Smoking Jacket

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Matt & Terri

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Mar 3, 2003, 12:47:01 PM3/3/03
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In the winter months, I used to have trouble keeping my smoker (a cheap one,
no comments about buying a BGE, please) up to temperature. I read in one of
the catalogs where they make a "smoking jacket" for smokers.

I did one better. Being a Firefighter, I went to the supply warehouse and
asked for one of the old turnout gear coats (a.k.a. bunker coat).

I decided that if I use the coat to keep the heat out, it ought do the same
in reverse.

Had wonderful results! Threw a couple of picnics on before bedtime and they
were ready the next A.M... And that was with a Wind Chill Factor of about
22deg. F.

All it cost me was a sandwich!

If you hear of your local Fire Department getting a large federal grant for
turnout gear replacement, it might behoove you to hunt down the supply
office and ask for one. Usually, if you tell them what you're going to do
with it, they'll me more than happy to give you one. They have to destroy
them anyway.

Fyrepup
(Save a few... Lose a few...)


Mr. Potato Head

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Mar 3, 2003, 1:23:33 PM3/3/03
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Well again, lots of effort and a crappy piece of meat. I can que any cut of
meat or fowl except a beef brisket.

I use the cryovac (sp) briskets, about 8 lbs. "Choice" they claim. Simple
rub. Spices, a little salt, no sugar. Hickory chunks and lump.

I've done the 10-12 hour, 225 dF in the smoker, till 180-190 inside the
meat. Nice color, juicy, tough as a boot unless I slice it 1/16" thick with
my meat slicer.

I just did one this weeked. Smoked it at 200 dF for 20 hours. Including 6
hours using the Texas Crutch (wrapped in foil). Sorta tender, sorta dry.
It's now in the crock post swimming in sauce to make shreaded barbeque beer
sammyiches.

Back to tri-tips I guess.

Anyone got any clues on the problem? I've eaten lots of beef at Arthur
Bryant's in KC MO. It's always good and tender. What cut of beef do they
use.

Scratching my,

Spud


Mr. Potato Head

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Mar 3, 2003, 5:29:05 PM3/3/03
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Whoops!!!!!!!!!! I screwed that up. I'll repost above.


Mr. Potato Head

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Mar 3, 2003, 5:30:18 PM3/3/03
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Cuchulain Libby

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Mar 3, 2003, 7:05:57 PM3/3/03
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"Mr. Potato Head" <sp...@hotmail.com> wrote

> Well again, lots of effort and a crappy piece of meat. I can que any cut
of
> meat or fowl except a beef brisket.

Spud,
Is it just the flat? Surely the point ain't tough?
The only thing I do different is higher temps.

-Hound, scratching head


BOB

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Mar 3, 2003, 7:29:49 PM3/3/03
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"Mr. Potato Head" wrote...

I don't claim to be an expert on brisket, but I'll keep on until I get there.
One thing I have noticed is that they try to trim all the fat off. There goes all of your
juiciness, before you ever buy the meat.

Another thing that I'm trying is listening to Hound when he says to put the fat between the
meat and the fire...fat DOWN! This is the opposite of what my mind tells me. I've always
put the fat UP so that when it cooks and renders out, it will baste the meat, but Hound
says no, put the fat down. What do I know? My brisket isn't always dry, but is always
inconsistent.
8.5# flat @ $1.99 per# from Sam's in the fridge just waiting for this weekend, bought the
only one that they had with a big lump of fat on it. Friday night, I'll try it Hound's
way, fat down and raise the heat a little.

BOB

Edwin Pawlowski

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Mar 3, 2003, 8:48:23 PM3/3/03
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"Mr. Potato Head" <sp...@hotmail.com> wrote in message

>
> I've done the 10-12 hour, 225 dF in the smoker, till 180-190 inside the
> meat. Nice color, juicy, tough as a boot unless I slice it 1/16" thick
with
> my meat slicer.

Sounds like it needed just a bit more time to tenderize. Shoot for 190 to
195 and you may have better luck. Crank up the temperature to 250.


>
> I just did one this weeked. Smoked it at 200 dF for 20 hours. Including
6
> hours using the Texas Crutch (wrapped in foil). Sorta tender, sorta dry.
> It's now in the crock post swimming in sauce to make shreaded barbeque
beer
> sammyiches.


I'm a believer that 200 is way to low to properly cook anything. It will
dry out before it cooks and breaks down the collagen. Considering you want
the temperature of the meat to climb to the 190+ range, 200 is just way too
low.
Ed
e...@snet.net
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome

Rosscoe

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Mar 3, 2003, 8:50:51 PM3/3/03
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"Mr. Potato Head" <sp...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:_HQ8a.1212$vl4...@newssvr19.news.prodigy.com...
Haven't tried a brisket yet but from what I recall reading in this group
before was to soak it in apple cider vinegar (non-metal bowl) for "x" amount
of time. This is supposed to breakdown the meat so that it won't be as
tough. Can't remember if brining was recommended for these or not. Good
luck and keep us posted.

Rosscoe


Louis Cohen

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Mar 3, 2003, 9:05:55 PM3/3/03
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Slice the brisket _across the grain_. Before you cook or even put the rub
on, cut a small piece off one end _across the grain_ so you know how to
slice when you can't see the grain.

Everything else sounds fine.

--

Regards

Louis Cohen
N37° 43' 7.9" W122° 8' 42.8"

"Mr. Potato Head" <sp...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
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Patrick McSparin

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Mar 3, 2003, 9:54:56 PM3/3/03
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Bryant's uses whole briskets - with the fat. Lots of fat. Lovin' the fat.
We've tried smaller cut briskets and never had much luck. Now, we try to get
at least 10-12 pounds every time.

"Mr. Potato Head" <sp...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
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CSS

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Mar 3, 2003, 11:14:34 PM3/3/03
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8 pounds sounds small-- my "select" cryovacs are in the 10-15 lb. range.
You need a nice fat cap-- about 1/8 to 1/4 inch thick overall. I cook to
195 in my WSM at 225-250 F, then usually "hold" in the cooler wrapped in
foil for 2-3 hours (not intentional, just the result of starting at midnight
and wanting to delay eating it until dinner). Consistently tender.

BTW, the flat will always be less tender than the point-- you need to cook
to a compromise temp that makes the flat somewhat tender w/o the point
falling all apart. But, its up to your personal preference.

This page has some good tips:
http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/brisketselect.html

Of course, I disagree with the recommendation that you have to buy "choice"
briskets. Heck, it's 'trash" meat, and the Texan in me won't pay steak
prices for a cheap cut. I've done both, and don't notice a difference
(except in my wallet). With brisket, its more technique than the starting
material, I think.

And no, you do not need to rush out and buy a Kamado to make a decent
brisket (g).

Clark


"Mr. Potato Head" <sp...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
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JD

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Mar 4, 2003, 12:38:52 AM3/4/03
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"Rosscoe" <123...@lsfd.net> wrote in message
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Sounds a little like you'd wind up with smoked sauerbraten. I'm all for
experimentation but I think I'll let you scarf the first taste on that one.

JD
>
>


frohe

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Mar 4, 2003, 4:50:18 AM3/4/03
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Mr. Potato Head wrote:
> I use the cryovac (sp) briskets, about 8 lbs. "Choice" they claim.
> Simple rub. Spices, a little salt, no sugar. Hickory chunks and
> lump.

Get a bigger cut of brisket, say 15 pounder if you can. 8 is way too small.

> I've done the 10-12 hour, 225 dF in the smoker, till 180-190 inside
> the meat. Nice color, juicy, tough as a boot unless I slice it 1/16"
> thick with my meat slicer.

IMO, 10-12 hours just ain't enough. But then you were doing a small
brisket. I cook 15 pounders at least 18 hours often going to 24 before they
are fork tender. 220-225 is the right amount of heat. Forget the iternal
temp routine. If you can stick a fork in it and twist and the meat
seperates easily, the brisket is done.
--
-frohe
Life is too short to be in a hurry

Kevin S. Wilson

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Mar 4, 2003, 5:31:33 AM3/4/03
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On Tue, 04 Mar 2003 02:05:55 GMT, "Louis Cohen"
<louis...@alum.mit.edu> wrote:

>Slice the brisket _across the grain_. Before you cook or even put the rub
>on, cut a small piece off one end _across the grain_ so you know how to
>slice when you can't see the grain.
>

Good advice, but doesn't the direction of the grain shift by 90
degrees about three-quarters of the way along the brisket? Using your
method to orient yourself still works, of course, if you keep in mind
the 90-degree shift.

--
Kevin S. Wilson
Tech Writer at a University Somewhere in Idaho
"Sometimes I almost feel/Just like a human being"

Wally Bedford

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Mar 4, 2003, 6:54:40 AM3/4/03
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On Mon, 03 Mar 2003 17:47:01 GMT, "Matt & Terri" <matt...@yahoo.com>
reported to us:

Have any pics? I'm a bit stuck visualizing this one...

BTW, that's about the only mod I didn't try on my ECB.

Wally
>

Matthew L. Martin

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Mar 4, 2003, 7:02:11 AM3/4/03
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frohe wrote:
> Mr. Potato Head wrote:
>
>>I use the cryovac (sp) briskets, about 8 lbs. "Choice" they claim.
>>Simple rub. Spices, a little salt, no sugar. Hickory chunks and
>>lump.
>
>
> Get a bigger cut of brisket, say 15 pounder if you can. 8 is way too small.
>

In my limited experience (I've never done a brisket as large as 8
pounds) size is no obstacle to a tender, juicy brisket. I've had burnt
edges, but never a tough dry brisket come out of my ECBX2.

FWIW, I've always used water in the water bowl and done my best to keep
it full.

Matthew

--
<http://member.newsguy.com/~mlmartin/>

Thermodynamics For Dummies: You can't win.
You can't break even.
You can't get out of the game.

Bill

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Mar 4, 2003, 10:10:55 AM3/4/03
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> Had wonderful results! Threw a couple of picnics on before bedtime and they
> were ready the next A.M... And that was with a Wind Chill Factor of about
> 22deg. F.
>

22deg F barely counts as a wind chill factor! That sounds balmy compared to
what we have been rocked with lately!

Mr. Potato Head

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Mar 4, 2003, 12:17:17 PM3/4/03
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> Sounds a little like you'd wind up with smoked sauerbraten. I'm all for
> experimentation but I think I'll let you scarf the first taste on that
one.
>
> JD


That brought a good chuckle!


Mr. Potato Head

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Mar 4, 2003, 12:18:51 PM3/4/03
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Naw, I always pay close attention to the grain and go 90 degrees,
perpendicular, across the grain.


Mr. Potato Head

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Mar 4, 2003, 12:21:10 PM3/4/03
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"CSS" <css...@ix.netcom.invalid> wrote in message
news:b4197c$176$1...@slb9.atl.mindspring.net...

> 8 pounds sounds small-- my "select" cryovacs are in the 10-15 lb. range.
> You need a nice fat cap-- about 1/8 to 1/4 inch thick overall. I cook to
> .


The ones I buy on sale at Save Mart for 89 cents a pound are usually 10 lbs.
plus. I don't cut off the fat.


Mr. Potato Head

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Mar 4, 2003, 12:23:42 PM3/4/03
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"> Is it just the flat? Surely the point ain't tough?
> The only thing I do different is higher temps.
>
>


Point is not too tough, but mostly fat. I think the higher temp. might be
what I need to do. Is 250 degrees too hot?

Rubbing my,

Spud


Mr. Potato Head

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Mar 4, 2003, 12:27:52 PM3/4/03
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>
> One thing I have noticed is that they try to trim all the fat off. There
goes all of your
> juiciness, before you ever buy the meat.

Oklahoma Joe in his tape series (Walmart) trims off quite a bit of fat. I
tried it and the meat was dry.

>
> Another thing that I'm trying is listening to Hound when he says to put
the fat between the
> meat and the fire...fat DOWN! This is the opposite of what my mind tells
me. I've always
> put the fat UP so that when it cooks and renders out, it will baste the
meat, but Hound
> says no, put the fat down. What do I know? My brisket isn't always dry,
but is always
> inconsistent.
>

I've tried both ways. I did it fat side up with the fat criss-cross cut to
let the fat render out.
I did it fat side down, with the thinking that it was an insulator to direct
heat.


Mr. Potato Head

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Mar 4, 2003, 12:29:16 PM3/4/03
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>
> Sounds like it needed just a bit more time to tenderize. Shoot for 190 to
> 195 and you may have better luck. Crank up the temperature to 250.
>
>


I think I'll try the 250 route. It takes too long to hit 190 internal temp
with only a 10 degree differential.

Spud


Cuchulain Libby

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Mar 5, 2003, 12:23:55 AM3/5/03
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"Mr. Potato Head" <sp...@hotmail.com> wrote >
> Point is not too tough, but mostly fat. I think the higher temp. might be
> what I need to do. Is 250 degrees too hot?

Heck no. TBT, I'm not exactly sure of my temps but 250-275 is around the
neighborhood. The Lazy Q runs 325 upper 300 lower and some famous Hill
Country shops go higher, although they use the Texas Crutch in the process
(foil). This 200 - 225 thing strikes me as big an Urban Legend as mopping.
There is really no secret to brisket other than these: cook 'em til they're
done and cook at least ten of 'em before giving up.

-Hound


frohe

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Mar 5, 2003, 3:26:42 AM3/5/03
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Matthew L. Martin wrote:
> In my limited experience (I've never done a brisket as large as 8
> pounds) size is no obstacle to a tender, juicy brisket. I've had burnt
> edges, but never a tough dry brisket come out of my ECBX2.

Done right any size brisket can turn out good. The key, IMO, is to not be
in a hurry with this cut of meat.

Duwop

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Mar 5, 2003, 9:54:09 AM3/5/03
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"Cuchulain Libby" <he...@goodbye.org> wrote in message news:<LRf9a.56502$Tz6.2...@twister.austin.rr.com>...

10 of em huh? Good, that gives me a few more years then! Hell, might
even ramp up to two a year, that'll still leave me 3 or 4 years ;). As
always, your advice is apreciated Hound.
Sure hoping to have a taste of what it supposed to be like though.
There's a little bar in Pescadero in the hills near the coast that's
got a nice big trailer rig they pull out in the summer months on
weekends. I bet they do a brisket. Damn rare to find out here in the
SF Bay Area.

Cuchulain Libby

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Mar 6, 2003, 12:24:44 AM3/6/03
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"Duwop" <tut...@hotmail.com> wrote

> There's a little bar in Pescadero in the hills near the coast that's
> got a nice big trailer rig they pull out in the summer months on
> weekends. I bet they do a brisket. Damn rare to find out here in the
> SF Bay Area.

Well...
For the last two years I've meant to send a brisket to a Raiders game for
some e-friends in the Raiders ng. Now I'm thinking *big*, as in dragging the
new pit out there. I could cook 2 cases of briskets bought on the cheap
here, sorta like the Al-Queda dudes who were schlepping smokes from NC to
MI. Only hitch is, they've gone to Disneyland-style parking and it's fucked
up the old-timers' tailgating plans.

-Hound


Wayne Sircoulomb

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Mar 6, 2003, 1:21:45 AM3/6/03
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What works for me is to cook the brisket for about 8 hours in the smoker.
Then either foil it with a little added water or put it in a roaster with a
cup or two of water and finish it off for about 12 hours. If you don't want
to stay up all night tending the fire you can put the roaster in the oven
and set the fire to 175. This makes the brisket very tender. I sometimes
slice it and some times I pull it, but the family can't seem to get enough
of it. And I know what you are going to say. It's cheating to use the
oven, but if you want tender and consistant then you need that extra long
simmer in damp heat. I also do not trim the meat or cut it up until it is
time for the roaster. If you do choose to cook it all the way on the smoker
then I would suggest getting a coal box to put in the firebox so you get a
slow easy burn that will keep the chamber hot for extended periods of time.
That is one of those expanded metal boxes that you fill with charcoal and
put hot coals on the top so that it burns slowly down to the bottom of the
box.

Wayne

"Mr. Potato Head" <sp...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
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frohe

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Mar 6, 2003, 6:04:54 AM3/6/03
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Wayne Sircoulomb wrote:
> If you do choose to cook it all the way on the smoker
> then I would suggest getting a coal box to put in the firebox so you
> get a slow easy burn that will keep the chamber hot for extended
> periods of time. That is one of those expanded metal boxes that you
> fill with charcoal and put hot coals on the top so that it burns
> slowly down to the bottom of the box.

Better yet, stack several fireplace bricks in a square or circle. Pour in
unlight lump and top off with some straight from the chimney starter.
VOILA! Monion method for longer burn plus the extra thermal mass.

Mr. Potato Head

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Mar 6, 2003, 12:11:57 PM3/6/03
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"Cuchulain Libby" <he...@goodbye.org> wrote in message
news:wYA9a.5261$z54.1...@twister.austin.rr.com...


Hound, I think your reply to Duwop got crossed up.

You'll need to go through Fresno on the way. You can park your rig in my
driveway, cook your briskets, throw them in a cooler and take them to the
game. While you're gone, I'll have all my friends over and have a bbq with
your new pit. Deal?

Spud
>
>


Cuchulain Libby

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Mar 7, 2003, 5:01:27 AM3/7/03
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"Steve Wertz" <swe...@bs.invalid> wrote
> You can't get into the parking lot of a Raiders (or 49'ers) game early
> enough to start (and finish) briskets. You'd *have* to start cooking
> outside the park/stadium someplace, and then wheel it in when the
> parking lot opens.

They go in days ahead according to some news reports of the festivities at
Raider's games. Seems these reporters are always on the lookout for beatings
and and such and end up writing about the good time they had.

-Hound


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