Switching Drinks

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Tim Shell

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Jun 2, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/2/96
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Everyone knows that switching drinks during the course of the
evening -- beginning the festivities with a Fuzzy Navel and
switching to a Boilermaker, for instance -- is tantamount to
guzzling an entire gallon of rat poison with a plutonium
chaser.

I tend to believe this has more to do with the tendency for
people to restart their drink count when they switch horses,
than the risk of creating the equivalent of a Hairy Buffallo
in your stomach.

But then again, I believe many things.

--
You know who.

Roger Douglas

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Jun 4, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/4/96
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ak...@lafn.org (Tim Shell) expostulated:

>Everyone knows that switching drinks during the course of the
>evening -- beginning the festivities with a Fuzzy Navel and
>switching to a Boilermaker, for instance -- is tantamount to
>guzzling an entire gallon of rat poison with a plutonium
>chaser.

I used to hear, particularly from the older of my drinking companions, that
mixing "grape and grain" was a Bad Thing. In other words, don't drink
wine AND (beer OR spirits).

Picture a person waking up with a bad head, a mouth like the bottom of a
birdcage and an unpleasant sensation of vertigo. S/he naturally seeks an
explanation:

"Lessee, I had three or four pints in the pub, then a bottle of red wine with
the curry, and a glass of brandy after. Or was it two? Oh and then we called
for a cleansing ale before we left. Then we kicked on to that club and had a
couple of beers and a round of scotches as a nightcap. Doesn't seem excessive.
Ah! Must have been mixing my drinks that caused the problem. The old grape and
grain thing. Yes, that'd explain it."

Roger "doesn't account for the diced carrots, though" Douglas


Dave Garland

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Jun 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/7/96
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RD> From: Roger....@tafensw.edu.au (Roger Douglas)

RD> I used to hear, particularly from the older of my
RD> drinking companions, that
RD> mixing "grape and grain" was a Bad Thing. In other words, don't drink
RD> wine AND (beer OR spirits).

A cautionary rhyme from my youth:
"Beer on wine, all fine;
beer on whiskey, mighty risky."

And a variation:
"Wine on beer, all clear;
wine on whiskey, mighty risky."

So our algorythm was different than yours. As I recall, the order was
significant (I always figured it meant, if you're already about to puke, don't
add large volumes of fluids).

-Dave "forget the whiskey, just gimme the beer chaser" Garland

Will Wheeler

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Jun 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/7/96
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In article <183_960...@wizinfo.com>, dave.g...@wizinfo.com (Dave Garland)
says:

>A cautionary rhyme from my youth:
>"Beer on wine, all fine;
> beer on whiskey, mighty risky."

>And a variation:
>"Wine on beer, all clear;
> wine on whiskey, mighty risky."

>So our algorythm was different than yours. As I recall, the order was
>significant (I always figured it meant, if you're already about to puke, don't
>add large volumes of fluids).

I've heard it:

"Beer before liquor, never sicker;
liquor before beer, never fear."

Of course, the rhyme works if you replace "before" with "after" which only
reinforces my belief that this is folk-wisdom; I have heard it both ways.
(I now fully expect Medline Boy to tell me that I am, in fact, wrong.)

My wild-assed-guess on this is that some people have recognized that if
you drink a few pitchers and then switch to shots, you will be able to
drink those shots faster than if you had started with the shots. Drinking
beer then shots of course gets you drunk and sick, and drunker and sicker
than if you had stuck to beer.

Will "I never do anything like this" Wheeler
Penn State University "Will's just so smart...and he programs
wj...@psuvm.psu.edu computers all by himself and everything!"
whe...@po.aers.psu.edu --Kevin Keith

Chem Eng Student

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Jun 10, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/10/96
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As far as I know, spirit chasers get you drunker quicker. This (supposedly) is
because neat spirits are too concentrated to cross from the stomach into the
blood quickly. Thus diluting them in some way (beer, soft drinks also I reckon)
means the alcohol gets into the blood quicker. Hence the order doesn't matter
too much.

Rick Nyman

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Jun 11, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/11/96
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Will Wheeler <WJ...@psuvm.psu.edu> wrote:

>In article <183_960...@wizinfo.com>, dave.g...@wizinfo.com (Dave Garland)
>says:
>
>>A cautionary rhyme from my youth:
>>"Beer on wine, all fine;
>> beer on whiskey, mighty risky."
>
>>And a variation:
>>"Wine on beer, all clear;
>> wine on whiskey, mighty risky."

<><Chomp!><>

>I've heard it:
>
>"Beer before liquor, never sicker;
>liquor before beer, never fear."
>
>Of course, the rhyme works if you replace "before" with "after" which only
>reinforces my belief that this is folk-wisdom; I have heard it both ways.
>(I now fully expect Medline Boy to tell me that I am, in fact, wrong.)

Hey Will,

I always heard it:
Liquor before beer, you're in the clear,
Beer before liquor, never sicker.

Which is different wording, but the same message. I have never done much
experimentation though - although I have done a few shots before having
some beers with no side effects. I think that once you've started drinking
with beer, there's no reason to switch because you're already drunk and you
don't care what it tastes like.


--
Rick Nyman <rny...@mail.serve.com>
http://www.serve.com/rnyman (Last changed: 5/31/96)
Traveling with Northrop Grumman & the Post Office in: Lexington, KY
Please note that my email and web addresses have both changed.

NOTE: Do not send any unsolicited bulk junk mail to this address.

Chris Lampton

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Jun 11, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/11/96
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Roger....@tafensw.edu.au (Roger Douglas) wrote:

>ak...@lafn.org (Tim Shell) expostulated:

>>Everyone knows that switching drinks during the course of the
>>evening -- beginning the festivities with a Fuzzy Navel and
>>switching to a Boilermaker, for instance -- is tantamount to
>>guzzling an entire gallon of rat poison with a plutonium
>>chaser.

>I used to hear, particularly from the older of my drinking companions, that


>mixing "grape and grain" was a Bad Thing. In other words, don't drink

>wine AND (beer OR spirits).

>Roger "doesn't account for the diced carrots, though" Douglas

The classic American expression -- see Edward Albee's play "Who's
Afraid of Virginia Woolf" -- is "Never mix, never worry!"

Personally, I've found that the only way to avoid a hangover is to
drink the same stuff night after night after night in roughly equal
quantities. Which, as anyone can tell you, is the road to perdition.

Excuse me while I go brew another cup of camomile tea....

--Chris

Bill T. Katt

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Jun 11, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/11/96
to

On Tue, 04 Jun 1996 12:55:20 GMT, Roger....@tafensw.edu.au (Roger
Douglas) wrote:

>ak...@lafn.org (Tim Shell) expostulated:
>
>>Everyone knows that switching drinks during the course of the
>>evening -- beginning the festivities with a Fuzzy Navel and
>>switching to a Boilermaker, for instance -- is tantamount to
>>guzzling an entire gallon of rat poison with a plutonium
>>chaser.
>

Wow. I'm lucky to be alive then, cause I switch drinks all the
time...

This is the dumbest thing I have ever heard...


Tal Guttman

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Jun 11, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/11/96
to

Will Wheeler <WJ...@psuvm.psu.edu> wrote:

>In article <183_960...@wizinfo.com>, dave.g...@wizinfo.com (Dave Garland)
>says:

>>A cautionary rhyme from my youth:
>>"Beer on wine, all fine;
>> beer on whiskey, mighty risky."

>>And a variation:
>>"Wine on beer, all clear;
>> wine on whiskey, mighty risky."

>>So our algorythm was different than yours. As I recall, the order was


>>significant (I always figured it meant, if you're already about to puke, don't
>>add large volumes of fluids).

>I've heard it:

>"Beer before liquor, never sicker;
>liquor before beer, never fear."

>Of course, the rhyme works if you replace "before" with "after" which only
>reinforces my belief that this is folk-wisdom; I have heard it both ways.
>(I now fully expect Medline Boy to tell me that I am, in fact, wrong.)

>My wild-assed-guess on this is that some people have recognized that if


>you drink a few pitchers and then switch to shots, you will be able to
>drink those shots faster than if you had started with the shots. Drinking
>beer then shots of course gets you drunk and sick, and drunker and sicker
>than if you had stuck to beer.


I once heard something about alcohol mixed with fizzy drinks (like
tequila and sprite, or beer and vodka), is absorbed faster into your
bloodstream, which makes you drunker/drunk faster. any truth in this?

Tal "I'll stick to lemon-lime" Guttman.
--
Tal Guttman
(tal_...@netvision.net.il)

As I walk through the valley of the shadow of death I
shall not fear, for my Mommy is here


Keith Willoughby

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Jun 12, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/12/96
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> ak...@lafn.org (Tim Shell) wrote:
>
> >
> >Everyone knows that switching drinks during the course of the
> >evening -- beginning the festivities with a Fuzzy Navel and
> >switching to a Boilermaker, for instance -- is tantamount to
> >guzzling an entire gallon of rat poison with a plutonium
> >chaser.
>

The correct answer to the "switching drinks" problems is - Always Switch

--
Keith Willoughby, Swansea, Wales
"Better drowned than duffers.
If not duffers, won't drown"

Homme A. Piest

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Jun 12, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/12/96
to

ak...@lafn.org (Tim Shell) wrote:

>
>Everyone knows that switching drinks during the course of the
>evening -- beginning the festivities with a Fuzzy Navel and
>switching to a Boilermaker, for instance -- is tantamount to
>guzzling an entire gallon of rat poison with a plutonium
>chaser.

Pure alcohol in itself really doesn't really make you that sick,
though it causes extra sensitivity for light and sound the morning
after, as well as dehydration and some loss of vitamins. It's the
extra stuff: the color additions, the taste additions (natural or
not): the more you swallow of THEM (both in amount and number), the
bigger the chance you'll have a terrible hangover. Best way of getting
drunk on booze is to stick to colorless drinks like wodka (with or
without orange juice), best way to avoid a hangover is to swallow as
much water as you can before you fall asleep. Some vitamine B and C
wouldn't hurt either.


--------------------

User ID: "Homme A. Piest <pi...@pobox.leidenuniv.nl>"
PGP Public Key ID: B0047F35; Size: 1024; Date: 1996/05/20
Fingerprint: F 7C 81 63 A4 F7 90 C4 93 2E 9D 4D 86 D3 5A 8E

"Neanderthal is a Netherland. Still looking for the other parts."

KenK

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Jun 12, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/12/96
to

Homme A. Piest wrote:
>
> ak...@lafn.org (Tim Shell) wrote:
>
> >
> >Everyone knows that switching drinks during the course of the
> >evening -- beginning the festivities with a Fuzzy Navel and
> >switching to a Boilermaker, for instance -- is tantamount to
> >guzzling an entire gallon of rat poison with a plutonium
> >chaser.
>
> Pure alcohol in itself really doesn't really make you that sick,
> though it causes extra sensitivity for light and sound the morning
> after, as well as dehydration and some loss of vitamins. It's the
> extra stuff: the color additions, the taste additions (natural or
> not): the more you swallow of THEM (both in amount and number), the
> bigger the chance you'll have a terrible hangover. Best way of getting
> drunk on booze is to stick to colorless drinks like wodka (with or
> without orange juice), best way to avoid a hangover is to swallow as
> much water as you can before you fall asleep. Some vitamine B and C
> wouldn't hurt either.


Doesn't make you that sick? Alcohol, in easily consumable qualtities
will kill you. It is amazing the folklore that surrounds alcohol use.
AFAIK, no one EVER died from an overdose of food colorings & spices
(although long-term heavy use is not recommended)

Lots of water DOES help, especially if it is consumed instead of alcohol.

The hangover is a result of alcohol poisoning.

"I'm surprised I have to tell anyone this." Joe Bob Briggs
--


Ken

"The only real difference between an oral
and rectal thermometer is the taste" David Feldman

Sandra Large

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Jun 13, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/13/96
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Bier auf Wein, laß das rein
Wein auf Bier, rat' ich dir

(Beer on wine, leave it alone
Wine on beer, I recommend to you)

or something like that, anyway


Homme A. Piest

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Jun 13, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/13/96
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KenK <elli...@concentric.net> wrote:
>Doesn't make you that sick? Alcohol, in easily consumable qualtities
>will kill you. It is amazing the folklore that surrounds alcohol use.
>AFAIK, no one EVER died from an overdose of food colorings & spices
>(although long-term heavy use is not recommended)

You'll probably kill yourself when drinking one bottle of booze within
ten minutes, yes. I wasn't talking about *that* kind of drinking
behaviour though, I was talking about the kind of drinking behaviour
people normally show at parties. You're mixing up things.

>Lots of water DOES help, especially if it is consumed instead of alcohol.

Drinking a lot of water before going to sleep helps solving the
dehydration problem. Just try it.

>The hangover is a result of alcohol poisoning.

As far as you're talking about the extra sensitivity and dehydration:
yes. But for the headaches and the vomiting: NO, not if you don't
drink alcohol in a suicidal way.

>"I'm surprised I have to tell anyone this." Joe Bob Briggs

I'm surprised you seem to think it necessary to twist my words.

Homme.

Phil Edwards

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Jun 14, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/14/96
to

Tal Guttman wrote:
>
> Will Wheeler <WJ...@psuvm.psu.edu> wrote:
>
> >In article <183_960...@wizinfo.com>, dave.g...@wizinfo.com (Dave Garland)
> >says:
>
> >>A cautionary rhyme from my youth:
> >>"Beer on wine, all fine;
> >> beer on whiskey, mighty risky."
>
> >>And a variation:
> >>"Wine on beer, all clear;
> >> wine on whiskey, mighty risky."
>

So beer before wine is OK, as is wine before beer. Which contrasts with
the one _I've_ heard:
"Beer before wine and you'll feel fine,
Wine before beer and you'll feel queer"

...which I've abided by to this day.

Phil "it's when to drink daiquiris I worry about" Edwards

Sean Simpson

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Jun 15, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/15/96
to

On Wed, 12 Jun 1996 20:25:19 -0700, KenK <elli...@concentric.net>
wrote:

>Doesn't make you that sick? Alcohol, in easily consumable qualtities
>will kill you. It is amazing the folklore that surrounds alcohol use.
>AFAIK, no one EVER died from an overdose of food colorings & spices
>(although long-term heavy use is not recommended)
>

WHAT? You mean I have to give up my diet of blue-colored
Volcano-style salsa??? Say it ain't so!

Sean "And I sprinkle MSG on top, too" Simpson

---
"If you choose not to decide
You still have made a choice"
--- Neil Peart, Rush

Sean Simpson

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Jun 16, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/16/96
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On Fri, 14 Jun 1996 13:58:51 -0700, Phil Edwards
<new...@dircon.co.uk> wrote:

>So beer before wine is OK, as is wine before beer. Which contrasts with
>the one _I've_ heard:
>"Beer before wine and you'll feel fine,
> Wine before beer and you'll feel queer"
>
>...which I've abided by to this day.

I prefer not to base my behaviour on rhymes.

Sean "but Mother Goose *really* turns my crank!" Simpson

Ralph Jones

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Jun 17, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/17/96
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ak...@lafn.org (Tim Shell) wrote:

>
>Everyone knows that switching drinks during the course of the
>evening -- beginning the festivities with a Fuzzy Navel and
>switching to a Boilermaker, for instance -- is tantamount to
>guzzling an entire gallon of rat poison with a plutonium
>chaser.
>

>I tend to believe this has more to do with the tendency for
>people to restart their drink count when they switch horses,
>than the risk of creating the equivalent of a Hairy Buffallo
>in your stomach.
>
>But then again, I believe many things.
>
>--
>You know who.

USAF wisdom, circa 1962: Whiskey on beer, never fear. Beer on whiskey,
mighty risky. rj


Message has been deleted

Frank Jennings

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Jun 19, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/19/96
to

On Thu, 13 Jun 1996, Sandra Large wrote:

> Bier auf Wein, la=DF das rein


> Wein auf Bier, rat' ich dir

>=20


> (Beer on wine, leave it alone
> Wine on beer, I recommend to you)

=09Beer before Liquor, you'll always feel sicker.=20
=09Liquor before Beer, you're in the clear.

Mike Holmans

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Jun 19, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/19/96
to

Tal Guttman wrote:
>
> I once heard something about alcohol mixed with fizzy drinks (like
> tequila and sprite, or beer and vodka), is absorbed faster into your
> bloodstream, which makes you drunker/drunk faster. any truth in this?
>
Well, I pointed out that this fizzy bit is supposed to work back in the
Snakebite discussion about three weeks ago, so maybe. As I Understand It,
the CO2 makes the kidney work faster.

Apropos of the Snakebite thread, the version I know is:

"Beer on zider
's a very good rider,
but zider on beer
'll make you feel queer".

Mike "the more you drink, the more you think" Holmans

WDixon3476

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Jun 21, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/21/96
to

I had an opportunity to check out this thread last Saturday night at City
Stages in Birmingham, AL. I had a VIP pass, which doesn't make you a VIP,
but does get you unlimited free drinks in the VIP area. I started out
with eight gin and tonics, then switched to beer because it's all you can
get outside the VIP area. Also the mixed drink lines got long after a
while. At any rate, I then drank roughly 12-16 beers of various variety.
After being driven home, I drank a big glass of water and took two
ibuprofen tablets. The next morning I felt fine, unlike my fellow VIP who
drank only beer. Therefore, I can say with certainty that drinking beer
after gin and tonics will not cause a bad hangover or other ill effects,
even in relatively large amounts. I intend to continue my research and
will report to you as I am able.

Wade "The Human Test Rat" Dixon
Doing my part for the common good.

Rich Clancey

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Jun 22, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/22/96
to

What is a tequila and sprite called?


alice faber

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Jun 22, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/22/96
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In <DtFBw...@world.std.com> r...@world.std.com (Rich Clancey) writes:

> What is a tequila and sprite called?

Off topic for alt.folklore.urban?

Alice "drunken elf" Faber

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