Earworms

27 views
Skip to first unread message

JoAnne Schmitz

unread,
Nov 28, 2004, 1:40:29 PM11/28/04
to
"Small World" theme is number 10 earworm:

http://my.webmd.com/content/article/61/67505.htm

JoAnne "a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema
wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep
a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a" Schmitz

--

The new Urban Legends website is <http://www.tafkac.org>
That's TAFKAC.ORG
Do not accept lame imitations at previously okay URLs

Marc Reeve

unread,
Nov 28, 2004, 4:37:18 PM11/28/04
to
JoAnne Schmitz wrote:

> JoAnne "a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema
> wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep
> a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a" Schmitz
>

YM "Uyimbube", mis-transcribed by Pete Seeger (who, in his defence, was
apparently working from a rather worn 78) as "Wimoweh".

http://www.3rdearmusic.com/forum/mbube2.html

Marc "first became familiar with the song as performed by the Kingston Trio" Reeve

Steve Maddison

unread,
Nov 28, 2004, 6:31:54 PM11/28/04
to
JoAnne Schmitz wrote:
> "Small World" theme is number 10 earworm:
>
> http://my.webmd.com/content/article/61/67505.htm
>

Well-known ditties are bad enough, but the most annoying earworms are
the unrecognisable variety. For those of us without a musical bone in
our body, consulting others for help seems only to result in making a
pratt of oneself.

I'm still waiting for an online database of every song in the world,
indexed by a signature generated by humming the tune into you computer's
microphone.

--
Steve Maddison
Den Haag, The Netherlands
http://www.cosam.org/

TeaLady (Mari C.)

unread,
Nov 28, 2004, 10:30:08 PM11/28/04
to
Steve Maddison <st...@cosam.org> wrote in
news:codncp$4o8$1...@reader10.wxs.nl:

> JoAnne Schmitz wrote:
>> "Small World" theme is number 10 earworm:
>>
>> http://my.webmd.com/content/article/61/67505.htm
>>
>
> Well-known ditties are bad enough, but the most annoying
> earworms are the unrecognisable variety.

Part 1) >For those of us


> without a musical bone in our body, consulting others for
> help seems only to result in making a pratt of oneself.
>

Part 2) > I'm still waiting for an online database of every

> song in the world, indexed by a signature generated by humming
> the tune into you computer's microphone.
>

For those afflicted with part 1, part 2 could be next to
useless.

--
Tea"Humming Silent Night and hearing Row Row Row Your Boat"Lady
(mari)

Nick Spalding

unread,
Nov 29, 2004, 6:49:21 AM11/29/04
to
Steve Maddison wrote, in <codncp$4o8$1...@reader10.wxs.nl>:

> JoAnne Schmitz wrote:
> > "Small World" theme is number 10 earworm:
> >
> > http://my.webmd.com/content/article/61/67505.htm
> >
>
> Well-known ditties are bad enough, but the most annoying earworms are
> the unrecognisable variety. For those of us without a musical bone in
> our body, consulting others for help seems only to result in making a
> pratt of oneself.
>
> I'm still waiting for an online database of every song in the world,
> indexed by a signature generated by humming the tune into you computer's
> microphone.

I have a splendid book called The Directory of Tunes' compiled by one Denys
Parsons. It works simply on the sequence of ups, downs or repeats in the note
sequence. Adapted from his introduction:

Write down an asterisk to represent the first note of the theme you wish to
identify. Then play, sing or hum the tune, noting whether successive notes go
down, up, or repeat, writing down D, U, or R in each case. Go on like this to
the 16th note, or as far as you are able.

For readability the codes are entered in the directory in groups of five, so
divide the code you have written down into groups of five from the left
ignoring the asterisk. You are now ready to look up the answer.

Example: in 'God Save the Queen' the second note repeats so we write R, the
third note is up , U, the fourth down, D, the fifth and sixth are up, U U -
and so on. So the full coding turns out to be:
*R U D U U U R U D D D U D D U
which you then look up in the body of the book, or if you already know that it
is a national anthem in a separate section at the end.

It works every time for me!
--
Nick Spalding

Paul Herzberg

unread,
Nov 29, 2004, 7:27:54 AM11/29/04
to
JoAnne Schmitz wrote:
> "Small World" theme is number 10 earworm:
> http://my.webmd.com/content/article/61/67505.htm

That's an interesting phenomena.

Paul "Doo Doo De Do Do" Herzberg

Thomas Prufer

unread,
Nov 30, 2004, 5:56:24 AM11/30/04
to
On Mon, 29 Nov 2004 00:31:54 +0100, Steve Maddison <st...@cosam.org> wrote:

>I'm still waiting for an online database of every song in the world,
>indexed by a signature generated by humming the tune into you computer's
>microphone.

Y'know, they have just launched such a service: call in on the cell phone, at
two-fifty a call, hum your tune, get a text message with the title.

No idea if that's the exact method -- no information other than seeing an ad on
the tube.


Thomas Prufer


Nick Spalding

unread,
Nov 30, 2004, 6:18:01 AM11/30/04
to
Nick Spalding wrote, in <df2mq0hfts9qpdpa2...@4ax.com>:

> I have a splendid book called The Directory of Tunes' compiled by one Denys
> Parsons. It works simply on the sequence of ups, downs or repeats in the note
> sequence. Adapted from his introduction:
>
> Write down an asterisk to represent the first note of the theme you wish to
> identify. Then play, sing or hum the tune, noting whether successive notes go
> down, up, or repeat, writing down D, U, or R in each case. Go on like this to
> the 16th note, or as far as you are able.
>
> For readability the codes are entered in the directory in groups of five, so
> divide the code you have written down into groups of five from the left
> ignoring the asterisk. You are now ready to look up the answer.
>
> Example: in 'God Save the Queen' the second note repeats so we write R, the
> third note is up , U, the fourth down, D, the fifth and sixth are up, U U -
> and so on. So the full coding turns out to be:
> *R U D U U U R U D D D U D D U
> which you then look up in the body of the book, or if you already know that it
> is a national anthem in a separate section at the end.
>
> It works every time for me!

Joanne Schmitz tells me that it is accessible on line at:
<http://www.musipedia.org/>
--
Nick Spalding

Keith Willis

unread,
Nov 30, 2004, 6:39:38 AM11/30/04
to
On Mon, 29 Nov 2004 00:31:54 +0100, Steve Maddison <st...@cosam.org>
wrote:

>I'm still waiting for an online database of every song in the world,


>indexed by a signature generated by humming the tune into you computer's
>microphone.

Got something similar here in the UK, at least.

* Hear unfamiliar tune on radio or whatever

* Dial 2580 on mobile phone

* Hold phone near loudspeaker for about fifteen seconds or so

* Song details are texted to you (for a fee) within about ten minutes

It seems to work through a reasonably impressive amount of background
noise (eg. my local bar). It also doesn't appear to require the
beginning of the track, or indeed any particular part, just a few
seconds continuous sample. I was quite impressed with the indexing
implications.

As a trial I just stuck on fifteen seconds of "Ain't Gone 'n' Give Up
On Love" by _Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble_[1] starting at 40
seconds into the track. The text arrived within 30 seconds, and
correctly identified the artist and track.

1. Obscure enough that now I'm _very_ impressed. Track taken from the
splendid "Blues At Sunrise" album...

--
http://www.bytebrothers.co.uk
PGP key ID 0xEB7180EC

M. J. Freeman

unread,
Nov 30, 2004, 12:05:53 PM11/30/04
to
Keith Willis <m...@privacy.net> posted in alt.folklore.urban:

> As a trial I just stuck on fifteen seconds of "Ain't Gone 'n' Give
> Up On Love" by _Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble_[1] starting
> at 40 seconds into the track. The text arrived within 30 seconds,
> and correctly identified the artist and track.
>
> 1. Obscure enough that now I'm _very_ impressed. Track taken from
> the splendid "Blues At Sunrise" album...

It's SRV, man, it's all good.[1]

Seriously, I strongly recommend most of SRV's albums. "Live Alive"
isn't the greatest (it was recording during the cocaine years),
though the track "Willy the Wimp" is a classic.

But "In the Beginning," "Texas Flood," "In Step," "Couldn't Stand the
Weather," and "The Sky is Crying" are all easily worth the price.

I haven't kept up on the plethora of SRV compilations that Sony's
been putting out. In typically annoying fashion, they tend to have a
large number of songs already available on the studio albums with
just a few extras thrown in. (Case in point, the song you tested
with, "Ain't Gone 'N' Give Up On Love," is on the studio album "Soul
to Soul.")


[1] Disclosure: I lived in Austin, TX for a few years, and am
therefore required, by law, to proclaim the greatness of Stevie Ray
Vaugh at all opportunities.
--
Michael J. Freeman mike_f...@SPMBLOKmac.com
'85 VF700S (The Leper) Cincinnati, OH, USA
'83 VF750S (The Shiny Sabre) "Insanity runs in the family
'99 GSF1200S (The Evil Bandit) ...it practically gallops"

JC Dill

unread,
Nov 30, 2004, 2:43:43 PM11/30/04
to
On Tue, 30 Nov 2004 11:56:24 +0100, Thomas Prufer
<pru...@i-dial.de.invalid> wrote:

>On Mon, 29 Nov 2004 00:31:54 +0100, Steve Maddison <st...@cosam.org> wrote:
>
>>I'm still waiting for an online database of every song in the world,
>>indexed by a signature generated by humming the tune into you computer's
>>microphone.
>
>Y'know, they have just launched such a service: call in on the cell phone, at
>two-fifty a call, hum your tune, get a text message with the title.

If someone has the company name of this service, I'd love to get more
info. The UK only number posted in another post in this thread
doesn't help, I'm in the US.

jc

Phil

unread,
Nov 30, 2004, 4:36:31 PM11/30/04
to

Shazam.com

Phil

PATRICIA BURNS

unread,
Nov 30, 2004, 10:29:22 PM11/30/04
to
Nick Spalding wrote:

This was wild. I typed in *rururd for Haydn's "Surprise Symphony". I got back
"Sounds of Silence" by Paul Simon, et al. It works!
But then...I sing the "Marine Corps hymn" to the tune of "Oh My Darlin' Clementine".

--
Patricia Burns
(to reply via email...address has only one "s")


R H Draney

unread,
Dec 1, 2004, 11:43:28 AM12/1/04
to
PATRICIA BURNS filted:

>
>Nick Spalding wrote:
>
>> Joanne Schmitz tells me that it is accessible on line at:
>> <http://www.musipedia.org/>
>
>This was wild. I typed in *rururd for Haydn's "Surprise Symphony". I got back
>"Sounds of Silence" by Paul Simon, et al. It works!
>But then...I sing the "Marine Corps hymn" to the tune of "Oh My Darlin'
>Clementine".

*DUUDDDDUUD hits eleven matches:

"Nowhere Man" (Beatles)
piano sonata No 12 in F, 3rd movement (Mozart)
"Die Fledermaus", overture, 3rd theme (Strauss)
string trio in Eb, 4th movement (Schubert)
polonaise No 2 in E, 3rd theme (Liszt)
"The rake's progress" Act II "Vary the song" (Stravinsky)
"Pomp & Circumstance", 2nd theme (Elgar)
"The New White Hart Hornpipe"
"Cantar de Ronda"
"New White Hart Hornpipe" (again?)
"Dusty Miller"

And a couple of "also possibles" including "Bungalow Bill" and
"Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo"....

R H "was going for the Elgar" Draney

Marc Reeve

unread,
Dec 1, 2004, 8:57:07 PM12/1/04
to
PATRICIA BURNS wrote:

You know, "Amazing Grace" works pretty well to several other tunes.

Including "I'd Like To Teach The World To Sing."

Marc "and _Auld Lang Syne_" Reeve

JoAnne Schmitz

unread,
Dec 2, 2004, 8:55:07 PM12/2/04
to
On Sun, 28 Nov 2004 13:37:18 -0800, Marc Reeve <ma...@nospam.calm> wrote:

>JoAnne Schmitz wrote:
>
>> JoAnne "a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema
>> wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep
>> a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a weema wep a" Schmitz
>>
>YM "Uyimbube", mis-transcribed by Pete Seeger (who, in his defence, was
>apparently working from a rather worn 78) as "Wimoweh".
>
>http://www.3rdearmusic.com/forum/mbube2.html

In my defense, apparently the voices in my head mis-transcribed Seeger.

JoAnne "care for a game of telephone?" Schmitz

BobMac

unread,
Dec 3, 2004, 12:23:10 PM12/3/04
to
Marc Reeve wrote:
>>
> You know, "Amazing Grace" works pretty well to several other tunes.
>
> Including "I'd Like To Teach The World To Sing."
>
> Marc "and _Auld Lang Syne_" Reeve

Ectually, (and this is no joke) it was designed that way. The meter is
that of an English ballad called "Chevy Chase." It's a fairly easy form
to write comprehensible English verse in, so the were a lot of ballads,
and a lot of tunes in this form. Look up Amazing Grace, (or the tune,
"New Britain") in an old hymn book, and somewhere on the page you will
likely see the cryptic "CM" which stands for "Common Meter." Others
were, Short Meter, Long Meter, Double Long , Common or Short meter,
various numbered meters, like "10 10 10 10" and my all time favourite,
PM, or "Peculiar Meter."

rm

Dr H

unread,
Dec 3, 2004, 3:56:32 PM12/3/04
to

On Tue, 30 Nov 2004, Thomas Prufer vociferated:

}On Mon, 29 Nov 2004 00:31:54 +0100, Steve Maddison <st...@cosam.org> wrote:
}
}>I'm still waiting for an online database of every song in the world,
}>indexed by a signature generated by humming the tune into you computer's
}>microphone.
}
}Y'know, they have just launched such a service: call in on the cell phone, at
}two-fifty a call, hum your tune, get a text message with the title.

...and if it's a hardcore punk tune, your cell phone blows up.

Dr H

Dr H

unread,
Dec 3, 2004, 4:16:52 PM12/3/04
to

On Wed, 1 Dec 2004, PATRICIA BURNS vociferated:

Well, it's an interesting concept, but...

I entered the pattern for the first line of "Jingle Bells" and got
10 pages of possibilities -- 99 songs -- none of which was "Jingle Bells."

I am not impressed.

Dr H

Charles Bishop

unread,
Dec 3, 2004, 9:25:44 PM12/3/04
to
In article <codncp$4o8$1...@reader10.wxs.nl>, Steve Maddison
<st...@cosam.org> wrote:

>JoAnne Schmitz wrote:
>> "Small World" theme is number 10 earworm:
>>
>> http://my.webmd.com/content/article/61/67505.htm
>>
>
>Well-known ditties are bad enough, but the most annoying earworms are
>the unrecognisable variety. For those of us without a musical bone in
>our body, consulting others for help seems only to result in making a
>pratt of oneself.
>
>I'm still waiting for an online database of every song in the world,
>indexed by a signature generated by humming the tune into you computer's
>microphone.

USENET is a good start. I was plagued by remembering a theme that had been
used in several commercials, but never with anyone who knew what it was. I
asked others, but couldn't reproduce it well enough. When USENET came
along, all I had to ask was what the music was in $Commercial and got the
answer.

charles, Carmina Burana

PATRICIA BURNS

unread,
Dec 3, 2004, 10:55:10 PM12/3/04
to
Dr H wrote:

All the Mork from Ork broke the website! (rrr rrr)

PB

PATRICIA BURNS

unread,
Dec 3, 2004, 11:16:26 PM12/3/04
to
PATRICIA BURNS wrote:

It's back. Their server was down for awhile. Jingle bells worked for me. (?) *UDDDRRUDDD

R H Draney

unread,
Dec 3, 2004, 11:55:42 PM12/3/04
to
Charles Bishop filted:

Still no luck with that whistling gunfighter thing I've been looking for...I can
point to an old Wendy's commercial and an episode of "The Adventures of Pete and
Pete" where it appears, but all the leads including musipedia haven't panned
out...since the thing is *everywhere*, I'd expect it to be a fixture in the
public-domain repositories...sounds like Morricone, or Bernard Hermann....

One source says it was the theme to an old TV western called "Tombstone
Territory" and had the title "Whistle Me Up A Memory", but I can't get
corroboration....r

Charles Bishop

unread,
Dec 4, 2004, 12:41:11 PM12/4/04
to
In article <corg0...@drn.newsguy.com>, R H Draney
<dado...@spamcop.net> wrote:

>Charles Bishop filted:
>>
>>In article <codncp$4o8$1...@reader10.wxs.nl>, Steve Maddison
>><st...@cosam.org> wrote:
>>
>>>Well-known ditties are bad enough, but the most annoying earworms are
>>>the unrecognisable variety. For those of us without a musical bone in
>>>our body, consulting others for help seems only to result in making a
>>>pratt of oneself.
>>>
>>>I'm still waiting for an online database of every song in the world,
>>>indexed by a signature generated by humming the tune into you computer's
>>>microphone.
>>
>>USENET is a good start. I was plagued by remembering a theme that had been
>>used in several commercials, but never with anyone who knew what it was. I
>>asked others, but couldn't reproduce it well enough. When USENET came
>>along, all I had to ask was what the music was in $Commercial and got the
>>answer.
>>
>>charles, Carmina Burana
>
>Still no luck with that whistling gunfighter thing I've been looking
for...I can
>point to an old Wendy's commercial and an episode of "The Adventures of
Pete and
>Pete" where it appears, but all the leads including musipedia haven't panned
>out...since the thing is *everywhere*, I'd expect it to be a fixture in the
>public-domain repositories...sounds like Morricone, or Bernard Hermann....

Any chance the old Wendy's commerical is cached somewhere you could point
someone with musical knowledge to? Similarly, could you ask on rec.arts.tv
for someone who has taped copies of Pete and Pete?


>
>One source says it was the theme to an old TV western called "Tombstone
>Territory" and had the title "Whistle Me Up A Memory", but I can't get
>corroboration....r

Go to

http://www.whirligig-tv.co.uk/tv/children/westerns/westerns.htm#Tombstone

and scroll down to the show. They have a file you can listen to.

charles

Freddy Letrange

unread,
Dec 4, 2004, 10:59:24 PM12/4/04
to
R H Draney ah dee:

|>Still no luck with that whistling gunfighter thing I've been looking for...I can
|>point to an old Wendy's commercial and an episode of "The Adventures of Pete and
|>Pete" where it appears, but all the leads including musipedia haven't panned
|>out...since the thing is *everywhere*, I'd expect it to be a fixture in the
|>public-domain repositories...sounds like Morricone, or Bernard Hermann....

If it's "everywhere" and "sounds like Morricone," then I'd guess it were a
"sound-alike" from a production-music library (needledrop library; canned
music library -- see, e.g., www.apmmusic.com, www.killertracks.com, or
http://www.royalty-free.tv/search_php_template.php?Genre=Soundalike) -- music
designed to evoke the mood without incurring the licencing cost of a real
Morricone spaghetti-western theme.

For example, if you're producing a TV journalism-awards show and want Aaron
Copland's "Fanfare for the Common Man" for your main title theme but can't
afford it (or Boosey & Hawkes doesn't want to sell it to you at any price),
you might instead licence Graham de Wilde's "Arlington Fanfare" from the KPM
library.

"Freddy 'wondering for some 40 years what that vibraphone/bass/flute piece
"C-- F-- D,G,E-- A-- F,Bb,E-- A-- D,G,C..." is that sounds like a Modern Jazz
Quartet knockoff and has turned up in recent years in at least two episodes of
"The Simpsons"' Letrange"
--
Till the foul crimes done in my days of nature/Are burnt and purg'd away,
Canst thou not send email to "Freddy" at the foul crimes oddfred done
@mindspring in my days of.nature com .
(((( "Freddy" sings the blews! http://freddystrange.tripod.com/ ))))

Karen McMurray

unread,
Dec 6, 2004, 11:42:22 AM12/6/04
to
"R H Draney" <dado...@spamcop.net> wrote in message
news:corg0...@drn.newsguy.com...

I expect you're thinking of *ududduduududduu, which is what I typed in to
find Morricone's theme for The Good, The Bad and The Ugly. Musipedia even
has a midi link so you can confirm.

-karen
--
For miracles should always happen in broad daylight.
The night makes them credible and therefore commonplace.
-- G.K. Chesterton


R H Draney

unread,
Dec 6, 2004, 12:46:00 PM12/6/04
to
Karen McMurray filted:

>
>"R H Draney" <dado...@spamcop.net> wrote in message
>news:corg0...@drn.newsguy.com...
>>
>> Still no luck with that whistling gunfighter thing I've been looking
>for...I can
>> point to an old Wendy's commercial and an episode of "The Adventures of
>Pete and
>> Pete" where it appears, but all the leads including musipedia haven't
>panned
>> out...since the thing is *everywhere*, I'd expect it to be a fixture in
>the
>> public-domain repositories...sounds like Morricone, or Bernard Hermann....
>>
>> One source says it was the theme to an old TV western called "Tombstone
>> Territory" and had the title "Whistle Me Up A Memory", but I can't get
>> corroboration....r
>
>I expect you're thinking of *ududduduududduu, which is what I typed in to
>find Morricone's theme for The Good, The Bad and The Ugly. Musipedia even
>has a midi link so you can confirm.

That's not it...nor is it the "Tombstone Territory" theme, now that I've heard
it...mine has the contour *dduududdu...principal instruments are whistle and
chime...the only exact match Musipedia finds is "Horny" by Mousse T, and that's
not it either....

I suspect it's one of those public-domain library pieces...I've just scored some
bootleg videos of "The Adventures of Pete and Pete" on eBay; once they come in
I'll see about extracting the appropriate audio so I can point people at the
actual tune...(it was in the episode about the payphone that had been ringing
constantly for 20 years)....r

amej...@search26.com

unread,
Dec 7, 2004, 4:36:36 AM12/7/04
to

Dr H

unread,
Dec 7, 2004, 7:00:52 PM12/7/04
to

On Sat, 4 Dec 2004, PATRICIA BURNS vociferated:

}PATRICIA BURNS wrote:
}
}
}It's back. Their server was down for awhile. Jingle bells worked for me.
}(?) *UDDDRRUDDD

That's the verse -- I entered the chorus, which is the part most likely
to be played, if only part of the song is played:

*RRRRRRUDUU

Dr H

Jordan Abel

unread,
Dec 7, 2004, 8:37:23 PM12/7/04
to

I hear it as *RRRRRDUDUU

Dr H

unread,
Dec 8, 2004, 1:34:55 PM12/8/04
to

On Tue, 8 Dec 2004, Jordan Abel vociferated:


In the key of C:

E E E E E E E G C D E

Jin-gle Bells, Jin-gle Bells, Jin-gle all the way...

* R R R R R R U D U U


Dr "best viewed with fixed-width font" H

R H Draney

unread,
Dec 8, 2004, 8:49:54 PM12/8/04
to
R H Draney filted:

>
>That's not it...nor is it the "Tombstone Territory" theme, now that I've heard
>it...mine has the contour *dduududdu...principal instruments are whistle and
>chime...the only exact match Musipedia finds is "Horny" by Mousse T, and that's
>not it either....
>
>I suspect it's one of those public-domain library pieces...I've just scored some
>bootleg videos of "The Adventures of Pete and Pete" on eBay; once they come in
>I'll see about extracting the appropriate audio so I can point people at the
>actual tune...(it was in the episode about the payphone that had been ringing
>constantly for 20 years)....r

The DVDs came, and I wasted no time recording an audio track for the episode
"The Call"...while the "gunfight" music appears repeatedly throughout the half
hour program, this scene:

http://home.earthlink.net/~dadoctah/music/PETE.mp3

contains about the longest uninterrupted stretch of it...the file linked above
is just under 1 MB and runs just over one minute in length...there's
considerable dialogue and some sound effects over most of it, but the mystery
theme is easy to hear....

R H "have at it, my little Vikings!" Draney

Louise Bremner

unread,
Dec 8, 2004, 11:47:14 PM12/8/04
to
R H Draney <dado...@spamcop.net> wrote:

> http://home.earthlink.net/~dadoctah/music/PETE.mp3
^^MP
Case sensitive.

But I can't help with the music, though.

________________________________________________________________________
Louise Bremner (log at gol dot com)
If you want a reply by e-mail, don't write to my Yahoo address!

R H Draney

unread,
Dec 9, 2004, 12:27:16 PM12/9/04
to
Louise Bremner filted:

>
>R H Draney <dado...@spamcop.net> wrote:
>
>> http://home.earthlink.net/~dadoctah/music/PETE.mp3
> ^^MP
>Case sensitive.

Sorry...I took note that some link in the chain (transfer to thumb drive?--back
to hard drive?--FTP?) uppercased the filename, but I missed the fact that the
extension was similarly interfered with....r

>But I can't help with the music, though.

Blast...there ought to be newsgroups especially devoted to this kind of
thing....r

TeaLady (Mari C.)

unread,
Dec 10, 2004, 7:24:41 PM12/10/04
to
R H Draney <dado...@spamcop.net> wrote in
news:cpa1t...@drn.newsguy.com:

Have you tried any music from "Once Upon a Time in the West" ?

It sorta reminds me of that movie. I don't hve the sound-track
to check, thoug - and I'd need a better sample of music to check
for, as my ear isn't all that great.

--
TeaLady (mari)

"I keep telling you, chew with your mouth closed!" Kell the
coach offers advice on keeping that elusive prey caught.

Freddy Letrange

unread,
Dec 10, 2004, 8:13:03 PM12/10/04
to
It's only RH Draney pursuing something he's not sure of:

|>The DVDs came, and I wasted no time recording an audio track for the
|>episode "The Call"...while the "gunfight" music appears repeatedly |>throughout the half hour program, this scene:
|>[http://home.earthlink.net/~dadoctah/music/PETE.MP3]

|>contains about the longest uninterrupted stretch of it...

The track is "The Gunfighter," from the UKoGBaNIan KPM Music Library, which
is owned by EMI and licenced in the USA by Associated Production Music.
It's on KPM CD 129, "Music for the Movies," and was composed by the
prolific Franco Micalizzi and Roberto Pregadio (see, amongst their film
scores listed at imdb.com, Micalizzi's for the 1971 spaghetti western
"They Call Me Trinity" and Pregadio's for "Kiss the Girls and Make Them
Die"). You can listen to the entire cut by going to http://www.apmmusic.com,
clicking on "Play Music Finder," logging in as a guest, and using the search
engine provided.

That the piece is from a production-music library doesn't mean it's in the
public domain; it is in fact protected by copyright, and its owners make
it available only to their own licencees (radio/ television/ film/ audio/
video producers, post-production houses, advertising agencies, etc.), not to
the general public. But production-library music is almost always cheaper and
easier to licence than music from commercial CDs in the record store would be.
It's one-stop shopping: the library usually owns both the composition and the
recording embodying it, so you don't have to make separate deals with a music
publisher and a recording label; and you also don't need to worry about
"re-use" fees and pension-and-welfare payments to talent unions.

- 'Freddy "the Coolidge of Musical Knowledge" Letrange'

R H Draney

unread,
Dec 11, 2004, 12:23:04 AM12/11/04
to
Freddy Letrange filted:

>
>It's only RH Draney pursuing something he's not sure of:

(Nice song, that...paraphrasing the lyrics gets you "don't call the cops just
because I'm out here on your lawn in the middle of the night with my butterfly
net")....

>|>The DVDs came, and I wasted no time recording an audio track for the
>|>episode "The Call"...while the "gunfight" music appears repeatedly
>|>throughout the half hour program, this scene:
>|>[http://home.earthlink.net/~dadoctah/music/PETE.MP3]
>|>contains about the longest uninterrupted stretch of it...
>
>The track is "The Gunfighter," from the UKoGBaNIan KPM Music Library, which
>is owned by EMI and licenced in the USA by Associated Production Music.
>It's on KPM CD 129, "Music for the Movies," and was composed by the
>prolific Franco Micalizzi and Roberto Pregadio (see, amongst their film
>scores listed at imdb.com, Micalizzi's for the 1971 spaghetti western
>"They Call Me Trinity" and Pregadio's for "Kiss the Girls and Make Them
>Die"). You can listen to the entire cut by going to http://www.apmmusic.com,
>clicking on "Play Music Finder," logging in as a guest, and using the search
>engine provided.

Have I said lately how much I love this group?...

I *LOVE* this group!...r

John Francis

unread,
Dec 14, 2004, 5:22:08 PM12/14/04
to
I've just been bitten by another one, darn it.

Preumably because we'd been watching the Matrix Trilogy and
The Lord of the Rings on movie channels, my TiVo decided I
might want to watch another movie featuring Hugo Weaving:
"Priscilla, Queen of the Desert". I'm not sure I agree with
the choice - I tried the first half an hour or so of the movie,
then bailed out.

By that time, though, I'd already seen the opening sequence,
with Hugo Weaving in drag lipsynching to "I've never been to me".
Now I'm stuck with that tune rattling around my head.

Ralph Jones

unread,
Dec 14, 2004, 5:54:56 PM12/14/04
to
On 14 Dec 2004 17:22:08 -0500, jo...@panix.com (John Francis) wrote:

>I've just been bitten by another one, darn it.
>
>Preumably because we'd been watching the Matrix Trilogy and
>The Lord of the Rings on movie channels, my TiVo decided I
>might want to watch another movie featuring Hugo Weaving:
>"Priscilla, Queen of the Desert". I'm not sure I agree with
>the choice - I tried the first half an hour or so of the movie,
>then bailed out.
>

Now you see there? You missed the pingpong ball sequence.

rj

R H Draney

unread,
Dec 14, 2004, 6:16:13 PM12/14/04
to
John Francis filted:

How a person subject to earworm can watch that movie and *not* come down with
ABBAitis is beyond me....r

John Francis

unread,
Dec 14, 2004, 6:51:41 PM12/14/04
to
In article <cpns7...@drn.newsguy.com>,

I didn't notice. But there again I spent six months in Sweden
in the early 70s, so I'm probably immunized against ABBA at any
level liable to be found outside of a Stockholm discotheque.

For that matter, I believe there might even be an ABBA CD somewhere
in our collection of odds-and-ends picked up from the bargain bins.

And how can any group be all bad that spawned a tribute band
with a name worthy of a Dave Barry throwaway? (Bjorn Again)

--
John "but I draw the line at the Bay City Rollers" Francis

Ray Heindl

unread,
Dec 15, 2004, 3:56:48 PM12/15/04
to
jo...@panix.com (John Francis) wrote:

> I've just been bitten by another one, darn it.
>
> Preumably because we'd been watching the Matrix Trilogy and
> The Lord of the Rings on movie channels, my TiVo decided I
> might want to watch another movie featuring Hugo Weaving:
> "Priscilla, Queen of the Desert". I'm not sure I agree with
> the choice - I tried the first half an hour or so of the movie,
> then bailed out.

Can you disable the feature that causes TiVo to record things that you
didn't request? Or do you like to be surprised?

--
Ray Heindl
(remove the Xs to reply to: xvortr...@yaxhoo.com)

John Francis

unread,
Dec 15, 2004, 4:29:31 PM12/15/04
to
In article <Xns95C0A237...@130.133.1.4>,

Ray Heindl <m...@privacy.net> wrote:
>jo...@panix.com (John Francis) wrote:
>
>> I've just been bitten by another one, darn it.
>>
>> Preumably because we'd been watching the Matrix Trilogy and
>> The Lord of the Rings on movie channels, my TiVo decided I
>> might want to watch another movie featuring Hugo Weaving:
>> "Priscilla, Queen of the Desert". I'm not sure I agree with
>> the choice - I tried the first half an hour or so of the movie,
>> then bailed out.
>
>Can you disable the feature that causes TiVo to record things that you
>didn't request?

Yes.

> Or do you like to be surprised?

Why not? It never over-records anything I requested with one
of the TiVo suggestions, so it's only using up otherwise-empty
disk space. There have been a couple of times when it has found
an obscure movie that has been well worth watching.

Letting it record things also gives me a far more accurate
estimate of how much recording time is left. That was quite
important on the original (series one) box, which could hold
anywhere between 24 and 30 hours of recorded material. The
difference is quite important if you've already got quite a
lot of stuff recorded, and are wondering whether there is
quite enough space left for your short-term recording plans.

With the second box it's less of an issue, because unless I
record a lot of stuff in HD I've never come close to filling
the disk.

sewiv

unread,
Dec 16, 2004, 4:49:28 PM12/16/04
to
I know this is a late followup, but what if you can't tell if it goes
up or down?

Martha Gallagher

unread,
Dec 16, 2004, 5:12:51 PM12/16/04
to
On 16 Dec 2004, sewiv wrote:

[wrt musical notes]


> I know this is a late followup, but what if you can't tell if it goes
> up or down?
>

You are William Hung, and I claim my two-fifty.

Martha

--
"ALPO is 99 cents a can. That's over SEVEN dog dollars!!"
Revek - ASDLC

Louise Bremner

unread,
Dec 16, 2004, 5:18:08 PM12/16/04
to
sewiv <thes...@gmail.com> wrote:

> I know this is a late followup, but what if you can't tell if it goes
> up or down?

I know that this new, "improved" implementation of Google's Usenet
interface does not provide automatic quoting, but do you think you could
copy-and-paste the text you're replying to, for reference? This part of
the thread expired from my newsreader long ago.

Alternatively, consider using a real newsreader yourself....

sewiv

unread,
Dec 17, 2004, 9:39:00 AM12/17/04
to
>sewiv <these...@gmail.com> wrote:

>> I know this is a late followup, but what if you can't tell if it
goes
>> up or down?

>I know that this new, "improved" implementation of Google's Usenet
>interface does not provide automatic quoting, but do you think you
could
>copy-and-paste the text you're replying to, for reference? This part
of
>the thread expired from my newsreader long ago.

Sorry, that was my first post with the broken Google.

>Alternatively, consider using a real newsreader yourself....

Ah, if only there was any access other than google from work....

Mary Shafer

unread,
Dec 18, 2004, 9:46:51 PM12/18/04
to
On Wed, 8 Dec 2004 10:34:55 -0800, Dr H <hiaw...@efn.org> wrote:

> In the key of C:
>
> E E E E E E E G C D E
>
> Jin-gle Bells, Jin-gle Bells, Jin-gle all the way...
>
> * R R R R R R U D U U

No, that's the chorus. The first line is "Dashing through the snow"
(the second is "In a one-horse open sleigh").

Mary

--
Mary Shafer Retired flight research engineer
shafe...@gmail.com

O J

unread,
Dec 19, 2004, 7:36:24 AM12/19/04
to
Mary Shafer wrote:

>Dr H wrote:
>
>> In the key of C:
>>
>> E E E E E E E G C D E
>>
>> Jin-gle Bells, Jin-gle Bells, Jin-gle all the way...
>>
>> * R R R R R R U D U U
>
>No, that's the chorus. The first line is "Dashing through the snow"
>(the second is "In a one-horse open sleigh").
>
>Mary

Of course in Austria, they sing it to slightly different words

Regards,
O J "Copied from 'Yowie' in rec.pets.cats.anecdotes" Gritmon

>Dashing through the bush in a rusty Holden Ute
>Kicking up the dust, Esky in the boot
>Kelpie by my side, Singing Christmas songs
>It's summer time and I am in my singlet, shorts and thongs! Oh!
>
>Chorus:
>Jingle Bells, Jingle Bells, Jingle all the way
>Christmas in Australia on a scorching summer's day, Oh!
>Jingle Bells, Jingle Bells, Christmas time is beaut,
>Oh what fun it is to ride in a rusty Holden ute
>
>Engine's getting hot, we dodge the kangaroos
>the swaggie climbs aboard, he is welcome too
>All the family's there, sitting by the pool
>Christmas day in the Aussie way, by the Bar-b-que! Oh!
>
>Come the afternoon and grandpa has a doze
>The kids and Uncle Bruce are swimming in the clothes
>The time comes round to go, we take the family snap
>And pack the car and all shoot through
>Before the washing up! Oh!
>
>Translation:
>Holden Ute: iconic Aussie flat-bed truck
>Esky: Portable insulated box that you keep your
> drinks in so they stay cold through the day
>Kelpie: Iconic Australian dog. A Blue heeler
>Singlet: Undershirt without sleeves
>Swaggie: Short for "Swagman". Iconic Australian
> "roaming person". viz: "Once a jolly swagman..."
>Uncle Bruce: Bruce is the classic name for
> any 'older' Australian male
>Family snap: family photo
>Shoot through: a slang term meaning to leave
> in a hurry so as to avoid your obligations.

No Spam

unread,
Dec 19, 2004, 1:44:59 PM12/19/04
to

"Mary Shafer" <mil...@qnet.com> wrote in message
news:2oq9s0h822mfa16bg...@4ax.com...

> On Wed, 8 Dec 2004 10:34:55 -0800, Dr H <hiaw...@efn.org> wrote:
>
>> In the key of C:
>>
>> E E E E E E E G C D E
>>
>> Jin-gle Bells, Jin-gle Bells, Jin-gle all the way...
>>
>> * R R R R R R U D U U
>
> No, that's the chorus.

Yes, that's the chorus. In this song, the chorus comes
first, and also after each verse.

David DeLaney

unread,
Dec 19, 2004, 7:27:03 PM12/19/04
to
No Spam <nos...@hormel.org> wrote:
>"Mary Shafer" <mil...@qnet.com> wrote in message
>> No, that's the chorus.
>
>Yes, that's the chorus. In this song, the chorus comes
>first, and also after each verse.

That would appear not to be the case. Granted, millions of people, if not
thousands, don't KNOW the first verse, so start at the chorus because that's
all they know, but the song itself starts at the first verse.

Dave "misfortune seem'd his lot" DeLaney
--
\/David DeLaney posting from d...@vic.com "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
http://www.vic.com/~dbd/ - net.legends FAQ & Magic / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.

Bob Ward

unread,
Dec 20, 2004, 11:12:49 PM12/20/04
to
On 19 Dec 2004 19:27:03 -0500, d...@gatekeeper.vic.com (David DeLaney)
wrote:

>No Spam <nos...@hormel.org> wrote:
>>"Mary Shafer" <mil...@qnet.com> wrote in message
>>> No, that's the chorus.
>>
>>Yes, that's the chorus. In this song, the chorus comes
>>first, and also after each verse.
>
>That would appear not to be the case. Granted, millions of people, if not
>thousands, don't KNOW the first verse, so start at the chorus because that's
>all they know, but the song itself starts at the first verse.
>
>Dave "misfortune seem'd his lot" DeLaney


Very few people can name the horse, either.

"Oryyf ba Obognvy evat"

Simon Slavin

unread,
Dec 22, 2004, 4:31:48 PM12/22/04
to
On 19/12/2004, David DeLaney wrote in message
<slrncsc6q...@gatekeeper.vic.com>:


> No Spam <nos...@hormel.org> wrote:
> >"Mary Shafer" <mil...@qnet.com> wrote in message
> >> No, that's the chorus.
> >
> >Yes, that's the chorus. In this song, the chorus comes
> >first, and also after each verse.
>
> That would appear not to be the case. Granted, millions of people, if not
> thousands, don't KNOW the first verse, so start at the chorus because
> that's all they know, but the song itself starts at the first verse.

Almost nobody knows the first verse to _White Christmas_.
Annoying, since it changes the meaning of the song.

Simon.
--
Using pre-release version of newsreader.
Please tell me if it does weird things.

Charles Wm. Dimmick

unread,
Dec 22, 2004, 7:09:41 PM12/22/04
to
Simon Slavin wrote:

> Almost nobody knows the first verse to _White Christmas_.
> Annoying, since it changes the meaning of the song.

OK. I'll bite. Is it somewhat different than
what one usually hears? A quick google check
shows the first 40 hits with the same lyrics.

charles

MonkeyHawk

unread,
Dec 22, 2004, 7:15:18 PM12/22/04
to

"Simon Slavin" <slavins.delete....@hearsay.demon.co.uk> wrote
in

> Almost nobody knows the first verse to _White Christmas_.
> Annoying, since it changes the meaning of the song.

Really?

Are you referring to the verse about writing Christmas cards in Beverly
Hills?

That's the only verse I'm familiar with. (Yeah, I could look it up, but I'm
lazy.)

I'm not sure it changes the meaning of the song, really.

Is there another, more sub..uhm...versive verse I've missed?


David DeLaney

unread,
Dec 22, 2004, 10:21:40 PM12/22/04
to

It's about a man (soldier? I'll know in a minute) dying overseas, I belive.
Hit four for "white christmas verse one" is a book review for White Christmas,
Jody Rosen, ISBN 0-9432-1875-2, that explains partway down "A number of things
paved the way for the massive and instant success of the song when released:
the in's and out's of Berlin's planned and executed uses of the song in the
movie Holiday Inn; the change to eliminate the opening verse on all sheet music
after the release of the Bing Crosby recordings; and the claim of wartime
adoption of the song by troops abroad in World War II longing for home and
peace. [...]".

Okay, no, I'm wrong, it's simply telling how the singer is in sunny Beverly
Hills - and finding it, I _have_ heard this before, on arrangements that surely
were made after Bing did it:

"The sun is shining, the grass is green
The orange and palm trees sway
There's never been such a day
In Beverley Hills, L. A.
.. But it's De-cember the twen-ty-fourth
.. And I am longing to be up north: ..."

Dave "four more days and the curse of harmony is LIFTED" DeLaney

Vreejack

unread,
Dec 23, 2004, 8:31:46 PM12/23/04
to

Use the "show options" button on the new Google interface to get
automatic quoting and a bunch of other things.

JoAnne Schmitz

unread,
Dec 24, 2004, 2:09:57 PM12/24/04
to
On Wed, 22 Dec 2004 21:31:48 +0000, Simon Slavin
<slavins.delete....@hearsay.demon.co.uk> wrote:

>Almost nobody knows the first verse to _White Christmas_.
>Annoying, since it changes the meaning of the song.

Terminology varies among different musical forms. Among jazz musicians,
it's usually not called the "first verse," it's just called the "verse."
And often it's a different form altogether from any succeeding non-chorus,
non-bridge sections. The function of the verse is to set the scene for the
remainder of the song. Sometimes omitting it changes the meaning of the
song.

There's another Christmas song with a rarely-heard verse, "Have Yourself A
Merry Little Christmas." The verse here also puts a very different spin on
the song.

Many pop standards have a verse that is not often performed, or remembered.
For example (with help from Google and the search terms "verse" and "rarely
heard"):

A Foggy Day
I Get A Kick Out Of You
Easter Parade
I Wonder Who's Kissing Her Now
Shine On Harvest Moon
In The Wee Small Hours
I'm In The Mood For Love
Ain't Misbehavin'
Sweet Georgia Brown
Embraceable You (the verse didn't even make it into the movie version of
"An American In Paris")

A modern song that almost follows this form is the Sade hit "Smooth
Operator" with a spoken rhyming intro.

I'd love to see a quiz: "match the often-omitted verse with the song."

JoAnne "the loveliness of Paris" Schmitz

--

The new Urban Legends website is <http://www.tafkac.org>
That's TAFKAC.ORG
Do not accept lame imitations at previously okay URLs

Lara

unread,
Dec 24, 2004, 10:14:58 PM12/24/04
to
JoAnne Schmitz <jsch...@qis.net> wrote:

> I'd love to see a quiz: "match the often-omitted verse with the song."


I'll start with a gimme:

Should foreign foe e'er sight our coast.
Or dare a foot to land,
We'll rouse to arms like sires of yore
To guard our native strand;
Britannia then shall surely know,
Beyond wide oceans roll
Her sons in fair <deleted>'s land
Still keep a British soul.
In joyful strains, etc

Lara

R H Draney

unread,
Dec 25, 2004, 2:44:09 AM12/25/04
to
JoAnne Schmitz filted:

>
>Many pop standards have a verse that is not often performed, or remembered.
>For example (with help from Google and the search terms "verse" and "rarely
>heard"):
>
>A Foggy Day
>I Get A Kick Out Of You
>Easter Parade
>I Wonder Who's Kissing Her Now
>Shine On Harvest Moon
>In The Wee Small Hours
>I'm In The Mood For Love
>Ain't Misbehavin'
>Sweet Georgia Brown
>Embraceable You (the verse didn't even make it into the movie version of
>"An American In Paris")
>
>A modern song that almost follows this form is the Sade hit "Smooth
>Operator" with a spoken rhyming intro.
>
>I'd love to see a quiz: "match the often-omitted verse with the song."

"This day and age we're living in
Gives cause for apprehension
With speed and new invention
And things like fourth dimension.
Yet we get a trifle weary
With Mister Einstein's theory.
We must get down to earth sometimes
Relax, relieve the tension.
No matter what the future brings
Or what may yet be proved,
The simple facts of life are such
They cannot be removed."

R H "I don't have to play it again, do I?" Draney

David DeLaney

unread,
Dec 25, 2004, 3:02:19 AM12/25/04
to
JoAnne Schmitz <jsch...@qis.net> wrote:
> I'd love to see a quiz: "match the often-omitted verse with the song."

Here's one I can stand to post because it's just for 24 more hours:

"Over the ground lies a mantle of white,
A heaven of diamonds shine down through the night,
Two hearts are thrillin' in spite of the chill in the weather.
Love knows no season, love knows no clime,
Romance can blossom any old time,
Here in the open we're walking and hoping together!"

Dave "that's rather a tender Tennessee subject" DeLaney

Simon Slavin

unread,
Dec 25, 2004, 5:04:45 PM12/25/04
to
Charles Wm. Dimmick <cdim...@snet.net> wrote:
>Simon Slavin wrote:
>
>> Almost nobody knows the first verse to _White Christmas_.
>> Annoying, since it changes the meaning of the song.
>
>OK. I'll bite. Is it somewhat different than
>what one usually hears? A quick google check
>shows the first 40 hits with the same lyrics.

Oh, I'd expect posters to this froup to know it. But that's
almost nobody. Most people think that the singer is singing
about Christmas in July. Instead the singer is singing at
Christmas day, and all he's nostalgic about is the snows of
yesteryear.

I hereby declare _White Christmas_ to be the themesong of
Global Warming. If it exists. Which I would rather this
group didn't discuss.

D.F. Manno

unread,
Dec 25, 2004, 9:06:56 PM12/25/04
to
In article <4aoos09e34o2nq4al...@4ax.com>,
JoAnne Schmitz <jsch...@qis.net> wrote:

> I'd love to see a quiz: "match the often-omitted verse with the song."

I'm the glum one.
It's explainable.
I met someone
Unattainable.
Life's a bore.
The world is my oyster no more.
All the papers
Where I led the news
With my capers
Now will spread the news:
"Superman turns out to be flash in the pan."
--
D.F. Manno
dfm2a...@spymac.com
"The work goes on, the cause endures, the hope still lives and the dream
will never die."

R H Draney

unread,
Dec 25, 2004, 11:50:02 PM12/25/04