Where does 'Eowyn' come from

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Kurt Jaeger

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Mar 3, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/3/97
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I have a friend whose given name is Eowyn.

I was wondering if anyone knew if it is purely a Tolkien name or
did Tolkien get it from somewhere. Is it of Welsh or Gaelic orgin?
If, so does anyone know what it means?

She tried looking it up in a names book once and got nowhere. I
figured if anybody would know, this bunch would.

How about it?

Thanks

Kurt

David Salo

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Mar 3, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/3/97
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In article <331B3B...@cae.wisc.edu>, Kurt Jaeger <jae...@cae.wisc.edu>
wrote:

> I have a friend whose given name is Eowyn.
>
> I was wondering if anyone knew if it is purely a Tolkien name or
> did Tolkien get it from somewhere. Is it of Welsh or Gaelic orgin?
> If, so does anyone know what it means?

Eowyn is a name that might have been Old English, but as far as I know
is not actually recorded in any Old English source. Thus it can count as
'purely a Tolkien name'. Nonetheless, it is composed of Old English
elements, eoh 'horse' (an element also used in the names of her father and
brother) and wynn 'joy'. It could be translated as 'one whose joy is in
horses'.

David Salo

Bryan James McGill

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Mar 3, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/3/97
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> I have a friend whose given name is Eowyn.
>
> I was wondering if anyone knew if it is purely a Tolkien name or
> did Tolkien get it from somewhere. Is it of Welsh or Gaelic orgin?
> If, so does anyone know what it means?

I believe "Eowyn" means "One who delights in horses" in old English. A
large number of the names Tolkien uses are derived from old and Middle
English.

Robert A. Woodward

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Mar 4, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/4/97
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In article <dsalo-ya02318000...@news.doit.wisc.edu>,
ds...@usa.net (David Salo) wrote:

> In article <331B3B...@cae.wisc.edu>, Kurt Jaeger <jae...@cae.wisc.edu>
> wrote:
>

> > I have a friend whose given name is Eowyn.
> >
> > I was wondering if anyone knew if it is purely a Tolkien name or
> > did Tolkien get it from somewhere. Is it of Welsh or Gaelic orgin?
> > If, so does anyone know what it means?
>

> Eowyn is a name that might have been Old English, but as far as I know
> is not actually recorded in any Old English source. Thus it can count as
> 'purely a Tolkien name'. Nonetheless, it is composed of Old English
> elements, eoh 'horse' (an element also used in the names of her father and
> brother) and wynn 'joy'. It could be translated as 'one whose joy is in
> horses'.
>

This is nearly the original meaning (from Greek roots) of the name
"Philip" (feminine Philipa).

--
rawoo...@aol.com
robe...@halcyon.com
cjp...@prodigy.com

Joshua Dyal

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Mar 5, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/5/97
to

Thus spoke robe...@halcyon.com (Robert A. Woodward):

>In article <dsalo-ya02318000...@news.doit.wisc.edu>,
>ds...@usa.net (David Salo) wrote:

>> In article <331B3B...@cae.wisc.edu>, Kurt Jaeger <jae...@cae.wisc.edu>
>> wrote:
>>
>> > I have a friend whose given name is Eowyn.
>> >
>> > I was wondering if anyone knew if it is purely a Tolkien name or
>> > did Tolkien get it from somewhere. Is it of Welsh or Gaelic orgin?
>> > If, so does anyone know what it means?

Tolkien never had anything with a Welsh or Gaelic origin, except for
the debatable similarities between early incarnations of his Elvish
and Welsh. All of Tolkien's Mannish names are strikingly Germanic,
and the Rohirrim expecially are Old English. The only mention I have
ever heard made by Tolkien about any Celtic words is in one of the
Appendices in RotK when he said that some of the place names of Bree
should sound vaguely autochthonous and "Celtic"


Joshua Dyal
J-D...@tamu.edu


David Salo

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Mar 6, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/6/97
to

In article <5fl0f9$8...@news.tamu.edu>, j-d...@tamu.edu (Joshua Dyal) wrote:

> The only mention I have
> ever heard made by Tolkien about any Celtic words is in one of the
> Appendices in RotK when he said that some of the place names of Bree
> should sound vaguely autochthonous and "Celtic"

A little more than 'vaguely'. Many of the names of the Bree-land are
examples of British (ancient Welsh) words early adopted into English
place-names, which often still have Welsh cognates:
Bree = Bryn 'Hill'
Chet(wood) = Coed 'wood'
Archet = Argoed 'at the edge of the wood'
Combe = Cwm 'valley'

David Salo

Grant Hughes

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Mar 6, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/6/97
to

In article <5fl0f9$8...@news.tamu.edu>, Joshua Dyal <j-d...@tamu.edu> wrote:
>
>Tolkien never had anything with a Welsh or Gaelic origin, except for
>the debatable similarities between early incarnations of his Elvish
>and Welsh. All of Tolkien's Mannish names are strikingly Germanic,
>and the Rohirrim expecially are Old English. The only mention I have

>ever heard made by Tolkien about any Celtic words is in one of the
>Appendices in RotK when he said that some of the place names of Bree
>should sound vaguely autochthonous and "Celtic"
>
>Joshua Dyal
>J-D...@tamu.edu
>

The concept of Valinor bears undeniable similarities to the Celtic myth of
Tir-na-og/Avalon, the Land of the Ever-young. Also, Tolkien appropriately
styled the Feanorian script after the old Irish script letters.

GCH

Joshua Dyal

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Mar 6, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/6/97
to

Thus spoke hug...@ohsu.edu (Grant Hughes):


>The concept of Valinor bears undeniable similarities to the Celtic myth of
>Tir-na-og/Avalon, the Land of the Ever-young. Also, Tolkien appropriately
>styled the Feanorian script after the old Irish script letters.

>GCH


It also bears striking similarities to the "Paradise" myth of almost
every culture. I can't think of a mythology that soesn't have an
"Abode of the Gods" that isn't similar in many respects to Valinor.
And when I said that Tolkien took his "mythos" from the Germanic
folklore and mythology, I was merely repeating his own declaration.
That doesn't mean that he wasn't subtly influenced in ways that he may
not have been aware of. Many linguists who have looked at his
languages (especially as they appear in early writings like Lost Tales
et al) bear a striking resemblance to Welsh and Finnish, although
Tolkien doesn't claim to have been particularly inpired by those
language in particular. Tolkien was in love with the concept of the
Old, Germanic Saxon England (Beowulf's world) and that was what he
wanted to echo. Of course the Saxons had to have already been
influenced by the Celtic Britons and the Romans by that point, so
another subtle influence can be traced to them. Who can say what all
of the influences are that shape a man's thought processes? But
Tolkien did say specifically that the LoTR and ME in general were
designed to be ENGLISH (by which he meant Anglo-Saxon-Jute, and the
part of modern English culture that is specifically descended from
them) and not Celtic, and the only reference that I have ever seen in
which he admits any Celtic influence in his work is when he says that
he wanted the names of places in Bree to "sound" to the English as if
it had a "vaguely" Celtic ring to it.


Joshua Dyal
J-D...@tamu.edu


Grant Hughes

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Mar 7, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/7/97
to

In article <5fnlc8$7...@news.tamu.edu>, Joshua Dyal <j-d...@tamu.edu> wrote:
>Thus spoke hug...@ohsu.edu (Grant Hughes):
>
>
>>The concept of Valinor bears undeniable similarities to the Celtic myth of
>>Tir-na-og/Avalon, the Land of the Ever-young. Also, Tolkien appropriately
>>styled the Feanorian script after the old Irish script letters.
>
>>GCH
>
>It also bears striking similarities to the "Paradise" myth of almost
>every culture. I can't think of a mythology that soesn't have an
>"Abode of the Gods" that isn't similar in many respects to Valinor.
>And when I said that Tolkien took his "mythos" from the Germanic
>folklore and mythology, I was merely repeating his own declaration.
>That doesn't mean that he wasn't subtly influenced in ways that he may
>not have been aware of.

I may have assumed certain nuances of the Irish Tir-na-og were widely
known. Tir-na-og was a mystic land that lay west across the water
(Atlantic) that was inhabited by a stately race called Faeries in English
translation. Furthermore, these people appeared to humans as immortal
since time did not pass in Tir-na-og. Emmisarries from Faery (as
Tir-na-og has been translated to) often arrived in swan-ships with hosts
of mighty warriors.

Perhaps read the inscriptions in the "Book of Lost Tales." (Although it
was undoubtably written by JRRT's son).

Also refer to JRRT's own "On Faery Stories," an essay uncovering the
original image of Faery and Faeries.

Many linguists who have looked at his
>languages (especially as they appear in early writings like Lost Tales
>et al) bear a striking resemblance to Welsh and Finnish, although
>Tolkien doesn't claim to have been particularly inpired by those
>language in particular. Tolkien was in love with the concept of the
>

My comment refered to the Feanorian script only and its similarity to
early Irish script.

GCH


Nathaniel Morris

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Mar 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/22/97
to

Joshua Dyal wrote:

> >> In article <331B3B...@cae.wisc.edu>, Kurt Jaeger <jae...@cae.wisc.edu>
> >> wrote:
> >>
> >> > I have a friend whose given name is Eowyn.
> >> >
> >> > I was wondering if anyone knew if it is purely a Tolkien name or
> >> > did Tolkien get it from somewhere. Is it of Welsh or Gaelic orgin?
> >> > If, so does anyone know what it means?
>

> Tolkien never had anything with a Welsh or Gaelic origin, except for
> the debatable similarities between early incarnations of his Elvish
> and Welsh. All of Tolkien's Mannish names are strikingly Germanic,
> and the Rohirrim expecially are Old English. The only mention I have
> ever heard made by Tolkien about any Celtic words is in one of the
> Appendices in RotK when he said that some of the place names of Bree
> should sound vaguely autochthonous and "Celtic"
>
> Joshua Dyal
> J-D...@tamu.edu

Tol Eressëa has a rather important relation to Celtic mythology.
Avallónë, the main port and city of Toll Eressëa is related to the
Celtic 'Avilion', and therein related to Tir-Nan-Og, the legendary 'Land
of the Young'. This is also related to an Arthurian story where
Guinevere is carried there.

Here's a description of Avilion from Tennyson's 'The Passing of Arthur':

. . . "island-valley of Avilion;
Where falls not hail, or rain, or any snow,
Nor ever wind blows loudly; but it lies
Deep-meadow'd, happy, fair with orchard-lawns
And bowery hollows crown'd with summer se"

Anyway, I think that Tolkien had quite much Celtic, Brittish and maybe
Gaelic influence in his mythology.

Nathaniel A. Morris

Joshua Dyal

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Mar 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/22/97
to

Thus spoke Nathaniel Morris <namo...@algonet.se>:


>Tol Eressëa has a rather important relation to Celtic mythology.
>Avallónë, the main port and city of Toll Eressëa is related to the
>Celtic 'Avilion', and therein related to Tir-Nan-Og, the legendary 'Land
>of the Young'. This is also related to an Arthurian story where
>Guinevere is carried there.

snip

>Anyway, I think that Tolkien had quite much Celtic, Brittish and maybe
>Gaelic influence in his mythology.

> Nathaniel A. Morris

Perhaps, but if he did, it was either subconsciously, or at least he
never admitted it. He is on record as saying clearly that he wanted
LoTR to be an alternate "Germanic" mythology. Now don't get me wrong,
it is quite possible that Avallone and Avalon do actually correspond.
Then again, it could be a coincidence, or a simple calqueing of a name
because the idea was similar.


Joshua Dyal
J-D...@tamu.edu


Michael Martinez

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Mar 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/22/97
to

On 3/22/97 8:33AM, in message <5h0u43$f...@news.tamu.edu>, Joshua Dyal
<j-d...@tamu.edu> wrote:

> Perhaps, but if he did, it was either subconsciously, or at least he
> never admitted it. He is on record as saying clearly that he wanted
> LoTR to be an alternate "Germanic" mythology. Now don't get me wrong,
> it is quite possible that Avallone and Avalon do actually correspond.
> Then again, it could be a coincidence, or a simple calqueing of a name
> because the idea was similar.

Tolkien is on record as saying he wanted to create a mythology for England,
but that mythology was not THE LORD OF THE RINGS. The mythology is the
material related in THE SILMARILLION, and that is much changed from the
original collection of stories written for THE BOOK OF LOST TALES.

Also, Tolkien did indeed acknowledge non-Germanic influences on his writing.
He was not particularly prejudiced against most of them, although he did on
occasion say he disliked Celtic stuff.

Nonetheless, arguments have been made for strong Celtic influence,
particularly in THE HOBBIT. THE LORD OF THE RINGS itself was not intended to
be a Germanic work at all (this would have been quite out of character with
the man and the time period -- 1937 to 1949). It was merely a sequel to THE
HOBBIT which grew beyond Tolkien's first conception, and which he used as a
vehicle for publishing some of his (English) mythology.

Tolkien certainly loved the Germanic languages and myths, but he didn't
confine his creativity to only those influences.

--
++ ++ "Well Samwise: What do you think of the elves now?"
||\ /|| --fbag...@mid.earth.com
|| v ||ichael Martinez (mma...@basis.com)
++ ++------------------------------------------------------


Doug

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Mar 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/23/97
to

In article <3333B7...@algonet.se>, namo...@algonet.se wrote:
>Joshua Dyal wrote:
>
>> >> In article <331B3B...@cae.wisc.edu>, Kurt Jaeger
> <jae...@cae.wisc.edu>
>> >> wrote:
>> >>
>> >> > I have a friend whose given name is Eowyn.
>> >> >
>> >> > I was wondering if anyone knew if it is purely a Tolkien name or
>> >> > did Tolkien get it from somewhere. Is it of Welsh or Gaelic orgin?
>> >> > If, so does anyone know what it means?
>>
>> Tolkien never had anything with a Welsh or Gaelic origin, except for
>> the debatable similarities between early incarnations of his Elvish
>> and Welsh. All of Tolkien's Mannish names are strikingly Germanic,
>> and the Rohirrim expecially are Old English. The only mention I have
>> ever heard made by Tolkien about any Celtic words is in one of the
>> Appendices in RotK when he said that some of the place names of Bree
>> should sound vaguely autochthonous and "Celtic"
>>
>> Joshua Dyal
>> J-D...@tamu.edu
>
>Tol Eressëa has a rather important relation to Celtic mythology.
>Avallónë, the main port and city of Toll Eressëa is related to the
>Celtic 'Avilion', and therein related to Tir-Nan-Og, the legendary 'Land
>of the Young'. This is also related to an Arthurian story where
>Guinevere is carried there.
>
>Here's a description of Avilion from Tennyson's 'The Passing of Arthur':
>
> . . . "island-valley of Avilion;
> Where falls not hail, or rain, or any snow,
> Nor ever wind blows loudly; but it lies
> Deep-meadow'd, happy, fair with orchard-lawns
> And bowery hollows crown'd with summer se"
>
>Anyway, I think that Tolkien had quite much Celtic, Brittish and maybe
>Gaelic influence in his mythology.
>
> Nathaniel A. Morris

I am reading The Lost Road, by JRR, vol 5, ISBN 0-345-40685-0, and it
gives a lot of information on the origins of the languages and ideas for JRR's
writings. Appendix F in the Return of the King touches on the translations of
languages as well. I cannot remember where I read it, so I do not trust my
memory much, but I recall something about the name Eowyn having Celtic roots
and having something to do with a water flower. I could be wrong. I often
am; got two ex-wives to prove it. ;-)

Doug

"Imagine a really cool tag line here."

Grant Hughes

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Mar 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/23/97
to

>
>Perhaps, but if he did, it was either subconsciously, or at least he
>never admitted it. He is on record as saying clearly that he wanted
>LoTR to be an alternate "Germanic" mythology. Now don't get me wrong,
>it is quite possible that Avallone and Avalon do actually correspond.
>Then again, it could be a coincidence, or a simple calqueing of a name
>because the idea was similar.
>
>
>Joshua Dyal
>J-D...@tamu.edu
>

I believe this issue was discussed at length last month. However, the
similarities between Elves/Valinor and the Irish Tuatha De
Danaan/Tir-na-nOg is undeniable.

To say that Tolkien's subcreation, of which the "Lord of the Rings" is
only a part, is flavored solely by German myth, is to impose a false
homogeneity on his works. Though Tolkien stated (as you point out) that
LOTR was primarily influenced by Germanic myth, he subtly uses other
mythologies to color his world. According to Tolkien, he was merely
translating the "Red Book of Westmarch." He employed a "parallel"
translation of proper names, drawing on various cultures (e.g.
German, English, Celtic, Arabic?) to give the reader a sense of what was
exotic and what was mundane. Of course Anglo-Saxon was his admitted (and
understandable) point of reference.

GCH

Kane Davis

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Mar 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/23/97
to

Now don't get me wrong,
>it is quite possible that Avallone and Avalon do actually correspond.
>Then again, it could be a coincidence, or a simple calqueing of a name
>because the idea was similar.

>Joshua Dyal

I think JRRT enjoyed playing word games, amusing himself by supposing
that his invented word origins are authentic, and our 'reality-based'
words and place names are mutated (or mutilated!) forms of his
myth-based words.
Examples:
Early on, in the Book of Lost Tales he created the word "Sahora" for
'the South', derived form the Qenya Lexicon root SAHA/SAHYA (other
derivatives include "sa" fire; "saiwa" hot.
He abandoned this word over time.

Later, we find "Avalone": "ava" means 'outside'(root AWA); "lone" from
"lona" means 'island, remote land' (root LONO).
Also obvious is "Atalanta", the Eldarin name of Numenor after its fall.
"Ata-" is a prefix for 're-' or 'again'; "lanta" means 'fall'(root DAT)
and thus --- Atlantis.
There are more examples but I can't think of them.
My humble opinion.
Kane

Joshua Dyal

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Mar 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/24/97
to

Thus spoke hug...@ohsu.edu (Grant Hughes):

>I believe this issue was discussed at length last month. However, the


>similarities between Elves/Valinor and the Irish Tuatha De
>Danaan/Tir-na-nOg is undeniable.

Although they can equally be said to match the Germanic elves (Alf
heim and such) even though they were never described at length like
the Tuatha De Danaan. Actually, the Tuatha De Danaan are poor
examples of Tolkienien elves; they are more like gods and goddesses of
other mythology, but by the time the Tuatha are "debased" to the
Sidhe, they more closely resemble Tolkien's elves. So he really
didn't need to go to Celtic mythology to find elves.

>To say that Tolkien's subcreation, of which the "Lord of the Rings" is
>only a part, is flavored solely by German myth, is to impose a false
>homogeneity on his works. Though Tolkien stated (as you point out) that
>LOTR was primarily influenced by Germanic myth, he subtly uses other
>mythologies to color his world. According to Tolkien, he was merely
>translating the "Red Book of Westmarch." He employed a "parallel"
>translation of proper names, drawing on various cultures (e.g.
>German, English, Celtic, Arabic?) to give the reader a sense of what was
>exotic and what was mundane. Of course Anglo-Saxon was his admitted (and
>understandable) point of reference.

>GCH
>

I'm not denying that he was influenced by all kinds of things-- I
don't know how any writer can even say what all of his influences are
as many influences are subtle and only stick with us subconsciously.
He did say that he especially avoided any Classical (Roman, Greek) and
Hebrew influences, and that he was consciously echoing the Germanic.
I think that to go much further than this is stretching it a little,
though.


Joshua Dyal
J-D...@tamu.edu

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Nathaniel Morris

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Mar 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/25/97
to

>
> I am reading The Lost Road, by JRR, vol 5, ISBN 0-345-40685-0, and it
> gives a lot of information on the origins of the languages and ideas for JRR's
> writings. Appendix F in the Return of the King touches on the translations of
> languages as well. I cannot remember where I read it, so I do not trust my
> memory much, but I recall something about the name Eowyn having Celtic roots
> and having something to do with a water flower. I could be wrong. I often
> am; got two ex-wives to prove it. ;-)
>
> Doug
>
> "Imagine a really cool tag line here."

Actually, I have no reference to my conclusion (I'm proud to say :-) ).
I discovered it when reading 'Celtic People', an interesting book worth
reading.

Nathaniel A. Morris

Edward J. Joffé

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Mar 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/25/97
to


Shame on you Englishmen ;-)

Eowin is simply Old English : eoh + wine = friend of horses.

EJK

La Faculté des études elfiques
The French Tolkien society
http://mygale.mygale.org/01/lafee

Nathaniel Morris

unread,
Mar 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/25/97
to

Kane Davis wrote:

> I think JRRT enjoyed playing word games, amusing himself by supposing
> that his invented word origins are authentic, and our 'reality-based'
> words and place names are mutated (or mutilated!) forms of his
> myth-based words.
> Examples:
> Early on, in the Book of Lost Tales he created the word "Sahora" for
> 'the South', derived form the Qenya Lexicon root SAHA/SAHYA (other
> derivatives include "sa" fire; "saiwa" hot.
> He abandoned this word over time.
>
> Later, we find "Avalone": "ava" means 'outside'(root AWA); "lone" from
> "lona" means 'island, remote land' (root LONO).
> Also obvious is "Atalanta", the Eldarin name of Numenor after its fall.
> "Ata-" is a prefix for 're-' or 'again'; "lanta" means 'fall'(root DAT)
> and thus --- Atlantis.
> There are more examples but I can't think of them.
> My humble opinion.
> Kane

I just discovered, when looking through The Lost Road a little, that
Tir-Nan-Og is linked (more or less) directly to Valinor, which reveals
to me a pattern: it seems that Tolkien relates Middle-earth mostly to
Germanic and Norse mythology, while he often makes connections between
Valinor, Tol Eressea and so on with Celtic-related mythology. This may
be diffuse and irrelevant, but I can't help asking if Tolkien intended
this, and if he did, why? Could it be for the cause of emphasizing the
difference between Middle-earth of Elves and Men, and The Holy Land as
two different worlds?

Hmm... Apparently this didn't have anything to do with what you wrote...
:-)

Nathaniel A. Morris

Nathaniel Morris

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Mar 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/26/97
to

Hmm... First of all I'm a Swede :-),and second I wasn't referring to
where the name Eowen comes from.

Nathaniel A. Morris <---- (My name is quite English though)

Nathaniel Morris

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Mar 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/26/97
to

Edward J. Joffé wrote:
>
> Nathaniel Morris wrote:
> >
> > >
> > > I am reading The Lost Road, by JRR, vol 5, ISBN 0-345-40685-0, and it
> > > gives a lot of information on the origins of the languages and ideas for JRR's
> > > writings. Appendix F in the Return of the King touches on the translations of
> > > languages as well. I cannot remember where I read it, so I do not trust my
> > > memory much, but I recall something about the name Eowyn having Celtic roots
> > > and having something to do with a water flower. I could be wrong. I often
> > > am; got two ex-wives to prove it. ;-)
> > >
> > > Doug
> > >
> > > "Imagine a really cool tag line here."
> >
> > Actually, I have no reference to my conclusion (I'm proud to say :-) ).
> > I discovered it when reading 'Celtic People', an interesting book worth
> > reading.
> >
> > Nathaniel A. Morris
>
> Shame on you Englishmen ;-)
>
> Eowin is simply Old English : eoh + wine = friend of horses.
>
> EJK
>
> La Faculté des études elfiques
> The French Tolkien society
> http://mygale.mygale.org/01/lafee

Hmhmm... First of all I'm a Swede :-),and second I wasn't referring to
where the name Eowen comes from. I discovered that Tolkien probably got
the name 'Avallone' from the Celtic 'Avilion', indirectly from
Tir-nan-Og, the Land of the Young.

Nathaniel A. Morris <---- (My last name is quite English though)

bthum...@gmail.com

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Mar 18, 2015, 5:19:47 PM3/18/15
to
It is also a celtic name meaning:house of joy

Brenda

Paul S. Person

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Mar 19, 2015, 1:21:34 PM3/19/15
to
On Wed, 18 Mar 2015 14:19:46 -0700 (PDT), bthum...@gmail.com wrote:

>It is also a celtic name meaning:house of joy

According to http://www.babynames.com/name/Eowyn, it means "horse of
joy" and was created by JRRT.

IIRC, the Rohirric language, of which Eowyn would be a name, was
modeled on Old English, so the form is probably intended to be some
Old English form that, by the time of the novel, had decayed into
Eowyn. Or maybe not, although the use of Eomer for her brother, as
opposed to Theoden and Theodred, suggests a dynastic naming pattern
although, for all I know, this sort of thing (name prefixes
designating family ties) was common among the Anglo-Saxons.

Eomer, said to mean "horse-famous" in Wikipedia, was used, it appears,
in Beowulf, making it Anglo-Saxon rather than Celt.

So "Eowyn" might have been formed from "Eomer" as a name appropriate
to his sister.
--
"Nature must be explained in
her own terms through
the experience of our senses."

Michael Cole

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Mar 19, 2015, 5:33:46 PM3/19/15
to
on 20/03/2015, Paul S. Person supposed :
> On Wed, 18 Mar 2015 14:19:46 -0700 (PDT), bthum...@gmail.com wrote:
>
>> It is also a celtic name meaning:house of joy
>
> According to http://www.babynames.com/name/Eowyn, it means "horse of
> joy" and was created by JRRT.

I would have said, Eo - Horse, Wyn - Woman. I cannot find a reference,
but I'm pretty sure that is it - wen, cwen, wyn etc are all words for
woman (in Old English), and go on to form the basis for queen (the
word, not the rock group.) I have no idea where the "joy" bit came from

--
Michael Cole

Paul S. Person

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Mar 20, 2015, 12:30:10 PM3/20/15
to
On Fri, 20 Mar 2015 08:33:20 +1100, Michael Cole <no...@invalid.com>
wrote:
Perhaps babynames.com, and its colleagues, are prone to gilding the
lily when it comes to the meaning of the more obscure names.

Bill O'Meally

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Mar 20, 2015, 1:04:12 PM3/20/15
to

According to Tolkien Gateway, "Éowyn" is AS for "horse joy". Wikipedia states that "Wynn is AS for "joy, bliss" and is actually the name of one of their runes.


http://tolkiengateway.net/wiki/%C3%89owyn

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wynn

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglo-Saxon_runes


-- 

Bill O'Meally

Michael Cole

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Mar 22, 2015, 5:47:19 PM3/22/15
to
Bill O'Meally explained on 21/03/2015 :
I stand corrected. I had a look at the dictionary.

wynn - Strong Feminine Noun
joy rapture pleasure delight gladness

wynn Singular Plural
Nominative (the/that séo) wynn (the/those þá) wynna
Accusative (the/that þá) wynne (the/those þá) wynna
Genitive (the/that þære) wynne (the/those þára) wynna
Dative (the/that þære) wynne (the/those þæm) wynnum

--
Michael Cole

Paul S. Person

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Mar 23, 2015, 12:11:03 PM3/23/15
to
So, I guess the OP's "house of joy" was just a typo.

On Mon, 23 Mar 2015 08:46:53 +1100, Michael Cole <no...@invalid.com>
wrote:

>Bill O'Meally explained on 21/03/2015 :
>> On 2015-03-19 21:33:20 +0000, Michael Cole said:
>>
>>> on 20/03/2015, Paul S. Person supposed :
>>>> On Wed, 18 Mar 2015 14:19:46 -0700 (PDT), bthum...@gmail.com wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> It is also a celtic name meaning:house of joy
>>>>
>>>> According to http://www.babynames.com/name/Eowyn, it means "horse of
>>>> joy" and was created by JRRT.
>>>
>>> I would have said, Eo - Horse, Wyn - Woman. I cannot find a reference, but
>>> I'm pretty sure that is it - wen, cwen, wyn etc are all words for woman (in
>>> Old English), and go on to form the basis for queen (the word, not the rock
>>> group.) I have no idea where the "joy" bit came from
>>
>> According to Tolkien Gateway, "Éowyn" is AS for "horse joy". Wikipedia states
>> that "Wynn is AS for "joy, bliss" and is actually the name of one of their
>> runes.
>>
>> http://tolkiengateway.net/wiki/%C3%89owyn
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wynn
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglo-Saxon_runes
>
>I stand corrected. I had a look at the dictionary.
>
>wynn - Strong Feminine Noun
>joy rapture pleasure delight gladness
>
>wynn Singular Plural
>Nominative (the/that séo) wynn (the/those ţá) wynna
>Accusative (the/that ţá) wynne (the/those ţá) wynna
>Genitive (the/that ţćre) wynne (the/those ţára) wynna
>Dative (the/that ţćre) wynne (the/those ţćm) wynnum
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