Title screen for HLA Adventure? Need help designing one

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dun...@yahoo.com

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Jun 14, 2005, 1:22:46 AM6/14/05
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I'm not much of an artist, but I was wondering if anyone
would be interested in designing an ASCII multi-colored
title screen for my game HLA Adventure?

One featuring a dragon, with perhaps a castle and a small
hillside with trees in the background?

I will, of course, credit your work in both the source
code of HLA Adventure and the game itself.

Please e-mail a screen design to me at: dun...@yahoo.com

The website for HLA Adventure is located at:

http://members.tripod.com/~panks/hlaadv.html

Thanks!

Paul

dun...@yahoo.com

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Jun 14, 2005, 3:30:42 AM6/14/05
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Ok, what I've got thus far was ASCIIed with software available
online.

See: mippyasc.zip in the "Files" section of "aoaprogramming" (on Yahoo!
groups).

When something better is developed, I'll remove the file.

Paul

Jukka Aho

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Jun 14, 2005, 5:06:19 AM6/14/05
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dun...@yahoo.com wrote:

> I'm not much of an artist, but I was wondering if anyone
> would be interested in designing an ASCII multi-colored
> title screen for my game HLA Adventure?

Try asking in alt.ascii-art or rec.arts.ascii. (What's "HLA", anyway?)

You might also want to specify a) what is the exact character set you
have at your disposal for this purpose (pure ASCII? ISO Latin 1? IBM
Codepage 437? PETSCII? Something else?) and b) which colors are usable
(16-color PC-style interpretation of the "ANSI" colors, or the original
8-color scheme? Something else?)

--
znark

dun...@yahoo.com

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Jun 14, 2005, 5:11:04 AM6/14/05
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Pure ASCII, 16 colors. HLA is "High Level Assembly" programming
language by Randall Hyde.

Paul

JohnnyMrNinja

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Jun 14, 2005, 10:56:19 PM6/14/05
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I highly reccomend you check out TheDraw, a text-mode drawing program -
http://www.syaross.org/thedraw/
It can also save to ANSI, or even Pascal.

JohnnyMrNinja

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Jun 14, 2005, 11:56:04 PM6/14/05
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   ÚÄÄ¿
Ú¿ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³
ÖÒÒÒÒ´ÃijÄijijÄÄijÄijڿڴ³³Ú¿Ú¿Å³³Ú¿Ú¿
ÓÐÐÐдÃͳÍͳͳÍÍͳÍͳôÀÙÀÙÀij³³ÀÙ³
ÀÄ
ÀÙ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³
Á Á ÁÄÄÙÁ Á

I know that when a lot of people say ASCII they mean plain-text, but
this is an actual ASCII thing I just did in TheDraw. If you save it to
HLA.txt and "TYPE HLA.TXT" in DOS or full-screen DOS window it should
work, I think. No dragons or anything, just an example of what can be
done in TheDraw. Except, you can also save in color and what-not.

JohnnyMrNinja

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Jun 15, 2005, 12:26:30 AM6/15/05
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Okay, I don't think that worked at all. Sorry.

Katzy

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Jun 15, 2005, 6:38:08 AM6/15/05
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Heya.

JohnnyMrNinja wrote in message
<1118809590.8...@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com>...


>Okay, I don't think that worked at all. Sorry.

Yes, it did. I could read it (HLA Adventure). Nice. There was just one
line-break.

Greetz, Katzy.


Beth

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Jun 15, 2005, 11:40:23 AM6/15/05
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Paul wrote:
> I'm not much of an artist, but I was wondering if anyone
> would be interested in designing an ASCII multi-colored
> title screen for my game HLA Adventure?
>
> One featuring a dragon, with perhaps a castle and a small
> hillside with trees in the background?

Okay, I had a go...no trees or dragons (I'm not Rolf Harris, don't push it!
;)...but it's a castle with some hills in the distance and a moat and
drawbridge...and a portculis, of course, to keep that dragon out of the
castle ;)...

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
,'
__ ___ __ ,'
| |___| |___| | _ ,'
| |' | ,'_______________
|_________________|-/__ _ _ _ | _
\_______________/ | |_| |_| |_| |_| / \ /
| |__ | ____ ___ | ___ | | ___ |
__ ____ | | ||__| |___| |_|_| |___| |_
\______ ___/ \_| _ |___________________________________
\__ __/ | / \ | __________
\_/ | | | | /\ /\ /| | |
\_ | | | | || || /-+---+---+-
________________\___________| === | -- -- || | | |
| | |--+---+---+-
_| | || | | |
_,' | | |--+---+---+-
_,' | | || | | |
,' ,| | |--+---+---+-
,' ,' | |_______________________|/\|/ \|/ \|/
| | \_____________/ /
| \_ __________ /
\ \___________________/ \______/
', /
',_________________________________________/
/_________________
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I have no idea how I post "colour" for this either...so, it's colourless
and you'll have to put that in yourself...obviously, the drawbridge should
be brown (wood), the castle grey (stone), the moat dark blue (water) and
the sky...well, sky blue, obviously...the rest is green (grass)...

There should be enough room there in the top-left of the picture to put
some "HLA adventure" logo...and it should also fit a 80 x 25 screen...

As for a "dragon" and "trees"? Don't ask me...I'm no good at that kind of
thing...I don't know...if someone else can draw a small "dragon" for you
then you can just "paste" it on top of the mostly empty space on the left,
perhaps...I've kind of left that space empty for the dragon, anyway...

As you can see, inside the outer walls of the castle, there's a building in
the middle with a sloping roof...I'm thinking that this is the big "banquet
hall" where the "king" or "baron" or whoever it is that owns this castle
has their "feasts" with invited "noble" guests and that kind of
thing...though you can't see it, I guess the "kitchens" would be a slightly
smaller building adjoining it, where the meals would be prepared and cooked
then brought through to the main "banquet hall"...which would have these
very long wooden tables (you know, like in the Harry Potter movies :),
where the guests would be seated...perhaps having some "wild boar" or, if
it were a king, then it might be a bit more "posh" and they'd eat "deer",
hunted from the King's forest nearby (though, the peasants should keep out
of the King's forest, lest be branded a "poacher" - a "deer thief" - which
carried a very serious punishment)...

Sorry about the lack of dragons and trees (I think that goes beyond my
ASCII art abilities there ;)...but it's the castle and the hills, anyway...

Right, let's see if this will even post properly, without screwing up the
ASCII picture...

Beth :)

Beth

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Jun 15, 2005, 12:21:57 PM6/15/05
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Hi,

Those "hills" were a bit crap...I've tried to "smooth" them out a bit more
to look a bit nicer...and I've attempted a simple "logo" there too (which
partially covers the "crap hills", anyway ;)...

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
_ _ _ _____ ,'
/ \ / \ / \ / _ \ __ ___ __ ,'
| |_| | | | | |_| | | |___| |___| | _ ,'
| _ | | | | _ | | |' | ,'_______________
| | | | | |____ | | | | |_________________|-/__ _ _ _ | _
\_/ \_/ \_____/ \_/ \_/ \_______________/ | |_| |_| |_| |_| / \ /
===================== | |__ | ___ ___ | ___ | | ___ |
A D V E N T U R E __ | | ||__| |___| |_|_| |___| |_
`'=====================` `'| _ |____________________________________
`',_ _,'` | / \ | __________
',_,' | | | | /\ /\ /| | |
', | | | | || || /-+---+---+-


________________\___________| === | -- -- || | | |
| | |--+---+---+-
_| | || | | |
_,' | | |--+---+---+-
_,' | | || | | |
,' ,| | |--+---+---+-
,' ,' | |_______________________|/\|/ \|/ \|/
| | \_____________/ /
| \_ __________ /
\ \___________________/ \______/
', /
',_________________________________________/
/_________________
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

...but, no, I'm not attempting the "dragon"...though, he could be lying down or
something next to the castle there on the left-side on the grass, in front of
the castle...that's the "reserved space" for the dragon, anyway...

How would I send "colours" for this picture, anyway?

Beth :)


Evenbit

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Jun 15, 2005, 12:52:32 PM6/15/05
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JohnnyMrNinja wrote:
> Â Â Â ÚÄÄż
> Úż ł ł ł ł ł
> ÖŇŇŇŇ´ĂÄłÄijijÄÄÄłÄÄłÚżÚ´łłÚżÚżĹłłÚżÚż
> ÓĐĐĐĐ´ĂÍłÍͳͳÍÍÍłÍͳôŔŮŔŮŔÄłłłŔŮł
> ŔÄ
> ŔŮ ł ł ł ł ł
> Á Á ÁÄÄŮÁ Á
>

Doesn't look very 'artful' in ASCII, but you are probably trying to
post ANSI and I don't think USENET has been upgraded to that yet.

> I know that when a lot of people say ASCII they mean plain-text, but
> this is an actual ASCII thing I just did in TheDraw. If you save it to
> HLA.txt and "TYPE HLA.TXT" in DOS or full-screen DOS window it should
> work, I think. No dragons or anything, just an example of what can be
> done in TheDraw. Except, you can also save in color and what-not.

On most PCs, this requires a "DEVICE=ANSI.SYS" line in "CONFIG.SYS" to
display ANSI graphics on DOS or in a DOS box. Windows console mode may
have ANSI support built-in, maybe not (perhaps why Paul was asking for
plain ASCII?).

Evenbit

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Jun 15, 2005, 1:01:05 PM6/15/05
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The castle doesn't seem to be teamming with life. Perhaps the dragon
is 'inside' enjoying a nice ...uh-hum... meal. ;-)

>
> How would I send "colours" for this picture, anyway?

I see your 'puter didn't come with the cayon input device either...

grey...@gmaildo.ttocom

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Jun 15, 2005, 1:45:54 PM6/15/05
to

I remember ASCII art on bulletin board login screens, some very
artistic, all a pain to download at 1200... After a while one noticed
a message at bottom of screen, saying `Hit <Esc> to enter immediatly',
one had a scene of an oasis. They are probably archived somewhere.

--
greymaus
97.025% of statistics are wrong

Ross Presser

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Jun 15, 2005, 4:42:52 PM6/15/05
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On 15 Jun 2005 09:52:32 -0700, Evenbit wrote:

> Doesn't look very 'artful' in ASCII, but you are probably trying to
> post ANSI and I don't think USENET has been upgraded to that yet.

It's not exactly ANSI - it's 8-bit ASCII, using the CP437 encoding (the
original IBM PC line drawing characters). If you view it in Notepad using
the Windows "Terminal" font, it should display close to correctly.

"@comcast >

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Jun 15, 2005, 5:16:54 PM6/15/05
to
Evenbit wrote:

>>How would I send "colours" for this picture, anyway?
>
> I see your 'puter didn't come with the cayon input device either...

:)

The HLA Standard Library has portable routines to set colors. The Linux
version sends VT-100 codes ("ansi escape sequences"). The Windows
version uses an API (which probably sends ansi escape sequences).

Best,
Frank


Beth

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Jun 15, 2005, 7:13:51 PM6/15/05
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Evenbit wrote:

> Beth wrote:
> > ...but, no, I'm not attempting the "dragon"...though, he could be lying down
or
> > something next to the castle there on the left-side on the grass, in front
of
> > the castle...that's the "reserved space" for the dragon, anyway...
>
> The castle doesn't seem to be teamming with life.

It's a castle! Everyone's gone inside!

Its use as a "means of defence" would be slightly "compromised", if no-one
actually went _INSIDE_ of the defensive castle walls...and its use as a
"building" (a means to escape wind, rain and cold) would not quite work, unless
you actually went _INSIDE_ the castle's buildings...

You can _try_ to standing outside the castle...and, well, just stand around
looking at it...but should those enemy troops show up or it starts pissing down
with down on your head, the wisdom of NOT standing around outside the castle all
day long might eventually dawn on you :)

> Perhaps the dragon
> is 'inside' enjoying a nice ...uh-hum... meal. ;-)

Perhaps the dragon isn't in the picture because some knight skewered him with a
lance...and that's why everyone's gone inside: They are all enjoying the rare
but delicious treat of "dragon burgers and chips"...with, of course, a can of
Dr.Pepper to wash it down...I've heard that dragon meat tastes a bit like
chicken, apparently...

> > How would I send "colours" for this picture, anyway?
>
> I see your 'puter didn't come with the cayon input device either...

No, really...how _DO_ I send colour information for the picture?

Is there some kind of "standard" for sending colour information in ASCII art?

Mind you, the picture may need "alterations" to make it work properly with
colour...as I wasn't really giving it any thought about colour whilst drawing...

Beth :)


Jukka Aho

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Jun 15, 2005, 8:29:54 PM6/15/05
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Beth wrote:

> No, really...how _DO_ I send colour information for the picture?
>
> Is there some kind of "standard" for sending colour information in
> ASCII art?

There is a real standard without any quotation marks. Try ECMA-48 [1]
("Control Functions for Coded Character Sets"), section 8.3.117 ("SGR -
Select Graphic Rendition"). That's what traditional VTxxx-derived color
terminals, modern color-enabled terminal emulators and - God forbid -
ANSI.SYS in MS-DOS use.

In dial-up BBS world, the same thing (being based on a standard called
ANSI X3.64, which is apparently pretty much identical to ECMA-94 - I'm
not sure which one came first) was known as "ANSI colors", although
that's a little bit too vague name for it and some people are known to
frown upon that term.

This Wikipedia article explains it all quite well:

<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ANSI_art>

Note that the article also provides links to some software tools with
which you can easily create colorful "ANSI graphics" on your own.
(However, make sure that you know where the pictures are going to end
up. For example, if you create color graphics for UNIX environments, you
would probably want to avoid using the IBM codepage 437 graphics
characters. Although they were used extensively in the dial-up BBS
world, UNIX environments usually prefer Latin-1 or the earlier DEC
Multinational character set instead.)

_____

[1] <http://www.ecma-international.org/publications/standards/
Ecma-094.htm>

--
znark

Jim Carlock

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Jun 15, 2005, 9:44:38 PM6/15/05
to
Т Т Т кФФП
кП Г Г Г Г Г
жввввДУФГФФГФГФФФГФФГкПкДГГкПкПХГГкПкП
гааааДУЭГЭЭГЭГЭЭЭГЭЭГУДРйРйРФГГГРйГ РФ
Рй Г Г Г Г Г
С С СФФйС С


Is that what it's supposed to look like?

--
Jim Carlock
Please post replies to newsgroup.

Jim Carlock

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Jun 15, 2005, 10:31:16 PM6/15/05
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Some ansi text file creators at the link below...
Search for tdraw463. I can't seem to get ANSI.SYS loaded up
inside the cmd.exe prompt nor the command.com prompt on XP,
but the program there will load(?) an ansi platform to properly
display the colors.

http://artscene.textfiles.com/viewers/dos/

Beth was asking about how to display the ansi characters.
On DOS systems you'd need:
DEVICEHIGH=C:\DOS\ANSI.SYS
inside the config.sys.

The config.nt is supposed to work in the same manner that the
config.sys file worked (on an NT system for the NT command
prompts) but I'm doing something wrong or I need to reboot or
somesuch. If anyone has a clue about this, let me know, please.

There's an ANSI.SYS file inside the system32 folder, as well as
the config.nt file. Copied the config.nt file to the %UserProfile%
folder and tried that but that didn't quite get it either.

mensa...@aol.com

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Jun 16, 2005, 1:39:10 AM6/16/05
to

I don't have ANSI.SYS installed either, but what I do have installed
is Cygwin (a Unix-like shell that runs under Windows). In Cygwin,
I can compile the following program which outputs ANSI codes to draw
a red, white and blue flag.

/*
flag-ansi.c 22-nov-89
*/
#define esc 27
main()
{
int c;
printf("%c[H%c[J",esc,esc);
printf("%c[37;44m",esc);
printf(" * * * * * * "); stripe(1,46);
printf("%c[37;44m",esc);
printf(" * * * * * "); stripe(1,46);
printf("%c[37;44m",esc);
printf(" * * * * * * "); stripe(0,46);
printf("%c[37;44m",esc);
printf(" * * * * * "); stripe(0,46);
printf("%c[37;44m",esc);
printf(" * * * * * * "); stripe(1,46);
printf("%c[37;44m",esc);
printf(" * * * * * "); stripe(1,46);
printf("%c[37;44m",esc);
printf(" * * * * * * "); stripe(0,46);
printf("%c[37;44m",esc);
printf(" * * * * * "); stripe(0,46);
printf("%c[37;44m",esc);
printf(" * * * * * * "); stripe(1,46);
printf("%c[37;44m",esc);
printf(" * * * * * "); stripe(1,46);
printf("%c[37;44m",esc);
printf(" * * * * * * "); stripe(0,46);
printf("%c[37;44m",esc);
printf(" "); stripe(0,46);
for (c=1; c<=3; ++c)
{
stripe(1,80); stripe(1,80);
stripe(0,80); stripe(0,80);
}
stripe(1,80); stripe(1,80);
}

stripe(bold,size)
int bold,size;
{
int i;
if (bold > 0)
printf("%c[41m",esc);
else
printf("%c[47m",esc);
for (i=1; i<size; ++i)
putchar(' ');
printf("%c[0m\n",esc);
}

When the compiled program is run from either the Cygwin shell or
the standard Windows cmd window, the flag comes out perfect.
I would guess the Cygwin.dll needed by the compiled program is
providing the ANSI interpretation.

If the text is captured to a file, say flagtest.txt, then from
Cygwin

$ cat flagtest.txt

displays correctly, but from Windows cmd

C:\cygwin\home\mensanator\cstuff>type flagtest.txt

does not.

L. Ross Raszewski

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Jun 16, 2005, 2:10:37 AM6/16/05
to

If you happen to have Masterpieces, there's a command line program
that provides the same functionality as ansi.sys. It might be a
little more friendly toward modern systems.

Steve O'Hara-Smith

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Jun 16, 2005, 3:16:20 AM6/16/05
to
On Thu, 16 Jun 2005 01:44:38 GMT
"Jim Carlock" <anon...@localhost.com> wrote:

> _ _ _ __Ŀ
> ڿ _ _ _ _ _
> ____Ҵ_ij_ijij__ij_ijڿڴ__ڿڿų_ڿڿ
> ____д_ͳ_ͳͳ__ͳ_ͳô_____ij___ٳ __
> __ _ _ _ _ _
> _ _ _____ _


>
>
> Is that what it's supposed to look like?

You should see what that looks like on a system set for UTF8 :)

--
C:>WIN | Directable Mirror Arrays
The computer obeys and wins. | A better way to focus the sun
You lose and Bill collects. | licences available see
| http://www.sohara.org/

Randy Howard

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Jun 16, 2005, 4:42:16 AM6/16/05
to
In article <1118804179.4...@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
Johnny...@gmail.com says...

> I highly reccomend you check out TheDraw, a text-mode drawing program -
> http://www.syaross.org/thedraw/
> It can also save to ANSI, or even Pascal.

Wow... major flashback. Last time I used that program was probably
sometime around 1988. Back in the Fido/Opus/RBBS days. :-)

--
Randy Howard (2reply remove FOOBAR)
"I don't really care about being right you know,
I just care about success." --Steve Jobs

JohnnyMrNinja

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Jun 16, 2005, 6:13:04 AM6/16/05
to

Evenbit wrote:


> JohnnyMrNinja wrote:
> > Â Â Â ÚÄÄ¿
> > Ú¿ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³
> > ÖÒÒÒÒ´ÃijÄijijÄÄijÄijڿڴ³³Ú¿Ú¿Å³³Ú¿Ú¿
> > ÓÐÐÐдÃͳÍͳͳÍÍͳÍͳôÀÙÀÙÀij³³ÀÙ³
> > ÀÄ
> > ÀÙ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³

> > Á Á ÁÄÄÙÁ Á


> >
>
> Doesn't look very 'artful' in ASCII, but you are probably trying to
> post ANSI and I don't think USENET has been upgraded to that yet.
>
> > I know that when a lot of people say ASCII they mean plain-text, but
> > this is an actual ASCII thing I just did in TheDraw. If you save it to
> > HLA.txt and "TYPE HLA.TXT" in DOS or full-screen DOS window it should
> > work, I think. No dragons or anything, just an example of what can be
> > done in TheDraw. Except, you can also save in color and what-not.
>
> On most PCs, this requires a "DEVICE=ANSI.SYS" line in "CONFIG.SYS" to
> display ANSI graphics on DOS or in a DOS box. Windows console mode may
> have ANSI support built-in, maybe not (perhaps why Paul was asking for
> plain ASCII?).

Sorry to drag this thread into an ANSI discussion, but I'm still trying
to understand this. I learned computers as a kid by studying .bat files
and using programs like TheDraw and Turbo Pascal (my old computer
belonged to a father of a friend who worked at some big software
company, before his wife kicked him out; in one box the disks where all
bright-orange and labeled 'Warning: Virus!').

I always assumed that these characters where the extended ASCII set,
that was thrown out when Bill Gates decided we should start caring
about foriegn languages. So on a Unicode computer, a "happy face" would
be Ò or something. But you are saying that these are ANSI
characters... which is a bit confusing.

Do these two formats overlap? Or does one pick up where the other left
off? If you TYPE FILE.TXT in a non-ANSI DOS system, does it show
anything? Or does loading ANSI.SYS over-ride pre-existing ASCII
characters?

For example, if you use TheDraw and save a file, two options you have
for formats are ANSI and ASCII. The image above was saved in ASCII. Are
they lying to me (if they are I will *HUNT THEM DOWN*!!!!)(or not).

Jukka Aho

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Jun 16, 2005, 8:21:40 AM6/16/05
to
JohnnyMrNinja wrote:

> Sorry to drag this thread into an ANSI discussion, but I'm still
> trying to understand this. I learned computers as a kid by studying
> .bat files and using programs like TheDraw and Turbo Pascal (my old
> computer belonged to a father of a friend who worked at some big
> software company, before his wife kicked him out; in one box the
> disks where all bright-orange and labeled 'Warning: Virus!').
>
> I always assumed that these characters where the extended ASCII set,
> that was thrown out when Bill Gates decided we should start caring
> about foriegn languages.

The MS-DOS era block-drawing characters, happy faces & such belong to
IBM Codepage 437, also sometimes referenced to as "IBM Extended ASCII".
Codepage 437 already contains many accented characters as well.

The support for international characters was further extended with the
introduction of Codepage 850, which I believe contains all the same
characters as ISO 8859-1 (Latin 1), though in different code positions,
plus most of the old block drawing characters (even though some of the
ones that existed in 437 had to be sacrificed.)

Windows, to my knowledge, has always used a derivation of ISO 8859-1
(Latin 1), though Microsoft has added in new characters in unused code
positions and calls this superset "Windows codepage 1252"

Then where did ISO 8859-1 (Latin 1) come from? It is itself a derivation
(and a slightly modified superset) of the "DEC Multinational" character
set, which is (or was) used in dumb character-cell based VT-xxx video
terminals.

> So on a Unicode computer, a "happy face" would be Ò or something.

The "happy face" character in IBM Codepage 437 occupies the character
code position 0x01 (or 0x02, if you want the filled happy face instead
of just an outline.) This is somewhat problematic, since normal terminal
emulations should consider this an unprintable control code. I'm pretty
sure Unicode considers the character code 0x01 "undefined" or a legacy
control code as well, without assigning any symbol to it.

> But you are saying that these are ANSI characters... which is
> a bit confusing.

The IBM PC + clones + MS-DOS world was filled with this kind of sloppy
language. There are no "ANSI characters". If someone from PC / MS-DOS
background is talking about "ANSI characters" they are referring to the
"IBM Extended ASCII" character set (in other words, "IBM Codepage 437",
which is usable in its entirety even without loading the "ANSI.SYS"
driver.)

> Do these two formats overlap? Or does one pick up where the other
> left off? If you TYPE FILE.TXT in a non-ANSI DOS system, does it
> show anything? Or does loading ANSI.SYS over-ride pre-existing
> ASCII characters?

ANSI.SYS simply adds VT-xxx style terminal emulation capabilities on top
of COMMAND.COM, allowing you to position the cursor, change the colors
etc. using ANSI X.34 (or ECMA-94) escape codes.

(IIRC ANSI.SYS was quite slow and there were better 3rd party
alternatives for it.)

> For example, if you use TheDraw and save a file, two options you have
> for formats are ANSI and ASCII. The image above was saved in ASCII.
> Are they lying to me (if they are I will *HUNT THEM DOWN*!!!!)(or
> not).

It's just another example of the kind of sloppy terminology that was
prevalent in those days. With "ANSI", they're referring to the ANSI X.34
color codes the "ANSI.SYS" driver provides. With "ASCII", they're
referring to not using those color codes, but contrary to what the label
says, TheDraw does not in any way ensure that the end result would be
pure ASCII (it does not filter the character codes 128...255 away), so
the resulting file will contain all Codepage 437 (or 850, or whatever
codepage you were using) "Extended ASCII" characters if you have used
them. (That's not a problem in MS-DOS environment, though, since - as
noted above - even if you don't load ANSI.SYS, you can still use all
characters.)

--
znark

jmfb...@aol.com

unread,
Jun 16, 2005, 6:54:01 AM6/16/05
to
In article <20050616081620....@eircom.net>,

Steve O'Hara-Smith <ste...@eircom.net> wrote:
>On Thu, 16 Jun 2005 01:44:38 GMT
>"Jim Carlock" <anon...@localhost.com> wrote:
>
>> _ _ _ __Ŀ
>> ڿ _ _ _ _ _
>> ____Ҵ_ij_ijij__ij_ijڿڴ__ڿڿų_ڿڿ
>> ____д_ͳ_ͳͳ__ͳ_ͳô_____ij___ٳ __
>> __ _ _ _ _ _
>> _ _ _____ _
>>
>>
>> Is that what it's supposed to look like?
>
> You should see what that looks like on a system set for UTF8 :)

It looks like upsidedown Polish playing horseshoes to my TTY.

/BAH

Subtract a hundred and four for e-mail.

JohnnyMrNinja

unread,
Jun 16, 2005, 9:16:42 AM6/16/05
to

Jukka Aho wrote:
(a lot of big words)

Thank you for the incredibly articulate reply. It took me a couple
turns, but it finally sunk in.

Just to be sure, I looked up some of your other Usenet posts, at
http://groups-beta.google.com/groups?q=&start=0&enc_author=D3PrTBAAAACQBxjOrkrNYwvJW2bfk89k&

Those that weren't in "Secret Code", I still couldn't understand, as
you know far too many words. This confirms my suspicions that you are
an encyclopedia with internet access. Or maybe a very smart person. But
probably the first one.

And again, thanks.

Jukka Aho

unread,
Jun 16, 2005, 10:33:44 AM6/16/05
to
JohnnyMrNinja wrote:

> Those that weren't in "Secret Code", I still couldn't understand,
> as you know far too many words.

That's because I invent them as I go.

--
znark

Annie

unread,
Jun 16, 2005, 11:14:57 AM6/16/05
to

On 2005-06-16 JohnnyMrNinja said:

> Those that weren't in "Secret Code", I still couldn't

> understand, as you know far too many words...
_____
Look, Johnny, this is all ((( `\
very simple. _ _`\ )
(^ ) )
'ANSI' has nothing...NOTHING ~-( )
to do with what 'characters' _'((,,,)))
are displayed on the screen. ,-' \_/ `\
( , |
ANSI is just a way to control `-.-'`-.-'/|_|
different things that HAPPEN \ / | |
on the screen...such as where =()=: / ,' aa
to put the cursor, what colors
to display...things like that.

ANSI is a sequence of characters that have a special
meaning to the screen.

An ANSI sequence always starts with the ESCAPE character
(ASCII 27, a left-arrow character).

That's an 'attention-getter;' it tells the screen that
some instructions are about to arrive.

The ESCAPE character is then followed by a string of
other characters that have a particular meaning to the
screen.

For instance, ESC followed by '[2J' is the ANSI code that
means 'clear the screen.'

So...ANSI is a string of characters that control different
things that HAPPEN on the screen.

ANSI has nothing to do with what characters APPEAR on the
screen. There's no such thing as an 'ANSI character.'

Have you got this so far? Good. It's pretty simple.

Okay. Now...here's what ASCII is:

ASCII is the actual CHARACTERS -- the letters, the numbers,
and the punctuation marks -- that can be displayed on the
screen to form words and sentences.

Standard ASCII starts with the 'space' character (decimal 32),
and goes up through the '~' character (decimal 126).

But there are some other characters, too...such as the 'smiley
face,' and the 'musical note.' These are located below the
standard ASCII characters. They're called LOW ASCII charac-
ters. They're the ones from decimal 0 through decimal 31.

And there's even more! There are a whole bunch of 'box
drawing' characters, and funny Greek letters, and various
letters with accents (like the French 'e'), and stuff like
that.

These are located above the standard ASCII alphabetical
characters, and they're called HIGH ASCII characters.
They go from decimal 127 through decimal 255.

So ASCII simply refers to the actual, individual characters
that can be displayed on the screen.

And remember, there are 3 different groups of ASCII characters:

LOW ASCII........0 through 31

STANDARD ASCII...32 through 126

HIGH ASCII.......127 through 255

What you need is an 'ASCII Table.' It's a little chart that
shows all of the ASCII characters, and also shows the number
that corresponds to each of those ASCII characters.

Once you have an ASCII Table, all of this will make sense
to you.

If you have any computer books, look in the back of them.
Almost every computer book has an ASCII table in it, some-
where.

If you don't have any computer books, go to the Google
search engine (http://www.google.com), and search for the
term 'ASCII Table.' ASCII Tables are available on thousands
of different web sites.

Well, that's about it. It's really easy. Find an ASCII Table,
then have fun with all those funky characters!

rand...@earthlink.net

unread,
Jun 16, 2005, 12:11:53 PM6/16/05
to

Annie wrote:
> On 2005-06-16 JohnnyMrNinja said:
>
> > Those that weren't in "Secret Code", I still couldn't
> > understand, as you know far too many words...
> _____
> Look, Johnny, this is all ((( `\
> very simple. _ _`\ )
> (^ ) )
> 'ANSI' has nothing...NOTHING ~-( )
> to do with what 'characters' _'((,,,)))
> are displayed on the screen. ,-' \_/ `\
> ( , |
> ANSI is just a way to control `-.-'`-.-'/|_|
> different things that HAPPEN \ / | |
> on the screen...such as where =()=: / ,' aa
> to put the cursor, what colors
> to display...things like that.

Ah, yes. The world view according to someone who has grown up on DOS
and never learned anything else since then :-)

Sorry, Annie, but the term ANSI actually means something besides
ANSI.SYS (an old DOS terminal screen device driver).
Cheers,
Randy Hyde

Mike Snyder

unread,
Jun 16, 2005, 12:15:57 PM6/16/05
to
<rand...@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:1118938313.0...@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...

> Ah, yes. The world view according to someone who has grown up on DOS
> and never learned anything else since then :-)
>
> Sorry, Annie, but the term ANSI actually means something besides
> ANSI.SYS (an old DOS terminal screen device driver).

Yeah. It means American National Standards Institute, and if I'm not
mistaken, there are ANSI standards for a number of things. If you put it in
the context of the current discussion, then she's right. Although back in
the DOS and BBS days, it was more accurate to say "ANSI graphics" -- but
there was no confusion either way.

--- Mike.


grey...@gmaildo.ttocom

unread,
Jun 16, 2005, 1:03:07 PM6/16/05
to

And you have revealed the secret US plan to integrate Iraq, and 11
more states, into the Union :)))

Beth

unread,
Jun 16, 2005, 1:48:10 PM6/16/05
to
Jukka Aho wrote:

> Beth wrote:
> > Is there some kind of "standard" for sending colour information in
> > ASCII art?
>
> There is a real standard without any quotation marks. Try ECMA-48 [1]
> ("Control Functions for Coded Character Sets"), section 8.3.117 ("SGR -
> Select Graphic Rendition"). That's what traditional VTxxx-derived color
> terminals, modern color-enabled terminal emulators and - God forbid -
> ANSI.SYS in MS-DOS use.
[ snip other useful information ]

Okay, cool...thanks...

Will that actually show up on the newsgroup? Or will it just look like crap
until fed to an actual "terminal" that understands it?

No, wait...consider that question "rhetorical"...I'll stop pestering you...the
simple way to find out, of course, is for me to actually read those references
(RTFM)...and then just "give it a go"...

Beth :)

P.S. Sorry about the "quotation marks", as I am an "obsessive" with their
use...just think of it as a kind of "facial tick" that you just look the other
way and pretend you don't see, so as not to cause any embarassment by drawing
attention to it ;)


Beth

unread,
Jun 16, 2005, 1:48:12 PM6/16/05
to
Jukka Aho wrote:
> The "happy face" character in IBM Codepage 437 occupies the character
> code position 0x01 (or 0x02, if you want the filled happy face instead
> of just an outline.) This is somewhat problematic, since normal terminal
> emulations should consider this an unprintable control code. I'm pretty
> sure Unicode considers the character code 0x01 "undefined" or a legacy
> control code as well, without assigning any symbol to it.

UNICODE is completely identical to ASCII for the first 127 character
positions...which, yes, means that it's all "control codes" up to 20h (space)...

But, one of the intentions with UNICODE was to provide "round-trip
compatibility" with all major standards currently in use (which simply means
that if you convert from some standard to UNICODE then convert back to the
original standard, you should suffer no "information loss"...another way to put
it: Though they may be in different positions, UNICODE tries to include all the
characters found in all the other major standards)...

Hence, the "happy face" is to be found in UNICODE at U+263A and U+263B (the
first is the "white happy face" (outline) and the second is "black happy face"
(filled)...apparently, the two happy faces is meant to be "racial equality",
judging by these "official names"...though, wouldn't the colours selected
actually determine if the faces are "black" or "white"? Indeed, I think
"outline" and "filled" might actually be more appropriate names...but, there you
are, I don't work for UNICODE, so my opinion is irrelevent and the names are
"WHITE SMILING FACE" and "BLACK SMILING FACE" - pardon the SHOUTING but UNICODE
names officially are always in ALL CAPS to avoid "case" issues - like it or
not)...

Also, the range U+2500 to U+257F supplies the familiar "box drawing characters"
from IBM's "extended ASCII"...plus, "extends" it a little with rounded corners,
diagonal lines as well as "bold line" box characters, as well as the usual
"single" and "double" line stuff that was in the IBM character set...

Because of the "round-trip compatibility", then all the characters in that "IBM
extended ASCII" set can be found in UNICODE...somewhere...you just have to "hunt
them down" amongst the thousands of characters, as, though they are there,
they've "moved positions"...

By the same token, all the Postscript "dingbats" are included too...a whole
range of "mathematical operators"...geometric shapes...and so forth...that, in
fact, UNICODE is a very good character set just to get all these "funny
characters" and "dingbats" by itself (it must have more of them than any other
character set), even if you don't really care for the more famous "international
languages" part of UNICODE...

Of course, the real problem with UNICODE is that it might "define" all these
characters...but if you haven't "got the right fonts installed" for the
characters to actually show up on the screen, then having the characters
"defined" is not greatly useful when you can't actually see them on the screen!
;)

Beth :)


"@comcast >

unread,
Jun 16, 2005, 3:41:05 PM6/16/05
to
rand...@earthlink.net wrote:

>> Look, Johnny, this is all ((( `\
>> very simple. _ _`\ )
>> (^ ) )
>> 'ANSI' has nothing...NOTHING ~-( )
>> to do with what 'characters' _'((,,,)))
>> are displayed on the screen. ,-' \_/ `\
>> ( , |
>> ANSI is just a way to control `-.-'`-.-'/|_|
>> different things that HAPPEN \ / | |
>> on the screen...such as where =()=: / ,' aa
>> to put the cursor, what colors
>> to display...things like that.
>
>
> Ah, yes. The world view according to someone who has grown up on DOS
> and never learned anything else since then :-)
>
> Sorry, Annie, but the term ANSI actually means something besides
> ANSI.SYS (an old DOS terminal screen device driver).

American National Standards Institute, is it not? (I'm a dos-head, too,
and too lazy to look it up, but that's my recollection) They set
standards for many things besides screen control - but that's what we're
talking about hete.

I don't know about ANSI (as in "ansi.sys"), but there seem to be VT-100
(? or *something*) sequences in Linux that *do* load another character
set. At least, printing a torrent of "garbage" to the screen (as
sometimes happens...) sometimes leaves the terminal printing "garbage"
forever after. (well, I'm sure there's a way to fix it - I just switch
to another terminal when it happens) So, if "ansi escape sequences" can
do that too, there *might* be some meaning to "ansi characters"...

Best,
Frank


Mike Snyder

unread,
Jun 16, 2005, 3:56:20 PM6/16/05
to
"@comcast,net" <""fbkotler\"@comcast,net"> wrote in message
news:pPqdnfexpuE...@comcast.com...
> rand...@earthlink.net wrote:

> American National Standards Institute, is it not? (I'm a dos-head, too,
> and too lazy to look it up, but that's my recollection) They set standards
> for many things besides screen control - but that's what we're talking
> about hete.

Er... yeah, I said that too.

I'm starting to think I'm in everybody's block lists.

--- Mike.


Adam Thornton

unread,
Jun 16, 2005, 4:08:37 PM6/16/05
to
In article <1118807764.7...@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,

JohnnyMrNinja <Johnny...@gmail.com> wrote:
>I know that when a lot of people say ASCII they mean plain-text, but
>this is an actual ASCII thing I just did in TheDraw.

That's not an ASCII thing.

Many, if not all, of those characters have the high bit set. ASCII is
7-bit. That might be an ANSI thing, but it's certainly not an ASCII
thing.

Adam

Adam Thornton

unread,
Jun 16, 2005, 4:09:37 PM6/16/05
to
In article <1a1qvggef9zuz$.aj8szi4u...@40tude.net>,

Ross Presser <rpre...@gmail.com> wrote:
>It's not exactly ANSI - it's 8-bit ASCII

No such thing.

Adam

mensa...@aol.com

unread,
Jun 16, 2005, 4:14:23 PM6/16/05
to

Well, that was my first c program after hello.c, so it may be a
bit sloppy. Now, 16 years later, I'm currently working on my
third c program. This one should be a bit tighter.

"@comcast >

unread,
Jun 16, 2005, 4:32:36 PM6/16/05
to
Mike Snyder wrote:

Sorry, Mike. I replied to Randy's message before I'd read yours. I
should learn to read to the end of the thread before responding, to
avoid repeating what someone else already said. Hey, at least I was
agreein' with ya! :)

Best,
Frank


Mike Snyder

unread,
Jun 16, 2005, 4:47:02 PM6/16/05
to
"@comcast,net" <""fbkotler\"@comcast,net"> wrote in message
news:z5WdnfzzHI4...@comcast.com...
> Mike Snyder wrote:

> Sorry, Mike. I replied to Randy's message before I'd read yours. I should
> learn to read to the end of the thread before responding, to avoid
> repeating what someone else already said. Hey, at least I was agreein'
> with ya! :)

I'm used to it. :) And I do the same thing, especially when I'm catching up
in a long thread. LOL.

--- Mike.


Jukka Aho

unread,
Jun 16, 2005, 5:37:03 PM6/16/05
to
Beth wrote:

>> There is a real standard without any quotation marks. Try ECMA-48
>> [1] ("Control Functions for Coded Character Sets"), section 8.3.117
>> ("SGR - Select Graphic Rendition"). That's what traditional
>> VTxxx-derived color terminals, modern color-enabled terminal
>> emulators and - God forbid - ANSI.SYS in MS-DOS use.

> Will that actually show up on the newsgroup?

Nope. If they work at all, that's only incidental and will depend highly
on your newsreader software (and the environment in which you're running
it.) A text-based newsreader running in a terminal emulator window (or
on a real video terminal) could perhaps technically allow them to be
used, but not any other environment.

Any decent text-based newsreader should filter out the CSI [1] codes,
anyway, since you could (potentially) cause all kinds of mayhem and
mischief by embedding, say, cursor positioning codes in your messages.

I recall seeing some netiquette guidelines from the early days where
this was actually mentioned - and, subsequently, strongly discouraged.
(Apparently there was some software that passed control codes through.)

There's another fairly good reason for avoiding them as well: not
everyone is using a terminal with the same capabilities. And, of course,
in modern GUI environments, not many are even _using_ terminals any
longer, emulated or not.

> Or will it just look like crap until fed to an actual "terminal"
> that understands it?

You have nailed it right on the head there.

> No, wait...consider that question "rhetorical"...

Did I just read far too much into those quotation marks?

> I'll stop pestering you...the simple way to find out, of
> course, is for me to actually read those references
> (RTFM)...and then just "give it a go"...

I wouldn't recommend that for Usenet articles, but you might want to
give it a try on a color-enabled video terminal (or in a color-enabled
terminal emulator window.)

It's quite simple really... you just output sequences like

<ESC>[33;44mHELLO WORLD<ESC>[0m

to the terminal. <ESC> in the above stands for code 0x1B, or 27 in
decimal.

The first control sequence should enable yellow text (33) on a blue
background (44) and the second one will revert everything back to the
normal.

_____

[1] "Control Sequence Introducer", not "Crime Scene Investigation"!

--
znark

Ross Presser

unread,
Jun 16, 2005, 5:36:41 PM6/16/05
to

Correct as usual, King Frida^w^w Mr. Thornton. I should have typed "the
extended ASCII character set, introduced with the IBM PC in 1981."

Beth

unread,
Jun 16, 2005, 6:24:44 PM6/16/05
to
Okay, Paul, I've tried to colour in the picture using "TheDraw"...but, to be honest, I think it looks _worse_ coloured in than it did monochrome...as you can only colour in entire blocks with colour and the choice of background colours is more limited than foreground colours (who's stupid idea was the "blink text" effect anyway? That's not a "colour", that's an animation effect! And throwing away all those perfectly good background colours to support a nonsense no-one ever wants or use is just a "crime"...now, if you had the full 16 colours for both background and foreground, coupled with those "25% fill", "50% fill", "75% fill" characters in the "IBM extended ASCII", you could nicely mix them together to have hundreds of "pseudo-colours" and shading and everything...but, no, they decide to use "blink text" instead...bloody pointless "blink text", which is an effect that could be (and should be) really done by actual animation techniques of changing the colours dynamically...it's such a total waste!)... And, well, this is the first time I've used this "TheDraw" program, so I'm not exactly "skilled" at colouring these pictures in, anyway... Nevertheless, I at least tried colouring it in...also, don't ask me how you "feed" this ANSI stuff into a terminal to actually see the picture...I presume someone else here will know how that works...this is just the "ANSI" file that "TheDraw" gave me when I hit "save": --------------- 8< ----------------- [?7h [40m [0;44m [1;35m_ [0;44m _ [1;35m_ [0;44m [40m [44m [1;35m_____ [0;44m [40m [44m [1;33m, [43m' [2;1H [0;44m [1;35;45m/ \ [0;44m [40m [1;35;45m/ \ [0;44m [1;35;45m/ \ [0;44m [1;35;45m/ _ \ [40m [0;44m [1m__ [0;44m ___ [1m __ [0;44m [40m [44m [1;33m, [43m' [3;1H [0;44m [1;35;45m| | [44m_ [45m| [40m [45m| [0;44m [1;35;45m| | [0;44m [1;35;45m| | [44m_ [45m| [40m [45m| [0;44m [1;47m| | [44m___ [47m| | [44m___ [47m| | [40m [0;44m [1m_ [0;44m [1;33m, [43m' [4;1H [0;44m [40m [1;35;45m| _ | [0;44m [1;35;45m| | [0;44m [1;35;45m| _ [40m [45m | [0;44m [1;47m| |' | [0;44m [40m [44m [1;33m, [43m'_______________ [5;1H [0;44m [1;35;45m| | [40m [0;44m [1;35;45m| | [0;44m [1;35;45m| | [44m____ [0;44m [40m [1;35;45m| | [0;44m [1;35;45m| | [0;44m [1;47m|______________ [40m [47m___|-/ [44m__ _ _ _ [47m| _ [6;1H [0;44m [40m [1;35;45m\_/ [0;44m [1;35;45m\_/ [0;44m [1;35;45m\_____/ [40m [0;44m [1;35;45m\_/ [0;44m [1;35;45m\_/ [0;44m [1;47m\_____ [40m [47m__________/ | | [44m_ [47m| | [44m_ [47m| | [44m_ [47m| | [40m [44m_ [47m| [40m/ \ [47m [40m/ [7;1H [0;44m [40m [1;35;45m===================== [0;44m [1;47m| | [40m [47m__ | ___ ___ | ___ [40m| | [47m ___ [40m| [8;1H [0;44m [1;35;45m A D V E N T U R E [0;44m [1;32m__ [0;44m [40m [44m [1;47m| | ||__| |___| |_|_| | [40m___ [47m| | [40m_ [9;1H [32;42m`' [35;45m===================== [40m [32;42m` `' [37;47m| _ |_____________________________ [40m [47m_______ [10;1H [42m [32m`' [44m,_ [0;44m [1;32m_ [40m [44m, [42m'` [37m [47m| [0m/ \ [1;47m | [40m [47m __________ [11;1H [42m [32m' [40m [44m,_, [42m' [37m [47m| [0m| | [1;47m | [40m [47m [0m/\ [1;47m [0m/\ [1;47m / [40m| | | [12;1H [32;42m ', [37;47m| [0m| | [1;47m | [0m|| [1;47m [0m|| [1;47m / [40m-+--- [u+---+- [13;1H [32;42m________________\___________ [37;47m| [40m [0;30;47m=== [1;37m | [0;30;47m-- [1;37m [40m [0;30;47m-- [1;37m | [0;30;47m| [1;37;40m | | | [14;1H [42m [47m| | [40m [47m | [0;30;47m- [1;37;40m-+---+---+- [15;1H [42m [40m [42m _ [47m| | [40m [47m | [0;30;47m| [1;37;40m | | | [16;1H [42m [40m [42m _, [34;44m' [37;47m| | [40m [47m | [0;30;47m- [1;37;40m-+---+---+- [17;1H [42m [40m [42m _, [34;44m' [37;47m| | [40m [47m | [0;30;47m| [1;37;40m | | | [18;1H [42m , [34;44m' [37;42m, [47m| [40m [47m | | [0;30;47m- [1;37;40m-+---+---+- [19;1H [42m , [34;44m' [37;42m,' [47m| [40m [47m |_____________ [C_________| [0;30;47m/ [1;37;43m\|/ \ [40m [43m|/ \|/ [20;1H [42m [34m| [44m [37;42m [40m [42m| [47m\_____________/ [42m [33;43m [40m [43m/ [21;1H [37;42m [34m| [44m [37;42m\_ [40m [42m __________ [33;43m/ [22;1H [40m [37;42m \ [34;44m [37;42m\______________ [40m [42m_____ [34;44m/ \ [37;42m______ [33;43m/ [23;1H [40m [37;42m [34;44m', [40m [44m [37;42m/ [24;1H ' [34;44m,_ [40m [44m________________________________________ [37;42m/ [25;1H [40m [42m [40m [61C [33;43m/_________________ [3;67H [37;42m [33;43m [40m [43m [37;42m [3;80H [33;43m [2;69H [37;42m [40m [2;80H [42m [2;80H [2;80H [33;43m [1;71H [37;42m [40m [1;80H [42m [1;80H [1;80H [1;80H [33;43m [4;80H_ [72C [37;47m [40m [47m [42m [5;80H [5;80H [5;80H [5;80H [47m_ [79C [40m [79C [79C_ [79C [42m [79C [78C [40m [10;80H [47m_ [9;80H_ [12;80H [40m [40m- [78C [79C- [78C [79C- [78C [79C- [79C [43m [67C [40m [43m [33m [37;42m [20;80H [20;80H [20;80H [40m [20;80H [42m [20;80H [33;43m [66C [37;42m [21;80H [40m [21;80H [42m [21;80H [21;80H [21;80H [33;43m [24;64H [40m [43m [37;42m [24;80H [24;80H [33;43m [79C [23;65H [40m [43m [37;42m [23;80H [23;80H [23;80H [33;43m [40m [22;66H [43m [37;42m [22;80H [22;80H [22;80H [40m [33;43m [17C [34;42m' [24;20H' [22;17H\ [3A, [18;20H, [17;22H_. [40m [16;25H [42m_. [15;28H_ [18;28H, [19;27H' [2D, [21;25H\_ [B\_______ [40m [42m____________ [21;48H__________ [22;59H______ [23;64H [33;43m [40m [43m/ [24;63H/ [20;25H [34;42m| [1D| [1;7H [35;44m_ [2;34H [37mf [40m [44ma [2D ___ [19;55H [32;47m\/ [37m___ --------------- >8 ----------------- There's a "clear the screen" sequence in there somewhere at the beginning...though, the picture basically covers the entire screen (implicitly, therefore, overwriting everything), anyway, so that's probably redundent... I had wanted to colour the "back walls" of the castle in a dark grey...a kind of "depth cueing" effect, so it looks further back...but, apparently, you can't choose the "dark grey" as a background colour, only a foreground colour...also, some "dark grey" along the edge of the tower and "casting a shadow" onto the other wall would have looked great, so it looked less "flat" than it does now...but I apparently can't do that either...can't make the sky "sky blue" too, so it's dark blue, just like the water...it'll just have to do...but I'm not particularly pleased at the result, really...there's too many "limitations" here to make much of a decent picture... And the "strict ASCII" limitation was a real pain because all the best and most interesting characters ("block drawing", "25% fill", "50% fill", "75% fill", etc.) are in the "IBM extended ASCII" region and not proper 7-bit ASCII... The purple logo, though, kind of looks cool...sort of... I don't know...I personally infinitely preferred it without the colouring, to be honest...as it was really a "line drawing", anyway... Paul, if you do use this colour picture, then don't bother crediting me for it...as I'd rather NOT be associated with it in the colour version...it just looks too much to me like some kind of "kid's crayon drawing" or something ;) But, well, you did say you'd like a colour picture, so I've at least tried to colour it in...don't ask me how you "decode" that strange "ANSI sequence" stuff above, Paul, as it's all a total mystery to me as well... Oh, still no "dragon" either...but, as I say, if you can get someone else to do a good "dragon" picture then just "paste" it on top of the "mostly blank" area on the left...that should work... Beth :)

Jukka Aho

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Jun 16, 2005, 7:15:49 PM6/16/05
to
@comcast,net" <""fbkotler\"@comcast,net wrote:

> I don't know about ANSI (as in "ansi.sys"), but there seem to be
> VT-100 (? or *something*) sequences in Linux that *do* load another
> character set. At least, printing a torrent of "garbage" to the
> screen (as sometimes happens...) sometimes leaves the terminal
> printing "garbage" forever after.

Those would usually be the "Shift Out" [1] and "Shift In" [2] codes. If
implemented on a terminal, they will exchange the glyphs in code
positions 33...126 for another set of glyphs.

As it so happens, the code positions 33...126 usually hold the printable
ASCII characters. (See where this is leading us?) If you send SO
(Ctrl-N) to the terminal, the ASCII characters will be "shifted out"
(exchanged for another set of glyphs). After having done that, you will
get "garbage" from keys where you would usually expect to get letters.
(Not garbage actually, but useful line drawing graphics characters. Then
again, if you didn't voluntarily end up in this mode, it's all the
same.)

> (well, I'm sure there's a way to fix it - I just switch to another
> terminal when it happens)

You can escape this mode by sending the code 15 (SI) to the terminal, or
by pressing Ctrl-O, if you're running something that echoes everything
you type - even the control characters - verbatim right back to the
terminal.

Some environments have command-line commands (such as "reset" or "cls"
or "clear") which will fix it, too, if you only manage to blindly type
in the command.

You could also print out the sequence <ESC>c to reset the terminal
yourself. Like this, for instance:

echo -e "\033c"

Yet another way of escaping from this mode is resetting the terminal
manually, if it has some built-in reset method. ("Real" hardware-based
terminals usually have a reset option in their setup menu. Terminal
emulators often have a similar menu option.)

> So, if "ansi escape sequences" can do that too, there *might* be some
> meaning to "ansi characters"...

The set of glyphs you will usually see in this mode is officially called
"DEC Special Graphics Character Set". It is also known as the "VT100
line drawing character set". (See
<http://vt100.net/docs/vt220-rm/table2-4.html> and the code positions
96...126.) Not too surprisingly, it was first introduced with DEC's
VT1xx range of video terminals.

_____

[1] "SO": Ctrl-N, ASCII code position 14
[2] "SI": Ctrl-O, ASCII code position 15

--
znark

Jukka Aho

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Jun 16, 2005, 7:17:34 PM6/16/05