Paul Kirk BBQ Class

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Louis Cohen

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Jun 18, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/18/00
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Just got back from a Paul Kirk all day (7 AM - 7 PM) BBQ class. Before
class, Mr. Kirk graciously autographed my copy of his book, and confirmed
that he hangs all his meats - this provides more capacity in his pit, cooks
them evenly without turning, and lets them self-baste from above.

The class was organized by Mr. Frank Boyer of the California BBQ
Association; their web site is down for maintenance but should be back up
soon. Thanks, Frank (fran...@slip.net), for a great job putting everything
together. We were hosted by Armadillo Willie's in Los Altos (Silicon
Valley); thanks to them for many services; Mr. Kirk spoke very highly of
their cuisine, and that's some endorsement.

By seven, about 15 or so students had arrived, mostly with their own pits
(Mr. Boyer provided WSM's for those who couldn't bring their own). Most
were WSM's, but one gentleman had a beautiful Klose pit - it was nice to see
one in person after reading about them. Another couple of guys trailered in
a commercial sized pit. The person I was eventually teamed with, Guido
Meindl, had a Weber kettle and I had my old ECB (along with photos of the
new Kamado ( http://www.SendPix.com/album/1000429/151600dc649819/ ).

I really lucked out - Guido and his lovely Missus run Guido's International
Foods, which makes Guido's Serious (guidos...@earthlink.net) line of rubs
and sauces.

At 7 or so, the call went out to light the fires. Kevin with the Klose, and
the guys with the big pit used propane fired torches to light their
briquettes and wood respectively - pics at :
http://www.SendPix.com/album/1000517/213300d8388018/

First up in the class was brisket. Mr. Kirk showed us how to trim a brisket
(leave not more than 1/8 - 1/4" of fat) and how to separate the point from
the flat to save cooking time (the points all went in the big commercial
pit - more on that later). Mr. Kirk handed out a rub and off we went.

Next came the pork butts - Mr. Kirk likes them lean, and trims outer fat
off, including a fat cap with covers a thin layer of meat which covers
another fat cap. He handed out jars of KC Rib Doctor rub, and off we went
to trim our butts and put them in the pits.

Then, Mr. Kirk shared some of vast knowledge of seasonings, and sent us to
develop our own, which he critiqued on paper. I was working with a pro, and
left the design to Guido (although I did suggest a bit of onion salt).

This rub went on the ribs (St Louis spares trimmed to look like baby backs -
go figure) and on the chickens. Mr. Kirk splits his chickens down the back
and hangs them.

The chickens hit the pits around 11:15 and off we went to lunch.

When we returned, the guys with the commercial pit took one of the points
out and served it - just melt-in-your-mouth tender (provided you cut across
the grain), moist, and delicious. If the points were this good after just 5
hrs, think how good the flats would be after 10 - more below.

After lunch, Mr. Kirk lectured on BBQ sauces.

At 3 PM or so, Mr. Kirk showed us how to present a chicken for judging. One
member of each team prepared the presentation and the other half went to
learn how judging is done. I managed to carve one half of ours decently,
but got confused on the second half. Mr. Kirk asked rhetorically, "Why are
you such a clusterf***?", elbowed me aside, and completed the job.

After the chicken judging, Guido prepared the ribs and I judged. There was
plenty of variation in appearance, tenderness (I marked down dry in this
category), and taste.

Next up was the pork butt. Mr. Kirk again gave me some valuable personal
instruction in bladework, and Guido judged.

Last was brisket, which I judged. All the presentations were fine, and all
the tenderness and taste disappointing. All the briskets save one were dry
(don't know which was the good one; judging was double blind), and a bit
tough, and they were nearly all rather bland. I can't imagine what these 20
hr brisket guys do to keep the meat tender and moist; the points were vastly
better after 5 hrs than the flats at 10.

Guido and I scored a 6th, 2 4ths, and a 3rd, making us 3rd overall out of 8
teams. Considering that we had the least impressive gear (a Weber kettle
and an ECB), I think we did damn well, thanks mostly to Guido's rub and
presentation. The Grand Champion, an experienced gentleman named Mr. Cook
(appropriate enough) had 3 first's; I think he used a WSM.

Working with the ECB reminded me why I bought a Kamado - with holes drilled
in the ECB firepan, keeping a consistent fire going is no longer hopeless,
merely a pain. And, if the light isn't just right, you can't tell how much
if any water is still in the pan.

Some other info:

Mr. Kirk slathers nearly all his meat with cheap mustard, in order to hold
the rub better, form nicer bark, and provide some vinegar to tenderize the
meat; we didn't do this in class.

Mr. Kirk demonstrated some rudimentary sausage making - 3 lbs of ground pork
and 2 lbs of coarse ground beef with a bunch of seasonings, mixed up and
scooped about a lb at a time on to plastic wrap and then rolled into sausage
shape. The mixture was too lean; in the future Mr. Kirk suggests mixing in
some bread crumbs or oatmeal to hold what moisture there is, if the meat is
too lean.

Mr. Kirk favors log burning JR (or maybe J & R) pits over the gas-assisted
Southern Pride and Ole Hickory units.

Regards from sunny San Leandro

Louis Cohen
N37° 43' 7" W122° 8' 42"
"Whose cuisine reigns supreme?' - Fukui Kenji
http://members.home.net/louiscohen


Steve

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Jun 18, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/18/00
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Louis Cohen wrote:
>
> Just got back from a Paul Kirk all day (7 AM - 7 PM) BBQ class. Before
> class, Mr. Kirk graciously autographed my copy of his book, and confirmed
> that he hangs all his meats - this provides more capacity in his pit, cooks
> them evenly without turning, and lets them self-baste from above.
>

<snip>

Sounds like you had a great time, Louis! Not sure if I agree with
trimming all the fat from the butts and most from the brisket, tho. Fat
provides lots of flavor and helps to keep the meat from drying out. I
remove unwanted fat AFTER cooking.
Sausage has to have fat, imho, and I shoot for about 25% fat ratio,
as a rule. Some sausages require more and some require less, just
depends on which kind you are making.
Again, it sounded like a day well spent. Thanks for the UCAP.

Steve

--
"T'was a woman who drove me to drink and I have never had the common
decency to write and thank her".........WC Fields

http://www.se.mediaone.net/~spices

Edwin Pawlowski

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Jun 18, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/18/00
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Louis Cohen <louis...@home.com> wrote in message news:AnZ25.6346

> Just got back from a Paul Kirk all day (7 AM - 7 PM) BBQ class. Before
> class, Mr. Kirk graciously autographed my copy of his book, and confirmed
> that he hangs all his meats - >
> Louis Cohen


Sounds like a fun day. A couple of qustions and comments.
Did you learn more of how to compete or just to make better bbq for
yourself?

Are you considering hanging meat in the future?

I've done brisket for 20 hours and had it come out more tender and moist
than brisket I've done in less time. I think it is more of a
temperature/fat ratio. Seems strange that so many people and so little good
brisket happened. Any suggestions as to why? Did Mr. Kirk help or give
guidance in the cooking of them?

I'd rather not use filler in my sausage. It would work in a pinch, but
nothing beats the real deal. Of course he may not have been able to select
the proper meats under the circumstances.
Ed
e...@snet.net
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome


notbob

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Jun 18, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/18/00
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Wow, I'm bummed I missed out on this class. How did you know this class
was being offered? I looked and looked and could no mention of it in
this newsgroup. Who's inner circle do I aspire to? Do I need to become
a member of Ca BBQ Assoc?

Also, what was the purpose of this class? You raise the question, "I


can't imagine what these 20 hr brisket guys do to keep the meat tender

and moist", after judging all but one of the briskets "tough" and
lacking in "taste". Did you learn the answer? Did Mr. Kirk do some Q
to show how it should be done? I guess my main question is what was
learned about cooking good bbq? I don't give a flop about presentation
or "bladework". Did you learn why the student's Q was lacking in
taste? Did you learn how to make the kind of BBQ you would like to?

I hope so. Anyway, thank you for relating your experience and providing
the pics.

nb

The Fat Man®

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Jun 18, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/18/00
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notbob <not...@NOThome.com> wrote in message
news:394CF57F...@NOThome.com...
<SNIP>

> Also, what was the purpose of this class? You raise the question, "I
> can't imagine what these 20 hr brisket guys do to keep the meat tender
> and moist", after judging all but one of the briskets "tough" and
> lacking in "taste". Did you learn the answer? Did Mr. Kirk do some Q
> to show how it should be done? I guess my main question is what was
> learned about cooking good bbq? I don't give a flop about presentation
> or "bladework". Did you learn why the student's Q was lacking in
> taste? Did you learn how to make the kind of BBQ you would like to?
>
> I hope so. Anyway, thank you for relating your experience and providing
> the pics.
>
> nb
===================

The brisket flats were no good because they had been seperated from the
point. The point has most of the fat. It's a good thing to have them
connected so they can share the juice.

If not connected, stacked with point on top.

--
The Fat Man®

Louis Cohen

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Jun 18, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/18/00
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Mr.Kirk did say that the sausage meat was too lean

He feels that seasoning and smoke won't penetrate into fat very far, and
hence the need to trim. All the class briskets were way too dry, IMHO.

Regards from sunny San Leandro

Louis Cohen
N37° 43' 7" W122° 8' 42"
"Whose cuisine reigns supreme?' - Fukui Kenji
http://members.home.net/louiscohen

"Steve" <geve...@mediaone.net> wrote in message
news:394CA4A5...@mediaone.net...


>
>
> Louis Cohen wrote:
> >
> > Just got back from a Paul Kirk all day (7 AM - 7 PM) BBQ class. Before
> > class, Mr. Kirk graciously autographed my copy of his book, and
confirmed
> > that he hangs all his meats - this provides more capacity in his pit,
cooks
> > them evenly without turning, and lets them self-baste from above.
> >

Harry A. Demidavicius

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Jun 18, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/18/00
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Nice post, Louis - thanks for sharing
Harry

On Sun, 18 Jun 2000 05:47:12 GMT, "Louis Cohen" <louis...@home.com>
wrote:

Louis Cohen

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Jun 18, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/18/00
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I'm not interested in competition, except maybe for the best leftovers in
the office.

I might try hanging something from the steel bars at the top of the Kamado
lid (that hold the threads into which the damper top screws), if I get the
OK from the company.

It probably won't make as much difference in a K as in a conventional pit,
especially since I use a rib rack anyway.

Mr Kirk provided the brisket rub and told everybody that he cooks at
230-250°, we put the brisket flats on at about 8:30 AM, and we took them off
around, oh 5:30 PM. The points, in the big commercial pit, were spectacular
at around 12:30 PM.

Since the brisket I can get around here is already trimmed, I better learn
to cook them that way. What temp do you use for 20 hr brisket (flat and
point, all fat on, I assume)?

I'm sure I've eaten commercial sausage with filler, but I'd like to try some
oatmeal filler, for the taste and texture. Maybe like meat loaf with
breadcrumbs.

Regards from sunny San Leandro

Louis Cohen
N37° 43' 7" W122° 8' 42"
"Whose cuisine reigns supreme?' - Fukui Kenji
http://members.home.net/louiscohen

"Edwin Pawlowski" <e...@snet.net> wrote in message
news:z2335.2635$Dz5.4...@typhoon.snet.net...


>
> Louis Cohen <louis...@home.com> wrote in message news:AnZ25.6346

> > Just got back from a Paul Kirk all day (7 AM - 7 PM) BBQ class. Before
> > class, Mr. Kirk graciously autographed my copy of his book, and
confirmed
> > that he hangs all his meats - >

Louis Cohen

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Jun 18, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/18/00
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"notbob" <not...@NOThome.com> wrote in message

> Wow, I'm bummed I missed out on this class. How did you know this class
> was being offered?

I was surfing and ran across the Ca BBQ Assoc. Their web site was down, so
I e-mailed the contact, Mr. Boyer, who sent me the class info. Try him at
fran...@slip.net, maybe he keeps a mailing list. No membership required.


>
> Also, what was the purpose of this class?

To learn some stuff from Paul Kirk, competition oriented, but competition
does involve cooking.

You raise the question, "I
> can't imagine what these 20 hr brisket guys do to keep the meat tender
> and moist", after judging all but one of the briskets "tough" and
> lacking in "taste". Did you learn the answer?

By then I was too tired, sunburnt, and full of dry brisket to care.

Did Mr. Kirk do some Q
> to show how it should be done?

Nope (not the cooking per se - he did provide the rubs for the brisket and
the ribs). Demonstrated meat trimming and then presentation, talked about
rubs and sauces, answered questions, told some stories and jokes, critiqued
rub recipes.

>I guess my main question is what was
> learned about cooking good bbq?

I was able to confirm that my product is at least in the ballpark with what
I read here. I finally saw the point and the flat. I learned what fat to
trim. I learned that, contrary to my experience it is possible to remove
the rib membrane without pliers.

> I don't give a flop about presentation

Nor do I, within reason.

> or "bladework".

They know me at the Emergency room - every couple I years I show up after
trying to trim the fat off a leg of lamb. A certain minimal level of
competence would be desirable.

> Did you learn why the student's Q was lacking in
> taste?

Not for sure, I think it was just cooked too long.

> Did you learn how to make the kind of BBQ you would like to?

Nor for sure, but I have some ideas to try and some guidance for plausible
directions to go in.

Louis Cohen

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Jun 18, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/18/00
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Most of the fat was trimmed off the points as well, down to 1/4 - 1/8", and
the points were placed in the pit along with the one of the flats. The
points were just terrific at 12:30, all the flats were dry at 5:30.

I couldn't see any reason to cook beyond how the points came out at 12:30.
If you want even more tender/long cooked brisket, I guess you would need to
leave the fat on, sacrificing some flavor of the smoke and the rub.

Regards from sunny San Leandro

Louis Cohen
N37° 43' 7" W122° 8' 42"
"Whose cuisine reigns supreme?' - Fukui Kenji
http://members.home.net/louiscohen

"The Fat Man®" <lar...@tn.freei.net> wrote in message
news:BU635.557$ef....@news4.atl...


>
> notbob <not...@NOThome.com> wrote in message

> news:394CF57F...@NOThome.com...
> <SNIP>


> > Also, what was the purpose of this class? You raise the question, "I
> > can't imagine what these 20 hr brisket guys do to keep the meat tender
> > and moist", after judging all but one of the briskets "tough" and
> > lacking in "taste". Did you learn the answer? Did Mr. Kirk do some Q
> > to show how it should be done? I guess my main question is what was
> > learned about cooking good bbq? I don't give a flop about presentation
> > or "bladework". Did you learn why the student's Q was lacking in
> > taste? Did you learn how to make the kind of BBQ you would like to?
> >
> > I hope so. Anyway, thank you for relating your experience and providing
> > the pics.
> >
> > nb

Cuchulain Libby

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Jun 18, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/18/00
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Louis,
Mr. Kirk gave a class up the road in New Braunfels recently. I didn't
attend. Sounds to me like he has 2 goals: Extract $$ from well-meaning
people and to teach others how NOT to cook brisket so as to remove any
potential competition.

There is about 500 years of brisket experience on this ng, when have you
ever heard of seperating briskets prior to cooking?

It'd be worth it to spend the $140 next time just to show him up, I'll keep
my ears out for his next SoTex appearance.

BTW, I cooked an Angus choice last night ($1.69/lb) WELL worth it to seek
out choice briskets. Got any Gelson's or Whole Foods near ya?

-C

Edwin Pawlowski

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Jun 18, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/18/00
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Louis Cohen <louis...@home.com> wrote in message

> I'm not interested in competition, except maybe for the best leftovers in
> the office.

Agree there and I nail the competition most every day.


>
> I might try hanging something from the steel bars at the top of the Kamado
> lid (that hold the threads into which the damper top screws), if I get the
> OK from the company.

So far, I've brought home some SS rod that I can use but have not gooen
around to making any hooks. I can just visualize thib big hunk of meat
cooking tender and falling into the coals. When I finally try it, there
will be an expanded metal grate under the meat.

>
> The points, in the big commercial pit, were spectacular
> at around 12:30 PM.

Pretty fast time for spectacular, but I guess separating them made the
difference. Shame that the flats did not come out as well.

> I'm sure I've eaten commercial sausage with filler, but I'd like to try
some
> oatmeal filler, for the taste and texture. Maybe like meat loaf with
> breadcrumbs.

I've used soy protiens in small quantities. It cuts the fat content
overall, add some other benefits, but you will not detect any flavor. You
can get it and more information from www.amescompany.com

Ed
e...@snet.net
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome

Louis Cohen

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Jun 19, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/19/00
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He mentioned the class in New Braunfels. As Mr. Kirk likes to refer to
aluminum foil as "the Texas crutch", his class presented him with a crutch
wrapped in aluminum foil.

We separated the flats from the points because we only had a limited time to
cook (say 8:30 AM - 5:30 PM actual cooking time).

Mr. Kirk also said that he had never had really good BBQ in either Texas or
Florida (but Florida has no BBQ tradition). He specifically said that
everything at Kreuz was way too dry, including the sausage.

Regards from sunny San Leandro

Louis Cohen
N37° 43' 7" W122° 8' 42"
"Whose cuisine reigns supreme?' - Fukui Kenji
http://members.home.net/louiscohen

"Cuchulain Libby" <cuch...@texomagas.com> wrote in message
news:8ijqc8$53hpf$1...@fu-berlin.de...

El Téjanglo

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Jun 19, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/19/00
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in article fcg35.7719$T9.7...@news1.rdc1.sdca.home.com, Louis Cohen at
louis...@home.com wrote on 6/18/00 10:12 PM:

> Mr. Kirk also said that he had never had really good BBQ in either Texas or

> Florida (but Florida has no BBQ tradition).

Regarding the above referenced comments made in New Braunfels, let first say
that I have a great respect for Mr. Kirk's book on sauces and rubs. Use it
frequently. It's a terrific book. That said, if he hasn't had good barbecue
in Texas, he's not looking for it. It's not a "beaten path" thing, you've
got to hunt it up, and that means going beyond the places everybody talks
about. Here in San Antonio, for example, we have a place called Rudy's. It
was good about ten years ago. Now, it sucks. A model for dry meat Q, due to
being acquired by a conglomerate and turned into a chain. But there's always
a big line at lumch time. Why? Because it USED to be good, and because it
has a great location easily visible from an interstate. Rudy's was modeled
after a place in Luling called the City Market. It's gone now, too, but it
was definitely off the beaten path, and was terrific in its day.

FOIL...The first place I ever read about foil, was in a book by Rich Davis,
The All American Barbecue Cookbook, published in 1988. Davis, the inventor
of K.C. Masterpiece is a Kansas City boy, offers a number of recipes that
call for the use of foil in that book. One is from an Arkansas guy, one is
for indoor cooking (Davis' own recipe, btw). A third, is from Louisiana.

Obviously, barbecue, in particularly barbecuing with foil, predates the
publication of Davis' book. I grew up in Kansas City, but I now live in
Texas. I've often used foil for cooking brisket, but I didn't learn it in
Texas! It's a natural for long slow cooking of essentially tough cuts of
meat, for enhancing the tenderizing effects of the rendering. It's also a
natural when you don't have the time for twelve to twenty-four hour fire
tending experience.

I'm developing a good hand for doing brisket in my Hasty Bake without the
use of foil. When it gets to it, though, I'd also say that foil or no foil,
it makes little difference if the eatin's good.

Hasta la...,
El Téjanglo

Michael Rochman

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Jun 19, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/19/00
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Louis, I'm really surprised to read this as his videos, nor his books
talk this way. And, he's smart enough to know that the statement is
false and inflammatory. Are you sure he said it within that context?
Mike


On Mon, 19 Jun 2000 03:12:11 GMT, "Louis Cohen" <louis...@home.com>
wrote:

>Mr. Kirk also said that he had never had really good BBQ in either Texas or

Michael Rochman

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Jun 19, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/19/00
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Steve,

Agree. Last two briskets and last pitfull of butts, I trimmed nothing.
Left all the fat on the two 12lb packer cuts. Left the fat on the
butts.

Slathered, rubbed and cooked as normal. The difference in flavor added
was quite noticable. The fat had rendered from the butts as usual, but
they appeared to have more "black fat" to be mixed with the meat.

BTW, I don't trim the fat from the flats when I carve them. Some
prefer it that way and those who don't can easily cut it away. That
remaining fat is one of the reasons why the point is so good chopped
up for sandwiches. So is the flat when you make a sandwich from it
with some of it's fat.

Mike

Michael Rochman

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Jun 19, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/19/00
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Yes and no. The Choice CAB packer cuts I buy have a sizeable fat cap
on the flat. If you desired, you could seperate the flat and the point
into two pieces and cook that way, still retaining a sizeable fat cap
on each piece.

Have never used Select grade brisket as you prefer. Maybe there's also
more marbleing in the Choice flats...?

Mike

Tyler Hopper

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Jun 19, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/19/00
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Cuchulain Libby wrote:
>
> Louis,
> Mr. Kirk gave a class up the road in New Braunfels recently. I didn't
> attend. Sounds to me like he has 2 goals: Extract $$ from well-meaning
> people and to teach others how NOT to cook brisket so as to remove any
> potential competition.

That was my impression as well.

>
> There is about 500 years of brisket experience on this ng, when have you
> ever heard of seperating briskets prior to cooking?

I had to reread the account twice to make sure he really said that.

>
> It'd be worth it to spend the $140 next time just to show him up, I'll keep
> my ears out for his next SoTex appearance.

Let me know if you'd like a souse chef.

>
> BTW, I cooked an Angus choice last night ($1.69/lb) WELL worth it to seek
> out choice briskets. Got any Gelson's or Whole Foods near ya?
>
> -C

I assume you got yours from W.F. Exactly how were they so much better?

--
____________________________________________
Tyler Hopper

Cuchulain Libby

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Jun 19, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/19/00
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"Tyler Hopper" <tho...@postoffice.swbell.net> wrote

>
> I assume you got yours from W.F. Exactly how were they so much better?
>
> --
> ____________________________________________
> Tyler Hopper

Louis is in NoCal so I figured he ain't got HEB's. Got it at Central Mkt.
'B3R' Angus $1/69 a lb. Better than select because of the marbling and the
floppiness. This was a 13lber with floppies like an 8lb Select. I figure my
skills are fairly constant and this was the best brisket yet.

-C

Big Jim

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Jun 19, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/19/00
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I'll have Mr. Kirk know that the BBQ tradition in Florida goes back before
there ever was any place else in this country. When the Spanish first landed
in Florida in the 1400's they found the local natives already barbecuing
meat on racks over live coals.
--
Big Jim
James A. Whitten
big...@lazyq.com
http://www.lazyq.com
http://www.bbq-porch.org
http://www.egroups.com/group/lazyq

"Louis Cohen" <louis...@home.com> wrote in message

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Edwin Pawlowski

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Jun 19, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/19/00
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Big Jim <big...@atlantic.net> wrote in message

> I'll have Mr. Kirk know that the BBQ tradition in Florida goes back before
> there ever was any place else in this country. When the Spanish first
landed
> in Florida in the 1400's they found the local natives already barbecuing
> meat on racks over live coals.
> --
> Big Jim

Did they have a local distributor for 'Willingham's rubs?
Ed
e...@snet.net
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome


W.E. Hortin

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Jun 19, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/19/00
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"Captan Kirk" perchance? Enterprise? BBQ alien? One wonders.

Jason Quick wrote:

> Louis Cohen <louis...@home.com>


>
> > At 3 PM or so, Mr. Kirk showed us how to present a chicken for judging. One
> > member of each team prepared the presentation and the other half went to
> > learn how judging is done. I managed to carve one half of ours decently,
> > but got confused on the second half. Mr. Kirk asked rhetorically, "Why are
> > you such a clusterf***?", elbowed me aside, and completed the job.
>

> Ah. Was this gentleman a Marine at some point, perchance?
>
> Jason


Jason Quick

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Jun 20, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/20/00
to

Louis Cohen <louis...@home.com>

> At 3 PM or so, Mr. Kirk showed us how to present a chicken for judging. One
> member of each team prepared the presentation and the other half went to
> learn how judging is done. I managed to carve one half of ours decently,
> but got confused on the second half. Mr. Kirk asked rhetorically, "Why are
> you such a clusterf***?", elbowed me aside, and completed the job.

Ah. Was this gentleman a Marine at some point, perchance?

Jason

Big Jim

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Jun 20, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/20/00
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Ed, I wasent here yet, but I do know that they basted with saltwater. Dont
think they had pepper here yet

"Edwin Pawlowski" <e...@snet.net> wrote in message
news:H8B35.3737$Dz5.6...@typhoon.snet.net...

Michael Rochman

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Jun 20, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/20/00
to
C., First of all, great price...paying right around $2 here for same.
There's been a lot of talk about how Select is just as good. I've
never bought Select so I don't know how good it might be. Common sense
does dictate that better in should = better out. And, if the marbling
and the floppiness are the tests to go by, Choice passes on the
several I've bought so far. Mike

Michael Rochman

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Jun 20, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/20/00
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What? No Big Jim's LazyQ? :->) Mike


On Mon, 19 Jun 2000 18:20:33 -0400, "Big Jim" <big...@atlantic.net>
wrote:

The Fat Man®

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Jun 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/24/00
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Michael Rochman <mdr...@primary.net> wrote in message
news:um70lsk02h2ale6lq...@4ax.com...
====================

I asked the butcher at Wal-Mart if he could get a choice brisket. He said
select was all they ever got.

Maybe I could get one at Sam's, but I ain't got no stinking card! Somebody
offered me one then wussed out on the deal.

I can deal with select for the time being. Last 2 I got were limber as a
rope.

--
The Fat Man®

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