Woman named "Placenta" vector.

3 views
Skip to first unread message

Mark Shaw

unread,
Nov 17, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/17/97
to

From rec.arts.tv.

In article <346EF5...@ix.netcom.com>, "s.t.sears" <skye...@ix.netcom.com> writes:
>i used to work at bi-county hospital here in warren, mi and while i was
>mopping the floor in the post partum ward, imagine my surprise when i
>heard a woman tell her miogther that the new child was named "placenta".
>gotta be the best case of a miss-named kids what i call the "boy named
>sue" syndrome


--
Mark Shaw
My opinions only
PGP public key available at ftp.netcom.com:/pub/ms/mshaw
(to email me, remove any mythical beasts from my address)

Marisa and Mike

unread,
Nov 17, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/17/97
to

Now, wait a second -- my mom told me this story when she was an obstetrics
nurse at Beth Israel in Newark... she said she was there for it too - it was
in the delivery room, though....

either my mom's spreading ULs or there are an awful lot of dopey new
mothers...


Mark Shaw wrote in message <64qj23$gv9$1...@spock.asic.sc.ti.com>...

mitcho

unread,
Nov 17, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/17/97
to

Marisa and Mike wrote:

> either my mom's spreading ULs or there are an awful lot of dopey new
> mothers...

Well that settles it. I simply refuse to believe that your mom could
possibly be a vector for tired old ULs. After all, she was a nurse,
wasn't she?


Mitcho

----------------------------------------------------------------
Mitcho of Goat Hill Rat Central mit...@netcom.com
Goat Hill, California http://www.employees.org/~ozyman

Mike Holmans

unread,
Nov 18, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/18/97
to

Captive964 <capti...@aol.com> felt like saying:
>>
>Mark Shaw reported:

>>From rec.arts.tv.
>>
>>In article <346EF5...@ix.netcom.com>, "s.t.sears"
>><skye...@ix.netcom.com> writes:
>>>i used to work at bi-county hospital here in warren, mi and while i was
>>>mopping the floor in the post partum ward, imagine my surprise when i
>>>heard a woman tell her miogther that the new child was named "placenta".
>>>gotta be the best case of a miss-named kids what i call the "boy named
>>>sue" syndrome
>I seem to remember hearing on tv a long time ago about a woman who had twins
> and named them Ragina and Vagina. (pronounced Rageena and Vageena, but still).
>

Birdsnest to Beehive! Birdsnest to Beehive! Funny Names Thread at 3
o'clock! Over!

Birdsnest, this is Beehive. We read. Thread sighted, range about 3
miles, changing to intercept course. Out.

DAKKA DAKKA DAKKA DAKKA BLWWWOOOMM! BLWWOOOMMMM! DAKKA DAKKA DAKKA BLAM
BLAM BLAM GRRNNCCHH DAKKA DAKKA

Birdsnest, this is Beehive. Attack complete. Returning to base. Out.

Mike "Mike" Holmans


The exciting AFU FAQ, and many other things, may be found at
http://www.urbanlegends.com

Captive964

unread,
Nov 18, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/18/97
to

>
>From rec.arts.tv.
>
>In article <346EF5...@ix.netcom.com>, "s.t.sears"
><skye...@ix.netcom.com> writes:
>>i used to work at bi-county hospital here in warren, mi and while i was
>>mopping the floor in the post partum ward, imagine my surprise when i
>>heard a woman tell her miogther that the new child was named "placenta".
>>gotta be the best case of a miss-named kids what i call the "boy named
>>sue" syndrome
>
>
>
>
>--
>Mark Shaw
>My opinions only
>PGP public key available at ftp.netcom.com:/pub/ms/mshaw
>(to email me, remove any mythical beasts from my address)
>

I seem to remember hearing on tv a long time ago about a woman who had twins


and named them Ragina and Vagina. (pronounced Rageena and Vageena, but still).

Captive

David J. Rimmer

unread,
Nov 18, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/18/97
to

While nursing on a Carribbean island which shall remain nameless
I personally looked after three patients whose names were, Hitler,
Stallin (sic) and Virus.
###1

Andrew Robinson

unread,
Nov 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/19/97
to

Mike Holmans mentions:

> Ragina and Vagina. (pronounced Rageena and Vageena, but still).

And leaps into combat

> Birdsnest to Beehive! Birdsnest to Beehive! Funny Names Thread at 3
> o'clock! Over!

I could never believe Rip Torn... I got a business letter from a Laurie
Cearr and was tempted to reply as Djeep Van Truckx...

(Since you ask for funny names. I know lots more)

(By the way "lorry" is east-atlantic for truck, and "cearr" is the
Waterford pronunciation for car, meaning automobile, in case my
hilarious jape falls flat) (ho hum stop digging)

Andrew Robinson

Drydusty

unread,
Nov 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/19/97
to

I hope this won't sound racist, but there is a DECIDED tendency among
African-Americans to give their kids really squirrely-ass names...and I don't
mean names like "Kenyatta," which ostensibly have roots in their specific
heritage.....

Case in point: few years ago, there was a football player in the Rose Bowl for
the U of Washington, I believe, whose first name was "Saran." The announcer
related the story, that his mother thought the name "Saran Wrap" was really
neat...so she named her son after the product....!!!!!

Saturnay Night Live did a really hilarious skit in the late '80's set in a
summer camp for inner-city kids situation---featuring a roll call with kids
named "Cunnilingus," "Little Fellatio," "Flatulence," "Gonorrhea," and other
hilarious derivations.

Methinks Lorne Michaels got dogged out big-time by African-American groups
concerning that skit!!!

Jeremy W. Burgeson

unread,
Nov 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/19/97
to

dryd...@aol.com (Drydusty) wrote:

>A bunch of stuff

Some respected people in a crowded theatre said that they
should bring back trolling. Flame bait is not trolling.

Jeremy

Mike Holmans

unread,
Nov 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/19/97
to

On Wed, 19 Nov 1997 03:45:01 +0000, Andrew Robinson <a...@tinet.ie>
wrote:

>Mike Holmans mentions:
>
>> Ragina and Vagina. (pronounced Rageena and Vageena, but still).
>

Since that was a quote from a nidiot's post, I resent having it
attributed to me, especially as what I did write was:

>> Birdsnest to Beehive! Birdsnest to Beehive! Funny Names Thread at 3
>> o'clock! Over!

[plus noise of fighter squadron going into obliterate thread]
>
but you followed up with:

[your crap names]


>(Since you ask for funny names. I know lots more)

I was not asking for funny names. We know all the funny names you've
got and then some.

What I was trying to do was point out to clueless wombats such as
yourself that the last thing we want is a frigging funny names thread,
because they are not funny and only cretins contribute to them. So you
did, because you are.

>(By the way "lorry" is east-atlantic for truck, and "cearr" is the
>Waterford pronunciation for car, meaning automobile, in case my
>hilarious jape falls flat) (ho hum stop digging)

And if it's not funny without your explanation, then it's Not Funny.

Now go away.

Mike "<epesplenetic here>" Holmans

R. Serena Wakefield

unread,
Nov 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/19/97
to

My spies inform me that, on 19 Nov 1997 06:10:55 GMT, dryd...@aol.com
(Drydusty), hiding under the bedcovers, scribbled in the following in
their diary:

>I hope this won't sound racist,

Nah. Jingoistic, not racist.


> but there is a DECIDED tendency among
> African-Americans to give their kids really squirrely-ass names...and I don't
> mean names like "Kenyatta," which ostensibly have roots in their specific
> heritage.....

Many names that sound really weird to English speakers are perfectly
normal in Urdu or Afrikaani (sp?) ...


>Case in point: few years ago, there was a football player in the Rose Bowl for
> the U of Washington, I believe, whose first name was "Saran." The announcer
> related the story, that his mother thought the name "Saran Wrap" was really
> neat...so she named her son after the product....!!!!!

... but there are exceptions. Most names that end in "ani," "anda,"
or "eesha" are for real, no matter how unusual they SOUND.


>Saturnay Night Live did a really hilarious skit in the late '80's set in a
> summer camp for inner-city kids situation---featuring a roll call with kids
> named "Cunnilingus," "Little Fellatio," "Flatulence," "Gonorrhea," and other
> hilarious derivations.

I see the words "Saturday Night Live," "hilarious," and "80's" in one
sentence, and I worry.


>Methinks Lorne Michaels got dogged out big-time by African-American groups
> concerning that skit!!!

Probably that was half the point of doing it!


R. Serena Wakefield
rai...@ROSECOLOREDGLASSES.gate.net
(remove rose-colored glasses to e-mail)
Serena's Sanctuary: http://www.gate.net/~raistw

Louann Miller

unread,
Nov 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/19/97
to

> I seem to remember hearing on tv a long time ago about a woman who had twins

> and named them Ragina and Vagina. (pronounced Rageena and Vageena, but still).
>
> Captive
>

I personally knew a woman called Ramada. Refrained from
making the obvious jokes; she was my boss on that temp job.

Recently ran into paperwork on a Krystal Ball. Poor kid.
--
Our ISP is cyberramp.net -- you know the routine...

Andrew Gore

unread,
Nov 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/19/97
to

I posted a couple of weeks ago about the UL about eating the placenta after
birth. That's NOT what I meant!

---------------------------------------
Check out my ultimate Las Vegas and gambling web site!! >>> http://www.primenet.com/~dice/

Joseph Michael Bay

unread,
Nov 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/19/97
to

mil...@spamoff.net (Louann Miller) writes:

>Recently ran into paperwork on a Krystal Ball. Poor kid.

Probably going to be a stripper.

--
"Whosoever looks at a woman with lust in his heart, he has already
committed adultery with her in his heart". Joe Bay
"Yeah, but you don't get beat up by her husband in your heart" Stanford
Dept of Microbiology, Immunology, and Atomic Supermen University

Eric Hocking

unread,
Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
to

R. Serena Wakefield wrote:

> >Saturnay Night Live did a really hilarious skit in the late '80's set in a
> > summer camp for inner-city kids situation---featuring a roll call with kids
> > named "Cunnilingus," "Little Fellatio," "Flatulence," "Gonorrhea," and other
> > hilarious derivations.

Ever heard of Rowan Atkinson? Who did this sketch first?
--
Eric "Sit up straight Ontop" Hocking
"A closed mouth gathers no feet."
Remove "nospam." from address to email.
http://www.ozemail.com.au/~ehocking/

Damion Dishart

unread,
Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
to

In alt.folklore.urban, Eric Hocking (ehoc...@nospam.ozemail.com.au) wrote:
> R. Serena Wakefield wrote:
> > > Saturnay Night Live did a really hilarious skit in the late '80's set
> > > in a summer camp for inner-city kids situation---featuring a roll call
> > > with kids named "Cunnilingus," "Little Fellatio," "Flatulence,"
> > > "Gonorrhea," and other hilarious derivations.

> Ever heard of Rowan Atkinson? Who did this sketch first?

I believe he performed the sketch on 'The Secret Policeman's
Ball' in the late '70s/ early '80s but that may not have been the first
occurance. The Atkinson sketch sounds funnier because the names weren't
so obvious. "Plectrum! Stop doing that to Orifice." Wonderful stuff.
Nearly as good as 'The Indian Waiter' and 'Welcome to Hell'.

Damion.
--
!Reply-to: D.C.D...@sussex.ac.uk!
Deja News has shown me that articles posted Friday - Sunday are expired
by my newsserver before I can read them. If you want a reply, please
mail and post, especially at the weekend. Thank You.

David Martin

unread,
Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
to

Nathan F Miller wrote:

>
> Louann Miller <mil...@spamoff.net> wrote:
> >
> >I personally knew a woman
(snip)
> >Poor kid.
>
> Woah. This funny names thread is still going.
>
> Ahem. It Is Said that when the Nine Billion Funny Names have all
> been collected and posted to AFU, the stars will fall from the sky, the
> Grapes of Wrath shall roll about freely, and the world as we know it shall
> come to a gut-wrenching, scractch-your-nails-on-a-blackboard end.
> Now, we wouldn't want to hurry that fate, would we?

I'd like to point out that for those of you with a need to tell/hear
about funny names, there is a book (two versions) of such names:

Funny Names by Mary Rogers ISBN#: 1568430663
Funny Names Big Book by Mary Rogers ISBN#: 1568430167

I'd suggest you go get the book and if your favorite isn't
in there, write Ms. Rogers.

David "I sell you a copy for two-fifty" Martin

--
For the alt.folklore.urban FAQ see:
http://www.urbanlegends.com/afu.faq/ or
http://www.panix.com/~sean/afu/ or
E-mail mail-...@rtfm.mit.edu with "send
usenet/news.answers/folklore-faq/*" in the body of your message.

mitcho

unread,
Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
to

JoAnne Schmitz wrote:

> I'm mostly on your side, Serena, in not wanting to disparage names simply
> because they're unfamiliar. But I fail to see how any name is not "for
> real." Or how, if there is a more restrictive definition of "for real,"
> that most names ending in ani, anda or eesha would for some reason be
> declared real. More real than LaTonya?

French authorities would disagree with you.

In many European countries, the local authorities vet babies' names to
ensure that people who have the responsibility to rear a human being
aren't being irresponsible about how said human being is named. My
girlfriend was born in the south of France. Her father named her
"Yacout," which is, I understand, an Arab word for diamond (appropriate
in a way, since he's Arab hisself). The local authorities said that's
not a proper name for a girl, and appended "Yacout" with an "a," so that
she is known as "Yacouta" to this day.

ObUL: Arabs have 100 words for sand.

Mark Tye

unread,
Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
to

mitcho wrote:
>
> JoAnne Schmitz wrote:
>
> > I'm mostly on your side, Serena, in not wanting to disparage names simply
> > because they're unfamiliar. But I fail to see how any name is not "for
> > real." Or how, if there is a more restrictive definition of "for real,"
> > that most names ending in ani, anda or eesha would for some reason be
> > declared real. More real than LaTonya?
>
> French authorities would disagree with you.
>
> In many European countries, the local authorities vet babies' names to
> ensure that people who have the responsibility to rear a human being
> aren't being irresponsible about how said human being is named.

<snip>

This is true, I read recently of a family in a Scandanavian country (or
possibly the Netherlands) who were being repeatedly fined by the gov't
for assigning their child a long and unpronouncable name. I don't
recall the country or the name but I believe the latter included a
number and perhaps a typographic symbol. Did anyone else see this?

-- Mark "My parents' first choice was Mj%zkpl23cqxxfoo, but the doctor
dope-slapped them and they settled for Mark" Tye

E-mail reply hint: Have you driven a fnord lately? Didn't think so.

The facts and opinions expressed herein are ficticious. Any
similarity to real opinions, belonging to either the author or
his employer, is coincidental and not intended by the author.

Drydusty

unread,
Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
to

>
>Some respected people in a crowded theatre said that they
>should bring back trolling. Flame bait is not trolling.

Now how could my first post be construed as falme bait??

Drydusty

unread,
Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
to

>
>What I was trying to do was point out to clueless wombats such as
>yourself that the last thing we want is a frigging funny names thread,
>because they are not funny and only cretins contribute to them

Why aren't funny names threads funny? If that premise is correct...why have
the writers of "Ally McBeal," the one breakout hit of this new season, had a
recurring gag with a lawyer named "Miss Poop?"

Simon Slavin

unread,
Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
to

In article <3477a238...@news.pacbell.net>,
p...@pacbell.net (Placenta Jones) wrote:

> On 17 Nov 1997 23:13:07 GMT, ms...@asic.sc.ti.unicorn.com (Mark Shaw)
> wrote:
>
> >From rec.arts.tv.

> >
> ><skye...@ix.netcom.com> writes:
> >>heard a woman tell her miogther that the new child was named "placenta".
>

> And I <am> that woman's daughter.

Hold on, I thought you name was 'fartboy'.

Simon.
--
Simon Slavin -- Computer Contractor. | The mind abhors a vacuum. Without
http://www.hearsay.demon.co.uk | facts, they'll fill their heads with
Check email address for spam-guard. | fantasies.
Junk email not welcome at this site. | -- Jonathan Kellerman: _Time Bomb_

Shed

unread,
Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
to

Louann Miller wrote:
<...>

> I personally knew a woman called Ramada. Refrained from
> making the obvious jokes; she was my boss on that temp job.
>

My friend (no, honest) knows someone called John McInernie. When asked
who he had been out with by his mother, he replied John McInernie and
she though he had been out with three people: John, Mac and Ernie.

--
Remove x to reply. Buy a shed today.

Nathan F Miller

unread,
Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
to

Louann Miller <mil...@spamoff.net> wrote:
>
>I personally knew a woman called Ramada. Refrained from
>making the obvious jokes; she was my boss on that temp job.
>Recently ran into paperwork on a Krystal Ball. Poor kid.

Woah. This funny names thread is still going.

Ahem. It Is Said that when the Nine Billion Funny Names have all
been collected and posted to AFU, the stars will fall from the sky, the
Grapes of Wrath shall roll about freely, and the world as we know it shall
come to a gut-wrenching, scractch-your-nails-on-a-blackboard end.
Now, we wouldn't want to hurry that fate, would we?

Nathan "and we sure wouldn't want to _hear_ all those names either"
Miller

Narendra C. Tulpule

unread,
Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
to

On 20 Nov 1997, Nathan F Miller wrote:
* Ahem. It Is Said that when the Nine Billion Funny Names have all
* been collected and posted to AFU, the stars will fall from the sky, the
* Grapes of Wrath shall roll about freely, and the world as we know it shall
* come to a gut-wrenching, scractch-your-nails-on-a-blackboard end.

Reminds me of a cultural legend:
Do the Japanese believe that your natural life is 900 million
breaths? (If you calculate it, at approx 18 breaths per minute
this is ~ 95 years. We'll forgo another allegedly Japanese
tradition of denoting a new born baby ayear old).
-- Narendra "live to see a thousand moons - although not on
the Freeway" Tulpule.
========================================================================
- Naren / nare...@alpha.dtix.com / 617-229-9797
Try 'finger tul...@cs.unc.edu' for more information.
Confucious say: "Man with hand in bush not necessarily trimming shrubs."
========================================================================


Mike Holmans

unread,
Nov 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/21/97
to

Ever watched a TV comedian whose routine consists entirely of old gags
you've heard a thousand times before? Pretty dull, huh?

Thing is, even bad TV comedians usually have some sense of timing and
delivery. Posters to funny names threads haven't, in general, so it's
like watching an inept amateur doing an impression of a bad TV
comedian telling hoary old chestnuts.

Hit comedy shows work because the performers and the writers have
considerable skill and technique, and can carry them off successfully.


Tell you what: you get yourself a breakout hit TV show with funny
names gags in it. If you are then prepared to dispense your pearls for
free, come back and post them to your heart's content.

Mike "until then, don't go there" Holmans

SThomas257

unread,
Nov 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/21/97
to

The strangest name that I have come across personally was in Augusta,
Georgia at a gas station. The female cashier's name was "Lasagne".
Also, my mom told me of a patient that she saw once whose last name was
"Caseofbeer".

Andrew Reid

unread,
Nov 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/21/97
to

Mark Shaw wrote:

> As the original poster to this thread, I humbly apologize for
> having let this lot of wretched fools into the froup. I'll
> accept my punishment like an adult if only someone'll tell what
> it is.

An "adult" is a post-pubescent organism largely or entirely
able to see to its own survival needs. Many human cultures
have a variety of rituals which establish "adulthood" through
rituals celebrating the achievment of some degree of
self-sufficiency.

Andrew "And your punishment is to put up with crap like the above" Reid

Michele Doney

unread,
Nov 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/21/97
to

In article <34756a88...@news.axion.bt.co.uk>,
mhol...@dircon.co.uk says...

>Thing is, even bad TV comedians usually have some sense of timing
and
>delivery. Posters to funny names threads haven't, in general, so
it's
>like watching an inept amateur

Except you always have the option to skip the entire thread. If not,
your newsreader is hopelessly inferior to mine.

Before anyone jumps on me, yes I do realize that funny names threads
don't belong here by virtue of there being a line in the FAQ
dedicated specifically to this rule. But as long as they keep
popping up, frankly I enjoy them and apparenlty so do a lot of other
poor misguided souls. The only thing that makes them less enjoyable
is all the posts complaining about their existence. Isn't that why
we have subject lines-- so you know which threads interest you and
which ones do not?

Michele "Ophelia Butt" Doney

David Martin

unread,
Nov 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/21/97
to

Let me quote from the first post: "I hope this won't
sound racist, but ..."

I don't mean to be insulting, but people use that
kind of weasel-speak when they know what they are
about to say is racist.

David "speak no weevil" Martin

Ben Walsh

unread,
Nov 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/21/97
to

Mark Tye wrote:

>
> mitcho wrote:
> > In many European countries, the local authorities vet babies' names to
> > ensure that people who have the responsibility to rear a human being
> > aren't being irresponsible about how said human being is named.

You're being too generous about their motives. Those laws were often
passed as part of a drive to stamp out regional cultures or religions:
in France many popular Basque names are not on the approved list. Those
laws are pretty much a dead letter now, although I'm sure the
NF-controlled towns will be resurrecting them.

> This is true, I read recently of a family in a Scandanavian country (or
> possibly the Netherlands) who were being repeatedly fined by the gov't
> for assigning their child a long and unpronouncable name. I don't
> recall the country or the name but I believe the latter included a
> number and perhaps a typographic symbol. Did anyone else see this?

Letters and numbers, yes. The name was pronounced "Alvin".

ben "it's *spelt* 'Raymond Luxury-Yacht' ..." w.

--
------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Drug dealers dealt heavy blow" | ben walsh
-- Irish News | benw at iona dot com
| http://bounce.to/heretic

Cindy Kandolf

unread,
Nov 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/21/97
to

Mark Tye <mt...@fnord.com> writes:
| This is true, I read recently of a family in a Scandanavian country (or
| possibly the Netherlands) who were being repeatedly fined by the gov't
| for assigning their child a long and unpronouncable name. I don't
| recall the country or the name but I believe the latter included a
| number and perhaps a typographic symbol. Did anyone else see this?

The family lives in Sweden. The parents wanted to register the boy's
name as some unpronounceable combination of letters and numbers, and
said it was pronounced "Albin" (a perfectly normal Swedish name). The
clerk who was supposed to register it refused to do so, the parents
appealed, and the courts agreed that if they wanted to call the kid
Albin they should write it in some way that looks vaguely like Albin.

Strictly speaking, the fines are not for the stupidity involved in
wanting to give the poor child that name, but for not registering a
valid name for the child by the age of six months as the law requires.

In Sweden and Norway, the law merely states that names that could
cause psychological harm to the child are not allowed. (Also family
names cannot be used as given names and vice versa.) There is no list
of permitted names. A name that is foreign or merely unusual (and
this includes newly invented names) is allowed, as long as it doesn't
seem to be setting the child up for years of teasing. And some old
Norwegian names (like some old-fashioned names beginning with "Do-",
which has become a slang word for toilet) are no longer allowed
because of the likelyhood of "psychological harm" to the child.

- Cindy Kandolf, certified language mechanic, mamma flodnak
flodmail: ci...@nvg.ntnu.no flodhome: Trondheim, Norway
flodweb: http://www.nethelp.no/cindy/

Ben Walsh

unread,
Nov 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/21/97
to

Cindy Kandolf wrote:

> The family lives in Sweden. The parents wanted to register the boy's
> name as some unpronounceable combination of letters and numbers, and
> said it was pronounced "Albin" (a perfectly normal Swedish name). The
> clerk who was supposed to register it refused to do so, the parents
> appealed, and the courts agreed that if they wanted to call the kid
> Albin they should write it in some way that looks vaguely like Albin.

I was close: Albin, not Alvin and Sweden, not Denmark. Armed with this
information I can now reveal that the name they wanted to give was
Brfxxccxxmnpcccclllmmnprxvclmnckssqlbb11116, which they describe as "a
pregnant, expressionistic development that we see as an artistic
creation."

ben "Brfxxccxxmnp, for short" w.

Mark Shaw

unread,
Nov 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/21/97
to

Groan.

As the original poster to this thread, I humbly apologize for
having let this lot of wretched fools into the froup. I'll
accept my punishment like an adult if only someone'll tell what
it is.

--
Mark "pshaw" Shaw (remove any mythical beasts from my address to email)
======================================================================
-^v------^v------^v------^v------^v------^v------^v-------------------
bip bip bip bip bip bip bip beeeeeeeeeeeee

Shed

unread,
Nov 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/21/97
to

Drydusty wrote:
>
> i originally noted:

>
> >> but there is a DECIDED tendency among African-Americans to give their kids
> >>really squirrely-ass names...and I don't mean names like "Kenyatta," which
> >>ostensibly have roots in their specific heritage.....
>
> to which R. Serena replied:

>
> >Many names that sound really weird to English speakers are perfectly
> >normal in Urdu or Afrikaani (sp?) ...
>
> Yes, I have known many friends with named such as Etiwanda, Etwandu, Kalumbe,
> etc, which are, of course, with legitimate African derivations. That is why I
> excluded such "legit" names in my first post.

Well, I used to live in Zimbabwe and I knew a school-mate whose surname
was Tambanewako which, from Shona to English, translates as 'play with
your own'. How legit. is that?

Drydusty

unread,
Nov 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/22/97
to

> The strangest name that I have come across personally was in Augusta,
>Georgia at a gas station. The female cashier's name was "Lasagne".

freind of mine was in a supermarket right outside of Oklahoma City, and the
eheckout girl was named "Charon."

For those not up on mythology, "Charon" was the name of the helmsman of the
boat on the River Styx, that transported the dead to Hades (I forget the
popular movie in which Charon was depicted as a berobed skeleton).

Anyhow, my friend, being a crack-up kinda guy, said to the girl,"Hey, that is
an interesting spelling of your name! Do you know where it comes from?"

She said, "Uh, this is how my ma spells "Sharon."

He didn't have the heart to elaborate!

(BTW, she was white, proving that white trash often fall prey to dumb naming
conventions).

Angus Johnston

unread,
Nov 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/22/97
to

cost...@pilot.msu.edu (Michele Doney) wrote:

> >> (BTW, she was white, proving that white trash often fall prey to dumb
naming
> >> conventions).
> >

> >Ms. Doney? Exhibit A.
>
> And you read it WHY?

Let's go to the videotape. You _quoted_ my answer to your question,
actually, but I'll flesh it out for you...

> >Angus "Reasons one, three, five, eight, and nine. At least." Johnston

From my immediately preceeding post:

"Why no funny names threads? Nine reasons, at least. One: like Mike says,
they're usually not that funny. ...Three: many of those tales, as we've
seen in this go-round wind up being of the obnoxiously idiotically racist
variety. ...Five: they attract a bad element. ...Eight: they bring out the
aforementioned racism, vectoring, and general stupidity, so it's
_dangerous_ to killfile them. Nine: the group's too damn big already."

In other words, if we ignore them, they'll multiply. Idiots like Dusty will
get come for the funny names, and stay for the pointless bigoted
flame-fests that will flower in their paths. Afu will complete its
transmogrification.

If you want dumb jokes, braindead arguments, craven bigotry, political
'discussions' that make every point on the continuum of opinion look bad,
shameless vectoring, and generally stratospheric chaff-to-wheat ratios,
usenet has what you're looking for. There are literally thousands of groups
that meet your needs. But afu isn't one of them---not quite, not yet---and
a big part of how we keep it that way is by not following the advice we're
constantly getting from people like you.

--
Angus "Dick Gozinya" Johnston

"How tall was Mussolini?"
"Five feet six and a half inches."
---The Answer Man

Jeremy W. Burgeson

unread,
Nov 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/22/97
to

cost...@pilot.msu.edu (Michele Doney) wrote:

>we have subject lines-- so you know which threads interest you and
>which ones do not?

Yes. The subject line matches something in my killfile, and now I won't
see followups to it.

Jeremy

Charles A. Lieberman

unread,
Nov 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/22/97
to

sh...@xmail.com wrote:
| Well, I used to live in Zimbabwe and I knew a school-mate whose surname
| was Tambanewako which, from Shona to English, translates as 'play with
| your own'. How legit. is that?

I hate to add to a f*nny-n*m*s thread, but how do you know it's not legit?
What is your African onomastics training?
I don't have any myself, but I'm not making claims either way

Charles A. Lieberman http://www.fortunecity.com/skyscraper/WhiteCat/25/index.html
Brooklyn, New York, USA

Angus Johnston

unread,
Nov 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/22/97
to

cost...@pilot.msu.edu (Michele Doney) wrote:

> mhol...@dircon.co.uk says...
>
> >Thing is, even bad TV comedians usually have some sense of timing
> >and delivery. Posters to funny names threads haven't, in general,
> >so it's like watching an inept amateur
>
> Except you always have the option to skip the entire thread. If not,
> your newsreader is hopelessly inferior to mine.

Except? How is that an "except"? You can always turn bad tv off, too.

> Before anyone jumps on me, yes I do realize that funny names threads
> don't belong here by virtue of there being a line in the FAQ
> dedicated specifically to this rule. But as long as they keep
> popping up, frankly I enjoy them and apparenlty so do a lot of other
> poor misguided souls. The only thing that makes them less enjoyable
> is all the posts complaining about their existence.

I'm the last guy to hold to a strict definition of what's on charter, and
the guy _behind_ the last guy to thump the FAQ, but I'll have none of
either funny names threads or your argument.

Why no funny names threads? Nine reasons, at least. One: like Mike says,

they're usually not that funny. Two: they usually abound with vectoring of
false tales as true, a pernicious development for afu. Three: many of those
false tales, as we've seen in this go-round wind up being of the
obnoxiously idiotically racist variety. Four: they're endlessly repetitive.
Five: they attract a bad element. Six: they spawn endless mutations---the
next-door neighbor of the Beast, for one, always seems to sneak in on Funny
Names' heels. Seven: they bring out occasional witty flames from the
regulars, so I don't usually killfile them. Eight: they bring out the


aforementioned racism, vectoring, and general stupidity, so it's

_dangerous_ to killfile them. Nine: the group's too damn big already. Want
more?

--
Angus "Amanda Huginkiss" Johnston

"Why do we say 'By Jiminy'?"
""'By Jiminy' is a scholarly euphemism for 'By the gods.' 'Jiminy' refers
to Gemini---the heavenly twins of the Zodiac, and the patron gods of
ancient Rome."
---The Answer Man

GrapeApe

unread,
Nov 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/22/97
to

But every time this zombie thread pops up, I wish that someone would post an
URL to something along the lines of "The Canonical List of Funny Names" Maybe
some people would wander over to such a site and see that they weren't the
first person to think of "Seymour Butts" and lose the sense that it is such a
'boffo yuks' topic.

Listing those 2 books was a good start. "Funny Names for your Newborn, and 101
Other Selfish Ways to Mistreat your Offspring", and "Crippling Your Childrens
Social Development Through Nomenclature"

Angus Johnston

unread,
Nov 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/22/97
to

dryd...@aol.com (Drydusty) wrote:

> freind of mine was in a supermarket right outside of Oklahoma City, and the
> eheckout girl was named "Charon."
>
> For those not up on mythology, "Charon" was the name of the helmsman of the
> boat on the River Styx, that transported the dead to Hades (I forget the
> popular movie in which Charon was depicted as a berobed skeleton).
>
> Anyhow, my friend, being a crack-up kinda guy, said to the girl,"Hey, that is
> an interesting spelling of your name! Do you know where it comes from?"
>
> She said, "Uh, this is how my ma spells "Sharon."
>
> He didn't have the heart to elaborate!

Those wacky Okies! I can't believe they don't know not to adopt an
alternate spelling of a common name that matches a Latinate transliteration
of that of a disreputable figure from ancient Greek myth! Your freind
showed more forbearance than _I_ would have!

> (BTW, she was white, proving that white trash often fall prey to dumb naming
> conventions).

Ms. Doney? Exhibit A.

--


Angus "Reasons one, three, five, eight, and nine. At least." Johnston

"What is an osier wythe?"
"That's just another name for a willow twig."
---The Answer Man

Lee Rudolph

unread,
Nov 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/22/97
to

ms...@asic.sc.ti.unicorn.com (Mark Shaw) writes:

>> The strangest name that I have come across personally was in Augusta,
>>Georgia at a gas station. The female cashier's name was "Lasagne".

...


>Groan.
>
>As the original poster to this thread, I humbly apologize for
>having let this lot of wretched fools into the froup. I'll
>accept my punishment like an adult if only someone'll tell what
>it is.

Well, Ann Landers would recommend a beating by Lasagne. Or something
like that.

Lee Rudolph

Michele Doney

unread,
Nov 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/22/97
to

In article <angusj-ya02408000...@news.mindspring.com>,
ang...@mindspring.com says...

>
>> (BTW, she was white, proving that white trash often fall prey to dumb naming
>> conventions).
>
>Ms. Doney? Exhibit A.

And you read it WHY? Yeesh people, it's usenet. If you don't like the thread,
don't read it! Come on Angus, I *know* you have better computer skills than
that.

Michele

Drydusty

unread,
Nov 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/22/97
to

>Let me quote from the first post: "I hope this won't
>sound racist, but ..."
>
>I don't mean to be insulting, but people use that
>kind of weasel-speak when they know what they are
>about to say is racist.

The reason I prefaced my post with that comment is, for one reason or another,
this particular phenomenon of choosing extremely unusual names is especially
noted in African-American demographics (followed, though significantly less, by
redneck demographics).

Alfred Bigcock

unread,
Nov 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/22/97
to

Mike Holmans wrote:
>
> On Wed, 19 Nov 1997 03:45:01 +0000, Andrew Robinson <a...@tinet.ie>
> wrote:
>
> >Mike Holmans mentions:
> >
> >> Ragina and Vagina. (pronounced Rageena and Vageena, but still).
> Since that was a quote from a nidiot's post, I resent having it
> attributed to me, especially as what I did write was:
>
> >> Birdsnest to Beehive! Birdsnest to Beehive! Funny Names Thread at 3
> >> o'clock! Over!
> [plus noise of fighter squadron going into obliterate thread]
> but you followed up with:
> [your crap names]
> I was not asking for funny names. We know all the funny names you've
> got and then some.

>
> What I was trying to do was point out to clueless wombats such as
> yourself that the last thing we want is a frigging funny names thread,
> because they are not funny and only cretins contribute to them. So you
> did, because you are.
> And if it's not funny without your explanation, then it's Not Funny.
>
> Now go away.
>
> Mike "<epesplenetic here>" Holmans

My fellow Andrew (and everybody else), DO NOT let this Holmans loser
bother you. He makes the stupidest posts imaginable, like a half-page
of 'fighter-plane' sound effects, like a little boy playing with toy
planes, and thinks it's hilariously funny and entertaining. Anybody
else's attempt at a joke, however, he crushes with "That was stupid, you
think you're so funny, why don't you stick your head in the toilet?"
type remarks. He probably goes to parties just so he can stand in the
corner and sneer at everyone else, imitating them in a funny voice,
making them depressed and angry so he can think that makes him superior
and a tough guy. Somebody's going to kick his ass and teach him a
lesson, and I pray for the day. I do what I want, post what I want, and
don't read his crap anymore, and I suggest you do the same. If I let
people like that bother me, I'd never leave the house, much less post on
the Net. I hope to see more of your posts.

Ian Munro

unread,
Nov 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/22/97
to

Alfred Bigcock (di...@primenet.comNOSPAM_REMOVE) wrote:
: My fellow Andrew (and everybody else), DO NOT let this Holmans loser

: bother you. He makes the stupidest posts imaginable, like a half-page
: of 'fighter-plane' sound effects, like a little boy playing with toy
: planes, and thinks it's hilariously funny and entertaining. Anybody
: else's attempt at a joke, however, he crushes with "That was stupid, you
: think you're so funny, why don't you stick your head in the toilet?"
: type remarks.

Actually, I generally find Mike's posts to be informative, witty, or both
at the same time. The number of his posts archived at TAFKAC suggests
that others agree with me.

That you can't see this is perfectly consistent with the quality of your
contribution to the group.

Ian "leaving the piss" Munro
--
"Just a friendly warning, dear. If you ooze that sort of ingratiating oily
charm, I shall hurt you."--Madeleine Page


Jeremy W. Burgeson

unread,
Nov 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/23/97
to

Alfred Bigcock (di...@primenet.comNOSPAM_REMOVE) wrote:
(By the way, changing your "name" and nospam address is making
it hard for me to killfile you).

>a half-page of 'fighter-plane' sound effects

What the hell newsreader are you using?

DAKKA DAKKA DAKKA DAKKA BLWWWOOOMM! BLWWOOOMMMM! DAKKA DAKKA DAKKA BLAM
BLAM BLAM GRRNNCCHH DAKKA DAKKA

is not a half-page here (and is more interesting than anything you
generally write).

Jeremy

D.M. Procida

unread,
Nov 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/23/97
to

Alfred Bigcock <di...@primenet.comNOSPAM_REMOVE> wrote:

> Somebody's going to kick his ass and teach him a lesson, and I pray for
> the day.

You're not from Buffalo by any chance, are you?

D.M. Procida
--
"...the so-called support act, The Awkward Moments, climbed onstage
unsmilingly, not even looking at the audience. They only played one
song: "Autobahn". In German. For twenty minutes. Then they swaggered
off, not once having acknowledged the crowd. Conceited arrogant swine."

Elisabeth Orr

unread,
Nov 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/23/97
to

mitcho wrote:
>
> JoAnne Schmitz wrote:
>
> > I'm mostly on your side, Serena, in not wanting to disparage names simply
> > because they're unfamiliar. But I fail to see how any name is not "for
> > real." Or how, if there is a more restrictive definition of "for real,"
> > that most names ending in ani, anda or eesha would for some reason be
> > declared real. More real than LaTonya?
>
> French authorities would disagree with you.

>
> In many European countries, the local authorities vet babies' names to
> ensure that people who have the responsibility to rear a human being
> aren't being irresponsible about how said human being is named. My
> girlfriend was born in the south of France. Her father named her
> "Yacout," which is, I understand, an Arab word for diamond (appropriate
> in a way, since he's Arab hisself). The local authorities said that's
> not a proper name for a girl, and appended "Yacout" with an "a," so that
> she is known as "Yacouta" to this day.

I remember reading about a girl in France whose parents lost a court
battle to name her "Fleur de Marie," on the grounds that given names in
France are not allowed to include conjunction-type-thingies (the name
translates, "Flower of Mary"). Of course, she was like 14 by the time
the case was solved, leavign me to wonder what she's actually been
*called* these many years.

Peace,

Elisabeth

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Hey ugly duckling, * Elisabeth Orr = ej...@wam.umd.edu
Let's get lost tonight" - Beat Happening
http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/lofts/1388

R. Serena Wakefield

unread,
Nov 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/23/97
to

My spies inform me that, on 22 Nov 1997 21:32:12 GMT, dryd...@aol.com
(Drydusty), hiding under the bedcovers, scribbled in the following in
their diary:

Try: is especially noted in the demographics of the poor of whatever
race. You won't often find bizarre names among middle and upper class
African-Americans OR European-Americans.

I've always associated odd names with either: the combination of
pretension and lack of education (the aforementioned apocryphal
Placenta and Saran), or deliberate pandering to the counterculture
(i.e. hippie names like Starchild and Moondust).

The results only show up skewed by race -- if they even do at all --
because the communities of the middle and upper classes are
increasingly heterogenous and therefore unlikely to be measured purely
on a racial basis.

Although you get some REALLY weird names among the "old money" types.

R. Serena Wakefield
rai...@ROSECOLOREDGLASSES.gate.net
(remove rose-colored glasses to e-mail)
Serena's Sanctuary: http://www.gate.net/~raistw

Vicki Robinson

unread,
Nov 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/24/97
to

In a previous article, pro...@cf.ac.uk (D.M. Procida) said:

>Alfred Bigcock <di...@primenet.comNOSPAM_REMOVE> wrote:
>
>> Somebody's going to kick his ass and teach him a lesson, and I pray for
>> the day.
>
>You're not from Buffalo by any chance, are you?
>

Hey! HEY! HEY!! I resent that!

On behalf of the entire Western New York Region, I hereby disavow any
connection whatsoever with dice.

Sheesh.

Vicki "Only 60 miles East" Robinson
--
Visit our wedding at http://www.rit.edu/~vjrnts/wedding.html and
sign our guest book! The alt.folklore.urban FAQ and archive can
be found at http://www.urbanlegends.com. Take a look, if you
have a week to spare.

mitcho

unread,
Nov 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/24/97
to

Angus Johnston wrote:
>
> If you want dumb jokes, braindead arguments, craven bigotry, political
> 'discussions' that make every point on the continuum of opinion look bad,
> shameless vectoring, and generally stratospheric chaff-to-wheat ratios,
> usenet has what you're looking for. There are literally thousands of groups
> that meet your needs. But afu isn't one of them---not quite, not yet---and

As a public service, I would like to recommend any group in the soc.*
hierarchy.

Mitcho

--------------------------------------------------------------------
Mitcho of Goat Hill Rat Central mit...@netcom.com
Goat Hill, California http://www.employees.org/~ozyman

Charles Wm. Dimmick

unread,
Nov 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/24/97
to

Drydusty wrote:
>
> I hope this won't sound racist, but there is a DECIDED tendency among

> African-Americans to give their kids really squirrely-ass names...

Looking through my family tree I find:
Aral, Arba, Asaph, Avon, Bevil, Branchard, Buryl, Ceos, Constant,
Cordial, Coyt, Darold, Delbert, Delvin, Dirck, Dorr (actually this
one was Dorr Sill Dimmick, really), Eliphalet, Erasmus, Erastus,
Guerdon, Hamlet, Harley, Hezekiah, Hoyt, Ichabod, Jabez, Jehial,
Lertes, Levalley, Martial, Merenius, Mores, Myron, Neve, Niel,
Noah (he had 26 children and founded Arkville, NY), Orrison,
Parley, Parmenas, Perez, Risley, Seneca, Seburn, Shadrack,
Shubael (about 40 of this first name), Sylvan, Theron, Trafford,
Zenas, and Ziba among the male first names. A name like Saran
would not look out of place in such a mixture. Then there was
Hamilton Fish of New York political fame, who had an ancestor
Preserved Fish. In context these names are not necessarily
funny nor should they be singled out for ridicule. It's not your
name that counts, it's what you do with it.

Charles Wm. "funny name goes here" Dimmick

Madeleine Page

unread,
Nov 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/24/97
to

"Alfred Bigcock" <buncha yucks that guy> writes anent Mike Holmans:

>If I let
>people like that bother me, I'd never leave the house, much less post on
>the Net.

Hmmm.

By my count, that makes it eight thousand seven hundred and ninety five
afuisti rooting for Mike to bother Mr. Q-Tip.

Madeleine "or did I miscount?" Page


Alice Faber

unread,
Nov 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/24/97
to

>Hmmm.

Yes...make that eight thousand seven hundred and ninety six...

Alice "oh, and welcome back, Maddy" Faber


Martin Gilbert

unread,
Nov 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/24/97
to

Alfred Bigcock <di...@primenet.comNOSPAM_REMOVE> wrote:

> DO NOT let this Holmans loser

>bother you. [...] He probably goes to parties just so he can stand in the


>corner and sneer at everyone else, imitating them in a funny voice,
>making them depressed and angry so he can think that makes him superior
>and a tough guy.

You mean you DON'T?? Next you'll be saying that you don't find your wang
a source of endless entertainment!1!!

>Somebody's going to kick his ass and teach him a

>lesson, and I pray for the day. I do what I want, post what I want, and
>don't read his crap anymore, and I suggest you do the same.

Hmm. Did you consider the possibility that Mike might have a point when
he objects to off-topic/unamusing posts? Or that others with a lower
posting rate (e.g. me) may agree?

>If I let
>people like that bother me, I'd never leave the house, much less post on

>the Net. I hope to see more of your posts.

Or, you could listen to the meaning behind the words, sit werry werry
still for an hour or so and think about it. If you still feel aggrieved,
fine -- defend your honour. Stopping your ears and shouting
"nahnahnahnahnahIcan'thearyou" is a less useful reaction to criticism.

Martin "NAHNAHNAHNAHICAN'THEARYOU" Gilbert

--
"I'll bet you didn't even know that the Tamil culture existed.
Find out what other cultures you know little about."
- http://www.dejanews.com/info/toplevel.shtml


Terry Smith

unread,
Nov 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/24/97
to

> From: dryd...@aol.com (Drydusty)
a> Date: 20 Nov 1997 22:18:23 GMT

> Why aren't funny names threads funny? If that premise is
> correct...why have the writers of "Ally McBeal," the one
breakout
> hit of this new season, had a recurring gag with a lawyer
named
> "Miss Poop?"

For a similar reason to that for the standardising of the
Stanford-Binet test score by setting the mean score as `100'.

Terry
--
If this wasn't encrypted, it wouldn't be a message.
HTML E-mail deleted quicker than spam addressed to `Dear Friend'.

Rodger Coghlan

unread,
Nov 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/25/97
to

Ben Walsh wrote:
>
> Mark Tye wrote:
> >
> > This is true, I read recently of a family in a Scandanavian country (or
> > possibly the Netherlands) who were being repeatedly fined by the gov't
> > for assigning their child a long and unpronouncable name. I don't
> > recall the country or the name but I believe the latter included a
> > number and perhaps a typographic symbol. Did anyone else see this?
>
> Letters and numbers, yes. The name was pronounced "Alvin".
>
> ben "it's *spelt* 'Raymond Luxury-Yacht' ..." w.
>

A quite avid motor cyclist in Denmark officially changed his name to
Harley Davidsen - the government would not let him use -son as it was
not danish.

Rodger "or have I confused my Scandinavian countries again?" Coghlan

--
All opinions expressed are Mine
(mea culpa, mea culpa, Mea maxima culpa)

mitcho

unread,
Nov 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/25/97
to

Madeleine Page wrote:
>
> "Alfred Bigcock" <buncha yucks that guy> writes anent Mike Holmans:
>
> >If I let
> >people like that bother me, I'd never leave the house, much less post on
> >the Net.

> By my count, that makes it eight thousand seven hundred and ninety five


> afuisti rooting for Mike to bother Mr. Q-Tip.

Hey hey hey, fairness above all. That many might disagree with Bigcock
does not invalidate his points. After all, remember Copernicus.

No, Bigcock invalidates *himself* because he is an unfunny loser.


Mr Fairness

Andrew Gore

unread,
Nov 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/26/97
to

Madeleine Page wrote:
>
> >If I let
> >people like that bother me, I'd never leave the house, much less post on
> >the Net.
> Hmmm.

> By my count, that makes it eight thousand seven hundred and ninety five
> afuisti rooting for Mike to bother Mr. Q-Tip.
>
> Madeleine "or did I miscount?" Page

Somebody posted a funny remark in his post, and Holmans responds with
something like "You think you're so cute. Why don't you go stick your
head in the toilet. Now go away!". As far as I can tell, the majority of
this losers' posts are of the same adolescent level. I really hate that
kind of stupid, depressing, asshole remark. Apparently, however, you
approve of that kind of thing. Perhaps you'd like it if all the posts
here were like that; wouldn't reading AFU be the highlight of the day!
When someone responds to your post with "Shut up! Now go away!", do you
agree with that? Suit y'self, but you're not going to have a lot of
company.

mitcho

unread,
Nov 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/26/97
to

Andrew Gore wrote:

> approve of that kind of thing. Perhaps you'd like it if all the posts
> here were like that; wouldn't reading AFU be the highlight of the day!

Because folks like Mike tend to post here more than do folks like you,
reading AFU is already the highlight of my day. [1]

Mitcho

[1] Except on Fridays, when the highlight of my day involves Guinness in
large quantities and live music.

H Gilmer

unread,
Nov 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/26/97