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jargon words

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Walter Howard

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Feb 10, 1994, 5:17:57 AM2/10/94
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Has anyone else been in an environment where the following words were
used?

shoehorn - to force a fit, especially of code into memory, "We thought
we'd have to hold up shipment but Ed was able to shoehorn the driver
into 32K"

SHIP IT! - The canonical marketdroid response when asked the
disposition of a software product.

geekmeter - a mythical device that measures the geekiness of a person.
"Woah! that guy really pegged my geekmeter!"

<name> code - programming code that has distinct characteristics
traceable to its author. "This section doesn't check for a NULL return from
malloc! Oh! no wonder! It's Ed Code!". Used most often with a programmer
who has left the company and thus is a convenient scape goat for
anything that is wrong with the project.

wack - to delete. connotes deletion because the item is in the way.
From mob term to assassinate.

<x> monster - Any well known bug that remains in heavily used code,
that appears randomly, wreaking havoc with the user's session.. "I had
a great hot chat going and then the scroll monster got me and
I got logged off!"

hot chat - sexually explicit, one-on-one chat mode.

captive - real employee, vs. contractor. "I got canned when I refused
to go captive"

mangler - the canonical perversion of the work manager. Microsoft's
elephantine network Lan Manager is often called Lan Mangler.

dBASED - pejorative name of the popular pc data-base program.

chat whore - a person who readily engages in hot chat.

bit head - assembly language programmer.

solder head - hardware engineer.

hork - 1. transitive, destroy. "When he booted the new version
it horked the entire database". 2. intransitive, die, crash. "OS/2
went to access the partition table and then it just horked".

It's a good think you made a backup! - the only graceful way to shift
blame after you clobber someone's data or system. Used sarcastically
because in most cases, he doesnt.

honked - same as horked.


--

+============================================================+

Yes, I may be crazy, but remember, you heard it here first!

+============================================================+

wa...@netcom.com

Scott Statton

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Feb 10, 1994, 1:29:27 PM2/10/94
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In article <walthCL...@netcom.com> wa...@netcom.com (Walter Howard) writes:
>Has anyone else been in an environment where the following words were
>used?

><name> code - programming code that has distinct characteristics
>traceable to its author. "This section doesn't check for a NULL return from
>malloc! Oh! no wonder! It's Ed Code!". Used most often with a programmer
>who has left the company and thus is a convenient scape goat for
>anything that is wrong with the project.

Use this one all the time. Example:

Programmer J had a masters in computer science, and was working on a
team that I was hired into to do a video game for the Sega
MasterSystem. Because he was there first, he got to define the
interfaces between the core of the game, and the user-interface. So,
he wanted a menu-handler. Each menu could have up to eight choices,
all mutually exclusive. So, when he asked for a menu choice, he
wanted precisely one bit in a byte set, to indicate which choice was
active.

example 2:
When hacking assembly, I will always optimize call/return at the end
of a subroutine. For example (in Z80)

BEEP: LD A,7 ; control-G
JP COUT ; character out (it will return)
saves about 20 cycles. over doing
CALL COUT
RET

That's archtypical Scott code.

>mangler - the canonical perversion of the work manager. Microsoft's
>elephantine network Lan Manager is often called Lan Mangler.

And a popular spelling of the VMS "SYSTEM" password. Most friends
I know who RUN VMS have MANGLER as the system password.


>hork - 1. transitive, destroy. "When he booted the new version
>it horked the entire database". 2. intransitive, die, crash. "OS/2
>went to access the partition table and then it just horked".

Now with this word, I have a totally DIFFERENT usage. I picked it up
back in '84 or so, and it means "to steal in a friendly way". "Hmmm
... Bryce isn't at his desk, he won't mind if I hork his EPROM
programmer for a while." Sortof to borrow without permission. The
implication is that when the horkee notices, the horkor is required to
retrohork without delay.

Scott

Joel Ray Holveck

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Feb 11, 1994, 10:02:29 AM2/11/94
to
In article <walthCL...@netcom.com>,

Walter Howard <wa...@netcom.com> wrote:
>Has anyone else been in an environment where the following words were
>used?
><name> code - programming code that has distinct characteristics
>traceable to its author. "This section doesn't check for a NULL return from
>malloc! Oh! no wonder! It's Ed Code!". Used most often with a programmer
>who has left the company and thus is a convenient scape goat for
>anything that is wrong with the project.

Well, this one also, of course, derives from the fact that no two programmers
have the same coding style. In my Computer Math II course in HS, nobody
put their names on their programs; it wasn't necessary.

Then, there's the Jargon File entry (Jargon File v3.0.0, 27Jul1993, thanks to
lin...@netcom.com for his lookup):

:joe code: /joh' kohd`/ n. 1. Code that is overly {tense} and
unmaintainable. "{Perl} may be a handy program, but if you look
at the source, it's complete joe code." 2. Badly written,
possibly buggy code.
Correspondents wishing to remain anonymous have fingered a
particular Joe at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and observed
that usage has drifted slightly; the original sobriquet `Joe code'
was intended in sense 1.

--
+--Joel Ray Holveck-----...@tamu.edu--------+------KC5ACN(G)--------+
| 43rd Law of Computing: Anything that can go wr | This space reserved |
.signature: Segmentation violation -- Core dumped

DoN. Nichols

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Feb 11, 1994, 10:10:41 PM2/11/94
to
In article <walthCL...@netcom.com> wa...@netcom.com (Walter Howard) writes:
>Has anyone else been in an environment where the following words were
>used?
>
>shoehorn - to force a fit, especially of code into memory, "We thought
>we'd have to hold up shipment but Ed was able to shoehorn the driver
>into 32K"

Sure. Common usage where I am.

[ ... ]

>hot chat - sexually explicit, one-on-one chat mode.

I like this one, but haven't been in an environment where it was
practical, and haven't heard it before.

[ ... ]

>mangler - the canonical perversion of the work manager. Microsoft's
>elephantine network Lan Manager is often called Lan Mangler.

I've heard it before, but I think that was in the Jargon file.

>dBASED - pejorative name of the popular pc data-base program.

Yep!

>bit head - assembly language programmer.

On the net only.

>solder head - hardware engineer.

Nope! But it is a reasonable complement to the preceeding.

--
Email: <dnic...@d-and-d.com> | ...!uunet!ceilidh!dnichols
<dnic...@ceilidh.beartrack.com>
Donald Nichols (DoN.) | Voice (Days): (703) 704-2280 (Eves): (703) 938-4564
--- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---

gor...@chmeds.ac.nz

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Feb 14, 1994, 4:47:24 PM2/14/94
to
In article <walthCL...@netcom.com>, wa...@netcom.com (Walter Howard) writes:
> Has anyone else been in an environment where the following words were
> used?
>
> shoehorn - to force a fit, especially of code into memory, "We thought
> we'd have to hold up shipment but Ed was able to shoehorn the driver
> into 32K"

I've frequently heard this, especially with reference to code in embedded
applications.

> It's a good think you made a backup! - the only graceful way to shift
> blame after you clobber someone's data or system. Used sarcastically
> because in most cases, he doesnt.

I once had this (or something very similar: perhaps "It's a good thing you
have a backup") said to me, after a field service engineer had just realised
that he had physically destroyed a PDP-11 RL02 system disk (by dusting it, of
all the unlikely things for a field engineer to do). I had a backup. I made
an extra one just before I expected the engineeroid.

--
Gordon Findlay, Computer Scientist, Christchurch School of Medicine
Nuclear-free New Zealand !It's not that there are too
Email: Gor...@CHMEDS.AC.NZ !many fools: it's just that
Paper: PO Box 4345, Christchurch, NEW ZEALAND !the lightning is badly
Voice: +64-3-364 0540 !distributed (Mark Twain)

Paul Tomblin

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Feb 14, 1994, 9:33:30 PM2/14/94
to
gor...@chmeds.ac.nz writes:

>In article <walthCL...@netcom.com>, wa...@netcom.com (Walter Howard) writes:
>> Has anyone else been in an environment where the following words were
>> used?
>>
>> shoehorn - to force a fit, especially of code into memory, "We thought
>> we'd have to hold up shipment but Ed was able to shoehorn the driver
>> into 32K"
>
>I've frequently heard this, especially with reference to code in embedded
>applications.

It's *not* computer jargon. It's standard english, or at least standard
north american slang. WTF do you think a shoe horn is, anyway?

--
Paul Tomblin - snide Canadian.
"I am not a signature virus, I am a human being" - Vicki Robinson

Richard N. Turner

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Feb 26, 1994, 1:57:24 AM2/26/94
to
Walter Howard <wa...@netcom.com> writes:

>shoehorn - to force a fit, especially of code into memory, "We thought
>we'd have to hold up shipment but Ed was able to shoehorn the driver
>into 32K"

Back in the Dark Ages I worked on a project that was running under RT-11 where
we had something like 48K left over after the OS had taken its
share. By project's end, the resulting code was nearly 300K in size and
pretty hideously overlayed (RT-11 does this differently than any other system
that I've seen where you could overlay code). The standing joke
was that new algorithms, features, etc. would need to be "shoehorned" in.


><name> code - programming code that has distinct characteristics
>traceable to its author. "This section doesn't check for a NULL return from
>malloc! Oh! no wonder! It's Ed Code!". Used most often with a programmer
>who has left the company and thus is a convenient scape goat for
>anything that is wrong with the project.

My current employer has two forms of this: "Bob code" -- code that sort of works
but is written in such a way that the parts that we'd like to change are
incomprehensible, and "Norm code" -- code that's been around since the
beginning days of the company.
--
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Richard N. Turner | Internet: rnt...@delphi.com
2026 St. Johns Ave #201 | Phone: 708.432.5593
Highland Park, IL 60035 |
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