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Steve James

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Feb 14, 2003, 2:32:00 PM2/14/03
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I have just seen a better homes type programme on TV (Big Boys?!)
They were doing up a few rooms.
The living room was a demonstration of style. The room before
they started was cream emulsioned walls and the fireplace, an
iron fireplace, was also painted with cream.
But what really made me cringe was the design on the fireplace.
There, painted for all to see were multiple chinese characters.
And what did the characters say?

Feng-Shuey

Now I am not an expert but putting FS characters in a room must
be extremely non-FS.

This made me think of the decorations in houses I have been to.

When looking to move I saw many houses - the worst decorated
was one in Palmers Green that had a stream, with fish, flowing
through the living room. The carpet was green (grass) and the
walls were papered with forest scenes. It must have cost quite a
bit but ... Apparently it had been on the market for nearly a year!

Steve (Steeljam) *BF DAcFD (UU) *
Resident Opsimath in Redivivus Studies

Clotilde

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Feb 14, 2003, 3:14:30 PM2/14/03
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stee...@cix.co.uk (Steve James) wrote:
>I have just seen a better homes type programme on TV (Big Boys?!)
>
>This made me think of the decorations in houses I have been to.
>
>When looking to move I saw many houses - the worst decorated
>was one in Palmers Green that had a stream, with fish, flowing
>through the living room. The carpet was green (grass) and the
>walls were papered with forest scenes. It must have cost quite a
>bit but ... Apparently it had been on the market for nearly a year!
>
>Steve (Steeljam) *BF DAcFD (UU) *
> Resident Opsimath in Redivivus Studies
>
I'da bought it. Just for the peculiarity factor. The worst house I saw was
the various shades of rose pink dining room with a window hole into the living
room done in orange and lime green then you walked into the kitchen done
in yellow and forest green. then down the hall to the bedrooms done in alternately
orange, rust browns and blues.

CCA

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Feb 14, 2003, 4:19:26 PM2/14/03
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Steve James (>stee...@cix.co.uk) wrote

>When looking to move I saw many houses - the worst decorated
>was one in Palmers Green that had a stream, with fish, flowing
>through the living room. The carpet was green (grass) and the
>walls were papered with forest scenes. It must have cost quite a
>bit but ... Apparently it had been on the market for nearly a year!

Have you seen a programme called 'Trading Up'? (Or 'Trading Up In The Sun' at
the moment, since they're doing houses in Spain) They go along to a perfectly
normal and ordinary-looking house that the owners are hoping to sell, then they
cover the walls with, quite often, paint in disgustingly lurid colours of lilac
or lime green. They make a whole lot of things like headboards in MDF or
pictures made out of photocopies, and quite frankly make the place look tacky
and crap. Then they invite back the prospective buyer who was thinking about
buying the place before they started...and who usually decides there and then
that this is not the place for him/her after all.
A couple of days ago they were cutting the spines off old books to make an
'authentic-looking' bookcase as a cover for a computer. Almost invariably, the
'after' looks a lot worse than the 'before'.
CCA:)

BRIERLEYJON

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Feb 14, 2003, 4:52:22 PM2/14/03
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>tee...@cix.co.uk (Steve James) wrote:
>>I have just seen a better homes type programme on TV (Big Boys?!)
>>
>>This made me think of the decorations in houses I have been to.
>>
>>When looking to move I saw many houses - the worst decorated
>>was one in Palmers Green that had a stream, with fish, flowing
>>through the living room. The carpet was green (grass) and the
>>walls were papered with forest scenes. It must have cost quite a
>>bit but ... Apparently it had been on the market for nearly a year!

>I'da bought it. Just for the peculiarity factor. The worst house I saw was


>the various shades of rose pink dining room with a window hole into the
>living
>room done in orange and lime green then you walked into the kitchen done
>in yellow and forest green. then down the hall to the bedrooms done in
>alternately
>orange, rust browns and blues.

Bergholt Stuttley Johnson never did painting-and-decorating, did he? If he did,
then clearly the Johnson school has followers on Roundworld, too. And at that
it couldn't be worse than Laurence Llewellyn Bowen.

Supermouse The Rodent

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Feb 14, 2003, 5:41:21 PM2/14/03
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In article <20030214161926...@mb-de.aol.com>, CCA
<sphi...@aol.com> writes

>A couple of days ago they were cutting the spines off old books to make an
>'authentic-looking' bookcase as a cover for a computer.

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRRRRRGGGGGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHH!!!

No! *sob* No! Please no! Make the bad people go away!

(I just like books, m'kay?)

Dazedly,
--
Supermouse

Clotilde

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Feb 14, 2003, 6:07:44 PM2/14/03
to


Almost as bad as drilling a hole in old books, gluing them together and making
a lamp out of them. Or tearing the pages out to be used as parts of a literary
party. Or better yet, old books nailed to a wall of a staircase for decor.
All of which I have seen on Home Decorating shows.

Steve James

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Feb 14, 2003, 6:40:00 PM2/14/03
to

> A couple of days ago they were cutting the spines off old books to make an
> 'authentic-looking' bookcase as a cover for a computer. Almost invariably,
> the 'after' looks a lot worse than the 'before'.
>

My God. I saw the end of that programme. I could not believe it.
What did the idiot say "They are in a language I can't read..." as he
pasted the cut off book backs - IKEA do something similar but at least
they have not adulterated real books.

It reminds me of one of the great series in Brian O'Nolan's Irish Times [1].
Chronicled in The Best of Myles by Myles na Gopaleen [2].

[1] Brian wrote under the name of Flann O'Brian
[2] and Myles na Gopaleen
Spoiler to the book below

||



||




||




||




||



V

{Buchhandlung]
While visiting a newly-married friend he discovers they have bought various
bits of furniture, including bookcases. These have been stuffed with all
manner of new books, some very costly.
So a new scheme is dreamed up where by second-hand books would
obtain, and suitably worry, the books so it looked like the new owner
had actually read them. For the better off this could even mean having
pertinent sentences and paragraphs underlined in red pencil, old (forged)
letters or even small currency notes [3] used as bookmarks.

[3] When the ten bob and one pound notes were in common use. Somehow
a pound coin doesn't help - they just fall out.

LoneCat

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Feb 14, 2003, 6:09:02 PM2/14/03
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It wasn't just me then? Oh good.

I'm imagining the poor books... Their spines missing, their stiching
exposed to the world, the loose hairs on the cut edges of binding...

*cries*

--
Susan/LoneCat, AFPgoddess of indecision
http://www.lonecat.org/
Music: http://www.numfrunct.co.uk/
The cat who walks by herself

Beth Winter

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Feb 14, 2003, 7:22:18 PM2/14/03
to
CCA wrote:
>
<cnippy>

> A couple of days ago they were cutting the spines off old books to make an
> 'authentic-looking' bookcase as a cover for a computer.

*Ouch.*

On a related tangent, my mother's a devoted reader of various
home&garden magazines (and she actually has a lot of talent for interior
design - certainly more than the editors of those magazines!). In a
given year, over three different magazines, she claims she can count the
number of households shown with a semi-reasonable [1] amount of books on
the fingers of both hands, none of them among the ones specially
assembled for the photoshoots. Somewhat coincidentally, those are most
often the ones with cats featured on the photos ^_^

[1] semi-reasonable in that case meaning more than a hundred. Which is
very limited, considering that I have ten times that in my bedroom
alone.
--
Beth Winter
The Discworld Compendium <http://www.extenuation.net/disc/>
"To absent friends, lost loves, old gods and the season of mists."
-- Neil Gaiman

CCA

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Feb 15, 2003, 6:51:48 AM2/15/03
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Supermouse The Rodent (>Super...@therodent.org.uk) wrote

>CCA
><sphi...@aol.com> writes

>>A couple of days ago they were cutting the spines off old books to make an
>>'authentic-looking' bookcase as a cover for a computer.

>AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRR
RRRRGGGGGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHH!!!

>No! *sob* No! Please no! Make the bad people go away!

I believe the reason he did it was to cover the computer, which was in the
dining room, because the presenter of the programme didn't like 'multi-purpose'
rooms. (He was afraid the presence of a computer in the dining room would make
it too 'officey', I think.) Which is something I find a bit old-fashioned, to
say the least. Practically every room in our house is a 'multi-purpose' room
in some way. It's probably true of most houses, and especially apartments.
The other thing they seem to have a habit of doing on 'Trading Up' is putting
shelves up directly over beds, so you bang your head every time you sit up.
CCA:)

Supermouse The Rodent

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Feb 15, 2003, 9:33:37 AM2/15/03
to
In article <v4qtm0h...@corp.supernews.com>, Clotilde
<hno...@ev1.net> writes
>Almost as bad as
[snipped]

*sob*

Brokenly,
--
Supermouse

Lesley Weston

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Feb 15, 2003, 1:43:48 PM2/15/03
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in article 20030215065148...@mb-cu.aol.com, CCA at
sphi...@aol.com wrote on 15/02/2003 3:51 AM:

<snip>

> The other thing they seem to have a habit of doing on 'Trading Up' is putting
> shelves up directly over beds, so you bang your head every time you sit up.
> CCA:)

Obviously, they don't live in an earthquake zone. Or perhaps they just don't
*realise* that they live in an earthquake zone.

Lesley Weston.

Lesley Weston

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Feb 15, 2003, 2:00:12 PM2/15/03
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in article 9xKsx2DR...@ntlworld.com, Supermouse The Rodent at

Super...@therodent.org.uk wrote on 14/02/2003 2:41 PM:

> In article <20030214161926...@mb-de.aol.com>, CCA
> <sphi...@aol.com> writes
>> A couple of days ago they were cutting the spines off old books to make an
>> 'authentic-looking' bookcase as a cover for a computer.
>

> No! *sob* No! Please no! Make the bad people go away!
>

There is just one reason for cutting up old books, and it's not to enhance
illiterates' decor. Some books are so badly damaged that it's not feasible
to repair them, but some of the pictures might still be OK. Carefully
removing these pictures and selling them individually at reasonable prices
means that ordinary people (like me) can have botanicals or whatever that we
could not afford otherwise, and at least something is preserved from the
book. On the other hand, I have a copy of The Natural History of Selborne
from 1842 with hand-coloured illustrations. The spine is missing (perhaps it
fell victim to a "decorator"), which means that I could afford it so that I
have the rest of the book. As a bonus, the paper used to fill the spine [1]
is a contemporary handbill giving a tiny piece of Oxford history.

[1] Is that the right term? I used to know this stuff.

Lesley Weston.

Torak

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Feb 15, 2003, 1:13:05 PM2/15/03
to
Steve James wrote:
> sphi...@aol.com (CCA) wrote:
>
>> A couple of days ago they were cutting the spines off old books to make
>> an 'authentic-looking' bookcase as a cover for a computer. Almost
>> invariably, the 'after' looks a lot worse than the 'before'.
>>
> My God. I saw the end of that programme. I could not believe it.
> What did the idiot say "They are in a language I can't read..." as he
> pasted the cut off book backs - IKEA do something similar but at least
> they have not adulterated real books.

No, Ikea just stack the bookcases full of job lots of Swedish books. I've
never seen any where they've glued them together as a chunk - as a kid
(about seven or eight) I used to sit reading in whatever happened to be the
most comfortable set-piece living room at the time while my parents wandered
around. Incidentally, it wasn't until several years later that I actually
realised what those Frank Harris books they had at Ikea Kungens Kurva were
actually about...

Nowadays I think they mostly have cookery books and psychology textbooks.
And I've been to a *lot* of Ikeas...


Torak

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Feb 15, 2003, 1:17:12 PM2/15/03
to
CCA wrote:
> Supermouse The Rodent (>Super...@therodent.org.uk) wrote
>> CCA
>
>>> A couple of days ago they were cutting the spines off old books to make
>>> an 'authentic-looking' bookcase as a cover for a computer.
>
>> No! *sob* No! Please no! Make the bad people go away!
>
> I believe the reason he did it was to cover the computer, which was in the
> dining room, because the presenter of the programme didn't like
> 'multi-purpose' rooms. (He was afraid the presence of a computer in the
> dining room would make it too 'officey', I think.) Which is something I
> find a bit old-fashioned, to say the least. Practically every room in
> our house is a 'multi-purpose' room in some way. It's probably true of
> most houses, and especially apartments. The other thing they seem to have
> a habit of doing on 'Trading Up' is putting shelves up directly over
> beds, so you bang your head every time you sit up. CCA:)

I think the worst case I've ever seen was on Changing Rooms where they made
a set of shelves suspended from the ceiling by wires. They then stocked it
with the owner's vast collection of antique and ludicrously expensive
teapots [1] and left for the evening.

They returned in the morning to find the floor covered with shattered
teapots, and the wires torn out of the plasterboard ceiling.

[1] - Much like dwarves and gold, were a robber to give that lady the
ultimatum "Your teapots or your life", they had better bring a chair and a
good book while the choice was debated. And I can't remember which book I
plagiarised that from. Probably Soul Music.


CCA

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Feb 15, 2003, 2:28:47 PM2/15/03
to
Torak (>a.w.m...@durham.ac.uk) wrote

>I think the worst case I've ever seen was on Changing Rooms where they made
>a set of shelves suspended from the ceiling by wires.

On 'Trading Up' the other day, they had a vase - well, it was a bottle really,
with flowers sticking out - suspended from the ceiling so it swung around all
over the place and looked extremely stupid. It was reasonably near to a wall,
too, and it'd only have taken one person to come in drunk and go "I name this
ship..."
CCA:)

Torak

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Feb 15, 2003, 2:14:06 PM2/15/03
to

Oh, I didn't mind the "suspended from the ceiling" bit. It was overloading
it with very fragile and very valuable things that bothered me.


gra...@affordable-leather.co.ukdeletethis

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Feb 15, 2003, 5:29:39 PM2/15/03
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Hi there,

On Fri, 14 Feb 2003 20:14:30 -0000, "Clotilde" <hno...@ev1.net>
wrote:

>>When looking to move I saw many houses - the worst decorated
>>was one in Palmers Green that had a stream, with fish, flowing
>>through the living room. The carpet was green (grass) and the

>>walls were papered with forest scenes. <snip>


>>
>I'da bought it. Just for the peculiarity factor. The worst house I saw was
>the various shades of rose pink dining room with a window hole into the living

>room done in orange and lime green <snip>

When I bought my flat the front room (which most people would use as a
sitting room, but I use more like a bedsit) was papered in a sort of
greeny grey "leaf" pattern with a dark green floral border.

Before I moved in I got a friend who was in need of some cash and said
"here's a roller, here's a stepladder, here's a tub of magnolia paint,
deal with this!"

Cheers,
Graham.

Richard Eney

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Feb 16, 2003, 12:59:00 AM2/16/03
to
In article <v4qtm0h...@corp.supernews.com>,

Clotilde <hno...@ev1.net> wrote:
>Supermouse The Rodent <Super...@therodent.org.uk> wrote:
>>CCA <sphi...@aol.com> writes
>>>A couple of days ago they were cutting the spines off old books to make
>>>an 'authentic-looking' bookcase as a cover for a computer.
>>
>>AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
>>AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
>>AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRRRRRGGGGGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHH!!!
>>
>>No! *sob* No! Please no! Make the bad people go away!

>Almost as bad as drilling a hole in old books, gluing them together and


>making a lamp out of them. Or tearing the pages out to be used as parts
>of a literary party. Or better yet, old books nailed to a wall of a
>staircase for decor. All of which I have seen on Home Decorating shows.

A couple of years ago I forcibly removed a book that had been glued to
the "bookshelves" of a restaurant and received permission from the manager
to replace it with a junk book of similar appearance (cost $1 at thrift
shop); I eventually sold the rescued one to a friend who recognized it
for the classic Swedish novel it was. (The rest of them were, IMO,
worthy of being glued to the walls for "decor" - fortunately, since they
had far more glue on them than the one I rescued. I like books in
general, but there are some that I can see savaged without a pang. Much.
<twitch>)

=Tamar

Richard Eney

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Feb 16, 2003, 1:09:02 AM2/16/03
to
In article <3E4D883A...@astercity.net>,
Beth Winter <ren...@astercity.net> wrote:
<snip>

>On a related tangent, my mother's a devoted reader of various
>home&garden magazines (and she actually has a lot of talent for interior
>design - certainly more than the editors of those magazines!). In a
>given year, over three different magazines, she claims she can count the
>number of households shown with a semi-reasonable [1] amount of books on
>the fingers of both hands, none of them among the ones specially
>assembled for the photoshoots. Somewhat coincidentally, those are most
>often the ones with cats featured on the photos ^_^

They showed _any_ books? That's more than they used to.
I remember one such showplace that actually had a room they called the
"library". Not only did they not have a book or even a magazine in it,
there wasn't a flat surface in it that you could have put a book down on
if you had walked in carrying one. IIRC, there also wasn't a chair; it
was really sort of an anteroom just in from the front door. It may have
had a floor lamp.

>[1] semi-reasonable in that case meaning more than a hundred. Which is
>very limited, considering that I have ten times that in my bedroom
>alone.

Except for some of the really serious magazines of the 1990s where they
begin with, for example, a country barn, and change it into a 3 million
dollar house, I've rarely seen a decorating magazine show a house with any
large number of books. In the above-mentioned magazines, the occasional
book house compensates by having almost as many books as you own in one
huge wall-full of shelves, with a distinct air of "eccentric professor" in
the decor. My reaction is usually "love the shelves, get rid of the
furniture, put in more shelves". :-)

=Tamar

Catja Pafort

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Feb 16, 2003, 3:36:27 AM2/16/03
to
Torak wrote:

> I think the worst case I've ever seen was on Changing Rooms where they made
> a set of shelves suspended from the ceiling by wires. They then stocked it
> with the owner's vast collection of antique and ludicrously expensive
> teapots [1] and left for the evening.
>
> They returned in the morning to find the floor covered with shattered
> teapots, and the wires torn out of the plasterboard ceiling.

:-(

That's just criminal. Moving shelves, when you happen to bang your
head/elbows against them, will wreck havoc with anything that's
valuable.

Another good reason for never letting these sorts of people near
anything I own.

The one episode I vividly remember had the people saying 'what we really
liked about this house was the free-standing pine staircase. The one
other thing we adore is our collection of pub mirrors.

The pub mirrors were, of course, taken out of the room - and the pine
staircase clad in aluminium to give it a contemporary look.

The owners got back and were ready to strangle the designers.

I guess the guy who got the paint out before the decorators had left
felt similar...

Catja

aka PerditaX

Childe Wellington

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Feb 16, 2003, 6:53:21 AM2/16/03
to
Supermouse The Rodent <Super...@therodent.org.uk> wrote in message news:<9xKsx2DR...@ntlworld.com>...

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOK!!!!!!!!!!!!!

CCA

unread,
Feb 16, 2003, 7:14:57 AM2/16/03
to
Catja Pafort (>green...@cix.co.uk) wrote

>The one episode I vividly remember had the people saying 'what we really
>liked about this house was the free-standing pine staircase. The one
>other thing we adore is our collection of pub mirrors.
>The pub mirrors were, of course, taken out of the room - and the pine
>staircase clad in aluminium to give it a contemporary look.
>The owners got back and were ready to strangle the designers.
>I guess the guy who got the paint out before the decorators had left
>felt similar...

I remember one episode of 'Changing Rooms' where they did two apartments
belonging to students. I can't remember what exactly they did with the
apartments, but at least one of the students took one look at the results and
said "Are the paint-rollers still here?"
CCA:)


Terry Pratchett

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Feb 16, 2003, 7:14:12 AM2/16/03
to
In article <b2m3pg$mui$1...@sirius.dur.ac.uk>, Torak
<a.w.m...@durham.ac.uk> writes

> The other thing they seem to have
>> a habit of doing on 'Trading Up' is putting shelves up directly over
>> beds, so you bang your head every time you sit up. CCA:)

After their legs have been broken, people like that should be kept away
from books. What am I saying...they probably keep away from books
anyway.
--
Terry Pratchett

Catja Pafort

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Feb 16, 2003, 10:12:42 AM2/16/03
to
Terry wrote:

{re people disrespectful of books]

> After their legs have been broken, people like that should be kept away
> from books.

It is good of you to point out this shocking gap in current legislation,
leading to the abuse of those most vulnerable of information carriers,
the humble book.


The SPCB (Society for the Prevention of Cruelty towards Books) will
shortly be offering a service to ease the suffering of books that are
often shoved into attics and forgotten about.

On http://www.bibliofile.co.uk [1] you will shortly find a webboard that
allows you to offer - for free (apart from shipping costs) - those
reference books and manuals that you really can do without, which are
too obscure to sell, but someone, somewhere, might love them.

Catja
aka PerditaX

[1] That means I need to put that domain on-line and do something with
it. Drat.


Jenny Griffee

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Feb 16, 2003, 4:39:21 PM2/16/03
to
In article <BA73CA64.518E%les...@vancouverbc.net>,
Lesley Weston <les...@vancouverbc.net> wrote:


I avoid Trading Spaces as much as humanly possible, but occasionally I
run across it while channel-surfing and find myself staring in abject
horror. The worst idea I've yet seen: covering the walls of a bathroom
with artificial flowers. Not wallpaper, not paint: actual flowers, in
the hundreds, stuck to the wall. They'll get dirty, damp, and moldy,
and they'll be impossible to clean....

The homeowners loved it. I wish them the best of luck. ::cough::

As for me, I just moved into a new condo and finished installing the
bookshelves yesterday. (There are many of them, and they're securely
anchored to the wall; I know I'm in a high-risk earthquake zone, and the
last thing I need is to get beaned with a six-foot bookcase. ;) It
probably says something about me that I put in all the shelves and
organized the books & CDs before I did anything about the kitchen or my
clothes....

- j
http://www.livejournal.com/users/casira/

Mary Messall

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Feb 16, 2003, 5:32:19 PM2/16/03
to
Jenny Griffee wrote:
> I avoid Trading Spaces as much as humanly possible, but occasionally I
> run across it while channel-surfing and find myself staring in abject
> horror.

I ended up watching quite a lot of it over Christmas break, because my
mother, sister, and cousin Colleen are fans. And I have to admit, it's
entertaining... More entertaining when the designs are appalling than
when they're good, possibly, because they're much funnier then. It's a
sort of gruesome form of amusement, like throwing prisoners to lions...

> The worst idea I've yet seen: covering the walls of a bathroom
> with artificial flowers. Not wallpaper, not paint: actual flowers, in
> the hundreds, stuck to the wall. They'll get dirty, damp, and moldy,
> and they'll be impossible to clean....
> The homeowners loved it. I wish them the best of luck. ::cough::

I saw that episode. The wife claimed to love it. The husband was
polite, at best. Hilde (I'm not at all sure I'm spelling that right,
"Hill-dee") is the worst of all the designers. Aside from that awful
fake flower thing (they were *stapled* to the wall with a staple gun!
If they ever want to take them down--I'd start the very next
day--they'd have to remove 6000 staples and their walls would be
entirely covered with holes) I also saw her nail a bunch of old LPs to
a wall in place of wallpaper. She also has this thing with *painting*
apholostered furniture, with spray paint. The people who got the room
full of record albums explicitly asked her not to paint the chair that
one of them inherited from her grandmother, and she did anyway. In a
later episode, she painted chocolate pudding into a wall, and I swear I
thought she was going to cover the whole wall with it... (Fortunately,
she was just trying to match paint to it.)

One of the other designers is almost as bad. He painted the walls of
one room bright lime green, and then painted the *hardwood floor*
black, and put orange furniture in the room. He did another room which
was quite nice, all autumn colors, but then he decorated it by framing
actual dead leaves and hanging them up. I wanted to see "one month
later" when the leaves were brown and disintegrating in their frames.

There's at least two designers, though, the woman with the southern
accent and the Asian man, who actually seem to work miracles. It's
impressive.

-Mary

Thomas Zahr

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Feb 16, 2003, 5:25:23 PM2/16/03
to
Jenny Griffee <gri...@halcyon.com> wrote in
news:griffee-06F25A...@brokaw.wa.com:

...

>
> As for me, I just moved into a new condo and finished installing the
> bookshelves yesterday. (There are many of them, and they're securely
> anchored to the wall; I know I'm in a high-risk earthquake zone, and
> the last thing I need is to get beaned with a six-foot bookcase. ;)
> It probably says something about me that I put in all the shelves and
> organized the books & CDs before I did anything about the kitchen or
> my clothes....
>

obviously you have a clear set of priorities. Next should come the
installation of some form of music system, an easy chair and a nice
drink, so that you can test your newly installed bookcases, do they
contain the right books, can you find the ones you really want to read
right now?

Lot's of fun with your new abode
--
Ciao

Thomas =:-)
<out of sig error>

BRIERLEYJON

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Feb 16, 2003, 5:43:45 PM2/16/03
to

Things done in the right order there, good to see. But did you do what I always
do when packing or unpacking books ... "oooh, I forgot I had that," and then
start reading it? In my case it is pretty rapidly terminated by a wifely book
round the earole, delivered with force, but I still do it.

Be happy in your new home.

Jon

Don't look back. Something might be gaining on you.

Jenny Griffee

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Feb 17, 2003, 3:10:05 AM2/17/03
to
In article <20030216174345...@mb-bj.aol.com>,
brier...@aol.com (BRIERLEYJON) wrote:


Thanks to both for the well-wishes. :)

I'm definitely enjoying the new place, although there's one problem: my
dialup speeds have plunged to 26400. Bleeargh. I think this is a sign
from above... Thou Shalt Get DSL. (Not that I need the expense just
now... groan.)

On the other hand, it's probably a good thing that I rediscovered Usenet
and can do some low-band browsing here instead. ::laugh::

Yep, the music system is installed -- I have a loop of Bertine, Frou
Frou and Duncan Sheik going in the next room over as I type. And the
books I want are within easy reach. I've been doing the "oh, boy,
THERE'S that book! I wanted to (re)read that!" thing for days -- mostly
because I can actually SEE everything now, instead of having everything
piled up three books deep in front of the shelves....

And to seque nicely back onto the thread topic: The show I have been
taking some design tips from lately is Surprise By Design, which is on
TLC during the day (I've been setting the VCR for it) and actually
features Designers With A Clue. Robert's big on bookshelf layouts, and
he's very good at it; I've been emulating some of his techniques,
insofar as I can find spots on the shelves that haven't been overtaken
by, uh, the books. Funny how they keep occupying every inch of
available space!

- j
http://www.livejournal.com/users/casira/

Terry Pratchett

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Feb 17, 2003, 7:02:36 AM2/17/03
to
In article <3E500214...@ups.edu>, Mary Messall <mmes...@ups.edu>
writes

>
>One of the other designers is almost as bad. He painted the walls of
>one room bright lime green, and then painted the *hardwood floor*
>black, and put orange furniture in the room. He did another room which
>was quite nice, all autumn colors, but then he decorated it by framing
>actual dead leaves and hanging them up. I wanted to see "one month
>later" when the leaves were brown and disintegrating in their frames.

I don't watch this programme. Do the show the bit where the talentless,
mouthy little turds get shot in the head?

Lemme tell you about this room here.

We had the walls plastered with old-fashioned lime plaster and painted
with distemper. The effect is amazing -- it gives the walls almost a
soft look, because the light is reflected from within the distemper
rather than from the surface (it sounds odd, but apparently is the same
with milk-- the light is coming back from within the first few layers of
fat molecules.) The walls change colour as the sun moves around, from
white up through cream and all the way to grey-green. The room lives.
I'd shoot the first designer that sets foot in it.
--
Terry Pratchett

Beth Winter

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Feb 17, 2003, 8:28:13 AM2/17/03
to
Mary Messall wrote:
>
<snippy>

> One of the other designers is almost as bad. He painted the walls of
> one room bright lime green, and then painted the *hardwood floor*
> black, and put orange furniture in the room.

Ouch. Nevermind the color combination, anyone who paints a hardwood
floor deserves to be shot. Reminds me of a lady who came into my
grandparents' summer cottage, took one look at the inside, which is
completely panelled with semi-finished pine boards, and said it would
look marvellous painted yellow. I think the quadruple-strength glare
from me, Gran, Mom and my aunt kind of discouraged her ^_~

> He did another room which
> was quite nice, all autumn colors, but then he decorated it by framing
> actual dead leaves and hanging them up. I wanted to see "one month
> later" when the leaves were brown and disintegrating in their frames.

Actually, you can get it done - if you spray the leaves with hairspray.
At the aforementioned cottage Mom made a wreath for a lamp, from leaves
and herbs, that after a bit of hairspray treatment stayed up for four
years and was thrown out when the lamp went. And then there's mistletoe,
which doesn't even need that, and looks gorgeous dried.

ward

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Feb 17, 2003, 9:33:11 AM2/17/03
to
Richard Eney wrote:

> Except for some of the really serious magazines of the 1990s where they
> begin with, for example, a country barn, and change it into a 3 million
> dollar house, I've rarely seen a decorating magazine show a house with any
> large number of books. In the above-mentioned magazines, the occasional
> book house compensates by having almost as many books as you own in one
> huge wall-full of shelves, with a distinct air of "eccentric professor" in
> the decor. My reaction is usually "love the shelves, get rid of the
> furniture, put in more shelves". :-)

I keep trying that, but my wife insists that I don't block the windows. As
though there were anything interesting to see through them in this New
Jersey suburb.
--
Ward Griffiths wdg...@comcast.net

He got the country's name wrong, but Bush was precisely right when he
said: "Your enemy is not surrounding your country. Your enemy is ruling
your country." -- Lew Rockwell, on the 2003 State of the Union speech

ward

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Feb 17, 2003, 9:36:43 AM2/17/03
to
Torak wrote:

The store in Elizabeth New Jersey has the shelves stocked with really cheap
remaindered volumes. Generally batches of 20-30 of _the same title_ on a
shelf. Depressing, really, but lots better than the idea of cutting up
real books for a facade.

ward

unread,
Feb 17, 2003, 9:46:24 AM2/17/03
to
Beth Winter wrote:

> Ouch. Nevermind the color combination, anyone who paints a hardwood
> floor deserves to be shot. Reminds me of a lady who came into my
> grandparents' summer cottage, took one look at the inside, which is
> completely panelled with semi-finished pine boards, and said it would
> look marvellous painted yellow. I think the quadruple-strength glare
> from me, Gran, Mom and my aunt kind of discouraged her ^_~

If you own cats, and one more sanding is going to leave holes in the floor,
there may be little other choice than to paint (with waterproof) a hardwood
floor. Especially if the floor has been through a century of sanding and
you can't (quite yet) afford to put a new layer of wood flooring down. Of
course, what we went with instead was a cat-vomit-colored carpet as a
temporary measure instead.

Beth Winter

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Feb 17, 2003, 9:52:01 AM2/17/03
to
ward wrote:
>
> Beth Winter wrote:
>
> > Ouch. Nevermind the color combination, anyone who paints a hardwood
> > floor deserves to be shot. Reminds me of a lady who came into my
> > grandparents' summer cottage, took one look at the inside, which is
> > completely panelled with semi-finished pine boards, and said it would
> > look marvellous painted yellow. I think the quadruple-strength glare
> > from me, Gran, Mom and my aunt kind of discouraged her ^_~
>
> If you own cats, and one more sanding is going to leave holes in the floor,
> there may be little other choice than to paint (with waterproof) a hardwood
> floor. Especially if the floor has been through a century of sanding and
> you can't (quite yet) afford to put a new layer of wood flooring down. Of
> course, what we went with instead was a cat-vomit-colored carpet as a
> temporary measure instead.

Uh, why exactly would cats damage the floor? I have a hardwood floor in
here, and the Right Hon. Lady Panther has had no effect on it. If
anything, she's more dangerous to the carpet, as her fur is very thick
and shedding constantly...

CCA

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Feb 17, 2003, 11:48:08 AM2/17/03