How To Use Dry Rubs

1 view
Skip to first unread message

Charles A. Daher

unread,
Jun 5, 2002, 6:05:13 PM6/5/02
to
I am new at this and tried dry rubs a few times. The results were not very
good. I cook mostly ribs on a New Braunfels smoker, the one with the offset
firebox and vertical smoking chamber.
I applied the rubs by dumping ribs and rub into a plastic bag and then
shaking them up. I then wrapped them in plastic wrap and refrigerated them
overnight. The amount of rub on the meat was very thick. When cooked they
did not come out tasting very good. Can somebody give me a receipe for a
good rib rub and tell me how to use it.
Thanks,
Charlie


Kevin S. Wilson

unread,
Jun 5, 2002, 6:17:56 PM6/5/02
to

I'll let someone else point you to rub recipes, but I can tell you
that the shake-and-bake approach you describe is best left to VERY
mild rubs. You'll end up with too much rub on the meat. It will mask
the flavor of the meat and most likely prevent it from getting a good
bark (crust).

--
Kevin S. Wilson
Tech Writer at a University Somewhere in Idaho

BOB

unread,
Jun 5, 2002, 6:20:59 PM6/5/02
to

"Charles A. Daher" <cda...@brick.net> wrote in message
news:CRvL8.1$2L6.3...@news1.i1.net...
check the faq for recipes:
http://www.eaglequest.com/~bbq/faq2/toc.html

Like the name says... RUB. Get in there and get your hands dirty, rub it on
and rub it in.
Then keep it in the refrigerator overnight or cook it now.

BOB


Edwin Pawlowski

unread,
Jun 5, 2002, 7:39:12 PM6/5/02
to

"Charles A. Daher" <cda...@brick.net> wrote in message
> The amount of rub on the meat was very thick. When cooked they
> did not come out tasting very good. Can somebody give me a receipe for a
> good rib rub and tell me how to use it.
> Thanks,
> Charlie

Until you have the procedure perfected, the best rub is salt and pepper.

Take a good look at the ribs. How thick is the meat and how much bone?
Look at how much rub you were putting on. Would you put that much seasoning
on anything else? Given the ratio of meat to seasoning, you probably
overdid it. This is one of the most common errors when starting out with
smoked foods.
Ed
e...@snet.net
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome

Ricky

unread,
Jun 5, 2002, 8:23:46 PM6/5/02
to
In article <CRvL8.1$2L6.3...@news1.i1.net>, cda...@brick.net says...

Charlie,
The rub should be on the meat side only and not very thick.
Actually just a light but complete dusting works the best. Make sure you
rub it in. Here's a link to 2 different rubs:
http://www.fawnridge.com/ricky/rub.txt

--
Ricky Ginsburg can be reached at:
E-Mail: ri...@fawnridge.com
Web...: http://www.fawnridge.com/ricky
Web...: http://www.flbbq.org

PigmundT

unread,
Jun 5, 2002, 9:34:12 PM6/5/02
to
What happened to the "cheap yellow mustard"?


"Charles A. Daher" <cda...@brick.net> wrote in message

news:CRvL8.1$2L6.3...@news1.i1.net...

BOB

unread,
Jun 5, 2002, 9:38:05 PM6/5/02
to

"PigmundT" <Pigm...@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:o_yL8.142300$Oa1.13...@bin8.nnrp.aus1.giganews.com...

> What happened to the "cheap yellow mustard"?
>
It's not a "dry" rub?

Matthew L. Martin

unread,
Jun 5, 2002, 10:57:01 PM6/5/02
to

Yup. I did it. Much too much salt and pepper. I had to

.
.
.
.
.

Purists go away now ...

.
.
.
.
.

boil the ribs for a few minutes _after_ smoking to remove most of the
excess.

HEY! I told you to go away!!

Matthew

--
"... Mr. (Gregory) LaCava, a producer-director who could be called a
genius except for the fact that Orson Welles has debased the term ...",
H. Allen Smith, "Lost in the Horse Latitudes"
Copy username over me to respond.

Brian Worthey

unread,
Jun 6, 2002, 12:07:07 AM6/6/02
to
Turbinado sugar....is this a kind of sugar or a particular brand of sugar?
I've never heard of it, of course I'm still a rookie Q'er and cook for that
matter!

B-Worthey

"Ricky" <ri...@fawnridge.com> wrote in message
news:MPG.1768759d...@news.cis.dfn.de...

Steve Wertz

unread,
Jun 6, 2002, 12:54:29 AM6/6/02
to
Brian Worthey wrote:
>
> Turbinado sugar....is this a kind of sugar or a particular brand of sugar?
> I've never heard of it, of course I'm still a rookie Q'er and cook for that
> matter!

Turbinado is "raw" and/or "unrefined" sugar, or so it says. It's usually a
darker color and may have more of a 'molasses' taste to it, but it's not
that unlike refined white granulated sugar.

I use asian palm sugar which is very similar, if not stronger, than turbinado.

-sw

Brian Worthey

unread,
Jun 6, 2002, 3:27:23 AM6/6/02
to
I had a feeling thats what it might be. Thanks!

B-Worthey

"Steve Wertz" <swe...@texas.net> wrote in message
news:3CFEEB83...@texas.net...

Ricky

unread,
Jun 6, 2002, 7:15:53 AM6/6/02
to
In article <LdBL8.73353$9z5.4...@typhoon.austin.rr.com>,
bwor...@jam.rr.com says...

> Turbinado sugar....is this a kind of sugar or a particular brand of sugar?
> I've never heard of it, of course I'm still a rookie Q'er and cook for that
> matter!
>
> B-Worthey

"Raw" sugar. It burns at a much higher temperature so you don't get it
caramelizing on the meat.

Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages