Re: OT: Chess

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Kerr-Mudd,John

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Nov 6, 2020, 4:50:45 AM11/6/20
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On Fri, 06 Nov 2020 08:54:07 GMT, Adam Funk <a24...@ducksburg.com>
wrote:

> On 2020-11-05, charles wrote:
>
>> In article <76nd7hx...@news.ducksburg.com>,
>> Adam Funk <a24...@ducksburg.com> wrote:
>>> On 2020-11-05, Tony Cooper wrote:
>>
>>> > My wife and I just watched the last episode of "The Queen's
>>> > Gambit".
>>> >
>>> > My knowledge of chess stops at knowing how each piece can move.
>>> > Why the player moves that piece, and the strategy involved, is
>>> > beyond me.
>>> >
>>> > Yet, we were entranced by the series. It didn't require any
>>> > knowledge of chess to follow even though 90-some percent of the
>>> > scenes involved chess.
>>> >
>>> > Melding this with different thread (reality in US
>>> > movies/television)...While we don't understand chess strategy, my
>>> > wife and I do understand that you can't put 20 pounds of sugar in
>>> > a 10 pound sack*.
>>> >
>>> > The heroine of the movie goes to chess tournaments in distant
>>> > cities. These tournaments last for several days and have social
>>> > events in the evenings. The heroine wears different - very
>>> > stylish - outfits each day and for the social events.
>>> >
>>> > Yet, she is shown arriving carrying a single suitcase about the
>>> > size of a large briefcase.
>>
>>> It probably uses the same magic as Indiana Jones's knapsack, which
>>> produces a clean & neat tuxedo as required. Maybe related to The
>>> Luggage in _The Colour of Magic_?
>>
>> or Dr Who's Tardis.
>
> But the Tardis can contain people. Actually, , IIRC, people can go
> into The Luggage but they don't come back out.
>
Neilette & Rincewind hide in it, in The Last Continent (I'm re-reading it
ATM)


(xposted to AFP for old times sake)


--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.

Adam Funk

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Nov 6, 2020, 8:15:05 AM11/6/20
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Fair enough --- I haven't read that one yet.


--
It is probable that television drama of high caliber and produced by
first-rate artists will materially raise the level of dramatic taste
of the nation. ---David Sarnoff, CEO of RCA, 1939; in Stoll 1995

Lewis

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Nov 6, 2020, 12:46:47 PM11/6/20
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What?! Look, there's only 41 books in Discworld, get on it.


--
Qui me amat, amat et canem meam

Kerr-Mudd,John

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Nov 6, 2020, 3:28:58 PM11/6/20
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On Fri, 06 Nov 2020 17:46:45 GMT, Lewis <g.k...@kreme.dont-email.me>
wrote:
I must be on my 3rd or 4th lap.

Matthieu Weber

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Nov 6, 2020, 4:16:08 PM11/6/20
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Le Fri, 6 Nov 2020 20:28:55 -0000 (UTC), Kerr-Mudd,John
<nots...@127.0.0.1> a écrit:
For what it's worth, mee too. And I regret never having considered
participating in a.f.p. twenty years ago when Usenet was still lively :(
I subscribed to a.f.p. a few months ago because there really hadn't been
much traffic in the past years on the (only) newsgroup I had been
subscribed since the end of the '90s.

Matthieu, usenet nostalgic
--
HTML lesson #42:
The only legitimate use of the greatly loathed <BLINK> tag.

Schroedinger's Cat is <BLINK>NOT</BLINK> dead.

Lewis

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Nov 6, 2020, 4:23:48 PM11/6/20
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I've lost track, but I am on The Fifth Elephant currently (25/41).


--
I'd rather have my mind opened by wonder than closed by belief

Lewis

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Nov 6, 2020, 4:27:34 PM11/6/20
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Or 30 years ago when Sir Terry himself posted here.

> I subscribed to a.f.p. a few months ago because there really hadn't been
> much traffic in the past years on the (only) newsgroup I had been
> subscribed since the end of the '90s.

Most of the group left in one swell foop for the shirt hole that is
Facebook a few years ago.

--
WHO KNOWS WHAT EVIL LURKS IN THE HEART OF MEN? The Death of Rats
looked up from the feast of potato. SQUEAK, he said. Death waved
a hand dismissively. WELL, YES, OBVIOUSLY *ME*, he said. I JUST
WONDERED IF THERE WAS ANYONE ELSE. --The Truth

Matthieu Weber

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Nov 7, 2020, 5:02:40 AM11/7/20
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Le Fri, 6 Nov 2020 21:27:32 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
<g.k...@kreme.dont-email.me> a écrit:
> In message <slrnrqbf8m...@minikone.weber.fi.eu.org>
> Matthieu Weber <mwe...@eispammia.free.fr.invalid> wrote:
>> Le Fri, 6 Nov 2020 20:28:55 -0000 (UTC), Kerr-Mudd,John
>> <nots...@127.0.0.1> a écrit:
>>> On Fri, 06 Nov 2020 17:46:45 GMT, Lewis <g.k...@kreme.dont-email.me>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> In message <u1uf7hx...@news.ducksburg.com> Adam Funk
>>>> <a24...@ducksburg.com> wrote:
>>>>> Fair enough --- I haven't read that one yet.
>>>> What?! Look, there's only 41 books in Discworld, get on it.
>>> I must be on my 3rd or 4th lap.
>> For what it's worth, mee too. And I regret never having considered
>> participating in a.f.p. twenty years ago when Usenet was still lively :(
>
> Or 30 years ago when Sir Terry himself posted here.

30 years ago I had not heard of the Internet yet :)

>> I subscribed to a.f.p. a few months ago because there really hadn't been
>> much traffic in the past years on the (only) newsgroup I had been
>> subscribed since the end of the '90s.
>
> Most of the group left in one swell foop for the shirt hole that is
> Facebook a few years ago.

This is one hole I'm very careful not to fall into. It's so sad that
people are attracted to shiny honeypots. I for one am very fond on open
and distributed systems such as IRC and Usenet, but I know I'm not in
the majority anymore.

Matthieu, old fart

Matthieu Weber

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Nov 7, 2020, 5:05:10 AM11/7/20
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Le Fri, 6 Nov 2020 21:23:45 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
<g.k...@kreme.dont-email.me> a écrit:
And I just started I shall wear Midnight, alternating with Jasper
Fforde's Thursday Next series, which is IMO a very good read too.

Matthieu

Lewis

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Nov 7, 2020, 6:22:52 AM11/7/20
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Yes, I like Fforde quite a lot.

--
The night is always old. He'd walked too often down dark streets in
the secret hours and felt the night stretching away, and known in
his blood that while days and kings and empires come and go, the
night is always the same age, always aeons deep. Terrors unfolded
in the velvet shadows and while the nature of the talons may
change, the nature of the beast does not. --Jingo

Nigel Stapley

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Nov 7, 2020, 7:12:51 AM11/7/20
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On 07/11/2020 10:02, Matthieu Weber wrote:
> Le Fri, 6 Nov 2020 21:27:32 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
> <g.k...@kreme.dont-email.me> a écrit:

>>
>> Most of the group left in one swell foop for the shirt hole that is
>> Facebook a few years ago.
>
> This is one hole I'm very careful not to fall into. It's so sad that
> people are attracted to shiny honeypots. I for one am very fond on open
> and distributed systems such as IRC and Usenet, but I know I'm not in
> the majority anymore.
>

I still check in regularly to see if anyone's still here, but it's been
a depressing experience in the last two or three years. Où sont les
posteurs d'antan?

--
Regards

Nigel Stapley

www.thejudge.me.uk

<reply-to will bounce>

--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

Matthieu Weber

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Nov 7, 2020, 8:14:55 AM11/7/20
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Le Sat, 7 Nov 2020 12:12:45 +0000, Nigel Stapley
<un...@judgemental.plus.com> a écrit:
> On 07/11/2020 10:02, Matthieu Weber wrote:
>> Le Fri, 6 Nov 2020 21:27:32 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
>> <g.k...@kreme.dont-email.me> a écrit:
>
>>>
>>> Most of the group left in one swell foop for the shirt hole that is
>>> Facebook a few years ago.
>>
>> This is one hole I'm very careful not to fall into. It's so sad that
>> people are attracted to shiny honeypots. I for one am very fond on open
>> and distributed systems such as IRC and Usenet, but I know I'm not in
>> the majority anymore.
>>
>
> I still check in regularly to see if anyone's still here, but it's been
> a depressing experience in the last two or three years. Où sont les
> posteurs d'antan?

I've been wondering the same thing about the French linux-related
newsgroup where I've spent a lot of my time in the naughties. Most of
those people were actual entousiasts about the Usenet technology, I
cannot imagine they have given up on it and gone to Facebook or Reddit
(although one of them has indeed joined a Reddit group because the
people with the technical knowledge he needed are there).

Matthieu

Matthieu Weber

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Nov 7, 2020, 8:19:38 AM11/7/20
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Le Sat, 7 Nov 2020 11:22:50 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
<g.k...@kreme.dont-email.me> a écrit:
> In message <slrnrqcsak...@minikone.weber.fi.eu.org>
> Matthieu Weber <mwe...@eispammia.free.fr.invalid> wrote:
>> Le Fri, 6 Nov 2020 21:23:45 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
>> <g.k...@kreme.dont-email.me> a écrit:
>>> In message <XnsAC6DD05A5D...@144.76.35.198>
>>> Kerr-Mudd,John <nots...@127.0.0.1> wrote:
>>>> On Fri, 06 Nov 2020 17:46:45 GMT, Lewis <g.k...@kreme.dont-email.me>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>> What?! Look, there's only 41 books in Discworld, get on it.
>>>> I must be on my 3rd or 4th lap.
>>> I've lost track, but I am on The Fifth Elephant currently (25/41).
>> And I just started I shall wear Midnight, alternating with Jasper
>> Fforde's Thursday Next series, which is IMO a very good read too.
>
> Yes, I like Fforde quite a lot.

Oh, another fan :) I rarely laugh out loud when reading a book, but I
have to admit I have done that more often reading Fforde than reading
Pratchett. I hope I won't get punished for admitting that in here :)

Matthieu Weber

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Nov 7, 2020, 9:06:51 AM11/7/20
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Le 07 Nov 2020 13:14:53 GMT, Matthieu Weber
<mwe...@eispammia.free.fr.invalid> a écrit:
> Le Sat, 7 Nov 2020 12:12:45 +0000, Nigel Stapley
> <un...@judgemental.plus.com> a écrit:
>> On 07/11/2020 10:02, Matthieu Weber wrote:
>>> Le Fri, 6 Nov 2020 21:27:32 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
>>> <g.k...@kreme.dont-email.me> a écrit:
>>
>>>>
>>>> Most of the group left in one swell foop for the shirt hole that is
>>>> Facebook a few years ago.
>>>
>>> This is one hole I'm very careful not to fall into. It's so sad that
>>> people are attracted to shiny honeypots. I for one am very fond on open
>>> and distributed systems such as IRC and Usenet, but I know I'm not in
>>> the majority anymore.
>>>
>>
>> I still check in regularly to see if anyone's still here, but it's been
>> a depressing experience in the last two or three years. Où sont les
>> posteurs d'antan?
>
> I've been wondering the same thing about the French linux-related
> newsgroup where I've spent a lot of my time in the naughties. Most of

I was chopping carrots when it dawned to me that this should have been
“noughties”, not “naughties”. Apologies to all who would have been
expecting hanky and possibly a bit of panky and are now understandably
disappointed.

Paul .Jamison

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Nov 7, 2020, 6:51:35 PM11/7/20
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On Saturday, November 7, 2020 at 6:12:51 AM UTC-6, Nigel Stapley wrote:
> On 07/11/2020 10:02, Matthieu Weber wrote:
> > Le Fri, 6 Nov 2020 21:27:32 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
> > <g.k...@kreme.dont-email.me> a écrit:
>
> >>
> >> Most of the group left in one swell foop for the shirt hole that is
> >> Facebook a few years ago.
> >
> > This is one hole I'm very careful not to fall into. It's so sad that
> > people are attracted to shiny honeypots. I for one am very fond on open
> > and distributed systems such as IRC and Usenet, but I know I'm not in
> > the majority anymore.
> >
> I still check in regularly to see if anyone's still here, but it's been
> a depressing experience in the last two or three years. Où sont les
> posteurs d'antan?
>
I'm still around and I check the group regularly as well. I miss doing the monthly birthday salutes, but the birthday list is - I *think* - on another dead-computer hard drive that I haven't had the wherewithal to access and copy to a flash drive. I'm not sure there are enough people left here to justify starting there salutes again, beyond for nostalgia's sake.

I've gone through some major changes in my life in the last year. I fell in my house due to low blood pressure and I have moved into Shanna's place, and she's my caregiver now. I seem to have Parkinson's, which is no fun. I maintain.

(And I regret my health issues right now, and I regret the lack of a chandelier here strong enough to hold my weight. Otherwise I'd be swinging vigorously from it right now shouting "HE WON! HE WON! *IT LOST!!* WOO-HOO!!!"

Lewis

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Nov 7, 2020, 8:46:58 PM11/7/20
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In message <e7cc3ebe-6a5f-4166...@googlegroups.com> Paul .Jamison <paul...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> (And I regret my health issues right now, and I regret the lack of a
> chandelier here strong enough to hold my weight. Otherwise I'd be
> swinging vigorously from it right now shouting "HE WON! HE WON! *IT
> LOST!!* WOO-HOO!!!"

So say we all!

--
I WILL NOT CARVE GODS Bart chalkboard Ep. 8F11

Nigel Stapley

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Nov 8, 2020, 7:16:37 AM11/8/20
to
On 07/11/2020 23:51, Paul .Jamison wrote:

> I've gone through some major changes in my life in the last year. I fell in my house due to low blood pressure and I have moved into Shanna's place, and she's my caregiver now. I seem to have Parkinson's, which is no fun. I maintain.

Yikes! Sorry to hear about all that, Paul.

After my scare in 2016, my ticker seems still to be OK. The big change
in my life is that I took redundancy from the Civil Service at the end
of last June, and am enjoying my freedom as much as one can when being
put into - and taken out of - various degrees of lockdown.

>
> (And I regret my health issues right now, and I regret the lack of a chandelier here strong enough to hold my weight. Otherwise I'd be swinging vigorously from it right now shouting "HE WON! HE WON! *IT LOST!!* WOO-HOO!!!"
>

It is something of a relief that the wretched tribble-head has been
deposed, even if I hope no-one seriously imagines that there will be any
major improvement beyond that, given that it means that Wall Street has
now regained complete control of the feral gummint.

Robert Carnegie

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Nov 8, 2020, 1:48:44 PM11/8/20
to
Ah yes!

When the Luggage swallows other people...
clean laundry comes out.

It's a trick lid or something. :-)

As for the clothes... struggling though a list of things
titled "Queen's Gambit" including an episode of "He-Man",
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Queen%27s_Gambit_%28miniseries%29>
is described set in the 1950s and 60s.

You can hire dresses in the 21st century, but
I think that's a modern innovation, possibly
depending on the existence of credit cards.
Perhaps I'm wrong.

Swapsies would be an explanation but I assume
she is the only female attending these events,
so that leaves separate luggage, shoplifting,
or the small case containing friendly elves, dwarfs
(with straw), mice or other educated rodents, or
fairy godmothers, which were successfully
miniaturized by 1959 (Disney, W.)

Matthieu Weber

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Nov 8, 2020, 3:54:01 PM11/8/20
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Le Sun, 8 Nov 2020 10:48:42 -0800 (PST), Robert Carnegie
<rja.ca...@excite.com> a écrit:
> On Friday, 6 November 2020 at 09:50:45 UTC, Kerr-Mudd,John wrote:
>> On Fri, 06 Nov 2020 08:54:07 GMT, Adam Funk <a24...@ducksburg.com>
>> wrote:
>>
>> > On 2020-11-05, charles wrote:
>> >
>> >> In article <76nd7hx...@news.ducksburg.com>,
>> >> Adam Funk <a24...@ducksburg.com> wrote:
>> >>> On 2020-11-05, Tony Cooper wrote:
>> >>
>> >>> > My wife and I just watched the last episode of "The Queen's
>> >>> > Gambit".
[...]
>> >>> > The heroine of the movie goes to chess tournaments in distant
>> >>> > cities. These tournaments last for several days and have social
>> >>> > events in the evenings. The heroine wears different - very
>> >>> > stylish - outfits each day and for the social events.
>> >>> >
>> >>> > Yet, she is shown arriving carrying a single suitcase about the
>> >>> > size of a large briefcase.
>> >>
>> >>> It probably uses the same magic as Indiana Jones's knapsack, which
>> >>> produces a clean & neat tuxedo as required. Maybe related to The
>> >>> Luggage in _The Colour of Magic_?
>> >>
>> >> or Dr Who's Tardis.
>> >
>> > But the Tardis can contain people. Actually, , IIRC, people can go
>> > into The Luggage but they don't come back out.
>> >
>> Neilette & Rincewind hide in it, in The Last Continent (I'm re-reading it
>> ATM)
>
> You can hire dresses in the 21st century, but I think that's a modern
> innovation, possibly depending on the existence of credit cards.
> Perhaps I'm wrong.
>
> Swapsies would be an explanation but I assume she is the only female
> attending these events, so that leaves separate luggage, shoplifting,
> or the small case containing friendly elves, dwarfs (with straw), mice
> or other educated rodents, or fairy godmothers, which were
> successfully miniaturized by 1959 (Disney, W.)

Or it may attributable to sloppy writing and the deeply rooted belief
that viewers are morons that do not notice pesky details like that. Just
like a large submarine hiding in the canals in Venice (Italy) and taking
90° turns (if you have seen The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, you
may have notice this slight inconsistency with the laws of physics on
the roundworld).

Anyway, if it had been the Luggage, the TV series would have been about
Thud, not chess, and would possibly have Koom Valley in its title.

Adam Funk

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Nov 9, 2020, 5:45:05 AM11/9/20
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My son & I only started reading them earlier this year
(unfortunately), & I'm relying on what's available from the local
library branch. The public libraries here are doing "order and
collect" (in a plastic bag) but only for books available at the branch
where you're collecting. I also have other things to read too.


--
Avoid socks. They are the fatal give-away of a phony
nonconformist. ---Elissa Jane Karg

Matthieu Weber

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Nov 9, 2020, 8:43:39 AM11/9/20
to
Le Mon, 09 Nov 2020 10:44:31 +0000, Adam Funk <a24...@ducksburg.com> a
écrit:
> On 2020-11-06, Lewis wrote:
>> What?! Look, there's only 41 books in Discworld, get on it.
>
> My son & I only started reading them earlier this year
> (unfortunately), & I'm relying on what's available from the local
> library branch. The public libraries here are doing "order and
> collect" (in a plastic bag) but only for books available at the branch
> where you're collecting. I also have other things to read too.

What do you mean “other thing so read”? What else is there to read
besides Discworld?

Robert Carnegie

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Nov 9, 2020, 9:43:26 AM11/9/20
to
On Monday, 9 November 2020 at 13:43:39 UTC, Matthieu Weber wrote:
> Le Mon, 09 Nov 2020 10:44:31 +0000, Adam Funk <a24...@ducksburg.com> a
> écrit:
> > On 2020-11-06, Lewis wrote:
> >> What?! Look, there's only 41 books in Discworld, get on it.
> >
> > My son & I only started reading them earlier this year
> > (unfortunately), & I'm relying on what's available from the local
> > library branch. The public libraries here are doing "order and
> > collect" (in a plastic bag) but only for books available at the branch
> > where you're collecting. I also have other things to read too.
> What do you mean “other thing so read”? What else is there to read
> besides Discworld?
> Matthieu

You could perhaps make time for _Good Omens_ ;-)

In which sexual intercourse happens, so, you may want
to schedule that read for later... that's co-writing for you.

Lewis

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Nov 9, 2020, 11:42:20 AM11/9/20
to
In message <slrnrqihs9...@minikone.weber.fi.eu.org> Matthieu Weber <mwe...@eispammia.free.fr.invalid> wrote:
> Le Mon, 09 Nov 2020 10:44:31 +0000, Adam Funk <a24...@ducksburg.com> a
> écrit:
>> On 2020-11-06, Lewis wrote:
>>> What?! Look, there's only 41 books in Discworld, get on it.
>>
>> My son & I only started reading them earlier this year
>> (unfortunately), & I'm relying on what's available from the local
>> library branch. The public libraries here are doing "order and
>> collect" (in a plastic bag) but only for books available at the branch
>> where you're collecting. I also have other things to read too.

> What do you mean “other thing so read”? What else is there to read
> besides Discworld?

The things you read in between rereading Discworld.

Good Omens, for example.


--
Criticizing evolutionary theory because Darwin was limited is like
claiming computers don't work because Chuck Babbage didn't
foresee Duke Nukem 3.

Matthieu Weber

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Nov 9, 2020, 2:15:46 PM11/9/20
to
Le Mon, 9 Nov 2020 06:43:24 -0800 (PST), Robert Carnegie
<rja.ca...@excite.com> a écrit:
> On Monday, 9 November 2020 at 13:43:39 UTC, Matthieu Weber wrote:
>> Le Mon, 09 Nov 2020 10:44:31 +0000, Adam Funk <a24...@ducksburg.com> a
>> écrit:
>> > On 2020-11-06, Lewis wrote:
>> >> What?! Look, there's only 41 books in Discworld, get on it.
>> >
>> > My son & I only started reading them earlier this year
>> > (unfortunately), & I'm relying on what's available from the local
>> > library branch. The public libraries here are doing "order and
>> > collect" (in a plastic bag) but only for books available at the branch
>> > where you're collecting. I also have other things to read too.
>> What do you mean “other thing so read”? What else is there to read
>> besides Discworld?
>> Matthieu
>
> You could perhaps make time for _Good Omens_ ;-)

Only when you run out of Discworld. But I must say I enjoyed the Johnny
Maxwell trilogy, both as a young adult and as a not-so-young-anymore
adult.

> In which sexual intercourse happens, so, you may want
> to schedule that read for later... that's co-writing for you.

I would think that if you are old enough to read (and understand)
Discworld, you are mature enough to know how babies are made. But I'm
biased, I discovered Discworld when I was about twenty.

John Williamson

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Nov 9, 2020, 3:27:31 PM11/9/20
to
<De-lurks> I first heard about The Colour of Magic on a radio programme
when I was 28, shortly after it was written, I immediately bought the
paperback when that was first published, and have read every book in all
the sub-series in the series many times. I still have trouble seeing the
pages of TCOM through the tears of laughter when I read it. (I work in
the tourist industry and I'm sure that I have met all the characters in
real life.)


--
Tciao for Now!

John.

Lewis

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Nov 9, 2020, 6:58:28 PM11/9/20
to
Some people are astonishingly prudish.

--
We’re despairing in style, as befits two former High Kings of Fillory.

Matthieu Weber

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Nov 10, 2020, 4:36:56 AM11/10/20
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Le Mon, 9 Nov 2020 20:27:26 +0000, John Williamson
<johnwil...@btinternet.com> a écrit:
This reminds me that I first started to read Discworld translated into
French (up to Small Gods, after which I switched to English as the
translator was not able to translate fast enough), and about 10 years
later I decided to purchase the English versions of the first books.
Then, being a geek, I wondered how the puns (or “play on words”) were
translated from English to French and I compared the two versions (not
very thoroughly, but still).

Some puns were translated into puns in French (as French and English
share enough words to make this possible, sometimes trivially) while
some puns were simply translated but did not become puns in French.
And then I was surprised to see that in some places the translator made
up puns that did not (as far as I could tell) exist in the original
English text, maybe to compensate for the puns that he could not
translate.

Is there among the few survivors here people who have similar
experiences with languages other than French? How are the puns
translated in those languages?

Lewis

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Nov 10, 2020, 6:02:13 AM11/10/20
to
In message <slrnrqknpm...@minikone.weber.fi.eu.org> Matthieu Weber <mwe...@eispammia.free.fr.invalid> wrote:
> Is there among the few survivors here people who have similar
> experiences with languages other than French? How are the puns
> translated in those languages?

Only at one removed, and also with French.

The Asterix series of books is French, and the English translations
manage to translate and replace many of the jokes and puns in the
original (at least in the first dozen books or so).

--
I laugh in the face of danger. Then I hide until it goes away.

Matthieu Weber

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Nov 10, 2020, 8:48:15 AM11/10/20
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Le Tue, 10 Nov 2020 11:02:11 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
<g.k...@kreme.dont-email.me> a écrit:
> In message <slrnrqknpm...@minikone.weber.fi.eu.org> Matthieu
> Weber <mwe...@eispammia.free.fr.invalid> wrote:
>> Is there among the few survivors here people who have similar
>> experiences with languages other than French? How are the puns
>> translated in those languages?
>
> Only at one removed, and also with French.

Now you reached the limits of my understanding of English. What does “at
one removed” mean in here?

> The Asterix series of books is French, and the English translations
> manage to translate and replace many of the jokes and puns in the
> original (at least in the first dozen books or so).

True, I hade noticed the same thing reading the few Astérix translated
in Alsatian dialect (the region of France, not the dog breed).

Lewis

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Nov 10, 2020, 3:26:34 PM11/10/20
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In message <slrnrql6gt...@minikone.weber.fi.eu.org> Matthieu Weber <mwe...@eispammia.free.fr.invalid> wrote:
> Le Tue, 10 Nov 2020 11:02:11 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
> <g.k...@kreme.dont-email.me> a écrit:
>> In message <slrnrqknpm...@minikone.weber.fi.eu.org> Matthieu
>> Weber <mwe...@eispammia.free.fr.invalid> wrote:
>>> Is there among the few survivors here people who have similar
>>> experiences with languages other than French? How are the puns
>>> translated in those languages?
>>
>> Only at one removed, and also with French.

> Now you reached the limits of my understanding of English. What does “at
> one removed” mean in here?

In this case, that it was not my experience, but one that was shared
with me.

In general, it means there is a separation, either physical or ethical
or perhaps legal between one and another without a direct connection.

If I hired Alice and Alice hires bob, I am 'at one removed' from Bob,
but it is usually used to indicate there is a separation where one would
not otherwise be clear.

--
We could grind our enemies into talcum powder with a sledgehammer,
but gosh, we did that last night.

Matthieu Weber

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Nov 10, 2020, 3:54:26 PM11/10/20
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Le Tue, 10 Nov 2020 20:26:32 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
<g.k...@kreme.dont-email.me> a écrit:
> In message <slrnrql6gt...@minikone.weber.fi.eu.org> Matthieu
> Weber <mwe...@eispammia.free.fr.invalid> wrote:
>> Le Tue, 10 Nov 2020 11:02:11 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
>> <g.k...@kreme.dont-email.me> a écrit:
>>> In message <slrnrqknpm...@minikone.weber.fi.eu.org> Matthieu
>>> Weber <mwe...@eispammia.free.fr.invalid> wrote:
>>>> Is there among the few survivors here people who have similar
>>>> experiences with languages other than French? How are the puns
>>>> translated in those languages?
>>>
>>> Only at one removed, and also with French.
>
>> Now you reached the limits of my understanding of English. What does “at
>> one removed” mean in here?
>
> In this case, that it was not my experience, but one that was shared
> with me.
>
> In general, it means there is a separation, either physical or ethical
> or perhaps legal between one and another without a direct connection.
>
> If I hired Alice and Alice hires bob, I am 'at one removed' from Bob,
> but it is usually used to indicate there is a separation where one would
> not otherwise be clear.

Thank you for the explanation.

Robert Carnegie

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Nov 11, 2020, 6:35:28 PM11/11/20
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Excuse me, but I think that ought to be "at one remove".
It sounds silly, but it's more common than the other.
Bob is not your employee but he works for you...

On the other hand, since Asterix was mentioned,
I am reminded that _Asterix in Britain_ starts with
the Romans invading Britain, and a British messenger
sent to France to ask for a supply of a certain magic
potion... He is (in English) Anticlimax, who is
a relative, Asterix's first cousin once removed.

I will allow <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cousin>
to explain what that means. ;-)

I think Obelix believes it is to do with a cousin living
in another country.

Matthieu Weber

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Nov 12, 2020, 12:58:02 AM11/12/20
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Le Wed, 11 Nov 2020 15:35:26 -0800 (PST), Robert Carnegie
<rja.ca...@excite.com> a écrit:
In the original text, Anticlimax is presented as a cousin-german (which
is apparently also used in English as a synonym of first cousin) of
Astérix's, which Obélix interprets as a German cousin (and later
describes him as a “German Britton”).

Lewis

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Nov 12, 2020, 10:16:39 AM11/12/20
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In message <764d1f0e-1bc1-452b...@googlegroups.com> Robert Carnegie <rja.ca...@excite.com> wrote:
> On Tuesday, 10 November 2020 at 20:26:34 UTC, Lewis wrote:
>> In message <slrnrql6gt...@minikone.weber.fi.eu.org> Matthieu Weber <mwe...@eispammia.free.fr.invalid> wrote:
>> > Le Tue, 10 Nov 2020 11:02:11 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
>> > <g.k...@kreme.dont-email.me> a écrit:
>> >> In message <slrnrqknpm...@minikone.weber.fi.eu.org> Matthieu
>> >> Weber <mwe...@eispammia.free.fr.invalid> wrote:
>> >>> Is there among the few survivors here people who have similar
>> >>> experiences with languages other than French? How are the puns
>> >>> translated in those languages?
>> >>
>> >> Only at one removed, and also with French.
>>
>> > Now you reached the limits of my understanding of English. What does “at
>> > one removed” mean in here?
>> In this case, that it was not my experience, but one that was shared
>> with me.
>>
>> In general, it means there is a separation, either physical or ethical
>> or perhaps legal between one and another without a direct connection.
>>
>> If I hired Alice and Alice hires bob, I am 'at one removed' from Bob,
>> but it is usually used to indicate there is a separation where one would
>> not otherwise be clear.

> Excuse me, but I think that ought to be "at one remove".

Sure, if you prefer.

> It sounds silly, but it's more common than the other.

Could be. I say removed and I hear removed but I wouldn't argue which is
right.

> I will allow <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cousin>
> to explain what that means. ;-)

I do not understand why anyone is confused by the "once/twice.etc
removed" in cousins. It is perfectly clear.


--
"It's like those French have a different word for *everything*" -
Steve Martin

Matthieu Weber

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Nov 12, 2020, 11:26:59 AM11/12/20
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Le Thu, 12 Nov 2020 15:16:37 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Once you have seen the diagram, yes of course it is clear. It's just like
programming your VCR (for those who remember VCRs): you just need to
understand the logic, it's not rocket science. But the majority of VCR
owners still could not understand it, or didn't even bother to try and
undestand it.

silas poulson

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Nov 12, 2020, 12:34:12 PM11/12/20
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Or if you're still confused allow youtuber CGP Grey to explain
here <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PM79Epw_cp8>

Silas

Lewis

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Nov 13, 2020, 5:41:04 AM11/13/20
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I've never needed a diagram.

> It's just like programming your VCR

No, it is nothing like that. Programming the VCR was a stupid an
illogical and terribly implemented process, not a perfectly logical
naming convention.

> understand the logic, it's not rocket science. But the majority of VCR
> owners still could not understand it, or didn't even bother to try and
> undestand it.

Even if you did, doing it was annoying and you had to redo it every few
days or, if you were very lucky, weeks.

--
M is for MAUDE who was swept out to sea
N is for NEVILLE who died of ennui

Matthieu Weber

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Nov 13, 2020, 7:22:38 AM11/13/20
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Le Fri, 13 Nov 2020 10:41:01 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
I don't need it anymore now that I have understood the logic :) But the
diagram helped understand said logic.

>> It's just like programming your VCR
>
> No, it is nothing like that. Programming the VCR was a stupid and
> illogical and terribly implemented process, not a perfectly logical
> naming convention.

Ah, I see that you are one of those people :) I read my VCR's manual
once, and after that I understood the very logical and well implemented
process.

>> understand the logic, it's not rocket science. But the majority of VCR
>> owners still could not understand it, or didn't even bother to try and
>> undestand it.
>
> Even if you did, doing it was annoying and you had to redo it every few
> days or, if you were very lucky, weeks.

Are we talking about the same thing? You needed to set the clock and the
TV chanels only once when you plugged it in for the first time, but the
programming was for recording one given program at a given time in the
future. Of course, if the schedule of the program changed in the
meanwhile you needed to change the program. This seems all logical to
me. It's hardly a case of Out Of Cheese Error.

Lewis

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Nov 13, 2020, 10:52:56 AM11/13/20
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In message <slrnrqsukc...@minikone.weber.fi.eu.org> Matthieu Weber <mwe...@eispammia.free.fr.invalid> wrote:
> Ah, I see that you are one of those people :) I read my VCR's manual
> once, and after that I understood the very logical and well implemented
> process.

Which was different on every single VCR.

> Are we talking about the same thing? You needed to set the clock and the
> TV chanels only once when you plugged it in for the first time, but the
> programming was for recording one given program at a given time in the
> future. Of course, if the schedule of the program changed in the
> meanwhile you needed to change the program. This seems all logical to
> me. It's hardly a case of Out Of Cheese Error.

1) power fluctuations reset the clock
2) moving the VCR which was quite common reset the clock
3) random perturbations in the alignment of the earth and the moon, with
the possible influence of moon unicorns and sun weasels reset the clock.

I worked with a LOT of VCRs in the 80s, and we quickly gave up on ever
setting the clocks. I was very happy to kick VCRs out of my life in 1997
when the TiVo arrived and have been on flavors of MPEG ever since.

The clocks were also garbage, even if they didn't reset the drifted by
minutes a week making them entirely pointless for scheduling recordings.


--
You and I remember Budapest very differently

James Kuyper

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Nov 13, 2020, 11:33:41 AM11/13/20
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On 11/13/20 10:52 AM, Lewis wrote:
> In message <slrnrqsukc...@minikone.weber.fi.eu.org> Matthieu Weber <mwe...@eispammia.free.fr.invalid> wrote:
...
>> Are we talking about the same thing? You needed to set the clock and the
>> TV chanels only once when you plugged it in for the first time, but the
>> programming was for recording one given program at a given time in the
>> future. Of course, if the schedule of the program changed in the
>> meanwhile you needed to change the program. This seems all logical to
>> me. It's hardly a case of Out Of Cheese Error.
>
> 1) power fluctuations reset the clock
> 2) moving the VCR which was quite common reset the clock
> 3) random perturbations in the alignment of the earth and the moon, with
> the possible influence of moon unicorns and sun weasels reset the clock.
...
> The clocks were also garbage, even if they didn't reset the drifted by
> minutes a week making them entirely pointless for scheduling recordings.

I never observed any of those problems. Power outages would reset the
clock, but those weren't particularly common where I lived. Were they
common in your area? The clocks did drift fairly fast, but not by
minutes per week; resetting them every time we started or ended daylight
savings time gave sufficient accuracy for scheduled recordings.

Lewis

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Nov 13, 2020, 8:34:43 PM11/13/20
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In message <romch2$np8$1...@dont-email.me> James Kuyper <james...@alumni.caltech.edu> wrote:
> On 11/13/20 10:52 AM, Lewis wrote:
>> In message <slrnrqsukc...@minikone.weber.fi.eu.org> Matthieu Weber <mwe...@eispammia.free.fr.invalid> wrote:
> ...
>>> Are we talking about the same thing? You needed to set the clock and the
>>> TV chanels only once when you plugged it in for the first time, but the
>>> programming was for recording one given program at a given time in the
>>> future. Of course, if the schedule of the program changed in the
>>> meanwhile you needed to change the program. This seems all logical to
>>> me. It's hardly a case of Out Of Cheese Error.
>>
>> 1) power fluctuations reset the clock
>> 2) moving the VCR which was quite common reset the clock
>> 3) random perturbations in the alignment of the earth and the moon, with
>> the possible influence of moon unicorns and sun weasels reset the clock.
> ...
>> The clocks were also garbage, even if they didn't reset the drifted by
>> minutes a week making them entirely pointless for scheduling recordings.

> I never observed any of those problems. Power outages would reset the
> clock, but those weren't particularly common where I lived.i

You didn't need an outage, the slightest flicker in the power, not even
enough to cause the lights to flash, was enough.

--
Live long enough to become a problem to your kids.

James Kuyper

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Nov 13, 2020, 10:53:58 PM11/13/20
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As I said above, I've never had those kinds of problems. Maybe the ones
I owned were of higher quality than yours? I have no idea how to
investigate that possibility - decades-old product testing reports from
unbiased sources are probably hard to come by, and I don't even remember
what brands/models I bought. Do you?

Matthieu Weber

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Nov 14, 2020, 4:58:24 AM11/14/20
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Le Fri, 13 Nov 2020 11:33:38 -0500, James Kuyper
<james...@alumni.caltech.edu> a écrit:
For what it's worth, I had the same experience as James. In the only
VCR I ever owned the clock was backed by a capacitor or a battery of
some sort so its setting would be preserved even after a short power
failure, and I never noticed any drift.

Lewis

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Nov 14, 2020, 5:17:06 AM11/14/20
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A couple of dozen different VCRs from 35 years ago? No, I do not. The
only one I remember was the one that features in the opening credits of
The Goldbergs¹. My wife's family had that one, but I stuck it on a decent
surge protector strip which cut down on the issues a lot. no one ever
relied on the clock for recording. In fact, my brother-in-law would pop
a tape in and just start recording if there was something he wanted to
see in 2-3 hours, then come back and rewind to the part he wanted.
Assuming no one turned off the cable box.

But most my use of VCRs was in the AV Department at school and work and
it was not fun.

¹ Still can't remember the brand, but it have very large color buttons
on it and was nearly the size of a small refrigerator. Perhaps a tad
smaller :) but very large. I think it was either a Pioneer or a JVC, her
parents had it forever (more than 25 years).

--
"Are you pondering what I'm pondering?"
"I think so, Brain. But Trojans won’t arrive on the scene for another
300 years."

Gary R. Schmidt

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Nov 14, 2020, 6:54:07 AM11/14/20
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Let me guess - you live(d) in a country with 110V power?

Yes, shit like that doesn't happen quite as easily with 220-240V, (but
it does happen).

Cheers,
Gary B-)

--
Waiting for a new signature to suggest itself...

Lewis

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Nov 14, 2020, 9:07:38 AM11/14/20
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not just shitty 110V, but privatize shitty 110V, so no motivation
whatsoever to maintain the power grind.


--
Margo: I look like Jack Sparrow if he were played by a man.
Eliot: I was actually thinking more like a fem bot Nick Fury.

ppin...@gmail.com

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Dec 15, 2020, 9:37:46 PM12/15/20
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- hi; on the 9th of november 2020 at 13:43:39 gmt, matthieu weber a demandé:
> Le Mon, 09 Nov 2020 10:44:31 +0000, Adam Funk <a24...@ducksburg.com> a
> écrit:
> > On 2020-11-06, Lewis wrote:
> >> What?! Look, there's only 41 books in Discworld, get on it.
> >
> > My son & I only started reading them earlier this year
> > (unfortunately), & I'm relying on what's available from the local
> > library branch. The public libraries here are doing "order and
> > collect" (in a plastic bag) but only for books available at the branch
> > where you're collecting. I also have other things to read too.
> What do you mean “other thing so read”? What else is there to read
> besides Discworld?

- well, yr hmbl srppnt. can recommend various series, one-offs and
even entire oeuvres of different authors writing in various fields -
though i must admit i'm not entirely sure oeuvres grow in meadows,
ploughed fields, on ranches nor steppes - not even the back steppes.

- none is a substitute, nor a replacement for the discworld series, nor
for any particular novel within it, nor any other of terry's novels; but
these have something, or things, somehow in common with his work:

starting with ''the silver pigs'', the falco series by lindsay davies
(historical novels set in a present-day of vespasian's rome, whose
viewpoint character is a working-class republican who doesn't like
emperors, knows he can't, as a private informer (nearest comparison,
a private detective) scraping along, do anything about that, and how
he gets accidentally caught up in uncovering a scheme to defraud
vespasian... or worse.
- falco has a lively sense of humour, especially when he's not being
threatened, tortured, manipulated, or made too big a fool of by some
senator's daughter...)

- more suggestions, in fantasy, sf, or other historical novel series?

- love, ppint.
--
'tis due to ppinqueans that set light
to nelson's hat
it glows at night
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