Standardising the length of an axle

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Charles Wm. Dimmick

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Jan 28, 2012, 12:51:24 PM1/28/12
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Remember the UL about how the standard railroad gauge was determined?
I was perusing C.P. Fitzgerald's "China, a Short Cultural History"
[available on-line through Google Books] and came across reference to
the major reforms under the first Emperor, Shih Huang Ti, circa 230
B.C., one of which was standardization of the length of the axles of
carts to match the average size of ruts. [Pardon me, evidently the book
is no longer available on-line. Google says it was "Drenched", whatever
that means.

Charles

Duggy

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Jan 28, 2012, 5:56:23 PM1/28/12
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On Jan 29, 3:51 am, "Charles Wm. Dimmick" <cdimm...@snet.net> wrote:
> Remember the UL about how the standard railroad gauge was determined?

No.

So I looked it up.

http://www.snopes.com/history/american/gauge.asp

Interesting.

Thanks.

> I was perusing C.P. Fitzgerald's "China, a Short Cultural History"
> [available on-line through Google Books] and came across reference to
> the major reforms under the first Emperor, Shih Huang Ti, circa 230
> B.C., one of which was standardization of the length of the axles of
> carts to match the average size of ruts.

That makes sense, as one that doesn't fit the wheel ruts is going to
have more issues... however how is that determined? Are all wheel
ruts in the land measured and averaged or just around the capital?

I can imagine areas having their own cart makers with their own local
averages.

There's a local UL that when the US army is here for exercises the
Hummers have trouble because they don't fit the local wheel ruts.

> [Pardon me, evidently the book
> is no longer available on-line. Google says it was "Drenched", whatever
> that means.

Maybe the original book got wet and now all the ebook copies don't
work.

===
= DUG.
===

Charles Wm. Dimmick

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Jan 28, 2012, 8:20:59 PM1/28/12
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On 1/28/2012 5:56 PM, Duggy wrote:
> On Jan 29, 3:51 am, "Charles Wm. Dimmick"<cdimm...@snet.net> wrote:
>> Remember the UL about how the standard railroad gauge was determined?

>> I was perusing C.P. Fitzgerald's "China, a Short Cultural History"
>> [available on-line through Google Books] and came across reference to
>> the major reforms under the first Emperor, Shih Huang Ti, circa 230
>> B.C., one of which was standardization of the length of the axles of
>> carts to match the average size of ruts.
>
> That makes sense, as one that doesn't fit the wheel ruts is going to
> have more issues... however how is that determined? Are all wheel
> ruts in the land measured and averaged or just around the capital?

What the Emperor did was decide by fiat what that width would be and
then made everyone in the entire empire switch over to it. In due time
all the ruts were changed to fit the new standard axle length, except in
Shansi province, which for some reason had a different axle length,
requiring carts going from other provinces to change axles when entering
Shansi.
>
> I can imagine areas having their own cart makers with their own local
> averages.
>
> There's a local UL that when the US army is here for exercises the
> Hummers have trouble because they don't fit the local wheel ruts.
>
>> [Pardon me, evidently the book
>> is no longer available on-line. Google says it was "Drenched", whatever
>> that means.
>
> Maybe the original book got wet and now all the ebook copies don't
> work.

It turns out that if I wait another few minutes the actual book is
there, but the "THIS BOOK IS DRENCHED" is the first thing to appear.
Further research shows that this message shows up on about 40-50 books
which were digitized by Osmania University, and means that immediately
after digitizing the book they purged the physical book from their
collection.
I learn something new every day.

Charles

Duggy

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Jan 28, 2012, 9:24:19 PM1/28/12
to
On Jan 29, 11:20 am, "Charles Wm. Dimmick" <cdimm...@snet.net> wrote:
> On 1/28/2012 5:56 PM, Duggy wrote:
> > On Jan 29, 3:51 am, "Charles Wm. Dimmick"<cdimm...@snet.net>  wrote:
> >> Remember the UL about how the standard railroad gauge was determined?
> >> I was perusing C.P. Fitzgerald's "China, a Short Cultural History"
> >> [available on-line through Google Books] and came across reference to
> >> the major reforms under the first Emperor, Shih Huang Ti, circa 230
> >> B.C., one of which was standardization of the length of the axles of
> >> carts to match the average size of ruts.
> > That makes sense, as one that doesn't fit the wheel ruts is going to
> > have more issues... however how is that determined?  Are all wheel
> > ruts in the land measured and averaged or just around the capital?

> What the Emperor did was decide by fiat what that width would be and
> then made everyone in the entire empire switch over to it. In due time
> all the ruts were changed to fit the new standard axle length, except in
> Shansi province, which for some reason had a different axle length,
> requiring carts going from other provinces to change axles when entering
> Shansi.

Sorry I took "one of which was standardization of the length of the
axles of carts to match the average size of ruts" meant that he made
the new width the average.

> >> [Pardon me, evidently the book
> >> is no longer available on-line. Google says it was "Drenched", whatever
> >> that means.
> > Maybe the original book got wet and now all the ebook copies don't
> > work.

> It turns out that if I wait another few minutes the actual book is
> there, but the "THIS BOOK IS DRENCHED"  is the first thing to appear.
> Further research shows that this message shows up on about 40-50 books
> which were digitized by Osmania University, and means that immediately
> after digitizing the book they purged the physical book from their
> collection.
> I learn something new every day.

Well, library space costs money and they're getting smaller and
smaller. That's how Google is getting some many places to give them
the books.

===
= DUG.
===

danny burstein

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Jan 28, 2012, 9:45:00 PM1/28/12
to

>> >> [Pardon me, evidently the book
>> >> is no longer available on-line. Google says it was "Drenched", whateve=
>r
>> >> that means.

>> It turns out that if I wait another few minutes the actual book is
>> there, but the "THIS BOOK IS DRENCHED" =A0is the first thing to appear.
>> Further research shows that this message shows up on about 40-50 books
>> which were digitized by Osmania University, and means that immediately
>> after digitizing the book they purged the physical book from their
>> collection.
>> I learn something new every day.

>Well, library space costs money and they're getting smaller and
>smaller. That's how Google is getting some many places to give them
>the books.

Could it be related to the "scan it in, and then let _one_
person at a time view it" proposal?

Here's a post I made elsewhere, under the heading
"why we contine to love Stewart Brand"

from a WSJ article describing the latest pursuit by those granola cruncher
mushy heads (bless their hearts) at the Internet Archive. They, in
conjunction with a group of libraries, are scanning in lots and lots of
"out of print" but still copyrighted books and will make them available
via internet loan.

The legal loophole they're hoping will let them gain traction,
until Congress, et al, come to their senses, is that they'll
keep the original somewhere safe and only allow one e-book
version out at a time.

(If they get permission, they'll allow more)

----
[WSJ]

Stewart Brand, author of the 1988 book "The Media Lab" - one of the
scanned books that will now be available for loan - said he didn't mind
seeing his title made available this way. Mr. Kahle at the Internet
Archive asked his permission, he said, and he gave it because he thinks
digitizing books has the potential to improve knowledge.

"I figure libraries are one of the major pillars of civilization, and in
almost every case what librarians want is what they should get," Mr. Brand
said.
--------
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703279704575335193054884632.html?mod=WSJ_hp_editorsPicks_3

--
_____________________________________________________
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
dan...@panix.com
[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]

Lon

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Jan 29, 2012, 6:31:15 PM1/29/12
to
On 1/28/2012 15:56, Duggy wrote:
> On Jan 29, 3:51 am, "Charles Wm. Dimmick"<cdimm...@snet.net> wrote:
>> Remember the UL about how the standard railroad gauge was determined?
>
> No.
>
> So I looked it up.
>
> http://www.snopes.com/history/american/gauge.asp
>
> Interesting.
>
> Thanks.
>
>> I was perusing C.P. Fitzgerald's "China, a Short Cultural History"
>> [available on-line through Google Books] and came across reference to
>> the major reforms under the first Emperor, Shih Huang Ti, circa 230
>> B.C., one of which was standardization of the length of the axles of
>> carts to match the average size of ruts.
>
> That makes sense, as one that doesn't fit the wheel ruts is going to
> have more issues... however how is that determined? Are all wheel
> ruts in the land measured and averaged or just around the capital?

It appears to make sense until you drive a cart with the averaged axle
length and discover it will not fit a single existing rut set. A more
intelligent emperor might have considered designing to the mode.

Lon "but the median is where the armco stuff is put" Stowell



Duggy

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Jan 29, 2012, 8:38:06 PM1/29/12
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On Jan 30, 9:31 am, Lon <lon.stow...@comcast.net> wrote:
> It appears to make sense until you drive a cart with the averaged axle
> length and discover it will not fit a single existing rut set.

The mean? Possible, but there'd be a lot of leeway in axles.

> A more
> intelligent emperor might have considered designing to the mode.

Might, but the mode would be very area specific.

===
= DUG.
===

David DeLaney

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Jan 30, 2012, 1:12:51 PM1/30/12
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Plus it would change with every new season of debutantes.

Dave "and measuring the distance between THEIR axles would be fraught with
various wacky difficulties" DeLaney
--
\/David DeLaney posting from d...@vic.com "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
http://www.vic.com/~dbd/ - net.legends FAQ & Magic / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.

Charles Bishop

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Apr 30, 2012, 9:18:02 PM4/30/12
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In article
<c84eb6f1-715e-449a...@nf9g2000pbc.googlegroups.com>, Duggy
<Paul....@jcu.edu.au> wrote:

>
>Well, library space costs money and they're getting smaller and
>smaller. That's how Google is getting some many places to give them
>the books.


It may be failing memory, but I remember the libraries of my youth being
more crowded, at least in the stacks, and the same when i got to college.
Nowadays, libraries seem to be all light and space. The library in the
last town I was in was two story, but only had one floor - the space was
open to the ceiling, 20 feet abaove. Also there is less shelving and more
space is "open" with couches and the like.

Of course there are study tables, which were there in the good old days,
but now there are also computer tables, the mentioned couches and comfy
chairs, along with DVDs and CD's. So, there is less space given to books.

In current news, some libraries are dickering with them what proved
e-books to come up with a plan where the libraries can rent out the
ebooks. There is a problem somewhere in the works, from, I think, the
ebook peeps.

--
charles

yathish...@gmail.com

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Aug 29, 2017, 9:48:31 PM8/29/17
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Can you please tell me where did you learn of this purging books immediately after scanning? With regard to drenching.

Mark Shaw

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Aug 29, 2017, 10:52:24 PM8/29/17
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yathish...@gmail.com wrote:
> Can you please tell me where did you learn of this purging books immediately after scanning? With regard to drenching.

You are Nance Equator and I claim my five pounds.

--
Mark Shaw moc TOD liamg TA wahsnm
========================================================================
"All of my mistakes are giving me ideas." - Natalie Lileks

Don Freeman

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Aug 30, 2017, 3:59:34 PM8/30/17
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On 8/29/2017 6:48 PM, yathish...@gmail.com wrote:
> Can you please tell me where did you learn of this purging books immediately after scanning? With regard to drenching.
>

Wait, is that some kind of sexual reference?

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/||\ Cthulhu Saves!!! (In case he needs a midnight snack)

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David DeLaney

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Sep 1, 2017, 12:52:29 AM9/1/17
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On 2017-08-30, Don Freeman <free...@cosmoslair.com> wrote:
> On 8/29/2017 6:48 PM, yathish...@gmail.com wrote:
>> Can you please tell me where did you learn of this purging books immediately
>> after scanning? With regard to drenching.
>
> Wait, is that some kind of sexual reference?

I'd've said _Rainbows End_, but yeah, drenching them first makes the process
nigh-impossible.

Dave, will binge books for food
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
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