home cooked steaks and commercially
> cooked steaks is the 1500-1700 F temp that the restaurant grill can reach.


You've got it! Ruth's Chris buys a special oven and grill which is not only
terribly expensive but also can reach these high temperatures. This is why we
can't duplicate the product at home even if we were able to buy the same prime
grade steaks as they do.


Alan L. Isaacson
Walnut Creek, California


“If you’re old, rich and dead, they’re with you. If you’re old, sick and middle
class, you’re out of luck.”

Rep. Barney Frank commenting on those who voted for the repeal of the estate
tax.

blake murphy

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Jun 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/24/00
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On Sat, 24 Jun 2000 08:05:51 -0700, rhgans <rhgans...@inficad.com>
wrote:

>Eaten there twice. First time had a good steak. Second time the meal was vile. I
>just don't think it's worth the money. I've had steaks just as good at cheaper
>prices and with more consistancy.
>Rich Gans
>
>Roger Herzler wrote:
>

i agree. i've only been once (in philadelphia) and had a mediocre
meal while dropping 150 bucks. plus the waiter was very rude, which
some folks might find charming, but not me.

your pal,
blake

Phreddy

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Jun 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/24/00
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If you want good steaks you have to start with good meat, no way
around it. I only age whole ribeyes, which are about $5/lb on sale.
Lose almost half in the aging and you've got expensive meat, you have
to decide if it's worth it to you. BBQ evolved as a way to slow cook
cheaper cuts of meat to make them more palatable and that is what we
mainly deal with in this NG. I might suggest rec.food.cooking if you
want tips for prime cuts and aging tips.


Roger Herzler

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Jun 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/24/00
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> >Eaten there twice. First time had a good steak. Second time the meal was
vile. I
> >just don't think it's worth the money. I've had steaks just as good at
cheaper
> >prices and with more consistancy.
> >Rich Gans
> >
> i agree. i've only been once (in philadelphia) and had a mediocre
> meal while dropping 150 bucks. plus the waiter was very rude, which
> some folks might find charming, but not me.
>
> your pal,
> blake

I'm bummed to hear about your's and Rich's experience. I ate at the one in
downtown (off the harbor) San Diego and it was great all the way around.
Terrific steaks and a great waiter. We are going to try some of the other
local steakhouses like Flemings and Donovans, but I really wanted to
duplicate the Ruth's Chris style steak, with alas I'm resigning myself to
the fact that I can't...oh well.

Thanks for your comments!

Roger
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
T h e H e r z l e r s
"Imagine if we were all on the same sheet of music...
What a symphony it would be." <><
mailto:rher...@cts.com
the @stro pages: http://theastropages.com ~ astronomy for the amateur
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"blake murphy" <bla...@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
news:395515b7....@nntp.ix.netcom.com...

Roger Herzler

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Jun 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/24/00
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> You can age your own beef, I've done it many times. Buy a whole
> ribeye with the fat on it. Wrap it in 100% cotton towels, they sell
> them at Walmart in 10 packs. Put it in the bottom rack of your
> refrigerator and maintain a temp of 34-40 degrees. The first few days
> you have to change the towels every day as it aborbs the blood from
> the meat, then check it every other day. 15-20 days, depending on the
> size of the ribeye, the fat will dry out and the meat will start to
> break down so it melts in your mouth when you cook it.

I had no idea this is how it's done. Any risks from bacteria, etc. (which I
assume will be burned off during the cooking anyway)? I'm just envisioning
picking out a stinking, rotting hulk from my refrigerator in 20 days time.
While I can do this knowing the steak will be awesome I'm not sure my wife
could stand it <G>...

Is there a general color to look for in the meat to know its done, or is the
fat drying up enough?

Thanks for the assist!


Roger
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
T h e H e r z l e r s
"Imagine if we were all on the same sheet of music...
What a symphony it would be." <><
mailto:rher...@cts.com
the @stro pages: http://theastropages.com ~ astronomy for the amateur
astronomylinks.com: http://astronomylinks.com
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"Phreddy" <phr...@prestige.net> wrote in message
news:3954b9e9...@news.ga.prestige.net...

Edwin Pawlowski

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Jun 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/24/00
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Alan L. Isaacson <amy...@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message >

> You've got it! Ruth's Chris buys a special oven and grill which is not
only
> terribly expensive but also can reach these high temperatures. This is
why we
> can't duplicate the product at home even if we were able to buy the same
prime
> grade steaks as they do.
>
>
> Alan L. Isaacson
> Walnut Creek, California

You can buy a TEC grill. They run about $1500 and up but can reach those
temperatures. You can see them at www.gasgrillsnow.com

Never tried the grill or the steakhouse so I have not other comments
Ed
e...@snet.net
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome

Freiberger

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Jun 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/24/00
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Blake,

There's your mistake right there -- if you were in Philadelphia, you shouldn't
have gone to Ruth's Chris? You should've gone to Jack's Firehouse which is
owned by Jack McDavid of Food TV's "Grillin' and Chillin'." ;-)

Bill

Cuchulain Libby

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Jun 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/24/00
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http://web.wt.net/~wmanuel/wine/articles/sgdrybeef.html
http://www.txsteaks.com/types_of_aging.htm
http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/nutrition/DJ5968.html
These are the guys that sell to Ruth:
http://www.lobels.com/other/prod_info/buying.html

And Phreddy told you how to do it: A bunch of how to sites said =exactly=
what Phred sed.:
http://www.kitchenminute.com/agingbeef.htm

Now Phreddy, will brisket be improved by aging?

-C

kitchenmaid

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Jun 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/25/00
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One must remember that Ruth's Chris Steakhouse is a chain restaurant......
I much prefer family owned places. They seem to consistently put more
'heart and soul' in all they do.

kitchenmaid

Charles Demas

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Jun 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/25/00
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In article <3955...@news.integrityonline.com>,

kitchenmaid <rje...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>One must remember that Ruth's Chris Steakhouse is a chain restaurant......

Yes but there are all kinds of chain restaurants, and Ruth's Chris Steakhouse
or Morton's of Chicago is much different than The Sizzler or The York
Steakhouse.

>I much prefer family owned places. They seem to consistently put more
>'heart and soul' in all they do.

Sometimes, but lots of restaurants fail, whereas chains have higher
success rates, and proven concepts. Put the same sucessful family
into a chain restaurant, and you'll have a very sucessful chain.

The problem with most chains is that the people that buy/own them
know very little about how to run a restaurant. This isn't the
case with the top-shelf chains, like Morton's, The Ritz Carlton,
Stouffers Top of the Hub/Sixes/Rock, etc.

FWIW, and getting back on topic for the BBQ newsgroup, I went out for
BBQ to the Blue Ribbon BBQ in Newton, Mass. Two brothers own it and
the one in Arlington Mass.

Great BBQ, I had a triple with ribs, pulled pork, and smoked hot
sausage. Not a chain, and so much better than Tennessee's (very _BAD_
ribs, IMNSHO) which is a chain.

I don't think I've seen a really good BBQ chain restaurant, but in
New England, BBQ is a fairly recent (last 15 years) type of
restaurant. BTW, Tennessee's smells like it should be good, but
their ribs are so bad (by comparison to the Blue Ribbon), that
I wonder if people actually know what good ribs are supposed to
be like.


Chuck Demas
Needham, Mass.


Chuck Demas
Needham, Mass.

--
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Phreddy

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Jun 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/25/00
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Of course it will. I take it out of the smoker after 10-12 hours or
thereabouts, wrap it in a few layers of foil and a beach towel, throw
it in a cooler and let it age for a couple of hours, comes out
delicious :-)

Phreddy

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Jun 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/25/00
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On Sat, 24 Jun 2000 20:18:15 GMT, phr...@prestige.net (Phreddy)
wrote:


Let me clarify that just a bit. I don't want to give the impression
that all you can age is whole ribeyes. It's just that a whole ribeye
generally fits into a standard refrigerator where you can maintain it
at the proper temperature. Most people don't have a proper cooler for
hanging a side of beef. If you do please invite me over for dinner
when your beef is done aging.


Jean B.

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Jun 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/25/00
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Have you tried the babyback ribs at Smokey's in Burlington?
They are VERY good. I also like to get their grilled
veggies to go and then pour on a bit of Bread & Circus'
chipotle marinade. Yum!

More commentary available if you are interested.

Jean B.

Jeff and Sandy Mayhew

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Jun 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/25/00
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

It is my understanding that the Ruth's Chris grills
are modified TECs.... we use a TEC for searing
but cook the meat slower w/smoke. Tastes better.

Jeff Mayhew
jma...@cris.com

Charles Demas

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Jun 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/25/00
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[ne.food added]

In article <3955E9DA...@ma.ultranet.com>,


Jean B. <jb...@ma.ultranet.com> wrote:
>
>Have you tried the babyback ribs at Smokey's in Burlington?
>They are VERY good. I also like to get their grilled
>veggies to go and then pour on a bit of Bread & Circus'
>chipotle marinade. Yum!
>
>More commentary available if you are interested.

Where is this Smokey's located? I looked in the yellowpages (online)
and didn't find them. I hope you meant Burlington, Mass.

Is it a takeout only place, or can you sit down and eat there?

The Blue Ribbon BBQ doesn't do baby back ribs, they do the big ones,
and they smoke them.

LaRotisserie (Rt 9, Brookline, Mass between Legal Seafood and Star
Market) has Rotisseried baby backs (not smoked) that are VERY good,
and falling off the bone tender. LaRotisserie also has great side
dishes.


Chuck Demas
Needham, Mass.

Jean B.

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Jun 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/25/00
to Charles Demas
Charles Demas wrote:
>
> [ne.food added]
>
> In article <3955E9DA...@ma.ultranet.com>,
> Jean B. <jb...@ma.ultranet.com> wrote:
> >
> >Have you tried the babyback ribs at Smokey's in Burlington?
> >They are VERY good. I also like to get their grilled
> >veggies to go and then pour on a bit of Bread & Circus'
> >chipotle marinade. Yum!
> >
> >More commentary available if you are interested.
>
> Where is this Smokey's located? I looked in the yellowpages (online)
> and didn't find them. I hope you meant Burlington, Mass.

Yes, Burlington, Mass.--I should hope I wouldn't have
responded the way I did if that was not the case, but who
knows.

Smokey's Longhorn Cafe
91 Middlesex Turnpike
Burlington, MA
781-270-6700

This is just past the Burlington Mall (heading away from
Lexington).


>
> Is it a takeout only place, or can you sit down and eat there?

You can sit down. I guess I don't have to caution you that
it is not a fancy place.

>
> The Blue Ribbon BBQ doesn't do baby back ribs, they do the big ones,
> and they smoke them.

Smokey's also has the normal spare ribs and beef ribs, but I
prefer the baby back ribs. Note that I prefer the sauce
meant for the pork, no matter what it is that I get.

I also really like the pulled pork (open face sandwiches).
Don't make the mistake of getting the boneless chicken; it
was very disapointing. Also, be warned that the swordfish
is unreliable. I wish that were not the case.


>
> LaRotisserie (Rt 9, Brookline, Mass between Legal Seafood and Star
> Market) has Rotisseried baby backs (not smoked) that are VERY good,
> and falling off the bone tender.

On the same side of the street? I am threatening to go to
Bloomies in the near future, so this is a nice tip!

LaRotisserie also has great side
> dishes.

The same cannot be said of Smokey's alas, although I won't
condemn them with as much vigor as my sort-of SO does. The
mashed (aka smashed) potatoes are real, and the barbecued
baked beans are nice. Otherwise, the sides are lacking.
The Waco Green Beans were awful--at least that was the case
on the day I got them. I think the corn bread is good as
far as bought versions go, but I may have heard that Blue
Ribbon's is better.

Would you believe that I have not gotten myself to Blue
Ribbon yet? I had a good excuse until recently, and then
Smokey's showed up, sooooooo...
>
> Chuck Demas
> Needham, Mass.
>
Jean B.
Lexington, Mass.

Charles Demas

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Jun 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/25/00
to
In article <39568E16...@ma.ultranet.com>,
Jean B. <jb...@ma.ultranet.com> wrote:

>Charles Demas wrote:
>> In article <3955E9DA...@ma.ultranet.com>,
>> Jean B. <jb...@ma.ultranet.com> wrote:
>> >
>> >Have you tried the babyback ribs at Smokey's in Burlington?
>> >They are VERY good. I also like to get their grilled
>> >veggies to go and then pour on a bit of Bread & Circus'
>> >chipotle marinade. Yum!
>>
>> Where is this Smokey's located? I looked in the yellowpages (online)
>> and didn't find them. I hope you meant Burlington, Mass.
>
>Yes, Burlington, Mass.--I should hope I wouldn't have
>responded the way I did if that was not the case, but who
>knows.
>
>Smokey's Longhorn Cafe
>91 Middlesex Turnpike
>Burlington, MA
>781-270-6700
>
>This is just past the Burlington Mall (heading away from
>Lexington).
>>
>> Is it a takeout only place, or can you sit down and eat there?
>
>You can sit down. I guess I don't have to caution you that
>it is not a fancy place.
>
>Smokey's also has the normal spare ribs and beef ribs, but I
>prefer the baby back ribs. Note that I prefer the sauce
>meant for the pork, no matter what it is that I get.

The Blue Ribbon doesn't do beef ribs, but they do a pretty good
Texas style brisket, very moist and smoky, though I confess, I'm
just not much of a fan of brisket, and I definitely prefer pork
ribs to beef ribs. This may be because I haven't had good beef ribs
yet though. The Blue Ribbon convinced me that brisket is definitely
edible though, and prior to trying theirs, I wondered how anyone
could get excited about brisket.

>I also really like the pulled pork (open face sandwiches).
>Don't make the mistake of getting the boneless chicken; it
>was very disapointing. Also, be warned that the swordfish
>is unreliable. I wish that were not the case.

The jerk chicken at the Blue Ribbon is not at all what I expected,
and _I_ didn't like it. I think it had a lot of fresh rosemary or
something. It definitely had an evergreeny type taste that shot up
my head. Not a pleasant sensation. Luckily they'd given me a taste
and after tasting it, I changed to BBQ'ed chicken instead. Good, but
nothing that I'll try again. I'm usually torn between ribs and pulled
pork.



>> LaRotisserie (Rt 9, Brookline, Mass between Legal Seafood and Star
>> Market) has Rotisseried baby backs (not smoked) that are VERY good,
>> and falling off the bone tender.
>
>On the same side of the street? I am threatening to go to
>Bloomies in the near future, so this is a nice tip!

Yes. It's a door or two down from Cafe Luna which has good food,
but pricey for lunch as their lunch menu and dinner menu are the
same.

La Rotisserie is mostly a takeout place, but you can sit down.
Plastic forks and paper plates. Not at all fancy, but the prices
are very reasonable, and I really like their ratatouille (sp?).
They have several different kinds of meat rotisseried, and there
are daily specials that rotate depending on the day of the week.

As I said, they have Rotisseried chicken and other things, but I've
always gotten ribs when I've gone there, but it's been a while.
Looking back, I'm not totally sure the ribs were baby back ribs, but
they were pork ribs, and I liked them. They are NOT smoked though.

>> LaRotisserie also has great side dishes.
>
>The same cannot be said of Smokey's alas, although I won't
>condemn them with as much vigor as my sort-of SO does. The
>mashed (aka smashed) potatoes are real, and the barbecued
>baked beans are nice. Otherwise, the sides are lacking.
>The Waco Green Beans were awful--at least that was the case
>on the day I got them. I think the corn bread is good as
>far as bought versions go, but I may have heard that Blue
>Ribbon's is better.
>
>Would you believe that I have not gotten myself to Blue
>Ribbon yet? I had a good excuse until recently, and then
>Smokey's showed up, sooooooo...

Now this is a pity, as the Blue Ribbon is truely excellent.
I just finished some left over pulled pork from last night's
dinner. The sides at the Blue ribbon are ok, but not great, IMO.
Fortunately, I like their smashed potato, potato salad, and collard
greens, so I don't mind their other sides not being what I like.

As for the Blue Ribbon's cornbread, I really like it, but it has
flour in it, and my friend Ellen from Alabama says that good
cornbread doesn't have flour in it. Unfortunately, she hasn't
yet decided to show me what her good cornbread is like. :~(

The Blue Ribbon also has great soups of the day. Yesterday it was
Kitchen Sink Gumbo with turkey, sausage, crabmeat, vegetables, etc.
Rather filling, which is why I had some pulled pork left over for
today. :-)

Harry A. Demidavicius

unread,
Jun 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/25/00
to
On Sun, 25 Jun 2000 06:09:45 GMT, de...@world.std.com (Charles Demas)
wrote:

>In article <3955...@news.integrityonline.com>,
>kitchenmaid <rje...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>One must remember that Ruth's Chris Steakhouse is a chain restaurant......
>

snip


>I don't think I've seen a really good BBQ chain restaurant, but in
>New England, BBQ is a fairly recent (last 15 years) type of
>restaurant. BTW, Tennessee's smells like it should be good, but
>their ribs are so bad (by comparison to the Blue Ribbon), that
>I wonder if people actually know what good ribs are supposed to
>be like.
>

You may have hit on it, Chuck. A Lot of, Many, Most, folks won't ever
meet up with a decent Rib and consequently are quite pleased with the
ilk of Tony Roma's, the Olive Garden of Barbeque. It's unfortunate.

Harry D.

Jean B.

unread,
Jun 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/25/00
to Charles Demas

Smokey's brisket has gotten such rave reviews that I had to
try it. I was disappointed, but maybe I am just ignorant.
Anyway, I vastly prefer other things on the menu.

This may be because I haven't had good beef ribs
> yet though.

The only worthwhile beef ribs I have ever eaten/prepared
were Korean (Kalbi Kui).

The Blue Ribbon convinced me that brisket is definitely
> edible though, and prior to trying theirs, I wondered how anyone
> could get excited about brisket.

Okay. I still have to be convinced, so I guess I know where
I need to go....


>
> >I also really like the pulled pork (open face sandwiches).
> >Don't make the mistake of getting the boneless chicken; it
> >was very disapointing. Also, be warned that the swordfish
> >is unreliable. I wish that were not the case.
>
> The jerk chicken at the Blue Ribbon is not at all what I expected,
> and _I_ didn't like it. I think it had a lot of fresh rosemary or
> something. It definitely had an evergreeny type taste that shot up
> my head. Not a pleasant sensation. Luckily they'd given me a taste
> and after tasting it, I changed to BBQ'ed chicken instead. Good, but
> nothing that I'll try again. I'm usually torn between ribs and pulled
> pork.

Sounds familiar; those are MT favorites. I like rosemary
but can't quite picture it in such a setting.


>
> >> LaRotisserie (Rt 9, Brookline, Mass between Legal Seafood and Star
> >> Market) has Rotisseried baby backs (not smoked) that are VERY good,
> >> and falling off the bone tender.
> >
> >On the same side of the street? I am threatening to go to
> >Bloomies in the near future, so this is a nice tip!
>
> Yes. It's a door or two down from Cafe Luna which has good food,
> but pricey for lunch as their lunch menu and dinner menu are the
> same.
>
> La Rotisserie is mostly a takeout place, but you can sit down.
> Plastic forks and paper plates. Not at all fancy, but the prices
> are very reasonable, and I really like their ratatouille (sp?).
> They have several different kinds of meat rotisseried, and there
> are daily specials that rotate depending on the day of the week.

Okay. Now I REALLY have a reason to hie to Chestnut Hill.
Maybe I'll get there this week.


>
> As I said, they have Rotisseried chicken and other things, but I've
> always gotten ribs when I've gone there, but it's been a while.
> Looking back, I'm not totally sure the ribs were baby back ribs, but
> they were pork ribs, and I liked them. They are NOT smoked though.
>
> >> LaRotisserie also has great side dishes.
> >
> >The same cannot be said of Smokey's alas, although I won't
> >condemn them with as much vigor as my sort-of SO does. The
> >mashed (aka smashed) potatoes are real, and the barbecued
> >baked beans are nice. Otherwise, the sides are lacking.
> >The Waco Green Beans were awful--at least that was the case
> >on the day I got them. I think the corn bread is good as
> >far as bought versions go, but I may have heard that Blue
> >Ribbon's is better.
> >
> >Would you believe that I have not gotten myself to Blue
> >Ribbon yet? I had a good excuse until recently, and then
> >Smokey's showed up, sooooooo...
>
> Now this is a pity, as the Blue Ribbon is truely excellent.
> I just finished some left over pulled pork from last night's
> dinner. The sides at the Blue ribbon are ok, but not great, IMO.
> Fortunately, I like their smashed potato, potato salad, and collard
> greens, so I don't mind their other sides not being what I like.

Oh? Good potato salad? Another thing to try. I forget
whether I have eaten Smokey's or whether it just doesn't
look appealing.


>
> As for the Blue Ribbon's cornbread, I really like it, but it has
> flour in it, and my friend Ellen from Alabama says that good
> cornbread doesn't have flour in it. Unfortunately, she hasn't
> yet decided to show me what her good cornbread is like. :~(

I doubt you will get flourless corn bread at any such
place. I am now happy if it has a crumbly, gritty texture
and is not really sweet.

>
> The Blue Ribbon also has great soups of the day. Yesterday it was
> Kitchen Sink Gumbo with turkey, sausage, crabmeat, vegetables, etc.

That sounds yummy? I hope there was okra in it....

> Rather filling, which is why I had some pulled pork left over for
> today. :-)

I think I'm convinced! Now which should I do first?
Actually I need to go to Brookline for some things anyway,
so it would be easy to hop up to Chestnut Hill thereafter.
But I REALLY want to go to Blue Ribbon too.... Problems,
problems--but such nice ones.

Jean B.
Lexington, Mass.

Jeff

unread,
Jun 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/25/00
to
Yeah right. I've had plenty of really awful steaks from "family owned
places", where they could have definitely used a professional to tell them
how to cook a decent dinner.

I've also had some really *great* dinners from small family owned places.

The point is, it has a whole lot more to do with skill & attention to detail
than whether they are a chain or independent.

--
Jeff
"Before criticizing someone, walk a mile in their shoes. Then when you do
criticize them, you will be a mile away and have their shoes." Jack Handy

kitchenmaid wrote in message <3955...@news.integrityonline.com>...


>One must remember that Ruth's Chris Steakhouse is a chain restaurant......

>I much prefer family owned places. They seem to consistently put more
>'heart and soul' in all they do.
>

>kitchenmaid
>
>

Cuchulain Libby

unread,
Jun 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/25/00
to

"Phreddy" <phr...@prestige.net> wrote
> Good idea but it must come at a price. Does he charge you the
> pre-aging weight, charge you extra for the aging or just do it because
> you're such a good customer? Aged beef from a butcher is high dollar,
> the people who do it themselves are usually trying to save money.
>
>
Phreddy,
Just et a 2.1 lb 'cowboy cut' [little rib bone attached] rib-eye. Wet-aged
21 days for $6.99/lb [choice]
Woo baby, except that damn tendon pisses me off, from now on it's porters
only. Unless I'm dry-aging myself...(whole rib-I's from Sammy's- your
recipe/technique)

-Cuchulain -ask nice an' I'll post the whole menu...

Brian Proud

unread,
Jun 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/26/00
to
On Sun, 25 Jun 2000 09:17:03 GMT, phr...@prestige.net (Phreddy)
wrote:

>Let me clarify that just a bit. I don't want to give the impression
>that all you can age is whole ribeyes. It's just that a whole ribeye
>generally fits into a standard refrigerator where you can maintain it
>at the proper temperature. Most people don't have a proper cooler for
>hanging a side of beef. If you do please invite me over for dinner
>when your beef is done aging.

I just tell my butcher to properly age the side before he cuts it up
for me. Course, I usually go for 2 hinds rather than a side.

Brian

Phreddy

unread,
Jun 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/26/00
to

Good idea but it must come at a price. Does he charge you the

Brian Proud

unread,
Jun 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/26/00
to
On Mon, 26 Jun 2000 00:14:25 GMT, phr...@prestige.net (Phreddy)
wrote:

>>I just tell my butcher to properly age the side before he cuts it up
>>for me. Course, I usually go for 2 hinds rather than a side.
>
>Good idea but it must come at a price. Does he charge you the
>pre-aging weight, charge you extra for the aging or just do it because
>you're such a good customer? Aged beef from a butcher is high dollar,
>the people who do it themselves are usually trying to save money.

Same charge as everyone else for the hinds plus slight per day charge
for storing meat the extra days. He usually ages 14 days vice the 28
I ask for. So yes, it is extra but sooo good.

Brian

Alan Zelt

unread,
Jun 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/26/00
to
kitchenmaid wrote:
>
> One must remember that Ruth's Chris Steakhouse is a chain restaurant......
> I much prefer family owned places. They seem to consistently put more
> 'heart and soul' in all they do.
>
> kitchenmaid

That is a very patently inane remark!! A family owned restaurant is
inherently better? Heart and soul. Dumb.
--
alan

Eliminate FINNFAN on reply.

"If you reject the food, ignore the customs, fear the religion, and
avoid the
people, you might better stay home."
--James Michener

Monika Adamczyk

unread,
Jun 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/26/00
to
Charles Demas wrote:
>
> [ne.food added]
>
> In article <3955E9DA...@ma.ultranet.com>,
> Jean B. <jb...@ma.ultranet.com> wrote:
> >
> >Have you tried the babyback ribs at Smokey's in Burlington?
> >They are VERY good. I also like to get their grilled
> >veggies to go and then pour on a bit of Bread & Circus'
> >chipotle marinade. Yum!
> >
> >More commentary available if you are interested.
>
> Where is this Smokey's located? I looked in the yellowpages (online)
> and didn't find them. I hope you meant Burlington, Mass.
>

Yes, this is Burlington, Mass. Smokey's is next to the previous location
of Barnes and Noble, which is the same area where Staples and Tower
Records are.

> Is it a takeout only place, or can you sit down and eat there?
>

Both. I used to go there 3-4 times a month for lunch and I loved their
baby back ribs. Sadly, I haven't been there since I changed jobs.

> The Blue Ribbon BBQ doesn't do baby back ribs, they do the big ones,
> and they smoke them.
>

I must say that Blue Ribbon is a bit of disappointment for me. I like
their meats but the side dishes have a lot of to wish for. Same with
their corn bread. Despite the fact that the Arlington location is 5
minutes from where I live, I rarely go there.

Monika

Monika Adamczyk

unread,
Jun 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/26/00
to
"Jean B." wrote:
>
>
> LaRotisserie also has great side
> > dishes.
>
> The same cannot be said of Smokey's alas, although I won't
> condemn them with as much vigor as my sort-of SO does. The
> mashed (aka smashed) potatoes are real, and the barbecued
> baked beans are nice. Otherwise, the sides are lacking.
> The Waco Green Beans were awful--at least that was the case
> on the day I got them. I think the corn bread is good as
> far as bought versions go, but I may have heard that Blue
> Ribbon's is better.
>

I also think that the green beans are bad but the reason I think it is
that they seems to be sprinkling them with garlic powder.

> Would you believe that I have not gotten myself to Blue
> Ribbon yet? I had a good excuse until recently, and then
> Smokey's showed up, sooooooo...
> >

You should definitively get there. Not for sides (which I am not crazy
about), but for the meat itself.

Monika

Jean B.

unread,
Jun 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/26/00
to
Monika Adamczyk wrote:
>
> "Jean B." wrote:
> >
> >
> > LaRotisserie also has great side
> > > dishes.
> >
> > The same cannot be said of Smokey's alas, although I won't
> > condemn them with as much vigor as my sort-of SO does. The
> > mashed (aka smashed) potatoes are real, and the barbecued
> > baked beans are nice. Otherwise, the sides are lacking.
> > The Waco Green Beans were awful--at least that was the case
> > on the day I got them. I think the corn bread is good as
> > far as bought versions go, but I may have heard that Blue
> > Ribbon's is better.
> >
>
> I also think that the green beans are bad but the reason I think it is
> that they seems to be sprinkling them with garlic powder.

SPRINKLING????? More like pouring the whole container on.
I don't dislike garlic, but these were most unpleasant!


>
> > Would you believe that I have not gotten myself to Blue
> > Ribbon yet? I had a good excuse until recently, and then
> > Smokey's showed up, sooooooo...
> > >
>
> You should definitively get there. Not for sides (which I am not crazy
> about), but for the meat itself.

Looks like I have some exploring to do this week!

Jean B.

Steve Calvin

unread,
Jun 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/26/00
to
Jean B. wrote:
>
> Have you tried the babyback ribs at Smokey's in Burlington?
> They are VERY good. I also like to get their grilled
> veggies to go and then pour on a bit of Bread & Circus'
> chipotle marinade. Yum!
>
> More commentary available if you are interested.
>
> Jean B.

Where's Smokey's in BTV? I've been to the Sirloin Saloon, Icehouse, etc
but haven't heard of Smokey's before.
--
Steve

PrkChps

unread,
Jun 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/26/00
to
Chuck's point is well taken. Here in Massachusetts, BBQ was
virtually unknown until fairly recently. Now it seems to have
taken on sort of a "fad" status, with new places springing up.
Some are great, and some are terrible. They tend to be
expensive, also. On Cape Cod, where I live, there don't seem to
be any places at all with real barbecue...just a lot of bad
seafood aimed at tourists.

I remember a place out near the University of Massachusetts in
Amherst...a little roadside joint, the way it should be.
Excellent food and a real BBQ atmosphere. I wonder if it is
still there? Anyone in central Mass. know? Also, the Yankee
Smokehouse in Ossippee, New Hampshire used to do a good
job...you could smell the smoke for quite a distance. It was a
little bit on the expensive side, though.

Don't fall for "yuppie" barbecue. If it comes with stuff like
arugula and baby corn, it might say barbecue, but it ain't!

Jim...thinking about ribs

Got questions? Get answers over the phone at Keen.com.
Up to 100 minutes free!
http://www.keen.com


Tyler Hopper

unread,
Jun 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/26/00
to

Is the food really as good as I've heard?

--
____________________________________________
Tyler Hopper

Freiberger

unread,
Jun 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/26/00
to
I thought the food was great when I went there. And Jack is there almost every
day. I took a picture with him and bought a shirt and baseball cap.

Bill

Monika Adamczyk

unread,
Jun 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/26/00
to

It is next to the previous location of Barnes and Noble bookstore. Tower
Records and Staples are in the same area.

Monika

bicker_...@nospamyahoo.com

unread,
Jun 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/26/00
to
On Mon, 26 Jun 2000 03:37:26 GMT, Monika Adamczyk
<mon...@mediaone.net> wrote:
> > The Waco Green Beans were awful--at least that was the case
> > on the day I got them.
> I also think that the green beans are bad but the reason I think it is
> that they seems to be sprinkling them with garlic powder.

Actually, they consistently ask me whether I want the garlic sauce on
them. It isn't powder. It is a very garlicky butter sauce which
really makes the green beans taste great.


--
bicker®

Jean B.

unread,
Jun 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/26/00
to

And what does it leave if you say "no"? Seems to me this is
just beans and sauce--and the sauce tasted like garlic
power to me! I don't dislike garlic, but found these very
unpleasant. Have you found them to be consistent, or is it
possible they vary day to day?

Jean B.