[R}] New books

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Donovan Porter

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Jun 7, 2001, 4:37:54 AM6/7/01
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Has PTerry mentioned anything anywhere about new books after The Last
Hero and The Amazing Maurice??

Richard Eney

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Jun 7, 2001, 7:20:28 PM6/7/01
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In article <d48710c2.01060...@posting.google.com>,

Donovan Porter <don...@molbiol.uct.ac.za> wrote:
>Has PTerry mentioned anything anywhere about new books after The Last
>Hero and The Amazing Maurice??

There's been some discussion of possibly producing a spinoff, The Way of
Mrs. Cosmopilite, but nothing firm yet.

=Tamar

Terry Pratchett

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Jun 10, 2001, 5:43:40 AM6/10/01
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In article <9fp27s$jq$1...@saltmine.radix.net>, Richard Eney
<dic...@Radix.Net> writes

Spin-offs aside, and leaving out the two books later this year, I'm
planning three more novels, one a year, for the next three years -- the
first coming out in November 2002. Titles and outlines are on the
computer and the contracts have been signed.

The Science of Discworld 2: The Globe is likely to be published around
the middle of 2002, and I'm also planning 'For Fear Of Little Men'
(working title!) a classic fairy story but with the addition of the Nac
Mac Feegle.

--
Terry Pratchett

MP

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Jun 10, 2001, 4:31:44 PM6/10/01
to
Hmm, he may be wrong, but MP thinks that Terry Pratchett
<tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk> wrote, on Sun, 10 Jun 2001 10:43:40
+0100, that:

>In article <9fp27s$jq$1...@saltmine.radix.net>, Richard Eney
><dic...@Radix.Net> writes
>>In article <d48710c2.01060...@posting.google.com>,
>>Donovan Porter <don...@molbiol.uct.ac.za> wrote:
>>>Has PTerry mentioned anything anywhere about new books after The Last
>>>Hero and The Amazing Maurice??
>>
>>There's been some discussion of possibly producing a spinoff, The Way of
>>Mrs. Cosmopilite, but nothing firm yet.
>
>Spin-offs aside, and leaving out the two books later this year, I'm
>planning three more novels, one a year, for the next three years -- the
>first coming out in November 2002. Titles and outlines are on the
>computer and the contracts have been signed.

And they are...? :-}

>The Science of Discworld 2: The Globe is likely to be published around
>the middle of 2002,

With Jack and Ian again? Sounds like a good one to me... What's the
emphasis on this time round?
TSoD was a sort of physicsy one with some evolution chucked in - is
this more of the same or concentrating on different bits of science?
(the qualifier title doesn't really help - it could be about
newspapers... :-} )

> and I'm also planning 'For Fear Of Little Men'
>(working title!) a classic fairy story but with the addition of the Nac
>Mac Feegle.

<brain explodes>
What an, erm, interesting, idea... Illustrated in the style of Grimm's
books? I can see it now... :-}

MP (I love proper details from the authors fingers, as opposed to the
rumours you get on some newsgroups, which must surely have been made
up...)
--
"You must continue to make at least your monthly minimum payment even
if we are not able to send you a statement until the Agreement is
terminated and any outstanding liability discharged"
- Associates Terms and Conditions

Terry Pratchett

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Jun 10, 2001, 6:25:23 PM6/10/01
to
In article <3b23d8e6...@news.britishlibrary.net>, MP
<m...@unseenuniversity.org> writes
>
>And they are...? :-}

Are you *mad?* Remember what happened with Unclear Physics? They are
working titles in any case, although two will probably make it; but if I
mention them, the rumour will spread, then maybe in the fullness of time
I'll use different titles, people will keep asking where the others have
got to...it could go on for *years*:-)


>
>>The Science of Discworld 2: The Globe is likely to be published around
>>the middle of 2002,
>
>With Jack and Ian again? Sounds like a good one to me... What's the
>emphasis on this time round?

Less physics, more about 'being human'. Includes the first ever
semaphore modem...


>
>> and I'm also planning 'For Fear Of Little Men'
>>(working title!) a classic fairy story but with the addition of the Nac
>>Mac Feegle.
>
><brain explodes>
>What an, erm, interesting, idea...

Let's just say: when they trash a mushroom, it stays trashed...
--
Terry Pratchett

MP

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Jun 11, 2001, 4:01:41 PM6/11/01
to
Hmm, he may be wrong, but MP thinks that Terry Pratchett
<tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk> wrote, on Sun, 10 Jun 2001 23:25:23
+0100, that:

>In article <3b23d8e6...@news.britishlibrary.net>, MP
><m...@unseenuniversity.org> writes
>>
>>And they are...? :-}
>
>Are you *mad?* Remember what happened with Unclear Physics?

Not personally - before my time (as an afper), but I have heard. It's
in the cutural collective knowledge, like the chocolate...
Of course, anyone who had _never_ heard of this book will now jump in
and start asking about it, hence, as a public service: Unclear Physics
was the working title for one of the existing books.[1]

>They are working titles in any case, although two will probably make it;
>but if I mention them, the rumour will spread, then maybe in the
>fullness of time I'll use different titles, people will keep asking
>where the others have got to...it could go on for *years*:-)

Ah, but that is the cunning plan[2] - eventually you might get to the
point where you write them to shut people up... :-}

>>>The Science of Discworld 2: The Globe is likely to be published around
>>>the middle of 2002,
>>
>>With Jack and Ian again? Sounds like a good one to me... What's the
>>emphasis on this time round?
>
>Less physics, more about 'being human'. Includes the first ever
>semaphore modem...

Actually...
<aims for the world's first pre-publication annotation[3]> There was
device (or series of devices> built in the 19th Century to link the
coastal watchhouses to London, of which one was recreated by Adam
Hart-Davis in Local Heroes (BBC TV) a couple of years ago. These acted
like a semaphore modem[4], passing the time of ships passing a
particular point to their owners[5]...</annotation>
Of course, you knew that... :-}

MP (not entirely serious - the device existed, but I don't think it
counts as an annotation. I'd claim all semaphore was modem-ish as
opposed to phone-ish)

[1] Evidentally, the story hasn't been firmly embedded in my mind,
since I can't remember which of the earlier books. Feet of Clay?
Interesting Times? Moving Pictures? Um...
[2] This is not a genuine cunning plan. I am actively against its use.
If you use it and get your head ripped off by PTerry, don't come
whinging to me - I did warn you. It you use it and then come to a meet
where I am and get your head ripped off, don't dare bleed on me. I
disclaim all responsibility for any cunning plans along these lines,
because they are a bad idea. OK?
[3] Well, sort of annotation... :-}
[4] In that only data could be sent down them - there were only a few
possible signals.
[5] I would give a precise reference, but I haven't got my copy of
AHD's bok with me... Damn!
--
Q. What do you think of Barnes & Noble verses Borders?
A. Borders has better cappuccino.
- alt.rec.books FAQ

Richard Eney

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Jun 11, 2001, 5:51:01 PM6/11/01
to
In article <3b251af7...@news.britishlibrary.net>,
MP <m...@unseenuniversity.org> wrote:
<snip>

> as a public service: Unclear Physics
>was the working title for one of the existing books.[1]

<snip>


>[1] Evidentally, the story hasn't been firmly embedded in my mind,
>since I can't remember which of the earlier books. Feet of Clay?
>Interesting Times? Moving Pictures? Um...

The one that begins with with a structure in the squash court...
The Last Continent.

=Tamar

Bj

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Jun 11, 2001, 6:13:41 PM6/11/01
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"MP" <m...@unseenuniversity.org> wrote in message
news:3b251af7...@news.britishlibrary.net...

> Actually...
> <aims for the world's first pre-publication annotation[3]> There was
> device (or series of devices> built in the 19th Century to link the
> coastal watchhouses to London, of which one was recreated by Adam
> Hart-Davis in Local Heroes (BBC TV) a couple of years ago. These acted
> like a semaphore modem[4], passing the time of ships passing a
> particular point to their owners[5]...</annotation>
> Of course, you knew that... :-}
>
> MP (not entirely serious - the device existed, but I don't think it
> counts as an annotation. I'd claim all semaphore was modem-ish as
> opposed to phone-ish)

I have just been in touch with my Inner Nerd, who points out that a
semaphore is very definitely not an interface between a digital data
transmission stream and an analogue stream, but is itself a system for
transmitting digital data style of device type ot thing, having only a
certain range of fixed values it can display, whereas the information it's
required to convey can have infinite variations which must be mapped onto
this fixed set of values. It thus is the completely exact opposite of a
modem, which is an interface device whose purpose is to take incoming data
of a digital nature from a digital transmission medium and turn it into an
analogue (infinitely variable) signal to be passed across an analogue
transmission medium (modulate the data) or convert it back to digital at the
other end (demodulate, thus MoDem for Modulator-Demodulator).

If there were such a thing as a semaphore modem it would have to be an
automatic device to replace the human who either reads outgoing messages and
moves the semaphore arms accordingly, or observes the position of the remote
semaphore's arms and notes down the message.

You could probably get all the bits from Radio Shack to build a real
semaphore modem that would connect two PCs across a line-of-sight link but I
suspect you might be disappointed with the data transmission speed, 110 baud
might be achievable...

Oh dear that's me Out too, like Sherilyn except I'm an Out Computer Nerd
<waves to Sheri>

Bj


David Chapman

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Jun 11, 2001, 1:50:42 PM6/11/01
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"Terry Pratchett" <tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk> wrote in message news:Fv2G5VATP$I7E...@unseen.demon.co.uk...

> In article <3b23d8e6...@news.britishlibrary.net>, MP
> <m...@unseenuniversity.org> writes
> >
> >And they are...? :-}
>
> Are you *mad?* Remember what happened with Unclear Physics? They are
> working titles in any case, although two will probably make it; but if I
> mention them, the rumour will spread, then maybe in the fullness of time
> I'll use different titles, people will keep asking where the others have
> got to...it could go on for *years*:-)

IOW - the Missing Chapter now has three titles.

<bow from waist>

--
"Would you say your songs are about liquor,
women, drugs and killing, for the most part?"

"Yep."


Margaret

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Jun 11, 2001, 10:17:44 PM6/11/01
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"Bj" <sung...@ntlworld.munge.com> wrote:

> I have just been in touch with my Inner Nerd, who points out that a
> semaphore is very definitely not an interface between a digital data
> transmission stream and an analogue stream, but is itself a system for
> transmitting digital data style of device type ot thing, having only a
> certain range of fixed values it can display, whereas the information it's
> required to convey can have infinite variations which must be mapped onto
> this fixed set of values. It thus is the completely exact opposite of a
> modem, which is an interface device whose purpose is to take incoming data
> of a digital nature from a digital transmission medium and turn it into an
> analogue (infinitely variable) signal to be passed across an analogue
> transmission medium (modulate the data) or convert it back to digital at the
> other end (demodulate, thus MoDem for Modulator-Demodulator).

Which is why I too would call a sema. more modem-ish
than phone-ish, since (til very soon ago) phones were
analog all the way down^Wacross.

Bj

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Jun 12, 2001, 3:42:42 AM6/12/01
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"Margaret" <no_...@all.thanks> wrote in message
news:omuait8nnd4qdhv7o...@4ax.com...

> "Bj" <sung...@ntlworld.munge.com> wrote:
>
> > I have just been in touch with my Inner Nerd, who points out that a
> > semaphore is very definitely not an interface between a digital data
> > transmission stream and an analogue stream, but is itself a system for
> > transmitting digital data style of device type ot thing

> Which is why I too would call a sema. more modem-ish


> than phone-ish, since (til very soon ago) phones were
> analog all the way down^Wacross.

Yes, no, look, you see... <sigh>

A semaphore chain is a digital system. Yes. But not a modem. A modem is a
little box that sits between your digital PC and your analogue telephone
line. It's an interface -- not a means of carrying data from A to B, but a
means of connecting the A to B link to the B to C link so data can get from
A to C. The semaphore is the equivalent of a digital network cable -
Ethernet or a kilostream link or a 2Mb pipe or something. It isn't an
interface between two different ways of transmitting data, it *is* a way of
transmitting data. So... you could have a semaphore modem if there was a
box that turned speech into semaphore arm movements and vice versa, but that
doesn't mean a semaphore system has anything to do with modems any more than
a telephone system or an Ethernet network does. Oh dear, should there have
been a spelling mistake in there somewhere?

Bj


Donovan Porter

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Jun 12, 2001, 6:29:51 AM6/12/01
to
Terry Pratchett <tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk> surreptitiously
conspired to write in message
news:<bBifCjAM...@unseen.demon.co.uk>...

> Spin-offs aside, and leaving out the two books later this year, I'm
> planning three more novels, one a year, for the next three years -- the
> first coming out in November 2002. Titles and outlines are on the
> computer and the contracts have been signed.
>
> The Science of Discworld 2: The Globe is likely to be published around
> the middle of 2002, and I'm also planning 'For Fear Of Little Men'
> (working title!) a classic fairy story but with the addition of the Nac
> Mac Feegle.

Wow

i was expecting some kind of speculative ramble from a well-meaning
but uninformed afper, but I this is a definitive answer...

i have my own wishes concerning future novels, but i shall keep my
mouth shut for of The Law Of Unintended Consequences

Don

Terry Pratchett

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Jun 12, 2001, 3:55:23 AM6/12/01
to
In article <9pbV6.41499$fs6.3...@news6-win.server.ntlworld.com>, Bj
<sung...@ntlworld.munge.com> writes

>If there were such a thing as a semaphore modem it would have to be an
>automatic device to replace the human who either reads outgoing messages and
>moves the semaphore arms accordingly, or observes the position of the remote
>semaphore's arms and notes down the message.

Using available DW 'technology', that's what Ponder has built. It's not
hard, and gives Hex unrestricted access to the semaphore network, at
least until the gargoyle gets tired. Interfacing the semaphore to a
stone circle would be harder (although easy-peasy with electronics...I'm
surprised it hasn't happened.)

--
Terry Pratchett

Andy Davison

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Jun 12, 2001, 10:08:27 AM6/12/01
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On Sun, 10 Jun 2001 23:25:23 +0100, in message
<Fv2G5VATP$I7E...@unseen.demon.co.uk>, Terry Pratchett
<tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk> wrote:

>Less physics, more about 'being human'. Includes the first ever
>semaphore modem...

Presumably so one can download Wuthering Heights?
Oh, bugger! <clink 20p>

MP

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Jun 12, 2001, 12:53:37 PM6/12/01
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Hmm, he may be wrong, but MP thinks that Margaret <no_...@all.thanks>

Yeah - a semaphore converts an infinite number of possible values into
a finite set for sends, then they are converted back to an infinite
set. Sounds modemish to me...

MP (CompSci, so knows how modems work. You don't want me to start on
ASDL links...)
--
You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say will be misquoted,
then used against you.

Kristian Peacocke

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Jun 12, 2001, 1:29:48 PM6/12/01
to

"Terry Pratchett" <tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
news:vMZ8BuAr...@unseen.demon.co.uk...

Now is a good time to mention that I have my CS232 - Computing technologies
exam next week. I get to write about PSTN, and digital networks, TCP/IP,
OSL, etc. to my hearts content.
Which is why I feel very tired when reading this thread :)


Sherilyn

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Jun 12, 2001, 6:35:09 PM6/12/01
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In Message-ID <9g5kfn$eab$5...@neptunium.btinternet.com>,
Kristian Peacocke <kitt...@btinternet.com> wrote:
[...]

>
>Now is a good time to mention that I have my CS232 - Computing technologies
>exam next week. I get to write about PSTN, and digital networks, TCP/IP,
>OSL, etc. to my hearts content.
>Which is why I feel very tired when reading this thread :)
>
Well I hope you don't end up footnoting the answers with Pratchettisms. ;)
--
Sherilyn

melcha

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Jun 12, 2001, 9:25:21 PM6/12/01
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6...@sherilyn.org.uk (Sherilyn) wrote in message news:<slrn9id6...@pegasus.sherilyn.org.uk>...

Oh, I don't know. A properly-acknowledged Practettism in the right
spot could turn a very dry, tiring pile of yet-to-be-marked exams
into...er...a dry, tiring pile of yet-to-be-marked exams with a nice
piece of wit in the middle. Could garner extra marks[1].
:-)

-Maaike

[1] But only if the prof in question possesses a Sense of Humour(tm).
Otherwise, you might lose marks for cheekyness. :-)

--
Well it worked for me in biology...

Kristian Peacocke

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Jun 13, 2001, 2:51:10 AM6/13/01
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"Sherilyn" <6...@sherilyn.org.uk> wrote in message
news:slrn9id6...@pegasus.sherilyn.org.uk...

Hey... it might brighten up an otherwise cloudy, erm, exam. Good idea :)


MP

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Jun 13, 2001, 3:46:25 AM6/13/01
to
Hmm, he may be wrong, but MP thinks that "Kristian Peacocke"
<kitt...@btinternet.com> wrote, on Tue, 12 Jun 2001 18:29:48 +0100,
that:
<snip>

>Now is a good time to mention that I have my CS232 - Computing technologies
>exam next week. I get to write about PSTN, and digital networks, TCP/IP,
>OSL, etc. to my hearts content.
>Which is why I feel very tired when reading this thread :)

Ooh, nasty. Sympathy goes out to you - I had a Computer Architectures
exam yesterday morning and had to write in great detail about RISC,
caches, an imaginary processor called the J5 and various other bits.
For three hours...
Oh, and had Algorithms and Data Structures one Monday!

MP (who now has a nice few days of revision for maths exams...)

LNR

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Jun 13, 2001, 7:37:33 AM6/13/01
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m...@unseenuniversity.org wrote:
>
>Ooh, nasty. Sympathy goes out to you - I had a Computer Architectures
>exam yesterday morning and had to write in great detail about RISC,

Interesting coinkydink. I had a Computer Architecture exam on Monday.
Only two hours though, and mostly concentrating on the 8086 rather than a
braod range, especially since the Assembler part of the course was
entirely 8086. Only exam I've got though. One advantage of a part-time
modular course where most of the modules are coursework based anyway.

--
l...@lspace.org http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~eleanorb/

Kristian Peacocke

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Jun 13, 2001, 2:20:02 PM6/13/01
to

"LNR" <l...@lspace.org> wrote in message
news:b6s*Fq...@news.chiark.greenend.org.uk...

> m...@unseenuniversity.org wrote:
> >
> >Ooh, nasty. Sympathy goes out to you - I had a Computer Architectures
> >exam yesterday morning and had to write in great detail about RISC,
>
> Interesting coinkydink. I had a Computer Architecture exam on Monday.
> Only two hours though, and mostly concentrating on the 8086 rather than a
> braod range, especially since the Assembler part of the course was
> entirely 8086. Only exam I've got though. One advantage of a part-time
> modular course where most of the modules are coursework based anyway.

I had my OO exam a couple of days ago. That wasn't fun... :(
But, wow, Systems Software (Compilers and O/S) tomorrow. BIG SMILE for
that...
yeah right.


MP

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Jun 13, 2001, 4:38:25 PM6/13/01
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Hmm, he may be wrong, but MP thinks that LNR <l...@lspace.org> wrote,
on 13 Jun 2001 12:37:33 +0100 (BST), that:

>m...@unseenuniversity.org wrote:
>>
>>Ooh, nasty. Sympathy goes out to you - I had a Computer Architectures
>>exam yesterday morning and had to write in great detail about RISC,
>
>Interesting coinkydink. I had a Computer Architecture exam on Monday.
>Only two hours though, and mostly concentrating on the 8086 rather than a
>braod range, especially since the Assembler part of the course was
>entirely 8086. Only exam I've got though. One advantage of a part-time
>modular course where most of the modules are coursework based anyway.

Personally I would have thought this would have been more useful - all
the systems in the department are 80x86 based - but the lecturer likes
"other" machines, and has a collection of workstations, mainframes and
supercomputers, which he brings bits of in for us to pass around. We
think he may have a shed about the size of, say, the Millennium Dome
if he keeps them at home...

MP (he's a good lecturer though... :-} )

LNR

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Jun 13, 2001, 6:26:20 PM6/13/01
to
m...@unseenuniversity.org wrote:
>
>MP (he's a good lecturer though... :-} )

You win then: ours is appalling! Bit of a noddy course really, but a good
fun way to get an MSc in my spare time. Expensive though (1400 quid a
year for 2 years + 700 quid for dissertation).

--
l...@lspace.org http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~eleanorb/

Smurf

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Jun 14, 2001, 3:32:05 PM6/14/01
to
As we crouched by the fire on Tue, 12 Jun 2001 08:55:23 +0100, from atop
a small rock Terry Pratchett <tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk> raised two
arms to the sky and screamed:

***IF someone has written this already elsewhere I apologise. Oh and I
***have not yet read ToT either. And I would like to state for the
***record that I hereby give, freely and unreservedly to whomever may
***want it, the eternal and irrevoccable right, to use any of the below
***ideas for their own ends, including transmission and retransmission
***by methods electronic or otherwise, editing and claiming as their
***own ideas [...and so on], the following passage.

Interfacing a semaphore to the stone circle should be fairly straight
forward. IIRC most megaliths are broadly optical computers in nature,
albeit a bit rocky. They a predominantly used to record the position of
the sun or other similar shiney objects like the moon, and relate this
to other stored information such as the season. Therefore the average
megalith must have a very effective optical I/O device [input/output
device] already installed.

Modern electronic computer engineers have been trying to build optical
computers for years. The main problem encountered is in the
switching[distribution] of optical data to the various components.
However the megalith design is able to utilise a very simple, high
speed, optical switch, hereinafter called the Mirror. The Mirror, if a
suitible mechanical steering device [a troll, or gargoyle perhaps] was
employed, would be able to directly convert the semaphore signals into
megalith readable optical data. Consider the semaphore being able to
selectivly cover or uncover various lights/fires/salamanders by use of
the flags. The Mirror could deflect this light [or dark] into the I/O
port of the megalith. This would enable the high speed downloading of
data. Of course the upload would be much slower but then that is also
the case in ADSL. The upstream data could be relayed from the Druid to
the semaphore operator orally [by shouting] or in writing, for later
transmission. Much like email "queueing" messages to be sent at a later
date.

An array of mirrors could be used to distribute the information to the
local LAN[dscape] of megaliths. Just think of the processing power that
could be harnesed by linking all the major megaliths into a truely
distributed network.

Of course, the actual decoding of the information may not be that
simple. I am not currently familiar with the megalith OS, and would have
to leave the _little_ details, like drivers, to the expert hardware or
software masons.

Shaun at acquiesce dot org

Smurf,

BTLTTL

"The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious.
It is the source of all true art and all science.
He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause
to wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead:
His eyes are closed."
-- Albert Einstein

Smurf

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Jun 14, 2001, 3:36:57 PM6/14/01
to
As we crouched by the fire on Thu, 14 Jun 2001 20:32:05 +0100, from atop
a small rock Smurf <spamm...@spamkiller.com> raised two arms to the
sky and screamed:

<snip>

Oh and one final thing, dare I suggest that ADSL could stand for
Arch-Druid-Semaphore-Link ?.

[Smurf ducks and runs for cover to avoid the stones]

John Ward

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Jun 15, 2001, 3:17:07 AM6/15/01
to

"Terry Pratchett" <tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
news:vMZ8BuAr...@unseen.demon.co.uk...

The next step would be to implement packet routing for gargoyles. You would
need a protocol along the lines of IP (Intergargoyle Protocol) and GCP
(Gargoyle control protocol)

Use of standards such as OSGF (Open Shortest Gargoyle First) would be
preferable to simpler protocols like GIP (Gargoyle Information Protocol),
but are harder to implement with limited numbers of lower intelligence
gargoyles, and tend to be more pigeon intensive. Variables like the
required height of the stone towers and the signals used would of course be
network independant, and may well follow proprietry standard (like
TrollBIOS).

However the encapsulated messages would follow accepted RFP's (Requests for
Pigeons). For example mail can be transferred as defined in RFP821 - SPTP
(Simple Pigeon Transfer Protocol).

With carefull planning and implementation, you have a system that could
bring education and information to the masses, not to mention enriching
those who supplied the vulture capital (good reflected sounds of underground
water spirits).

I'd say more about this exciting development, but my flag just broke.

--
jw.


Donovan Porter

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Jun 15, 2001, 8:03:12 AM6/15/01
to
Terry Pratchett <tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk> surreptitiously
conspired to write in message
news:<bBifCjAM...@unseen.demon.co.uk>...

> Spin-offs aside, and leaving out the two books later this year, I'm

> planning three more novels, one a year, for the next three years -- the
> first coming out in November 2002. Titles and outlines are on the
> computer and the contracts have been signed.
>
> The Science of Discworld 2: The Globe is likely to be published around
> the middle of 2002, and I'm also planning 'For Fear Of Little Men'
> (working title!) a classic fairy story but with the addition of the Nac
> Mac Feegle.

A question about the status of 'The Amazing Maurice'. I'm guessing it
won't
be a Discworld book as such, but a spin-off. In other words, when I
buy my paperback of 'Thief of Time' next year, will 'The Amazing
Maurice' be listed at the front under "The Discworld Series" or
not?????

MP

unread,
Jun 16, 2001, 9:09:09 AM6/16/01
to
Hmm, he may be wrong, but MP thinks that don...@molbiol.uct.ac.za
(Donovan Porter) wrote, on 15 Jun 2001 05:03:12 -0700, that:

<snip>


>A question about the status of 'The Amazing Maurice'. I'm guessing it
>won't
>be a Discworld book as such, but a spin-off. In other words, when I
>buy my paperback of 'Thief of Time' next year, will 'The Amazing
>Maurice' be listed at the front under "The Discworld Series" or
>not?????

AFAIK, Maurice is supposed to be a sort of "DW for children with
pictures", and, me being me, could be described as "catch'em young"...
:-}
OTOH, The Last Hero is supposed to be a sort of "DW for adults with
pretty pictures", and, again, me being me, could be described as
"hotly anticipated"... :-}

MP (who will buy both when they appear in the shops and his bank
account can stand the cost...!)
--
Grandmanager: My manager’s manager.
Great-grandmanager: My grandmanager’s manager.
Great-great-great-great-grandmanager: BillG.
(Microspeak)

Smurf

unread,
Jun 16, 2001, 2:30:09 PM6/16/01
to
As we crouched by the fire on Fri, 15 Jun 2001 17:17:07 +1000, from atop
a small rock "John Ward" <jo...@bobbird.com.au.expandbob> raised two

arms to the sky and screamed:

>

Messages could also be distributed via HTTP (Heavy, Troll Thrown
Packages), although you would probably want ot ensure that they were
correctly addressed, otherwise the local mail Demon would get really
annoyed, although I guess that s/he could always eat the spam as a
fringe benefit. Or IRC (Intergargoyle Relayed Conversation) could be
used to talk (albeit rather slowly) to distant relatives.

Unknown Rock Locations could be indexed (a G[athering] O[f] O[ther]
G[argoy]LEs) to locate the remote Megaliths, or perhaps you could use
GPS (Golem Powered Searches) to find them.

S.

Terry Pratchett

unread,
Jun 17, 2001, 12:44:43 PM6/17/01
to
In article <d48710c2.01061...@posting.google.com>, Donovan
Porter <don...@molbiol.uct.ac.za> writes

>A question about the status of 'The Amazing Maurice'. I'm guessing it
>won't
>be a Discworld book as such, but a spin-off. In other words, when I
>buy my paperback of 'Thief of Time' next year, will 'The Amazing
>Maurice' be listed at the front under "The Discworld Series" or
>not?????

It probably will. We're describing it as 'set on Discworld', which is
as nice a distinction as that between Iain Banks and Iain M Banks.
Where it needs to fit into the larger world, it's DW that it fits into
-- it's set in Uberwald, UU is referred to (although not by name --
Maurice doesn't know what its called) and there are stalk-ons by two
anthropomorphic personifications or, rather, one anthropomorphic
personification and one musopomorphic personification.

What I'm doing is what other authors have done. I'm franchising my
universe. But I'm franchising it to myself.
--
Terry Pratchett

alchemist

unread,
Jun 17, 2001, 10:01:25 PM6/17/01
to
I'm very worried. A network of communication across the disk. Hex is
to have access to it as well.....

What happens if the Guild of Engravers cooperate with the Guild of
Seamstresses and start a new publishing empire over this new medium?

It wouldn't do to have young minds corrupted.....

wilkins

unread,
Jun 17, 2001, 10:08:50 PM6/17/01
to
alchemist <alch...@blast.net.au> wrote:

Even worse - what if someone releases a Home Hex kit? Then you'll get
kiddies building the things and reading the clacks directly, without
Guild or parental supervision.

I can't wait to see the Hex for The Rest of Us, though. I'm told it has
pretty pictures you can look at.
--
John Wilkins, Head, Communication Services, The Walter and Eliza Hall
Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, Australia
Homo homini aut deus aut lupus - Erasmus of Rotterdam
<http://www.users.bigpond.com/thewilkins/darwiniana.html>

alchemist

unread,
Jun 18, 2001, 3:38:40 AM6/18/01
to
wil...@wehi.edu.au (wilkins) wrote in message news:<1ev75n4.4f6ih9dg5bxbN%wil...@wehi.edu.au>...

> alchemist <alch...@blast.net.au> wrote:
>
> > I'm very worried. A network of communication across the disk. Hex is
> > to have access to it as well.....
> >
> > What happens if the Guild of Engravers cooperate with the Guild of
> > Seamstresses and start a new publishing empire over this new medium?
> >
> > It wouldn't do to have young minds corrupted.....
>
> Even worse - what if someone releases a Home Hex kit? Then you'll get
> kiddies building the things and reading the clacks directly, without
> Guild or parental supervision.
>
> I can't wait to see the Hex for The Rest of Us, though. I'm told it has
> pretty pictures you can look at.


Or a little portable hex.....to replace those silly demon based organisers....
As long as it didn't break in ones pocket.

After all.....


Your wouldn't want ants in your pants..... would you....

...


...

sorry....

MP

unread,
Jun 18, 2001, 1:07:58 PM6/18/01
to
Hmm, he may be wrong, but MP thinks that Terry Pratchett
<tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk> wrote, on Sun, 17 Jun 2001 17:44:43
+0100, that:

>In article <d48710c2.01061...@posting.google.com>, Donovan
>Porter <don...@molbiol.uct.ac.za> writes
>>A question about the status of 'The Amazing Maurice'. I'm guessing it
>>won't
>>be a Discworld book as such, but a spin-off. In other words, when I
>>buy my paperback of 'Thief of Time' next year, will 'The Amazing
>>Maurice' be listed at the front under "The Discworld Series" or
>>not?????
>
>It probably will. We're describing it as 'set on Discworld', which is
>as nice a distinction as that between Iain Banks and Iain M Banks.

In which case, the question we're all dying to ask has to be "What is
your middle initial?"... :-}

<snip>


>What I'm doing is what other authors have done. I'm franchising my
>universe. But I'm franchising it to myself.

I hope you're charging you a good royalties fee... :-}

MP

Beth Winter

unread,
Jun 18, 2001, 1:50:44 PM6/18/01
to
MP wrote:

> Hmm, he may be wrong, but MP thinks that Terry Pratchett
> <tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk> wrote, on Sun, 17 Jun 2001 17:44:43
> +0100, that:
>
> >In article <d48710c2.01061...@posting.google.com>, Donovan
> >Porter <don...@molbiol.uct.ac.za> writes
> >>A question about the status of 'The Amazing Maurice'. I'm guessing it
> >>won't
> >>be a Discworld book as such, but a spin-off. In other words, when I
> >>buy my paperback of 'Thief of Time' next year, will 'The Amazing
> >>Maurice' be listed at the front under "The Discworld Series" or
> >>not?????
> >
> >It probably will. We're describing it as 'set on Discworld', which is
> >as nice a distinction as that between Iain Banks and Iain M Banks.
>
> In which case, the question we're all dying to ask has to be "What is
> your middle initial?"... :-}

Well, he has the choice between D. and J. ^__^
--
Beth Winter, Sister of Vetinari, afpianceed to Jan Mazurek
The Discworld Compendium <http://go.to/thediscworldcompendium>
"To absent friends, lost loves, old gods and the season of mists."
-- Neil Gaiman


esmi

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Jun 18, 2001, 4:13:52 PM6/18/01
to
On 17 Jun 2001, Terry Pratchett <tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk> wrote

<snip>

>What I'm doing is what other authors have done. I'm franchising my
>universe. But I'm franchising it to myself.

Now *that* is what I call "maintaining control". :-)

esmi
--
* "2002: A Discworld Odyssey" * The Discworld Convention *
* Hanover International, Hinckley * August 16th-19th, 2002 *
* Web: http://www.dwcon.org/ * Email: in...@dwcon.org *

MP

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Jun 18, 2001, 5:12:24 PM6/18/01
to
Hmm, he may be wrong, but MP thinks that Beth Winter
<ren...@astercity.net> wrote, on Mon, 18 Jun 2001 19:50:44 +0200,
that:

>MP wrote:
>
>> Hmm, he may be wrong, but MP thinks that Terry Pratchett
>> <tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk> wrote, on Sun, 17 Jun 2001 17:44:43
>> +0100, that:

<snip about whether Maurice is DW or not>


>> >It probably will. We're describing it as 'set on Discworld', which is
>> >as nice a distinction as that between Iain Banks and Iain M Banks.
>>
>> In which case, the question we're all dying to ask has to be "What is
>> your middle initial?"... :-}
>
>Well, he has the choice between D. and J. ^__^

Where'd you get that from? My immense sources failed on this count...
:-}

MP
--
"What hundreds of volumes we might make of all that we
do not know" - Jules Verne, Round the Moon

Beth Winter

unread,
Jun 19, 2001, 2:58:32 AM6/19/01
to
MP wrote:

> Hmm, he may be wrong, but MP thinks that Beth Winter
> <ren...@astercity.net> wrote, on Mon, 18 Jun 2001 19:50:44 +0200,
> that:

> <snip about Pterry's middle initial>


> >Well, he has the choice between D. and J. ^__^
>
> Where'd you get that from? My immense sources failed on this count...
> :-}

May I refer you to the site in my signature? You will find that the
Illustrious Author's full name is Terence David John Pratchett (alright, so I
got it from the Colin Smythe site first ^_^)

Supermouse

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Jun 20, 2001, 11:40:19 AM6/20/01
to
In article <tIMCgIA7...@unseen.demon.co.uk>, Terry Pratchett
<tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk> writes
>musopomorphic personification

Ooh, you found that phrase I've been looking for all these years. I
shall take it in and give it a good home, if that's okay - even let it
out once a week or so for exercise.

Cordially,
--
Supermouse

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