Great lines from the Series.

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Steve Parker

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Jul 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/24/00
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So which lines from the series stick in your head?

"'If I hear *not allowed* much oftener" said Sam "I'm going to get
angry."

"And now at last it comes. You will give me the Ring freely! In place
of a Dark Lord you will set up a Queen. And I shall not be dark, but
beautiful and terrible as the Morning and the Night! Fair as the sea
and the sun and the Snow upon the Mountain! Dreadful as teh Storm and
the Lightning! Stronger than the foundations of the earth! All shall
love me and dispair!' [cut description] "I pass the test" she said "I
will diminish and go into the West, and remain Galadrial" (Note: This
one, no matter how often I reread it, sends shivers up my spine. Every
time.)

"....adventures. Nasty, disturbing uncomfortable things! Make you late
for dinner!"

"Do not meddle in the affairs of Wizards, for they are subtle and
quick to anger."

"I will take the ring, although I do not know the way."

"Well, I'm back" he said

"I am naked in the dark, Sam, and there is no veil between me and the
wheel of fire. I begin to see it even with my waking eyes, and all
else fades."

"I am glad you are here with me. Here at the end of all things, Sam."

(And finally,one of my favorite scenes, where Sam transforms from the
bumbling comic sidekick into a hero in his own right: in Shelob's
lair, when Sam thinks Frodo's dead, and knowing EXACTLY what it means
to put the Ring on does)
And then he bent his own neck and put the chain upon it, and at
once his head was bowed to the ground with the weight of the Ring, as
if a great stone had been strung on him.

Tolkien has got to be one of the most quote-able writers out there.

Post your own!

Steve
--
Hugo-Reviews Page (and cover scans) at
http://www.crosswinds.net/~sparker9/home.html

Steve Parker

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Jul 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/24/00
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On Mon, 24 Jul 2000 23:00:49 GMT, Steve Parker <spar...@home.com>
wrote:

>So which lines from the series stick in your head?

Aargh! That was supposed to be "Tolkein's series". Sorry for any
confusion.

Mike (AKA Eppie)

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Jul 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/25/00
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"Steve Parker" <spar...@home.com> wrote in message
news:flgpns4pqgkck1lmd...@4ax.com...

> So which lines from the series stick in your head?

"Horns, horns, horns. In dark Mindolluin's sides they dimly echoed. Great
horns of the North, wildy blowing. Rohan had come at last."

ROTK, Chapter 4, "The Seige of Gondor".


Kilrae

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Jul 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/25/00
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Dear me! Not the Gandalf who was responsible for so many lads going off into
the Blue for mad adventures? Anything from climbing trees to visiting
Elves...

The hobbits are funny. 50 year old Bilbo sounds like a little kid half of
the time.

"Steve Parker" <spar...@home.com> wrote in message

news:qtipnsovccbbu2eoq...@4ax.com...


> On Mon, 24 Jul 2000 23:00:49 GMT, Steve Parker <spar...@home.com>
> wrote:
>

> >So which lines from the series stick in your head?
>

Simon van Dongen

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Jul 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/25/00
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On or about Mon, 24 Jul 2000 23:00:49 GMT, Steve Parker wrote:

>So which lines from the series stick in your head?
>

And then wonder took him, and a great joy; and he cast his sword up
in the sunlight and sang as he caught it. And all eyes followed his
gaze, and behold! upon the foremost ship a great standard broke, and
the wind displayed it as she turned towards the Harlond. There
flowered a White Tree, and that was for Gondor; but Seven Stars were
about it, and a high crown above it, the signs of Elendil that no lord
had born for years beyond count.


"If your pack has not been found, then you must send for the
herb-master of this House. And he will tell you that he did not know
that the you desire had any virtues, but that it is called
_westmansweed_ by the vulgar, and _galenas_ by the noble, and other
names in other tongues more learned, and after adding a few
half-forgotten rhymes that he does not understand, he will regretfully
inform you that there is none in the House, and he will leave you to
reflect on the history of tongues."


--
Simon van Dongen <sg...@xs4all.nl> Rotterdam, The Netherlands
'My doctor says I have a malformed public duty gland and a
natural deficiency in moral fibre,' he muttered to himself,
'and that I am therefore excused from saving Universes.'
Life, the universe and everything

Russ

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Jul 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/25/00
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I guess this isn't technically from the series but I love it anyway:

"A well-known case, also, was that of Lalia the Great (or less couteously the
Fat). Fortinbras II, one time head of the Tooks and Thain, married Lalia of the
Clayhangers in 1214, when he was 36 and she was 31. He died in 1380 at the age
of 102, but she love outlived him, coming to an unfortunate end in 1402 at the
age of 119. So she ruled the Tooks and the Great Smials for 22 years, a great
and memorable, if not beloved, 'matriarch'. She was not at the famous Party (SY
1401), but was prevented from attending rather by her great size and immobility
than by her age. Her son, Ferumbras, had no wife, being unable (it was
alleged) to find anyone willing to occupy apartments in the Great Smials, under
the rule of Lalia. Lalia, in her last and fattest years, had the custom of
being wheeled to the Great Door, to take the air on a fine morning. In the
spring of SY 1402 her clumsy attendant let the heavy chair run over the
threshold and tipped Lalia down the flight of steps into the garden. So ended
the reign and life that might have rivalled that of the Great Took."

Letter 214.

Russ

Wizard of Odd

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Jul 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/25/00
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"Steve Parker" <spar...@home.com> wrote in message
news:flgpns4pqgkck1lmd...@4ax.com...

> So which lines from the series stick in your head?
>

"Come not between the Nazgūl and his prey! Or he will not slay thee in thy
turn. He will bear thee away to the houses of lamentation, beyond all
darkness, where thy flesh shall be devoured, and thy shrivelled mind be left
naked to the Lidless Eye."

Now THAT is a threat! Of all the books i've ever read, this is still the
most menacing threat i've ever come across. What a fantastic line!

The Wizard of Odd

Alper Cugun

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Jul 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/25/00
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Steve Parker says...

> So which lines from the series stick in your head?

> Tolkien has got to be one of the most quote-able writers out there.
>
> Post your own!
>
I don't know half of you half as well as I should like; and I like less
than half of you half as well as you deserve.
-Bilbo Baggins

What do you mean?
Do you wish me a good morning, or mean that it is a good morning whether
I want it or not; or that you feel good on this morning; or that it is a
morning to be good on?
-Gandalf

The Nazgul they were; the Ringwraiths, the Enemy's most terribly
servants; darkness went with them and they cried with the voices of
death.

"Then Fingolfin beheld (as it seemed to him) the utter ruin of the
Noldor, and the defeat beyond redress of all their houses; and filled
with wrath and despair he mounted Rochallor his great horse and rode
forth alone, and none might restrain him. He passed over Dor-nu-Fauglith
like a wind amid the dust, and all that beheld his onset fled in amaze,
thinking Orome himself was come; for a great madness of rage was upon
him, so that his eyes shone like the eyes of the Valar. Thus he came
alone to Angband's gates, and he sounded his horn, and smote once upon
the brazen doors, and challenged Morgoth to come forth to single combat.
And Morgoth came."

--
Alper

David Goldfarb

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Jul 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/25/00
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"Then stand aside, if you be not deathless! For living or dark
undead, I will smite you, if you touch him."

"You fool. No living man may harm me."
"No living man am I! You face a woman!"

I've read the books over a dozen times, and that confrontation yet
seems to me the most thrilling moment in the trilogy.

"Go not to the Elves for counsel, for they will say both no and yes."

--
David Goldfarb <*>|
gold...@ocf.berkeley.edu | "Hey, mister -- your ninja's dragging!"
aste...@slip.net | -- MST3K, "Master Ninja I"
gold...@csua.berkeley.edu |

Russ

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Jul 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/25/00
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In article <MPG.13e77a2e9...@elektron.its.tudelft.nl>, Alper Cugun
<a.c...@student.tudelft.nl> writes:

>> So which lines from the series stick in your head?
>
>> Tolkien has got to be one of the most quote-able writers out there.
>>
>> Post your own!
>>
>I don't know half of you half as well as I should like; and I like less
>than half of you half as well as you deserve.
>-Bilbo Baggins

Some fellow recently left his job - I forgot whether he quit or was fired.
Anyway, on his last day,he emailed that quote to everyone in the company.

Funny.

Russ

Dorothy J Heydt

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Jul 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/25/00
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In article <8ljrph$5i1$1...@agate.berkeley.edu>,

David Goldfarb <gold...@OCF.Berkeley.EDU> wrote:
>
>"You fool. No living man may harm me."
>"No living man am I! You face a woman!"
>
>I've read the books over a dozen times, and that confrontation yet
>seems to me the most thrilling moment in the trilogy.

The best part about it is the way Tolkien covered his bets from a
linguistic standpoint.

The word "man" in English has been made to stand in for what were
originally two words: _mann_ meaning "a man, as distinguished
from an animal, demon, or god" (compare Latin _homo_, Greek
_anthropos_), and _wer_ meaning "a man, as distinguished from a
woman or a child" (Latin _vir_, Greek _aner, andros_).

If Eowyn and the Witch-King had been pedants like the herb-master
of Minas Tirith, the dialogue might have gone more like this:

"You fool, no living man may harm me."

"_Distinguo_, Sir, I am not _vir_ but _femina._ Prepare to die."

"Excuse me, your Westron is so imprecise. I did not mean _vir_,
I meant _homo_."

"Ah, point taken! In that case, permit me to point out that
Meriadoc, who is not _homo_ but _dimidiulus,_ a Halfling, has
just introduced an Arnorian blade into your knee."


Dorothy J. Heydt
Albany, California
djh...@kithrup.com
http://www.kithrup.com/~djheydt

GSV Three Minds in a Can

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Jul 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/25/00
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Bitstring <Fy9GH...@kithrup.com> from the wonderful Dorothy J Heydt
<djh...@kithrup.com> asserted

A Classic, Dorothy. I'm sure JRRT is rolling around in his grave at that
one. Thanks! 8>

GSV Three Minds in a Can

Ermanna

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Jul 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/25/00
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Steve Parker wrote:


> On Mon, 24 Jul 2000 23:00:49 GMT, Steve Parker <spar...@home.com>
> wrote:
> >So which lines from the series stick in your head?
>

> Aargh! That was supposed to be "Tolkein's series". Sorry for any
> confusion.

I'm afraid that would be wrong, too. It's spelt Tolkien, not Tolkein.

> Steve
> --
> Hugo-Reviews Page (and cover scans) at
> http://www.crosswinds.net/~sparker9/home.html

Ermanna the Elven Jedi Knight

Elbereth Gilthoniel!

Bill Snyder

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Jul 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/25/00
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On Wed, 26 Jul 2000 01:15:41 GMT, djh...@kithrup.com (Dorothy J
Heydt) wrote:

>In article <397E38A2...@home.com>,
>carl Dershem <der...@home.com> wrote:


>>Dorothy J Heydt wrote:
>>
>>> "You fool, no living man may harm me."
>>>
>>> "_Distinguo_, Sir, I am not _vir_ but _femina._ Prepare to die."
>>>
>>> "Excuse me, your Westron is so imprecise. I did not mean _vir_,
>>> I meant _homo_."
>>>
>>> "Ah, point taken! In that case, permit me to point out that
>>> Meriadoc, who is not _homo_ but _dimidiulus,_ a Halfling, has
>>> just introduced an Arnorian blade into your knee."
>>

>>You've been reading Paarfi again, haven't you?
>
>Nope, never heard of him. Who's Paarfi?
>
Why, the author of _The Phoenix Guards_ and _Five Hundred Years After_
(as re-titled by Brust).

--
Bill Snyder [This space unintentionally left blank.]

Mike Romberg

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Jul 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/25/00
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>>>>> " " == Steve Parker <spar...@home.com> writes:

> So which lines from the series stick in your head?


"Faithful servant yet master's bane,
Lightfoot's foal, swift Snowmane."

Mike Romberg (rom...@fsl.noaa.gov)

carl Dershem

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Jul 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/26/00
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Dorothy J Heydt

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Jul 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/26/00
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In article <397E38A2...@home.com>,
carl Dershem <der...@home.com> wrote:

Nope, never heard of him. Who's Paarfi?

Dorothy J. Heydt

Paul Shenton

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Jul 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/26/00
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Bravo Dorothy.

I think I will be laughing about that one for at least a week.

Paul.


"Dorothy J Heydt" <djh...@kithrup.com> wrote in message
news:Fy9GH...@kithrup.com...


> In article <8ljrph$5i1$1...@agate.berkeley.edu>,
> David Goldfarb <gold...@OCF.Berkeley.EDU> wrote:
> >
> >"You fool. No living man may harm me."
> >"No living man am I! You face a woman!"
> >
> >I've read the books over a dozen times, and that confrontation yet
> >seems to me the most thrilling moment in the trilogy.
>
> The best part about it is the way Tolkien covered his bets from a
> linguistic standpoint.
>
> The word "man" in English has been made to stand in for what were
> originally two words: _mann_ meaning "a man, as distinguished
> from an animal, demon, or god" (compare Latin _homo_, Greek
> _anthropos_), and _wer_ meaning "a man, as distinguished from a
> woman or a child" (Latin _vir_, Greek _aner, andros_).
>
> If Eowyn and the Witch-King had been pedants like the herb-master
> of Minas Tirith, the dialogue might have gone more like this:
>

> "You fool, no living man may harm me."
>
> "_Distinguo_, Sir, I am not _vir_ but _femina._ Prepare to die."
>
> "Excuse me, your Westron is so imprecise. I did not mean _vir_,
> I meant _homo_."
>
> "Ah, point taken! In that case, permit me to point out that
> Meriadoc, who is not _homo_ but _dimidiulus,_ a Halfling, has
> just introduced an Arnorian blade into your knee."
>
>

Dorothy J Heydt

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Jul 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/26/00
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In article <3D6C6FF3700ACC38.3D844125...@lp.airnews.net>,

Bill Snyder <bsn...@iadfw.net> wrote:
>On Wed, 26 Jul 2000 01:15:41 GMT, djh...@kithrup.com (Dorothy J
>Heydt) wrote:

>>Nope, never heard of him. Who's Paarfi?
>>

>Why, the author of _The Phoenix Guards_ and _Five Hundred Years After_
>(as re-titled by Brust).

Well, I read some Brust one upon a time, but I don't think those
were the titles. They were in that series where the titles are
all the names of clan totems or something.

So no, I haven't been reading Paarfi.

William H. Hsu

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Jul 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/26/00
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Bill Snyder <bsn...@iadfw.net> writes:

>On Wed, 26 Jul 2000 01:15:41 GMT, djh...@kithrup.com (Dorothy J
>Heydt) wrote:

[Great "linguistic debate" spoof: TWKOA vs. Eowyn]

>>>
>>>You've been reading Paarfi again, haven't you?
>>

>>Nope, never heard of him. Who's Paarfi?
>>
>Why, the author of _The Phoenix Guards_ and _Five Hundred Years After_
>(as re-titled by Brust).

Note to self: read Paarfi. :-)

-Bill

=======================================================
William H. Hsu ICQ: 28651394
bh...@cis.uiuc.edu
The Red Songbook of Westmarch: Tolkien Song Parodies
http://ringil.cis.ksu.edu/Tolkien/Humor/RedSOW
=======================================================

William H. Hsu

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Jul 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/26/00
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Alper Cugun <a.c...@student.tudelft.nl> writes:

>Steve Parker says...


>> So which lines from the series stick in your head?

>> Tolkien has got to be one of the most quote-able writers out there.

Agreed!

>>
>> Post your own!
>>

[snip]

>"Then Fingolfin beheld (as it seemed to him) the utter ruin of the
>Noldor, and the defeat beyond redress of all their houses; and filled
>with wrath and despair he mounted Rochallor his great horse and rode
>forth alone, and none might restrain him. He passed over Dor-nu-Fauglith
>like a wind amid the dust, and all that beheld his onset fled in amaze,
>thinking Orome himself was come; for a great madness of rage was upon
>him, so that his eyes shone like the eyes of the Valar. Thus he came
>alone to Angband's gates, and he sounded his horn, and smote once upon
>the brazen doors, and challenged Morgoth to come forth to single combat.
>And Morgoth came."

You can probably tell that this is one of my favorites as well:
http://ringil.cis.ksu.edu

Andrew Durdin

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Jul 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/26/00
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William H. Hsu <bh...@ringil.cis.ksu.edu> wrote in message
news:8llta3$cm3$1...@ringil.cis.ksu.edu...
> Alper Cugun <a.c...@student.tudelft.nl> writes:
>
> >> Post your own!

"What do you want to know?"
"The names of all the stars, and of all living things, and the whole history
of Middle-earth and Over-heaven and of the Sundering Seas. Of course! What
less?"

This is one of my (many) favourite quotes from LotR - it reflects my
curiosity and philognomy.

Andrew

Andrea Leistra

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Jul 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/26/00
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In article <FyA66...@kithrup.com>,

Dorothy J Heydt <djh...@kithrup.com> wrote:
>In article <397E38A2...@home.com>,
>carl Dershem <der...@home.com> wrote:
>>Dorothy J Heydt wrote:
>>
>>> "You fool, no living man may harm me."
>>>
>>> "_Distinguo_, Sir, I am not _vir_ but _femina._ Prepare to die."
>>>
>>> "Excuse me, your Westron is so imprecise. I did not mean _vir_,
>>> I meant _homo_."
>>>
>>> "Ah, point taken! In that case, permit me to point out that
>>> Meriadoc, who is not _homo_ but _dimidiulus,_ a Halfling, has
>>> just introduced an Arnorian blade into your knee."
>>
>>You've been reading Paarfi again, haven't you?
>
>Nope, never heard of him. Who's Paarfi?

Brust, when he's being Dumas.

Oh, all right, I'll unpack that. Steven Brust wrote some very clever and
very entertaining pastiches of Dumas' style, _The Phoenix Guards_ and
_Five Hundred Years After_ (which, if you've read any of the Vlad books,
are set in the same universe amid Dragaerans somewhat earlier). The
framing device, such as it is, is that these are by Paarfi of Roundwood, a
rather florid narrator. The style is a lot like what you have above,
especially the last exchange; I wouldn't have noticed it, but I *snrk*ed
when Carl pointed it out.

--
Andrea Leistra


Leif Magnar Kj|nn|y

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Jul 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/26/00
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In article <FyAG4...@kithrup.com>,

Dorothy J Heydt <djh...@kithrup.com> wrote:
>>On Wed, 26 Jul 2000 01:15:41 GMT, djh...@kithrup.com (Dorothy J
>>Heydt) wrote:
>
>>>Nope, never heard of him. Who's Paarfi?
>>>
>>Why, the author of _The Phoenix Guards_ and _Five Hundred Years After_
>>(as re-titled by Brust).
>
>Well, I read some Brust one upon a time, but I don't think those
>were the titles. They were in that series where the titles are
>all the names of clan totems or something.

The works in question are technically set in the same world as
that series (except a great deal earlier), but written in a
radically different style -- quite explicit Three Musketeers
pastiche, complete with two-page digressions about the local
history of small villages that the heroes pass through, and
that sort of thing.

The dialogue snippet you produced seemed to me like you were
channeling Alexandre Dumas, which might account for the
association some others make with Paarfi.

--
Leif Kj{\o}nn{\o}y | "Its habit of getting up late you'll agree
www.pvv.org/~leifmk| That it carries too far, when I say
Math geek and gamer| That it frequently breakfasts at five-o'clock tea,
GURPS, Harn, CORPS | And dines on the following day." (Carroll)

Ermanna

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Jul 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/26/00
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Do you mind being corrected? If so, stop reading.

David Goldfarb wrote:
> "Then stand aside, if you be not deathless! For living or dark
> undead, I will smite you, if you touch him."

I'm afraid it's "Begone, if you be not deathless!"

> "You fool. No living man may harm me."
> "No living man am I! You face a woman!"

I'm afraid it's "look upon", not "face".

<shnip>


> David Goldfarb <*>|
> gold...@ocf.berkeley.edu | "Hey, mister -- your ninja's dragging!"
> aste...@slip.net | -- MST3K, "Master Ninja I"
> gold...@csua.berkeley.edu |

Ermanna the Elven Jedi Knight

Elbereth Gilthoniel!

Chris Hoelscher

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Jul 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/26/00
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i canot quote it directly, but my favorite passage deals with Gandalf's
"yes - many live who deserve death - many die who deserve life"

chris hoelscher

John Ringo

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Jul 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/26/00
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It was Brust rewriting "The Three Musketeers" in the style and metric of the
original Dumas. Very interesting and unbelievably wordy.

John

--


See sample chapters for my upcoming book "A Hymn Before Battle" (Baen
Publishing) at:
http://www.baen.com/chapters/W200007/0671319418.htm?blurb
www.johnringo.com
"When Al Gore gives a fireside chat the fire goes out."
Bob Dole, the new political commentator on "The Daily Show"

"William H. Hsu" <bh...@ringil.cis.ksu.edu> wrote in message

news:8llthi$cn2$1...@ringil.cis.ksu.edu...


> Bill Snyder <bsn...@iadfw.net> writes:
>
> >On Wed, 26 Jul 2000 01:15:41 GMT, djh...@kithrup.com (Dorothy J
> >Heydt) wrote:
>

> [Great "linguistic debate" spoof: TWKOA vs. Eowyn]
>
> >>>

> >>>You've been reading Paarfi again, haven't you?
> >>

> >>Nope, never heard of him. Who's Paarfi?
> >>
> >Why, the author of _The Phoenix Guards_ and _Five Hundred Years After_
> >(as re-titled by Brust).
>

> Note to self: read Paarfi. :-)
>

Dorothy J Heydt

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Jul 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/26/00
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In article <8lm4ea$e8d$1...@kopp.stud.ntnu.no>,

Leif Magnar Kj|nn|y <lei...@pvv.ntnu.no> wrote:
>
>The dialogue snippet you produced seemed to me like you were
>channeling Alexandre Dumas, which might account for the
>association some others make with Paarfi.

No, if I was channeling anybody (and I doubt it) it would've
been Tolkien and Lewis arguing grammatical niceties in their
local pub.

Actually, I don't think I've ever read Dumas.

wilb...@aol.com

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Jul 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/26/00
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In article <8llthi$cn2$1...@ringil.cis.ksu.edu>,

bh...@ringil.cis.ksu.edu (William H. Hsu) wrote:

> Note to self: read Paarfi. :-)
>

Those 2 books are a delightful read! I think you'll enjoy yourself --
though the language is florid and hard to follow for a little while,
you get used to it. I imagine writing that way is the same -- hard to
do but you get used to it after a while.


Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

Tommi Haapaniemi

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Jul 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/26/00
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These ones are straight from my head so excuse mistakes:

"So it was that when summer waned, there came a night of Moon, and
Gwaihir, the swiftest of the great eagles, came unlooked for to Orthanc,
and found me standing on the pinnacle" etc. is one _great_ passage!

But this one is even better:
"In rode the Lord of the Nazgūl. A great black shape against the fires
beyond he loomed up, grown to a vast menace of despair. In rode the Lord
of the Nazgūl, under the archway that no enemy ever yet had passed, and
all fled before his face..."

(BTW, those of you who have read the Finnish translation of the book: the
latter one is exceptionally well translated, if you ask me. Kinda
captures the moment.)

Both were included in a Tolkien Calendar some years ago, which is why I
remember them so well.

---
Tommi Haapaniemi (mailto:toha...@NOSPAMpaju.oulu.fi)
Procomp Solutions Oy
University of Oulu, Department of Information Processing Science


Brett Paul Dunbar

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Jul 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/26/00
to
In article <flgpns4pqgkck1lmd...@4ax.com>, Steve Parker
<spar...@home.com> writes

>So which lines from the series stick in your head?

"Old fool!" he said "Old fool! This is my hour. Do you not know Death
when you see it? Die now and curse in vain!"
--
Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search http://www.mersenne.org/prime.htm
Brett Paul Dunbar

the softrat

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Jul 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/26/00
to
On Wed, 26 Jul 2000 06:44:38 -0400, Ermanna <jsol...@erols.com>
wrote:

>
>Do you mind being corrected? If so, stop reading.
>
>David Goldfarb wrote:
>> "Then stand aside, if you be not deathless! For living or dark
>> undead, I will smite you, if you touch him."
>
>I'm afraid it's "Begone, if you be not deathless!"
>
>> "You fool. No living man may harm me."
>> "No living man am I! You face a woman!"
>
>I'm afraid it's "look upon", not "face".
>
>> David Goldfarb <*>|

>
>Ermanna the Elven Jedi Knight
>
Doncha just *love* these idiot (mis)quoters? And so authoritative,
too. "Look how smart I am! D'oh!!"

the softrat
mailto:sof...@pobox.com
--
"The POP3 server service depends on the SMTP server service,
which failed to start because of the following error: The
operation completed successfully." (Windows NT Server v3.51)

Jonathan

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Jul 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/26/00
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'Fissh, nice fissh. White face has vanished, my precious, at last, yes. Now
we can eat fish in peace. No, not in peace, precious. For Precious is lost;
yes,lost. Dirty hobbits, nasty hobbits. Gone and left us, gollum; and
Precious is gone. Only poor Smeagol all alone. No Precious. Nasty Men,
they'll take it, steal my Precious. Theives. We hates them. Fissh, nice
fissh. Makes us strong. Makes us eyes bright, fingers tight, yes. Throttle
them, precious. Throttle them all, yes if we gets the chances. Nice fissh.
Nice fissh!'


Sam drew a deep breath. 'An Oliphaunt it was! he said. 'So there are
Oliphaunts, and I have seen one. What a life! But no one at home will ever
beleive me. Well if that's over, I'll have a bit of sleep.'
--
Otter


"Steve Parker" <spar...@home.com> wrote in message
news:flgpns4pqgkck1lmd...@4ax.com...

carl Dershem

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Jul 27, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/27/00
to
Dorothy J Heydt wrote:

> In article <397E38A2...@home.com>,
> carl Dershem <der...@home.com> wrote:
> >Dorothy J Heydt wrote:
> >
> >> "You fool, no living man may harm me."
> >>
> >> "_Distinguo_, Sir, I am not _vir_ but _femina._ Prepare to die."
> >>
> >> "Excuse me, your Westron is so imprecise. I did not mean _vir_,
> >> I meant _homo_."
> >>
> >> "Ah, point taken! In that case, permit me to point out that
> >> Meriadoc, who is not _homo_ but _dimidiulus,_ a Halfling, has
> >> just introduced an Arnorian blade into your knee."
> >

> >You've been reading Paarfi again, haven't you?
>
> Nope, never heard of him. Who's Paarfi?

Paarfi of Roundwood is one of Brust's personae - the one who wrote "The
Phoenix Guards" and "500 Years After". Much of the dialogue is in the
style of your post, and the funnier for it.

cd


OMeallyMD

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Jul 27, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/27/00
to

>Steve Parker <spar...@home.com> writes:
>
> > So which lines from the series stick in your head?

I missed the original thread, so excuse me if someone has quoted this passage
(I heard Tolkien cried as he wrote it) from 'The Field of Cormallen':
"And all the host laughed and wept, and in the midst of their merriment and
tears the clear voice of the minstrel rose likr silver and gold, and all men
were hushed. And he sang to them, now in the Elven-tongue, now in the speech of
the West, until their hearts, wounded with sweet words, overflowed, and their
joy was like swords, and they passed in thought out to regions where pain and
delight flow together and tears are the very wine of blessedness."

Some of the most beautiful writing in the English language, this passage
defines the emotion 'bittersweet'.

Bill
"If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a
merrier world."


Mark Wells

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Jul 27, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/27/00
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"So many have said. But her name is not mine. Though maybe my doom
will be not unlike hers."
-- Arwen, in the World's Most Subtle Pick-Up Line


Juho P. Pahajoki

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Jul 27, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/27/00
to
Se oli Steve Parker joka näin lausui, noin nimesi:
>"I am naked in the dark, Sam

And some call Tolkien prissy. My favourite is
Play it again, Sam.


--
"Kuinka näet roskan veljesi silmässä, mutta et huomaa, että omassa
silmässäsi on hirsi? Kuinka voit sanoa veljellesi: 'Annapa kun otan
roskan silmästäsi', kun omassa silmässäsi on hirsi?"
-- Jeesus, "Evankeljumi Matteuksen mukaan"

SSSimon

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Jul 28, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/28/00
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Chris Hoelscher <chris.h...@gte.net> wrote:

>i canot quote it directly, but my favorite passage deals with Gandalf's
>"yes - many live who deserve death - many die who deserve life"

My favourite passage is:
"All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.
From the ashes a fire shall be woken,
A light from the shadows shall spring;
Renewed shall by blade that was broken,
The crownless again shall be king."

SSSimon
--
Szymon Szott "SSSimon" sss...@poczta.onet.pl ICQ#16519944
http://www.sssimon.w.pl http://commandos.strefa.com
_____________________________________________________________________
An egotist is a person of low taste, more interested in himself than in me.

Ecthelion

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Jul 29, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/29/00
to
"William H. Hsu" wrote:
>
> Alper Cugun <a.c...@student.tudelft.nl> writes:
>
> >Steve Parker says...
> >> So which lines from the series stick in your head?
>
> [snip]
>
> >"Then Fingolfin beheld (as it seemed to him) the utter ruin of the
> >Noldor, and the defeat beyond redress of all their houses; and filled
> >with wrath and despair he mounted Rochallor his great horse and rode
> >forth alone, and none might restrain him. He passed over Dor-nu-Fauglith
> >like a wind amid the dust, and all that beheld his onset fled in amaze,
> >thinking Orome himself was come; for a great madness of rage was upon
> >him, so that his eyes shone like the eyes of the Valar. Thus he came
> >alone to Angband's gates, and he sounded his horn, and smote once upon
> >the brazen doors, and challenged Morgoth to come forth to single combat.
> >And Morgoth came."
>
>
Oh ! I couldn't bring myself to snip that part ! I loved it too.
THAT'S what I call going down in a blaze of glory ! <g>

Unfortunately I no longer have a copy of "The Simarillian" handy, so I
can only choose from LOTR.

My sig's my favorite, as are some of the others I've seen already
posted, but did anyone get this gem of Theoden responding to Saruman's
wiles?

'We will have peace...Yes, we will have peace....we will have peace,
when you and all of your works have perished--and the works of your dark
master to whom you would deliver us. You are a liar, Saruman, and a
corrupter of men's hearts. You hold out your hand to me, and I perceive
only a finger of the claw of Mordor. Cruel and cold! Even if your war
on me was just--as it was not, for were you ten times as wise you would
have no right to rule me and mine for your profit as you desired--even
so, what will you say of your torches in Westfold and the children that
lie dead there? And they hewed Hama's body before the gates of the
Hornburg, after he was dead. When you hang from a gibbet at your window
for the sport of your own crows, I will have peace with you and
Orthanc. So much for the House of Eorl. A lesser son of great sires am
I, but I do not need to lick your fingers. Turn elsewhither. But I fear
your voice has lost it's charm.'

SLAM DUNK!! *That's* what's called unconditional surrender! <g>

They better not snip that from the movie....

--
'It needs but one foe to breed a war, not two, Master Warden,
And those who have not swords can still die upon them.'

noothan

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Jul 29, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/29/00
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From all his policies and webs of fear and treachery, from all his
stratagems and wars his mind shook free; and throughout his realm a
tremor ran, his slaves quailed, and his armies halted, and his captains
suddenly steerless, bereft of will, wavered and despaired. For they were
forgotten. The whole mind and purpose of the Power that wielded them was
now bent with overwhelming force upon the Mountain.


Nathan Danylczuk

Butrfly Faerie

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Jul 30, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/30/00
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The Road goes ever on and on
Down from the door where it began.
Now far ahead the Road has gone,
And I must follow, if I can,
Pursuing it with eager feet,
Until it joins some larger way
Where many paths and errands meet.
And whither then? I cannot say.
~Bilbo Baggins~

"SSSimon" <sss...@poczta.onet.pl> wrote in message
news:3dt0osca86d3mhmd8...@4ax.com...

Andrew Durdin

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Jul 30, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/30/00
to

William H. Hsu <bh...@ringil.cis.ksu.edu> wrote in message
news:8llta3$cm3$1...@ringil.cis.ksu.edu...

> Alper Cugun <a.c...@student.tudelft.nl> writes:
>
> >Steve Parker says...
> >> So which lines from the series stick in your head?
> >> Post your own!

Great lines from The Hobbit:

As they sang the hobbit felt the love of beautiful things made by hands and
by cunning and by magic moving through him, a fierce and jealous love, the
desire of the hearts of dwarves. Then something Tookish woke up insides him,
and he wished to go and see the great mountains, and hear the pine-trees and
the waterfalls, and explore the caves, and wear a sword instead of a
walking-stick.


Gollum had not actually threatened to kill him, or tried to yet. And he was
miserable, alone, lost. A sudden understanding, a pity mixed with horror,
welled up in Bilbo's heart: a glimpse of endless unmarked days without light
or hope of betterment, hard stone, cold fish, sneaking and whispering.

To say that Bilbo's breath was taken away is no description at all. There
are no words left to express his staggerment, since Men changed the language
that they learned of elves in the days when all the world was wonderful.

"Revenge!" he snorted, and the light of his eyes lit the hall from floor to
ceiling like scarlet lightning. "Revenge! The King under the Mountain is
dead and where are his kin that dare seek revenge? Girion Lord of Dale is
dead, and I have eaten his people like a wolf among sheep, and where are his
sons' sons that dare approach me? I kill where I wish and none dare resist.
I laid low the warriors of old and their like is not in the world today.
Then I was but young and tender. Now I am old and strong, strong, strong,
Thief in the Shadows!" he gloated. "My armour is like tenfold shields, my
teeth are swords, my claws spears the shock of my tail a thunderbolt, my
wings a hurricane, and my breath death!"

Out of a dark opening in a wall of rock there issued a boiling water, and it
flowed swirling in a narrow channel, carved and made straight and deep by
the cunning of ancient hands. Beside it ran a stone-paved road, wide enough
for many men abreast. Swiftly along this they ran, and round a wide-sweeping
turn-and behold! before them stood the broad light of day. In front there
rose a tall arch, still showing the fragments of old carven work within,
worn and splintered and blackened though it was. A misty sun sent its pale
light between the arms of the Mountain, and beams of gold fell on the
pavement at the threshold.

"Halt!" he called in a voice like thunder, and his staff blazed forth with a
flash like the lightning. "Dread has come upon you all! Alas! it has come
more swiftly than I guessed. The Goblins are upon you! Bolg of the North is
coming, O Dain! whose father you slew in Moria. Behold! the bats are above
his army like a sea of locusts. They ride upon wolves and Wargs are in their
train!"

"No!" said Thorin. "There is more in you of good than you know, child of the
kindly West. Some courage and some wisdom, blended in measure. If more of us


valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier

world. But sad or merry, I must leave it now. Farewell!"

"So comes snow after fire, and even dragons have their ending!" said Bilbo


But speaking of The Hobbit, is it really true that Gandalf, Bilbo, and
thirteen dwarves set out on this journey without even so much as a sword
between them? That doesn't sound very wise to me...


William H. Hsu

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Jul 30, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/30/00
to
noothan <noo...@home.com> writes:

>> > >Steve Parker says...
>> > >> So which lines from the series stick in your head?
>> >

[snip many fine quotes from /The Lord of the Rings/]

>From all his policies and webs of fear and treachery, from all his
>stratagems and wars his mind shook free; and throughout his realm a
>tremor ran, his slaves quailed, and his armies halted, and his captains
>suddenly steerless, bereft of will, wavered and despaired. For they were
>forgotten. The whole mind and purpose of the Power that wielded them was
>now bent with overwhelming force upon the Mountain.

>Nathan Danylczuk

Now, why does this strangely remind me of:
http://www.synicon.com.au/sw/tradfed/tradfed12.htm
http://www.synicon.com.au/sw/tradfed/tradfed13.htm

*TEUNCish CS-geek cackle*

noothan

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Jul 30, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/30/00
to
The Federation were fools for making the droids completely dependant on
the Control Ships. It's the weakest part of their plan. At least
Imperial Stormtroopers could function by themselves.

David Salo

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Jul 30, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/30/00
to
In article <398368CC...@home.com>, noothan <noo...@home.com> wrote:

> From all his policies and webs of fear and treachery, from all his
> stratagems and wars his mind shook free; and throughout his realm a
> tremor ran, his slaves quailed, and his armies halted, and his captains
> suddenly steerless, bereft of will, wavered and despaired. For they were
> forgotten. The whole mind and purpose of the Power that wielded them was
> now bent with overwhelming force upon the Mountain.

*scratches head*

Oh, so _that's_ why he left the newsgroup.

GSV Three Minds in a Can

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Jul 30, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/30/00
to
Bitstring <3983...@pink.one.net.au> from the wonderful Butrfly Faerie
<Butrfl...@hotmail.com> asserted

>The Road goes ever on and on
>Down from the door where it began.
>Now far ahead the Road has gone,
>And I must follow, if I can,
>Pursuing it with eager feet,
>Until it joins some larger way
>Where many paths and errands meet.
>And whither then? I cannot say.
>~Bilbo Baggins~

I have a record (vinyl) of Tolkien reading some of his poems from LOTR,
and various others sung to music (not by JRRT!), dating from 197x. I
wonder if it is still available (and on CD)??

--
GSV Three Minds in a Can

Ross TenEyck

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Jul 30, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/30/00
to
"All your words are but to say: you are a woman, and your part is
in the house. But when the men have died in battle and honour, you
have leave to be burned in the house, for the men will need it no
more. But I am of the House of Eorl and not a serving-woman. I can
ride and wield blade, and I do not fear either pain or death."

If memory serves, this was quoted to good effect some time back in
a thread on women serving in the armed forces.

--
================== http://www.alumni.caltech.edu/~teneyck ==================
Ross TenEyck Seattle, WA \ Light, kindled in the furnace of hydrogen;
ten...@alumni.caltech.edu \ like smoke, sunlight carries the hot-metal
Are wa yume? Soretomo maboroshi? \ tang of Creation's forge.

Dorothy J Heydt

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Jul 31, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/31/00
to
In article <tEYm6hAI...@quik.freeuk.net>,

GSV Three Minds in a Can <G...@quik.freeuk.com> wrote:
>
>I have a record (vinyl) of Tolkien reading some of his poems from LOTR,
>and various others sung to music (not by JRRT!), dating from 197x. I
>wonder if it is still available (and on CD)??

I have that one too. The others comprise the song cycle "The
Road Goes Ever On," and most of the music is by Donald Swann (the
piano half of the late Flanders and Swann, creators of the
Hippopotamus song and others).

There's one piece in it, however, that is not by Swann. At least
mostly not. Swann had written up the songs and presented them to
Tolkien for his approval, and JRRT said most of them were just
fine, except for Galadriel's song in Quenya. "Oh, no, no," he
said. "It's not like that at all. It's plainchant. It sounds
like this." And he sang it for Swann, who transcribed it on the
spot (no biggie, it *is* plainchant), added a little instrumental
ritornello, and published it like that.

I too still have the LP. Whether it's been re-released on CD I
have no idea.

The tenor soloist in the cycle is one William Elvin and the
pianist is Swann. It's all pretty good except that they took
Treebeard's song MUCH TOO FAST. They did it at Andante-for-a-human,
and they should have done it at Andante-for-an-Ent.

Sea Wasp

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Jul 31, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/31/00
to
Dorothy J Heydt wrote:

> The tenor soloist in the cycle is one William Elvin and the
> pianist is Swann. It's all pretty good except that they took
> Treebeard's song MUCH TOO FAST. They did it at Andante-for-a-human,
> and they should have done it at Andante-for-an-Ent.

HOOOM, yes, well... Humans have always been a bit... HASTY, but the
recording device was limited.

They wouldn't have been able to fit the Andante-for-an-Ent version on
anything less than a seven-record collection set.

--
Sea Wasp http://www.wizvax.net/seawasp/index.html
/^\
;;; _Morgantown: The Jason Wood Chronicles_, at
http://www.hyperbooks.com/catalog/20040.html

GSV Three Minds in a Can

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Jul 31, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/31/00
to
Bitstring <FyJJv...@kithrup.com> from the wonderful Dorothy J Heydt
<djh...@kithrup.com> asserted
<snip lots good stuff>

>The tenor soloist in the cycle is one William Elvin and the
>pianist is Swann. It's all pretty good except that they took
>Treebeard's song MUCH TOO FAST. They did it at Andante-for-a-human,
>and they should have done it at Andante-for-an-Ent.

But if they'd done it Andante-for Ent, they'd have had no room on the LP
for anything else!! 8>,

--

Dorothy J Heydt

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Jul 31, 2000, 3:00:00 AM7/31/00
to
In article <DBy9bXAh...@quik.freeuk.net>,

No, now, that isn't true. About 1.2 to 2 seconds per stride
would've been about right. We're talking about an Ent, not Paul
Bunyan.

I've sung the cycle myself, by the way. I took Treebeard's song
at Andante-for-an-Ent. The whole cycle still took less than an
hour.

carl Dershem

unread,
Aug 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/1/00
to
Dorothy J Heydt wrote:

> The tenor soloist in the cycle is one William Elvin and the
> pianist is Swann. It's all pretty good except that they took
> Treebeard's song MUCH TOO FAST. They did it at Andante-for-a-human,
> and they should have done it at Andante-for-an-Ent.

Hmmm... that'd be what, about Quarter note = 1 per day?

cd
--
This post is copyright 2000 by Carl Dershem. Permission to
insert links when displaying it is available for $100. Use in
this fashion constitutes acceptance of these terms.

Maggie Exon

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Aug 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/1/00
to
I have always found the idea that lies behind this song fascinating and one
of the most potent in Tolkien. The path outside your door is the beginning
of all paths and roads in the world and every time you step out you have no
idea where you will end up or what adventures you might have.

Of course, the path usually ends at work or the supermarket. But who
knows......
Maggie

GSV Three Minds in a Can wrote:

> Bitstring <3983...@pink.one.net.au> from the wonderful Butrfly Faerie
> <Butrfl...@hotmail.com> asserted
> >The Road goes ever on and on
> >Down from the door where it began.
> >Now far ahead the Road has gone,
> >And I must follow, if I can,
> >Pursuing it with eager feet,
> >Until it joins some larger way
> >Where many paths and errands meet.
> >And whither then? I cannot say.
> >~Bilbo Baggins~
>

> I have a record (vinyl) of Tolkien reading some of his poems from LOTR,
> and various others sung to music (not by JRRT!), dating from 197x. I
> wonder if it is still available (and on CD)??
>

> --

Öjevind Lång

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Aug 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/1/00
to
carl Dershem hath written:

>Dorothy J Heydt wrote:
>
>> The tenor soloist in the cycle is one William Elvin and the
>> pianist is Swann. It's all pretty good except that they took
>> Treebeard's song MUCH TOO FAST. They did it at Andante-for-a-human,
>> and they should have done it at Andante-for-an-Ent.


When Tolkien heard the name William Elvin he said: "A name of good omen!"

Öjevind

Jerry Friedman

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Aug 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/1/00
to
In article <Fy9GH...@kithrup.com>,
djh...@kithrup.com (Dorothy J Heydt) wrote:
> In article <8ljrph$5i1$1...@agate.berkeley.edu>,

> David Goldfarb <gold...@OCF.Berkeley.EDU> wrote:
> >
> >"You fool. No living man may harm me."
> >"No living man am I! You face a woman!"
> >
> >I've read the books over a dozen times, and that confrontation yet
> >seems to me the most thrilling moment in the trilogy.
>
> The best part about it is the way Tolkien covered his bets from a
> linguistic standpoint.
>
> The word "man" in English has been made to stand in for what were
> originally two words: _mann_ meaning "a man, as distinguished
> from an animal, demon, or god" (compare Latin _homo_, Greek
> _anthropos_), and _wer_ meaning "a man, as distinguished from a
> woman or a child" (Latin _vir_, Greek _aner, andros_).
>
> If Eowyn and the Witch-King had been pedants like the herb-master
> of Minas Tirith, the dialogue might have gone more like this:

>
> "You fool, no living man may harm me."
>
> "_Distinguo_, Sir, I am not _vir_ but _femina._ Prepare to die."
>
> "Excuse me, your Westron is so imprecise. I did not mean _vir_,
> I meant _homo_."
>
> "Ah, point taken! In that case, permit me to point out that
> Meriadoc, who is not _homo_ but _dimidiulus,_ a Halfling, has
> just introduced an Arnorian blade into your knee."

I started laughing at "Distinguo", and I haven't stopped yet!

--
Jerry Friedman
jfrE...@nnm.cc.nm.us
i before e
and all the disclaimers


Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

Dorothy J Heydt

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Aug 2, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/2/00
to
In article <xjHh5.389$7g1....@nntpserver.swip.net>,

Öjevind Lång <ojevin...@swipnet.se> wrote:
>carl Dershem hath written:
>
>>Dorothy J Heydt wrote:
>>
>>> The tenor soloist in the cycle is one William Elvin....

>
>When Tolkien heard the name William Elvin he said: "A name of good omen!"

Yeah, but he really isn't that good a singer.....

Dorothy J Heydt

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Aug 2, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/2/00
to
In article <8m7iug$j1s$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,

Jerry Friedman <jfried...@my-deja.com> wrote:
>
>I started laughing at "Distinguo", and I haven't stopped yet!

A favorite word of Lewis's.

Christopher Michael Jones

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Aug 2, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/2/00
to
Jerry Friedman (jfried...@my-deja.com) wrote:
> In article <Fy9GH...@kithrup.com>,
> djh...@kithrup.com (Dorothy J Heydt) wrote:
[snip]

> > "You fool, no living man may harm me."
> >
> > "_Distinguo_, Sir, I am not _vir_ but _femina._ Prepare to die."
> >
> > "Excuse me, your Westron is so imprecise. I did not mean _vir_,
> > I meant _homo_."
> >
> > "Ah, point taken! In that case, permit me to point out that
> > Meriadoc, who is not _homo_ but _dimidiulus,_ a Halfling, has
> > just introduced an Arnorian blade into your knee."

> I started laughing at "Distinguo", and I haven't stopped yet!


LOL, this is hilarious.


Note to self: read rasfw more often.

Phil Fraering

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Aug 2, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/2/00
to
just~pat <plut...@my-deja.com> writes:

> In article <flgpns4pqgkck1lmd...@4ax.com>,


> spar...@home.com wrote:
> > So which lines from the series stick in your head?
>

> "Sneaking!"
>
> I've seen several bumper stickers hereabouts saying "Not all
> who wander are lost."

I'm not a morning person; I'm occasionally known to wake up,
get dressed, and lurch to work, muttering, "The Yellow Face,
it hurts us, yessssss..."

Then again, I really really want to get some of those shadowcrab
bumperstickers.

--
Phil Fraering "One day, Pinky, A MOUSE shall rule, and it is the
p...@globalreach.net humans who will be forced to endure these humiliating
/Will work for tape/ diversions!"
"You mean like Orlando, Brain?"

Michael Caldwell

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Aug 3, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/3/00
to
John Ringo wrote in message <8lmv60$kmm$1...@slb6.atl.mindspring.net>...
>It was Brust rewriting "The Three Musketeers" in the style and metric of
the
>original Dumas. Very interesting and unbelievably wordy.


I was unaware that "the three musketeers" was unoriginal Dumas....

--


just~pat

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Aug 3, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/3/00
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In article <flgpns4pqgkck1lmd...@4ax.com>,
spar...@home.com wrote:
> So which lines from the series stick in your head?

"Sneaking!"

I've seen several bumper stickers hereabouts saying "Not all
who wander are lost."

--
Pat Luther --- http://www.cs.pdx.edu/~pluther
"...and, when all men are hastening to become either tyrants or slaves,
that is when we make Liberalism the prime bogey."
- Screwtape (C.S. Lewis)

Daniel Silevitch

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Aug 3, 2000, 3:00:00 AM8/3/00
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In article <8766pjj...@globalreach.net>, Phil Fraering
<p...@globalreach.net> wrote:

> just~pat <plut...@my-deja.com> writes:
> > I've seen several bumper stickers hereabouts saying "Not all
> > who wander are lost."

> Then again, I really really want to get some of those shadowcrab
> bumperstickers.

My favorite bumper sticker is the one with a bright red background and
the text 'If this sticker is blue, you're driving too fast.'

I saw it and I had to buy it, even though I don't own a bumper (or a
car) to put it on...

-dms

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